Sunday Morning Book Thread 12-14-2014: Narrative Collapse [OregonMuse]


Mafra Library.jpg
Mafra Library, Lisbon, Portugal

(No, it's not "Mafia Library", read it again, that's "Mafra".)
(and thanks to @DoreenHDickson for the photo)

Good morning morons and moronettes and welcome to AoSHQ's stately, prestigious, and high-class Sunday Morning Book Thread. The only AoSHQ thread that is so hoity-toity, pants are required. Or kilts. Kilts are OK, too. But not tutus. And no fair wearing tutus on your head, like those ne'er-do-wells over on the food thread. I'm not fooled. Go make me a sammich. Preferably one of those Cuban sandwich pockets. With extra ham and cheese. Mmmmmmm...


Quote of the Week

Some books are on the shelf for what the title/author on the spine says about the owner, not for the content between the covers.


Posted by: Mikey NTH - The Outrage Outlet for all of Your Holiday Needs!


Lies, Lies, Lies

With the investigation of the UVA 'gang rape' story discovering more lies than a Hillary Clinton press release, it is sobering to know that this is not the first time this sort of hoax has happened:

In 1931, two white girls claimed they were savagely raped by nine young black men aboard a freight train moving across northeastern Alabama. The young men - ranging in age from twelve to nineteen - were quickly tried, and eight were sentenced to death. The age of the defendants, the stunning rapidity of their trials, and the harsh sentences they received sparked waves of protest and attracted national attention during the 1930s.

This rape hoax became known as the Scottsboro Boys case, and they did serious prison time, even after one of the girls admitted they had made the whole thing up.

The above synopsis of the case is from the book Scottsboro: A Tragedy of the American South by Dan T. Carter, which is a pretty thorough investigation of the events surrounding this deplorable series of events. Of course, my question in these fake rape stories is always, what happened to the girls? Were they in any way punished for pretty much destroying the lives of the young men?

And speaking of fake rape stories, the one being peddled by privileged 1%-er Lena Dunham may be blowing up in her face. 'Barry One', the man whom she pointed her finger at, has retained legal counsel and is gearing up for a lawsuit. Here is Barry's gofundme page for this. I don't believe the admitted child molester Dunham had a clue that there might be any blowback from her fabulation, and it's hard to believe that Random House didn't do a better job of fact-checking and legally vetting her book.


Where Do I Self-Publish My Book?

Here's a big long list of options. They're ranked, but I I'm not sure I understand the ranking system they're using, but there it is.

I never knew there were so many self-publishing outlets, and most of them I've never heard of, but if you're an author, or an aspiring author, I'd bet they're worth looking into. (Warning: I've been advised that this list contains a number of questionable publishing outfits with notoriously poor reputations which should be avoided. Sorry I didn't check first and please, please caveat emptor.)

R I P

Perhaps some of you know the moron commenter who went by the nic 'backhoe'. I have been informed that he has passed away in his sleep a week ago Thursday. I remember him always speaking fondly of his wife Emily, who died young, how he missed her terribly. Looks like he went to be with her again.

A memorial page has been set up for him here.


Bleg, and Some Links

I have it on good authority (i.e. some guy looking through my books at a garage sale we had last year) that one of the greatest Western stories ever is "Spanish Man's Grave by James Warner Bellah. So I went looking for it on the internet. I found out that it was published in the May 3 1947 edition of the The Saturday Evening Post.

Most people these days remember the Post chiefly for its Norman Rockwell covers, but it used to be quite a literary magazine, and has published stories from any number of famous authors, including F. Scott Fitzgerald’s, C.S. Lewis, Agatha Christie, William Saroyan, Louis L'Amour, Rudyard Kipling, John Steinbeck, Rex Stout and William Faulkner. Some of the contributions of these famous authors can be read here.

I discovered that the Post is actually still being published. I thought it had died around 1970, but it's still around. Apparently, control has passed to new owners and new issues come out 6 times a year. According to the wikipedia entry,

With the January/February 2013 issue, the Post launched a major makeover of the publication including a new cover design and efforts to increase the magazine's profile after several people thought it was no longer in existence."

The Post has been running a short-story contest for unpublished writers (first prize: $500) for the past few years. Unfortunately, the 2015 contest is closed, so you'll have to wait until next year.

The 2014 winners have been published as a single volume.

If the Post owners were smart, they would invest some money into digitizing as many of the back issues as they could (.pdf scans should work, just so long as the text was legible), and then either making it available to subscribers online, or selling it on DVD archives. A digitized library of Post back issues on DVD is something I might buy myself, if such ever became available.

Oh, and I never did find a copy of "Spanish Man's Grave". If any of you know where I can get a link or a copy, please let me know, thanks.


Microsoft To B&N: Later, Dude

This does not bode well for the Nook e-reader:

Barnes & Noble had been struggling to get its e-reader on solid footing. While the Nook was well-reviewed, it was a late entrant to the e-reader race and had been plagued by delays...Barnes & Noble spun the Nook off into its own hardware-and-ebooks unit to try to stanch the bleeding.

Microsoft stepped in with $300 million for a 17.6% stake in Nook. Now it's stepping out with $62 million and 2.7 million Barnes & Noble shares -- what The Verge calls "a clear loss on Microsoft’s original investment."

Dang. B&N has been running a trade-in-your-old-Nook-and-get-$30-off deal for the Samsung Galaxy 4 Nook, and I was thinking of maybe taking advantage of it, but now maybe I won't.


Moron Recommendations

In a morning thread earlier this week, the Yiddish language was a subject of discussion, and moron "Mary Poppins' Practically Perfect Piercing" took time off from his wonderful Hollywood stories to recommend If You Can't Say Anything Nice, Say It In Yiddish: The Book of Yiddish Insults and Curses. Now, we all enjoy MP4's comments and he's certainly no slouch at cursing and insults (particularly liberals and RINOs), but I wonder he's ever said, "Harry Reid should marry the daughter of the Angel of Death."

Although it would be damn funny if he did.


Books By Morons

Ha! Another moron author heard from: longtime lurker and infrequent commenter 'Farmer Bob' emailed this week to let me know he has written and published two mystery novels.

The books follow the exploits of Fiddler O'Connell and his Uncle Emmett. Fiddler is a New Orleans defense attorney and Emmett is a hard boiled PI.

Termite Takedown and Flea Flicker (hmmm, I think I see a theme there...) are available on Kindle for $2.99.


___________

Lurking moron 'Mastiff' also emailed to say he has a new book out. But first, his old books that have been mentioned here before:

The Best Congress Money Can Buy: Stories of Political Possibility is a collection of short stories that are actually thought experiments where certain aspects of our governing structure are changed and what that would look like. For example:

Joe is a congressman who openly sells his services to the highest bidder. Nick is a drunken brawler who must pay for his crime in a workhouse. Beth is a peaceful woman in a country where gun ownership is mandatory. Their stories and others explore how our political dysfunctions needn’t be taken for granted, and small changes in our political system can lead to meaningful changes in our lives.

Mastiff's new (short) ebook, No More Foreclosures: The Case for Flexible Homeownership, is his proposal to reform housing finance by using not only debt to buy homes, but also equity finance, which he says would make it less prone to credit bubbles. This proposal is based on "Jewish, Christian and Islamic views on usury, but with a modern twist."

Also, Mastiff has a request that you buy the book and spread it around:

If you could ask the Morons to try to spread this around to people who could actually put this into practice in the real world (people working for local banks, or real estate holding companies, or property-management firms, or tech entrepreneurs or real-estate lawyers), you would be doing a great thing. (Note that the ebook is enrolled in Kindle Unlimited and Kindle Select, so if you're a prime member you can borrow it for free.)

It's only 99 cents on Kindle.

And with Chanuka coming up on Dec. 26th, don't forget Mastiff's other book, The Princess, the Dragon, and the Baker: A Chanuka Fairy Tale.


___________

So that's all for this week. As always, book thread tips, suggestions, bribes, rumors, threats, and insults may be sent to OregonMuse, Proprietor, AoSHQ Book Thread, at the book thread e-mail address: aoshqbookthread, followed by the 'at' sign, and then 'G' mail, and then dot cee oh emm.

What have you all been reading this week? Hopefully something good, because, as you all know, life is too short to be reading lousy books.

Posted by: Open Blogger at 09:14 AM




Comments

(Jump to bottom of page)

1 Re-reading the Empire of Man series that they have released in a 2 volume set for the Kindle. I had not read it in a while and I had it in paperback so I thought I would give the Kindle version a shot. Doesn't seem as good now.


http://is.gd/pi25GK

Posted by: Vic at December 14, 2014 09:06 AM (u9gzs)

2 I finished The Hot Zone and All the Eyes Cannot See. Started The Martian.

Posted by: NCKate at December 14, 2014 09:08 AM (FPQut)

3 RIP backhoe.

Posted by: NCKate at December 14, 2014 09:10 AM (FPQut)

4 Thanks!

Posted by: Farmer Bob at December 14, 2014 09:12 AM (sqpGi)

5 Dang. BN has been running a trade-in-your-old-Nook-and-get-$30-off deal for the Samsung Galaxy 4 Nook, and I was thinking of maybe taking advantage of it, but now maybe I won't.



I have a Galaxy Tab 2 with a Kindle apt and I love it. I put away my Kindle and have not cracked it since.


You can't get a 2 anymore because they are up to 4 now.

Posted by: Vic at December 14, 2014 09:14 AM (u9gzs)

6 Digging through my copious mess looking for some old books for one of my sons, I found a full set of the original old Star Trek Photonovels which I thought (and regretted) I had given away.

Turns out I hadn't, and they were just on a lower strata of mess.

Okay, only slightly book related, but still...

Posted by: --- at December 14, 2014 09:14 AM (MMC8r)

7 I'm rereading "The City & the City," by China Miéville. He writes "new weird" fantasy that is seriously creative. Miéville's New Crobuzon books are imaginative and out of the ordinary, and he's a beautifully competent writer to boot.

OH, AND I'M STILL READING "MIDDLEMARCH." It's a big book and well worth the time I'm taking on it. My sister-in-law, a writer, tried reading it and couldn't get interested in the heroine. I, on the other hand, am in love with this book. Eliot seems to me to be a writer's writer, making difficult authorly maneuvers seem effortless. I'm so grateful that I've discovered this book.

Posted by: Smallish Bees at December 14, 2014 09:15 AM (YPgXi)

8 Hm, China Mieville, with an accent on the first e of the last name. In my browser, the name isn't coming through properly for some reason.

Posted by: Smallish Bees at December 14, 2014 09:16 AM (YPgXi)

9 for you morons who have young children
I suggest a book for Christmas called Santa's Twin by Dean Koontz (yes, that Dean Koontz)

it is a great Christmas tale and a beautiful book as well.
out of print but you can still get it at amazon

Posted by: rain of lead at December 14, 2014 09:19 AM (LMBva)

10 If I want to buy Kobos for my dad and sister, does anyone have an idea where to look (other than online)?
I'd at least like to buy something I know they can use that they won't want me to do IT support

I'm not fond of Kindles, and I wish I could get a Sony, but they don't make them anymore.

Posted by: Kindltot at December 14, 2014 09:20 AM (t//F+)

11 Thanks to this book thread I continue to use up valuable time actually reading stuff I would never normally even pick up and look at. Based on a review here, I started reading "The Last Policeman" and found it to be a fascinating read. My original plan was to just read the first in the trilogy and move on to other books, but I am now 2/3s through the second book and just ordered the third. Very dark which suits my mood based on both the approach of the solstice and the power of the political corruptocrats our neighbors, friends, and coworkers continue to elect.

RIP Backhoe who always struck me as a gentleman (in the old sense of the word) that I would have liked very much were I to have met him in person.

Posted by: Hrothgar at December 14, 2014 09:22 AM (fL/7/)

12 I am still reading "Popular Delusions and the Madness of Crowds" - on my Kindle, as it was on sale at Amazon for about $2 a couple of weeks ago. I made good headway on it, as I had a book event last Saturday and a weekend-long market event this weekend. Many hours of sitting at the table, watching the crowd drift past - but there were a good few fans and repeat readers coming to the table, but so many other shoppers who were startled to discover that yes, I am the person who wrote every book on display that I have made a little sign with an arrow "The Author --> to put next to where I set. Hopefully this will bring in some interest, although being Sunday, there won't be as much of a crowd until church services let out.
Last craft event of the year, and I am glad about that. They are rewarding enough, but exhausting.

Posted by: Sgt. Mom at December 14, 2014 09:23 AM (95iDF)

13 Posted by: Vic at December 14, 2014 09:14 AM (u9gzs)

I found the Kindle app on the iPad to be a very nice interface. Effortless downloading from Amazon.

Posted by: Hrothgar at December 14, 2014 09:24 AM (fL/7/)

14 Did the Scottsboro boys play lacrosse?

Posted by: Bob Belcher at December 14, 2014 09:33 AM (bLhAC)

15 just read "The Damnation Game" an oldie by Clive Barker that I somehow missed-- wow-- it's a retake on the Faust tale and great stuff-- nobody does horror like Clive-- although, stay away from "Tortured Souls: The Legend of Primordium"-- yech-- pure garbage... don't know when he wrote that piece of crap but he must have been drunk-- it reads like it's written for a 10 year old

Posted by: tomc at December 14, 2014 09:33 AM (avEuh)

16 Morning all. Lots of reading this weekend, sitting in the hospital with my wife. We just got word she's going into surgery in 5 minutes to get her gallstones and gallbladder out. I'm slightly nervous, I hate the thought of her going under. It should all be over in a couple of hours.

Posted by: kalel666 at December 14, 2014 09:33 AM (95358)

17 I don't know about where to find Bellah's "Spanish Man's Grave," but this is mighty interesting background on the author and his works: http://zoorefugee.blogspot.com/2006/10/why-and-how-im-proud-to-say-that-i-know.html

Posted by: BeccaL at December 14, 2014 09:34 AM (nXijW)

18 Of course, my question in these fake rape stories is always, what
happened to the girls? Were they in any way punished for pretty much
destroying the lives of the young men?



Statistics that I have seen show that between 50 and 60% of all rape claims are false, and that is nationwide.


And no, the girls were never punished. They seldom are even though a false rape claim is a felony. So is perjury in the AR shooting case but nobody will be charged there either.


Twana Brawley was from NY, not Alabama and she was never charged either.

Posted by: Vic at December 14, 2014 09:35 AM (u9gzs)

19 If you have never read American Assassin by Vince Flynn I highly recommend you do so before they mess it up with the movie.

Posted by: Bob Belcher at December 14, 2014 09:36 AM (bLhAC)

20 Just finished "The Orphan Master's Son," set in North Korea during the reign of Kim Jong Il. Unbelievably good. Won the Pulitzer.

Am now into "All The Light We Cannot See," which opens with the WWII bombing raid on the French town of St.-Malo on the Breton coast, two months after D-Day. A blind French teen girl and an 18-year old German soldier will be the protagonists. This one is good, too.

Posted by: the littl shyning man at December 14, 2014 09:38 AM (vSxTY)

21 >>We just got word she's going into surgery in 5 minutes to get her gallstones and gallbladder out.

Prayers offered, kalel.

(Hmm, couldn't quite bring myself to write the number in your nic while offering prayers...)

Posted by: Mama AJ at December 14, 2014 09:38 AM (0xTsz)

22 Btw, I believe the new nook tablets are rebranded Samsung Galaxies. So they should survive the collapse of the nook brand.

Posted by: kalel666 at December 14, 2014 09:39 AM (95358)

23 >>I have made a little sign with an arrow "The Author -->

LOL. And maybe another below it saying "No, really!"

Posted by: Mama AJ at December 14, 2014 09:40 AM (0xTsz)

24 I have a Nook HD and 2 Samsung Galaxy Note tablets ( 8 in. and 10.1 in.) but I love reading on my Nook. I've given them as gifts and everyone loves reading on them. I've never had a Kindle because I have epub ebooks and I disliked being tethered to Amazon. I'm a gadget freak according to my family.

Posted by: abbygirl at December 14, 2014 09:40 AM (Bt2Rc)

25 Re: the B&N electronic reader. You would think an e-book reader called the nook-e-reader would have a pretty good following even if just among the people who follow this blog.

Posted by: Dennis at December 14, 2014 09:40 AM (qgwgn)

26 "The Best Congress Money Can Buy" was a really good read.

Posted by: BornLib at December 14, 2014 09:41 AM (zpNwC)

27 14
Did the Scottsboro boys play lacrosse?

Posted by: Bob Belcher at December 14, 2014 09:33 AM (bLhAC)

Negro Baseball League, no doubt.

Posted by: Nip Sip at December 14, 2014 09:41 AM (0FSuD)

28 I am splitting my time between O'Brien's Aubrey Maturin series, and reading
Nameless Magery by Delia Marshall Turner.

She was one of the DelRey Discovery writers, and she apparently only wrote two books which are amazingly well written
Her main characters tend to be mostly pleasant, directed and mostly uninterested in what the other characters think is important or correct.

Reminds me of Hugh Cook's character from The Women and the Warlord, Yen Olass. Come to think of it, it also reminds me of two of my step sisters.

Posted by: Kindltot at December 14, 2014 09:41 AM (t//F+)

29 Kalel is fine, the number is in jest and a long story. Thank you for the prayers.

Posted by: kalel666 at December 14, 2014 09:41 AM (95358)

30 I read "Spanish Man's Grave" by James Warner Bellah several years ago, in an anthology book published by Jerry Pournelle. Pournelle is known for including non-SF stories in his anthologies. Bellah is perhaps best known for having written stories used by legendary movie director John Ford, particularly his "cavalry trilogy" of films starring John Wayne ("Fort Apache", "Rio Grande" and "She Wore a Yellow Ribbon"). One character in particular appears in "Spanish Man's Grave" who is also featured in two of Ford's cavalry trilogy; Sergeant Tyree (played in the movies by actor Ben Johnson).

"Spanish Man's Grave" concerns a US cavalry troop chasing a band of Comanche raiders who have taken some white children as captives. The Comanches had retreated to an area called "Spanish Man's Grave", where many years before the Indians had wiped out a group of Spanish conquistadors. This action gave the area "good medicine" insofar as the Comanches were concerned, and was therefore considered safe to them.

The cavalry troop is not buying this, however, and goes in after them, even though is it very harsh terrain to cover on horseback. The commander of the troop dies from exposure, leaving Sergeant Tyree in command, giving him a charge to go on into Spanish Man's Grave and get those kids out, which they do.

Posted by: The Oort Cloud--SMOD is inbound at December 14, 2014 09:44 AM (l1Nun)

31 The Best Congress Money Can Buy


I have that on my Samsung, good book.

Posted by: Vic at December 14, 2014 09:45 AM (u9gzs)

32
Thanks again OregonMuse for this great thread - so many books, so little time to read them all!

This week I've been reading The Complete Works of Suetonius - it's taking a long time and according to the little thingie at the bottom of the page on my Kindle, I'm only 18% through it!

Nero has just been finished off and it's Emperor Galba who seems a rather nasty chap...

In the paper book world, I was given a book "Cockroaches" a Harry Hole detective story, by Norwegian author, Jo Nesbo, and I'm enjoying it immensely

Being a great fan of Henning Mankell and his Inspector Kurt Wallander series (Swedish) I feel right at home with Jo Nesbo's style of writing

If you have the chance, watch the TV series of Wallander, both the Swedish one and the British version with Kenneth Branagh - wonderful TV

Posted by: aussie at December 14, 2014 09:46 AM (qHP+t)

33 Another good book on Yiddish is "Born to Kvetch" by Michael Wex.

Posted by: Dr. Varno at December 14, 2014 09:47 AM (fIv/H)

34 Kalel, good luck. The surgery is not a hard one and less invasive now than 10 years ago.
so, no hugs, bu here's a punch on the shoulder.

Posted by: Kindltot at December 14, 2014 09:48 AM (t//F+)

35 Also might read The Travels of Marco Polo since we just started watching the series on Netflix.

Posted by: NCKate at December 14, 2014 09:49 AM (FPQut)

36 Is this last weeks post or am I just ahead a week?

Posted by: olddog in mo at December 14, 2014 09:54 AM (6hrmc)

37 *hugs bookthread*

Posted by: @votermom at December 14, 2014 09:54 AM (cbfNE)

38 The Post publictation details can be found here:
http://connection.ebscohost.com/c/short-stories/19958933/spanish-mans-grave

Posted by: Toby Flenderson at December 14, 2014 09:55 AM (zV9c4)

39 RIP, backhoe.

Sgt. Mom, I may have to steal that idea, especially when I'm working a booth alone... I don't have as many books out, but apparently people think I'm still in high school and are shocked that I'm the author!

One disc into 41: A Portrait of My Father and enjoying it so far. One advantage to the audiobook, at least IMO, is that it doesn't leave you time to get hung up on the spots that could have used tighter editing--repetitions of full names, the occasional (minor!) grammatical error, etc. So I can shush my inner editorial nitpicker and get on with enjoying the stories. Several laugh-out-loud moments so far, and several "awwww" moments (like wee!41 trying to give his younger brother half of everything, including his bike), and interesting history, especially about 41's role in WWII. Hearing it in W's voice is a treat, too, better than just imagining it from the text!

Posted by: Elisabeth G. Wolfe at December 14, 2014 09:57 AM (iuQS7)

40 I mentioned this is last week's thread but late so here it is again:

Audiobook of Larry Correia's new Grimnoir short story "Murder on the Orient Elite" is free from Audible right now. There is no text version, it's an Audible exclusive.

Posted by: BornLib at December 14, 2014 09:58 AM (zpNwC)

41 g'mornin', 'rons

Posted by: AltonJackson at December 14, 2014 09:59 AM (4gN5w)

42 I just started " All the light we cannot see" too, like it very much so far.

Have been having trouble getting into reading lately for the first time ever in my life, don't know if it's too much internet reading during the day or what, but I don't feel like myself. Must fix.

For a harrowing look at a false rape accusation (not race based, more like psycho preteen revenge) highly, highly recommend "Atonement" by Ian McEwan. Read it years ago, still not over it-That book (and movie) still haunts me.

Posted by: Goldilocks at December 14, 2014 09:59 AM (SgBAA)

43 "Princess, Dragon, and Baker"..... is that an insider view of the WH? Obumbles, Jarrett and Rice, only I don't know which one bakes up lies every day, which thinks of herself as a princess above the wishes of the people and laws of the land, and which on a monster. They all do/are.

Posted by: goatexchange at December 14, 2014 10:09 AM (sYUHT)

44 When I found out that I was traveling to Chicago for a week I ordered Cold Days and picked up where I had left off with Harry Dresden. It was like putting on something comfortable, and soon we were back together at MacAnally's having a beer and steak sandwich plotting our way out of another supernatural mess that only a wizard could handle.

I don't usually post, but when I do, it's on the book thread. Thanks muse...I'm here every week for the book thread.

Posted by: sunny at December 14, 2014 10:10 AM (pOh0f)

45 You are stuck in last Sunday.

Posted by: Boss Moss at December 14, 2014 10:12 AM (h4a9G)

46 Posted by: aussie at December 14, 2014 09:46 AM (qHP+t)
-------
Aussie, I loved Suetonius and devoured his "Lives of the Caesars" like it was a tell-all excerpted in the Star. From "Life of Caligula":

http://tinyurl.com/4snp9

Posted by: All Hail Eris at December 14, 2014 10:13 AM (KH1sk)

47 "Spanish Man's Grave" and James Warner Bellah.

Reading this and then reading the Wiki, reminded me that I had read this short story in Pournelle's "There Will be War" anthology.

Jerry put that in his anthology because it was a great short story, and Heinlein once remarked that this short story was an inspiration for him to write "Starship Troopers". Jerry was a good friend of RAH and always honors his memory.

God rest Backhoe, and may this family be at peace. I remember reading his comments here and at the Belmont Club. He was a fine and thoughtful man.

Posted by: Bossy Conservative....in the bleak midwinter at December 14, 2014 10:16 AM (+1T7c)

48 She's just bone in. ECRP first, then the gallbladder surgery. Reciting the Bene Gesserit Litany against Fear right now (this is the book thread after all). OM, thank you for this thread every week. It is a particular comfort today.

Posted by: kalel666 at December 14, 2014 10:17 AM (95358)

49 Police in Lynwood, Washington charged an 18-year-old woman with making a false rape charge in 2008. She was found guilty, paid a fine and had a criminal record due to this. In 2011, police in Colorado arrested a serial rapist in their state named Marc O'Leary. Among hundreds of photos he took of his rape victims were photos of the young Lynwood, Washington woman. So, police do charge women with making false rape charges.

Posted by: Jen at December 14, 2014 10:17 AM (msAGT)

50 O/T False accusation anecdote. I was once asked by my boss to disprove a false lie about myself told to him by a scummish co-worker. I worked for Govt at time and it had to do with my military service. So although I could have easily disproved the lie with a quick display at my DD214, I refused to do so; instead I threatened to slap my boss with a grievance complaint unless he challenged the co-worker who started it all. I also held the grievance threat over them 'til they both apologized to me personally. (all while I was waving my DD214 at them. never did show it to them). Bullies in all forms need to be confronted immediately, and harshly. When their careers are directly threatened.....you get action. Only then.

Posted by: goatexchange at December 14, 2014 10:18 AM (sYUHT)

51 Gone in. Good Lord, man.

Posted by: kalel666 at December 14, 2014 10:18 AM (95358)

52 Sorry to go O/T but...did anyone catch the War Cock on Meet the Press? It was a thing of beauty.
He pimped-slapped that fooking idiot Chuck Todd all over the studio.

I hope someone posts the vid soon

Posted by: Albie Damned at December 14, 2014 10:20 AM (nGaMY)

53 I have had two co-workers go in for gall bladder removal in past 6 months. apparently these days they cut three incisions, insert tubes, and suck out the offending organ. outpatient. so - good luck and best health to our moron.

Posted by: goatexchange at December 14, 2014 10:21 AM (sYUHT)

54 I'm about to dive into the third of Lev Grossman's Magician trilogy, "The Magician's Land". Can't recommend it highly enough for fans of Narnia. Beneath the snark of the precocious lead character, Quentin, is the very real longing for beauty and magic. It's a riff that loves the source material.

Also have a stack of books from the library suggested by Horde members: "Parliament of Whores", "Hitler and the Power of Aesthetics", and "White Gold: the Story of Thomas Pellow and Islam's One Million White Slaves". Thank God for libraries.

Posted by: All Hail Eris at December 14, 2014 10:21 AM (KH1sk)

55 First, a general comment about this weekly feature -- I don't comment often, but I do open this tab every week and usually read all the comments even if it is a day or two later. Thanks OM for this fine weekly post. You put a lot of work into it.

I'm on a slow moving quest to read books 1 through 96 of The Destroyer series. I inherited the set from my dad. I read quite a few of them in the 70s and 80s, but not all of them and not in order. So it's a different experience. Plus with CRS syndrome, they all seem fresh and new.

Richard Sapir and Warren Murphy were quite prolific at the start; I'm at book #33 and those 33 were published in a short 5 years. Interestingly, Richard wrote the first book in 1963 but it wasn't published until 1971 (my copy of #1 has a 1973 copyright; #33 is 197. Richard died in 1987 from a heart attack.

Part superhero series, part social commentary, and part Kung Fu style wisdom -- Throw in a bunch of soon to be dead bad people, and you have a winner.

Richard (and Warren) liked Kennedy, disliked LBJ but didn't discuss him much, wasn't too fond of Nixon, severely lampooned Ford, and so far seem to be kind about Carter. When reading Richard's wiki entry, I discovered a possible why -- He graduated from Columbia U. But he's no raving moonbat, as he's none too fond of gubmint in general nor the welfare state.

Now I'm curious about how they will cast RR.

Posted by: GnuBreed at December 14, 2014 10:22 AM (BetoZ)

56 I just finished Eye of the Red Tsar, and loved it. Thank you to whichever Moron recommended it. I have the rest of the series now and look forward to them.

Posted by: kalel666 at December 14, 2014 10:27 AM (95358)

57
46 All Hail Eris

Yes I'm enjoying Suetonius and possibly,Caligula and his deviancies would fit right in these days!

Posted by: aussie at December 14, 2014 10:28 AM (qHP+t)

58
Definitely OT

Goodnight all, and have a wonderful yesterday!

Posted by: aussie at December 14, 2014 10:30 AM (qHP+t)

59 Now I'm curious about how they will cast RR.

After reading your synopsis, you've got me curious, too. Please let us know.

Posted by: OregonMuse at December 14, 2014 10:32 AM (S6Q1o)

60 Posted by: GnuBreed at December 14, 2014 10:22 AM (BetoZ)


I started reading that series when I was in the Navy. When I got out I had the complete series up to July 1977. I carried them to the ship's library and put them on the shelf there. I wish I had kept them. But they are available now in e-book format at Amazon.


And the first one is FREE


http://is.gd/onV0fT

Posted by: Vic at December 14, 2014 10:33 AM (u9gzs)

61 You bring us these pictures of elegant libraries every week. Why are they empty of people?

Posted by: I lurk, therefore I amn't at December 14, 2014 10:36 AM (TqyFL)

62 Is it just me, or do others also hate the term "fabulation"?

How about calling it what it is, or they are.....lies.

Posted by: dmac at December 14, 2014 10:39 AM (U1ZgY)

63 RIP, backhoe. A thread on FreeRepublic that was started when his wife died has been updated. Url in y nic

Posted by: Baldy at December 14, 2014 10:40 AM (+35FH)

64 Good night, aussie!

Posted by: OregonMuse at December 14, 2014 10:40 AM (S6Q1o)

65 You bring us these pictures of elegant libraries every week. Why are they empty of people?

Because the last thing a library needs is a bunch of people shifting around and messing things up

Posted by: OregonMuse at December 14, 2014 10:43 AM (S6Q1o)

66 Okay HQ, drop everything you are doing and pick up Andy Weir's "The Martian".

This book is about a smartass NASA botanist dropped off at Mars and not retrieved until... later. How much later? Lots later. So the botanist has to find a way to stretch his rations and a few potatoes to cover for "later", while at the same time not blowing himself up.

There are only a few things wrong with it:

- the book establishes that the air pressure is low on Mars. So whence does the sandstorm get sufficient total force to blow a comm array into Mark Watney? Yeah, there has to be an explanation as to why the crew left him there but this explanation is stupid.

- er... radiation.

- other errors noted in terpkristen's review: http://www.goodreads.com/review/show/925096404

- NASA is treated like a real space agency and not like a playpen for SJWs and Muslims. Maybe President Cruz has fired all the management.

- Ridley Scott is going to direct the movie and he's cast Matt Damon as Watney. No, dude. Just... no. Imagine yourself as the Martian instead; if you're a moron, you're already a smartass. On the other hand, if Matt Damon was on the mission, it's easier to explain why they left him behind...

Other than that: gripping read. Also conclusion has one of the best emotional payoffs in any book I've seen.

Posted by: boulder terlit hobo at December 14, 2014 10:45 AM (AVEe1)

67 Lucky find in the new books section of my library -- "King of the Weeds: A Mike Hammer Novel" by Mickey Spillane and Max Allen Collins.

I've read a couple of Collins' books and liked them.

From the Co-Author's Note:

"Shortly before his death in 2006, Mickey Spillane told his wife Jane, 'When I'm gone, there's going to be a treasure hunt around here. Take everything you find and give it to Max--he'll know what to do.'"

"... Mickey conceived 'King of Weeds' as the final Mike Hammer, and a sequel to Blind Alley (1996), the last Hammer published during his lifetime."

Posted by: doug at December 14, 2014 10:46 AM (NxXS8)

68 AAAOOOGAH! *blare sirens, flash warning lights* The list of self-publishing options includes some notorious scam operations like iUniverse. Do not make eye contact. Do not give them your email. And for Ghu's sake don't give them money or they will stick to you like herpes. Go to the WriterBeware website, or David Gaughran's blog and search for Author Solutions. It is all one company with many aliases, and they are all bad. They may claim to be part of Penguin--they got bought by Penguin, but they are NOT a way in to be published by Penguin.

And RIP backhoe. We should have a blog wake for him, and a rousing Viking sendoff. He was a good egg and a true Moron.

Posted by: Sabrina Chase at December 14, 2014 10:47 AM (yCJWD)

69 Not reading much this week. Have a daughter with a 3 month old, a 2 year-old, and carrying 14 credits in an EE program. Her hubby works swings, so I cooked dinner for her a couple of hits and played with the grandkids while she studied.

'Bloodlands' is still weighting down the corner of the night stand but mostly I'm on a Dick Francis/Robert Parker kick.

A plug for one of my books - you can get it from Amazon in time for Christmas. It's an action-adventure book for young women, and since I raised daughters, I skipped the seemingly required smutty crap that infects most of the YA category. Suitable for daughters of morons/ettes. http://tinyurl.com/lb2kmz8

Still working my way through moron Skandia Recluse's third book. Gonna have to go back & pick up copies of the first two.

Posted by: LongRunningFool at December 14, 2014 10:47 AM (/A5gb)

70 After reading your synopsis, you've got me curious, too. Please let us know.

Posted by: OregonMuse at December 14, 2014 10:32 AM (S6Q1o)

Will do. It'll probably take another month or two to get to the 80s. I do recall from my first reading that the quality of the writing declined starting around #70 or so; probably about the time Sapir died. The humorish aspect was hardest hit.

Posted by: GnuBreed at December 14, 2014 10:53 AM (BetoZ)

71 From the not-for-everyone department, I've been enjoying Brian Krebs' "Spam Nation: The Inside Story of Organized Cybercrime -- From Global Epidemic to Your Front Door."

It is sort of a true crime book about cybercrime. Not targeted to IT professionals, just people interested in the topic. Only one chapter is devoted to methods to protect oneself.

Krebs writes the great blog krebsonsecurity [dot] com, and was the former security blogger for the "Washington Post." He is an unusual journalist in that he is widely acknowledged to have become an expert in the subject. He even taught himself Russian in order to read the source materials.

Posted by: doug at December 14, 2014 10:53 AM (NxXS8)

72 And the first one is FREE

http://is.gd/onV0fT

Posted by: Vic at December 14, 2014 10:33 AM

Thanks Vic, I can't pass up FREE!

and thanks to Smallish Bees for Middlemarch

For my contribution to the thread I'll offer up

The Mill River Recluse by Darcie Chan

http://astore.amazon.com/aoshq-20/detail/B00H3NNWXE

$5.12 on Amazon.

Posted by: Skandia Recluse at December 14, 2014 10:55 AM (tauw9)

73 OT, but has anyone been following the Jessica Chambers murder in Mississippi? There's been little or no reporting, but the circumstances of the case are . . . Interesting . . . Considering the focus on Ferguson/Garner and torture. Link in sig with mondo research.

Posted by: Emile Antoon Khadaji at December 14, 2014 10:56 AM (8Kv96)

74 I'm part way through Fellowship of the Ring, my 49th annual reading as I mentioned last week. I am taking it very slow and savoring the words.

I'm interspersing the chapters with a change of pace. I've been thumbing through old issues of "Backwoodsman" magazine. Articles can involve old firearms use, camp cooking, fishing, Bigfoot (the editor really believes), traditional outdoor skills, and so much more. Every page holds the possibility of some tidbit of information. It is a of of fun.

Posted by: JTB at December 14, 2014 10:57 AM (FvdPb)

75 Oregonmuse - Some quick internet "research" brings up many pages of articles about women being charged with false rape accusations in a variety of localities - including the horrible miscarriage of justice against the Lynwood, Washington rape victim. Feminists trumpet one set of extreme statistics and the Men's Rights Movements trumpet another set of extreme statistics. Since many rapes are either not reported/not prosecuted or result in acquittals, it looks to me like it is very easy to claim either a "rape epidemic" or an "epidemic of false rape claims".

Posted by: Jen at December 14, 2014 10:57 AM (msAGT)

76 AAAOOOGAH! *blare sirens, flash warning lights* The list of self-publishing options includes some notorious scam operations like iUniverse.

Oh, crap. Sorry, I didn't even think to check. I just assumed that whoever compiled he list wouldn't do something as stupid and misleading like not filter out the scammers.

Silly me.

I'll update accordingly.

Posted by: OregonMuse at December 14, 2014 10:58 AM (S6Q1o)

77 Didn't know Mothra had a library. Pity about his lisp, though... It made the guy he was dictating to misspell it. Godzilla must be jealous.

Posted by: DingusKhan at December 14, 2014 11:01 AM (MrjE9)

78 First surgery complete, now for the gallbladder. Everything good so far.

Posted by: kalel666 at December 14, 2014 11:06 AM (95358)

79 Posted by: Emile Antoon Khadaji at December 14, 2014 10:56 AM (8Kv96)


Yes, an incredibly horrible death. And unless someone comes forward they will likely never catch the sick AH who did it.

Posted by: Vic at December 14, 2014 11:10 AM (u9gzs)

80 "Have a daughter with a 3 month old, a 2 year-old, and carrying 14 credits in an EE program."

Sympathies. I have an 11-month old, a two year old, and a seven year old while carrying 14 credits in an EE program (in which I am foolishly pursuing a minor in Chinese).

I don't know how my wife puts up with them all day every day, but I'm grateful.

Posted by: Df82 at December 14, 2014 11:12 AM (QqNO+)

81 "The Drop Dead Simple Guide to Finding (and Loading) Free eBooks for Your Kindle" can be found at http://bit.ly/1sqOak5

Posted by: doug at December 14, 2014 11:13 AM (NxXS8)

82 Thanks to the volunteers who offered to wade through my bad grammar, and thanks to Roger for explaining to me how to punctuate dialog.

I'm still editing. Eyesight is bad, dog ate my homework, car had a flat tire.

Thanks especially to the horde for the encouragement.

Posted by: Skandia Recluse at December 14, 2014 11:16 AM (tauw9)

83 Someone in one of the night time threads referenced "Bored of the Rings" a Harvard Lampoon take on LOTR. I thought I was the only one who remembered it. It is raunchy and often silly and many references are long out of date but can still make me chuckle.

Posted by: JTB at December 14, 2014 11:17 AM (FvdPb)

84 I just read that Vivid is offering Honey Boo Boo's mother up to a million bucks to star in a porno with her sexual predator boyfriend. No farm animals are allowed though.

I also threw up a little in my mouth when I read that.

Posted by: Roy at December 14, 2014 11:18 AM (tiOTz)

85 Check out the link in my previous post Vic. Maybe not so OT after all in terms of collapsing narratives.

Posted by: Emile Antoon Khadaji at December 14, 2014 11:19 AM (8Kv96)

86 80- Df82

Best of luck to you and to your wife. This is why raising kids is a young person's sport. Would half-kill me now to try and maintain that type of schedule.

Fortunately for my daughter, this is the last semester that will have this workload. She's rearranging things by adding in summer classes so she'll still graduate on time and debt-free.

Posted by: LongRunningFool at December 14, 2014 11:20 AM (/A5gb)

87 Someone in one of the night time threads referenced "Bored of the Rings" a Harvard Lampoon take on LOTR. I thought I was the only one who remembered it. It is raunchy and often silly and many references are long out of date but can still make me chuckle.

I have a copy, which someone gave me years ago, back in the 70s. It made me laugh out loud.

I think it's somewhat of a collector's item now.

Posted by: OregonMuse at December 14, 2014 11:22 AM (S6Q1o)

88 Regarding 'Spanish Man's Grave' and the There Will Be War anthology series: I am currently at work at preparing Volume I (of IX) for e-book release. I've been slacking off for a while but this makes me feel a bit more motivated.

I hope to have the whole set available by some point in 2015. A lot depends on Jerry. I've got a backlog of completed conversions waiting for him to turn in his updates and other inputs.

Posted by: Epobirs at December 14, 2014 11:26 AM (IdCqF)

89 I think it's somewhat of a collector's item now.

Actually, not so much. Copies of BOTR are selling on eBay for $5 or less.

Posted by: OregonMuse at December 14, 2014 11:27 AM (S6Q1o)

90 Get a copy of the "Self-Publishing Manual" by Dan Poynter. Covers everything you need to know. We used it in the early 90's to publish a technical book (that is still in print and selling regularly) and have pretty much followed it since on a range of new books. My most recent copy is from 8 years ago and is still geared towards actually printing books in large-ish quantities as opposed to one-ofs, but he's most likely updated that since.

Posted by: GoCougs at December 14, 2014 11:28 AM (uapEO)

91 Regarding 'Spanish Man's Grave' and the There Will Be War anthology series: I am currently at work at preparing Volume I (of IX) for e-book release. I've been slacking off for a while but this makes me feel a bit more motivated.

You're Jerry Pournelle's editor? Cool.

Having said that, get off your butt and get to work. I want to be the first one to buy an eCopy of TWBW Vol 1.

Posted by: OregonMuse at December 14, 2014 11:29 AM (S6Q1o)

92 I've been reading Leningrad: Siege and Symphony by Moynahan. It's about Shostakovich composing and performing his Seventh Symphony during the Nazi siege. I just started and so far we're into Stalin's terror. It is absolutely astounding the minor offenses you could accidentally commit that would get you tortured and shot. Shostakovich was a teenager at the time of the revolution and embraced it. He and his buddies would pull stupid hippy tricks like stealing grand pianos from the houses of the wealthy, put them on trucks, and provide music for the proletariat. Soon, however, he felt Stalin's iron fist when Stalin, a music aficionado, didn't like one of his operas.

Posted by: The Great White Snark at December 14, 2014 11:29 AM (LImiJ)

93 A farewell toast to backhoe.

*raises glass*

Posted by: eman at December 14, 2014 11:30 AM (MQEz6)

94 Reading How To Be a Victorian Paperback
by Ruth Goodman. A very interesting approach and topic. It examines life in the culture from morning to night, explaining food, chores, clothing, child-rearing etc. It's amazing any child survived. Approachable and well written.

For all our faults, we are much advanced over those old times. Can't help but wonder if the survivors of today will look back at the Left's theories and practices as barbarism.

Posted by: NaCly Dog at December 14, 2014 11:30 AM (u82oZ)

95 OM: I read a bunch of the Destroyer books back in high school, and have thought about working my way through them all in sequence. Don't know if they would hold the same appeal as they once did. What 16 year old boy wouldn't want to be Remo Williams, super-assassin? Hmmm, come to think of it, what 45 year old man wouldn't want to be a super-assassin?

Posted by: PabloD at December 14, 2014 11:30 AM (t1Nmg)

96 To Backhoe. Sailor rest your oars.

Ready, two.

Posted by: NaCly Dog at December 14, 2014 11:33 AM (u82oZ)

97 My wife and I have a good relationship w/Bob McCarty, a conservative author. He has written 2 non-fiction, "The Clapper Memo," and "Three Days in August." His current fiction is "The National Bet," is one my wife can't put down. All are available on Amazon.

Posted by: Brave Sir Robin at December 14, 2014 11:34 AM (5buP8)

98 So, there is a chance to find out the creator of Schlock Mercenary's political leanings. He's done a decent job of being apolitical (I think he probably leans left but am not positive) and the only real gripe I have with his world view is the "psychotic mass murderer" trope he seems to fall into regarding organized military.

Unfortunately, *he* sees some sort of possible parallel between his current storyline and the Ferguson/New York and wrote a note in today's comic that they *aren't* related but anyone who wants to know his precise opinions can check out his blog where he explains them. I was tempted to check (and Lord knows I may be pleasantly surprised) but am now thinking that ignorance is bliss.

Posted by: Polliwog the 'Ette at December 14, 2014 11:35 AM (GDulk)

99 /87 Someone in one of the night time threads referenced "Bored of the Rings" a Harvard Lampoon take on LOTR. I thought I was the only one who remembered it. It is raunchy and often silly and many references are long out of date but can still make me chuckle.

I have a copy, which someone gave me years ago, back in the 70s. It made me laugh out loud.

I think it's somewhat of a collector's item now.
Posted by: OregonMuse at December 14, 2014 11:22 AM (S6Q1o)

I vaguely remember parts of that. Wasn't the main Hobbit renamed Dildo Faggins or something like that

Posted by: Insomniac at December 14, 2014 11:35 AM (mx5oN)

100 I vaguely remember parts of that. Wasn't the main Hobbit renamed Dildo Faggins or something like that

Dildo Bugger, I think.

Posted by: OregonMuse at December 14, 2014 11:40 AM (S6Q1o)

101 Schlock is good friends with John Ringo IIRC, I doubt he's too far left.

Posted by: Emile Antoon Khadaji at December 14, 2014 11:40 AM (/8qpd)

102 87 Someone in one of the night time threads referenced "Bored of the Rings" a Harvard Lampoon take on LOTR. I thought I was the only one who remembered it. It is raunchy and often silly and many references are long out of date but can still make me chuckle.

They also did an amazing and hilarious parody of Frank Herbert 's Dune called Doon.

Posted by: Gregory of Yardale at December 14, 2014 11:41 AM (ETrjW)

103 - the book establishes that the air pressure is low on Mars. So whence
does the sandstorm get sufficient total force to blow a comm array into
Mark Watney? Yeah, there has to be an explanation as to why the crew
left him there but this explanation is stupid.


BTH: It is easy to second guess an author, but wouldn't Selkirk's (the sailor who was the inspiration for Defoe's Robinson Crusoe) rationale be a fun reason to maroon the biologist?
Selkirk got left on his island because he thought the ship was too rotten to float, which it was.
If some mission specialist decided he knew more about the safety of the ship than the Captain and the only other option was tying him up to get him back on board where he would have to be watched continually, the temptation would be to leave him on Mars with the jettisonables and the supplies for the follow up mission to review his life choices

Posted by: Kindltot at December 14, 2014 11:42 AM (t//F+)

104 Sci-fi gold, Jerry! Sci-fi gold!

Posted by: george costanza at December 14, 2014 11:44 AM (0b722)

105 Dildo and Frito Buggins.

Arrowroot, son of Arrowshirt

Twodor and Fordor

The Riders of the Roi-Tan (many will not remember Roi-Tan cigars)

Goodgulf, the wizard

Serutan, the wizard (and who remembers what Serutan was? Because backwards it spells Natures)

Sorhed, chief villain of this tale.

Posted by: Bossy Conservative....in the bleak midwinter at December 14, 2014 11:44 AM (+1T7c)

106 nood

Posted by: Vic at December 14, 2014 11:44 AM (u9gzs)

107 Let's see, going from memory:

Bilbo == Dildo
Frodo == Frito
Sam == Spam
Merry == Moxie
Pippin == Pepsi
Gandalf == Goodgulf
Legolas == Legolam
Aragorn == Arrowroot
Gimli == Gimlet

Yes, BOTR was pretty sophmoric. But I larfed.

Posted by: OregonMuse at December 14, 2014 11:45 AM (S6Q1o)

108 To carry on a theme, look up the Tulsa race riots of 1931. " a hysterical white girl claimed assault by a young black male in an elevator..." She turned out to be highly dubious, (bat-shit crazy), and caused the death of 50, and 1.5 million dollars in property damage. Now we have hysterical feminists egged on by a hysterical media.

Posted by: Brave Sir Robin at December 14, 2014 11:46 AM (5buP8)

109 Now we have hysterical feminists egged on by a hysterical media.
Posted by: Brave Sir Robin


Sounds like Helen of Troy. I heard from Vic that she was a big trouble maker too.

Posted by: Bossy Conservative....in the bleak midwinter at December 14, 2014 11:48 AM (+1T7c)

110 They also did an amazing and hilarious parody of Frank Herbert 's Dune called Doon.
Posted by: Gregory of Yardale at December 14, 2014 11:41 AM (ETrjW)


"I shall not have fun. Fun is the time-killer. Fun is for children, customers and the help. When fun is gone there will be nothing; nothing but my will to succeed. Damn, I'm good."

Posted by: Kindltot at December 14, 2014 11:48 AM (t//F+)

111 #91

I don't know if I'd call the job editor. These are completed works, after all. I'm more of a 21st Century typesetter.

Posted by: Epobirs at December 14, 2014 11:50 AM (IdCqF)

112 Re: Spanish Man's Grave and James Warner Bellah - Others have already mentioned the fact that the story is contained in the "There Will Be War" series, but no one mentioned that the story is part of a series and that the characters and stories were the basis for the 3 movies in John Ford's Cavalry trilogy. The entire series of stories of which Spanish Man's Grave is a part are contained in a book called Reveille. I am looking for an electronic copy (or a paper copy even they are rare). If you are interested drop me a messaged in the AoS part II group in facebook and I will let you know when I locate something.

Posted by: chad at December 14, 2014 11:52 AM (gYowz)

113 Thanks for mentioning the "Doon" lampoon. I didn't know about it. And it is good to know I'm not the only one sick enough to remember, fondly, Bored of the Rings. God help us all.

Posted by: JTB at December 14, 2014 11:53 AM (FvdPb)

114 I would have mentioned that, Chad, but that's Tyree's department.

Posted by: andycanuck at December 14, 2014 11:54 AM (0b722)

115 "I would have mentioned that, Chad, but that's Tyree's department."

That sounds suspiciously like union talk to me. :-)

Seriously, I have been looking for this book off and on for years. The Torri Station Library had a copy and I checked it out way back when (1986 or 1987) but I have never seen another copy. Should have just stolen the damn thing back then.





Posted by: chad at December 14, 2014 12:05 PM (gYowz)

116 83 Someone in one of the night time threads referenced "Bored of the Rings" a Harvard Lampoon take on LOTR. I thought I was the only one who remembered it. It is raunchy and often silly and many references are long out of date but can still make me chuckle.
Posted by: JTB at December 14, 2014 11:17 AM (FvdPb)
--------
Might have been me. That was one of the cornerstones of my tweener reading list! The stoner and dirty hippie humor was not of my time, but mayhem and perversity are eternal.

"'Floop', suggested the tar pit."

Posted by: All Hail Eris at December 14, 2014 12:06 PM (KH1sk)

117 Surgeries are over, and she's in recovery. Everything went well, still waiting to see her. I am relieved, and starving.

Posted by: kalel666 at December 14, 2014 12:08 PM (95358)

118 OT, but has anyone been following the Jessica
Chambers murder in Mississippi? There's been little or no reporting, but
the circumstances of the case are . . . Interesting . . . Considering
the focus on Ferguson/Garner and torture. Link in sig with mondo
research.

Posted by: Emile Antoon Khadaji at December 14, 2014 10:56 AM (8Kv96)


Wow! If law enforcement won't do anything, sounds like a certain Judge needs to come out of retirement. Finch, maybe?

Posted by: Alberta Oil Peon at December 14, 2014 12:11 PM (8Fl6F)

119 Bored of the Rings is available at Amazon for $9 on the Kindle version.


http://is.gd/sloI4O

Posted by: Vic at December 14, 2014 12:13 PM (u9gzs)

120 Posted by: Df82 at December 14, 2014 11:12 AM (QqNO+)

Good news, with Chinese under your belt you might be able to get a technical job in the future!

Posted by: Hrothgar at December 14, 2014 12:14 PM (fL/7/)

121 "Wow! If law enforcement won't do anything, sounds like a certain Judge needs to come out of retirement"

Judge Dredd is retired?

www.youtube.com/watch?v=lHN5E-tnyyw

Posted by: chad at December 14, 2014 12:15 PM (gYowz)

122 - the book establishes that the air pressure is low
on Mars. So whence does the sandstorm get sufficient total force to blow
a comm array into Mark Watney? Yeah, there has to be an explanation as
to why the crew left him there but this explanation is stupid.



Posted by: boulder terlit hobo at December 14, 2014 10:45 AM (AVEe1)

The author answering reader questions admitted that yeah, he stretched the science so that Watley would get left behind. What impressed me was the Martian sandstorm scene where Watley could barely tell there was a storm as the atmosphere is so thin.

I read Richard Kadrey's Sandman Slim, where a hitman is sent to Hell while still alive. After 11 years he returns seeking vengeance and gets drawn into a larger conflict involving Heaven and Hell. Didn't like the major characters too much and not much humor, but it was an entertaining read and well written, may look into the sequels.

Posted by: waelse1 at December 14, 2014 12:16 PM (T1Dfu)

123 BOTR. Sigh. I looked all over that book to find the section inside the front cover where the scantily clad elf maiden temps Frito for the Ring.

I still have the book.

Posted by: NaCly Dog at December 14, 2014 12:16 PM (u82oZ)

124 Kalel, Thanks for letting us know it went well. My wife had this surgery a few years ago. The procedures they use now are light years better than they did ten to fifteen years ago.

Do what I did, say hello then get something to eat. It is safer than trying to steal her pudding from the tray.

Posted by: JTB at December 14, 2014 12:19 PM (FvdPb)

125 The author answering reader questions admitted that
yeah, he stretched the science so that Watley would get left behind.
What impressed me was the Martian sandstorm scene where Watley could
barely tell there was a storm as the atmosphere is so thin.

I
read Richard Kadrey's Sandman Slim, where a hitman is sent to Hell while
still alive. After 11 years he returns seeking vengeance and gets drawn
into a larger conflict involving Heaven and Hell. Didn't like the major
characters too much and not much humor, but it was an entertaining read
and well written, may look into the sequels.


Posted by: waelse1 at December 14, 2014 12:16 PM (T1Dfu)


I believe it's possible on Mars, that even though the air pressure is very low, that the wind velocity can be extremely high, so that the kinetic energy of the air mass would still be substantial. And erosion by airborne sand grains would be worse, on a per-grain basis.

Posted by: Alberta Oil Peon at December 14, 2014 12:21 PM (8Fl6F)

126 I will probably sit down tonight and read again The Shepherd by Frederick Forsyth.

A story of an RAF Vampire pilot flying home from BAOR in Germany to reach family in England the night of Christmas Eve 1957. And over the North Sea his electrical system fails.

Since Sabrina has mentioned Writers' Beware - http://accrispin.blogspot.com/

I have rediscovered about a thousand words of story I wrote just a few years ago and completely forgot about. It is still a funny read. So debating if I can create a proper MacGuffin for it and recapture the tone. Has this ever happened to anyone else?

Posted by: Anna Puma (+SmuD) at December 14, 2014 12:25 PM (ciHDV)

127 Still working my way through the Ian Rutledge series by Charles Todd. Rutledge is a Scotland Yard detective who suffers from PSTD because of his horrifying experiences as a soldier in the First World War. Kind of dark and brooding, as befits the dark days of winter. I think there are a dozen or so books in the series. My habit is to find an author I like and then read everything they've published.

Posted by: grammie winger, joy to the world at December 14, 2014 12:28 PM (3B+O8)

128 I've been reading a book called Ready Player One. It's kind of a cross between Charlie and the Chocolate Factory and Avatar. I don't know anything about the author, Ernest Cline, but the book is a really fun read.

Posted by: JohnJ at December 14, 2014 12:29 PM (TF/YA)

129 It's also my intention to read through the Books of Luke and John this week, or at least by Christmas. My simplistic viewpoint is that Luke does a very fine job with the "what" of the narrative of Jesus, and John amplifies it by highlighting the "why". Luke is great on details. John is great on the meaning of it all.

Posted by: grammie winger, joy to the world at December 14, 2014 12:36 PM (3B+O8)

130 Posted by: JohnJ at December 14, 2014 12:29 PM (TF/YA)

Need clarification. Which Avatar? The tall smurf one or the elemental magic one? Unless there's yet another I've forgotten of.

Posted by: Polliwog the 'Ette at December 14, 2014 12:37 PM (GDulk)

131 I believe it's possible on Mars, that even though
the air pressure is very low, that the wind velocity can be extremely
high, so that the kinetic energy of the air mass would still be
substantial. And erosion by airborne sand grains would be worse, on a
per-grain basis.


Posted by: Alberta Oil Peon at December 14, 2014 12:21 PM (8Fl6F)

In the novel the wind is so powerful it causes a radar array to fly into Watney knocking him unconscious, and is about to knock over the living quarters so the astronauts flee to safety abandoning a search for him. I think I read the Martian atmosphere is about 1/200th the density of Earth's so seems a stretch, not to say I caught this at the time of reading it.

Posted by: waelse1 at December 14, 2014 12:37 PM (T1Dfu)

132 People to toss a curse at - HBO.

They are having a Game of Thrones contest to create a companion book. The real deal killer for artists/writers/etc is of course in the fine print.

Even if your submission does not win, HBO will retain all rights in perpetuity to your work and won't be obligated to even give you credit for your work.

If you win? Well hey you get included in the book, get a copy of the book, and HBO still owns all rights and won't pay you.

http://tinyurl.com/oab6xns

Posted by: Anna Puma (+SmuD) at December 14, 2014 12:41 PM (ciHDV)

133 If you are a subscriber to Audible, check your email. You have a free audiobook awaiting you.

Posted by: grammie winger, joy to the world at December 14, 2014 12:43 PM (3B+O8)

134 Still working my way through the Ian Rutledge series by Charles Todd. Rutledge is a Scotland Yard detective who suffers from PSTD because of his horrifying experiences as a soldier in the First World War. Kind of dark and brooding, as befits the dark days of winter. I think there are a dozen or so books in the series. My habit is to find an author I like and then read everything they've published.

-
I finished Test of Wills last week and have just started Wings of Fire.

Posted by: The Great White Snark at December 14, 2014 12:44 PM (LImiJ)

135 Imperfect Sword, Jack Campbell
Military SF
This book best in the Lost Stars so far.

Posted by: Huggy at December 14, 2014 01:16 PM (PGh+Q)

136 "Saturday Evening Post" from May 3, 1947 can be purchased for $20 from a couple of different book dealer.

Search bookfinder.com

Not cheap, I assume because it has a Rockwell cover.

Posted by: Chester White at December 14, 2014 01:18 PM (dLF+N)

137 I am not going to get to this until later, but wanted to weigh in with my thanks for this Sunday Morning Book Thread. It is wonderful and I appreciate all the work put into it and the sharing. I have been exposed to so much I might not have read and learn something just from the diverse comments. Thanks. Goodwill to all.

Posted by: gracepmc at December 14, 2014 01:33 PM (xvd51)

138 Not really reading much this week. I have some previews to do but work has been kinda busy, spinning everything back up to speed after having the week long shut-down over Thanksgiving. I'd bet they won't do that again, bringing everything back up has been...interesting.

Posted by: GGE of the Moron Horde, NC Chapter at December 14, 2014 01:36 PM (6fyGz)

139 What? Didn't know the Saturday Evening Post was still around? Where have you been? This former lurker, magazine collector, and off-and-on subscriber to the Post for the last 40 years, will now come out and set you straight . . .

Properly, the Saturday Evening Post was founded as a "home paper" in 1821 and had 90,000 subscribers at its peak in 1855 before Cyrus H. K. Curtis bought it in 1897 when it was on its last legs (it had 3,500 subscribers, and the publisher didn't have enough money to publish the next issue).

When Curtis brought it back in January of 1898 (after a hiatus of five months), the legend "Founded A.D. 1728" had been added to the masthead. Later it was expanded to "Founded A.D. 1728 by Benj. Franklin" with no initial explanation. Eventually, Curtis linked the Post's history to Franklin's Pennsylvania Gazette, which Franklin bought in 1729. Franklin sold the paper in 1765, and the Gazette was published by other hands until 1815. When the Saturday Evening Post started publishing six years later, the original publishers made no attempts to link their "home paper" with Franklin's Gazette, even though it was published in the same building and possibly on the same press. But Curtis did take advantage of that tenuous historical link, and it turned out to be a good PR move.

After continuing to publish the Post as a "home paper" for almost two years, Curtis redesigned the Post as a conventional magazine with color covers and all that, commencing with the Sept. 30, 1899 issue. (I have a "Poor Richard's Almanac" promotional booklet from 1899 advertising the redesign.) George Horace Lorimer had recently become the Post's editor, a position he held until 1937. Lorimer deserves a lot of the credit for the literary and artistic shaping of the magazine in its early years, and discovered many of the authors you mentioned above.

A lawsuit practically bankrupted the magazine in the mid-1960s, and the last issue rolled out in February of 1969. The SerVass family had bought the magazine before then, but they couldn't afford to publish the Post again until June of 1971, when it restarted as a quarterly magazine, and started publishing bimonthly in 1974.

Currently, the Post has a really sharp publishing staff, and head archivist Jeff Nilsson is making a lot of the Post's history available online. Their website, www.saturdayeveningpost.com, is updated weekly (on Saturdays, natch) and even has blogs chronicling WW1 and WW2 with stories from the Post. Check it out!

Posted by: DynamiteDan at December 14, 2014 01:56 PM (CO0Ee)

140 A must read for those interested in false accusations and hoaxes was written ten years ago - No Crueler Tyrannies by Dorothy Rabinowitz.

She has also written a number of excellent articles on the subject through the years.

Posted by: WannabeAnglican at December 14, 2014 02:21 PM (CW6pW)

141 Scottsboro Boys? Have you heard of the hoax of the Soetoro Boy?

Posted by: Illiniwek at December 14, 2014 02:33 PM (LzpWO)

142
Here I is. Late again.

Last week I read "The Boy Who Saw Demons," in record time. Couldn't put it down. Stood reading it by the stove while stirring stuff for dinner!

On reaching puberty, a boy finds that he sees demons among the population and it falls to him to not only findall of them in his area AND kill them, but to complete this task before the demons complete their rituals that will open the gates of Hell. No, not holiday reading, but absolutely riveting.

Posted by: RushBabe at December 14, 2014 02:36 PM (gEuvX)

143 Scottsboro Boys? Have you heard of the hoax of the Soetoro Boy?
Posted by: Illiniwek at December 14, 2014 02:33 PM (LzpWO)


His victims are still in prison.

Posted by: Bertram Cabot Jr. at December 14, 2014 02:39 PM (W5DcG)

144 Back to medieval history. Now reading "The Greatest Knight: The Remarkable Life of William Marshal" by Thomas Asbridge. Remarkable is quite an understatement IMO.

Mr. Asbridge wrote a very fine account of the 1st Crusade which I read some years ago

Posted by: Tuna at December 14, 2014 02:53 PM (JSovD)

145 This might lead to Spanish Man's Grave.
http://connection.ebscohost.com/c/short-stories/19958933/spanish-mans-grave

Posted by: TJ Greer at December 14, 2014 03:02 PM (PFZ4Q)

146 Escort girls http://REGMODELS.RU

Posted by: Tina at December 14, 2014 03:33 PM (ykRQL)

147 A couple of books this week/end so far...

The End Of Barbary Terror, by Frederick Leiner. It tells what happened after the War of 1812, when the rejuvenated USN was sent (less than two months after the 1812 war was concluded) to "deal with" the Barbary territories, who had been so imprudent as to attack American merchant shipping in the Med. at British behest. Considering Stephen Decatur was in command, I would expect nothing less.

Also, The Men Who Lost America, a study of the British government officials in charge during our first disagreement with that nation; it's rather sympathetic to Lord North, oddly enough, but slams virtually every other British government minister, not to mention George III.

Good books, the both of them.

Also, re: BOTR, " 'Pity? It was pity stayed his hand,' said Goodgulf. 'It's a pity I ran out of bullets,' thought Dildo..."

Posted by: Mahan at December 14, 2014 04:02 PM (8BD8r)

148 Well just finished March Upcountry combo bk 1 and downloaded bk 2.

Posted by: Vic at December 14, 2014 05:25 PM (u9gzs)

149 I'm a professional archaeologist who lurks here all the time and has made, like, three comments in the past five years. No, really, I hardly ever post anything.

Anyway, I did just publish a chapter in a new book on the ritual archaeology of a Classic Maya City. It will make you laugh, it will make you cry. It will make you wonder why academic presses are so bloody expensive.

http://www.amazon.com/Archaeology-El-Per%C3%BA-Waka%C2%92-Performances-Americas/dp/0816530963

(I have no idea why academic presses are so expensive.)

Posted by: Keith Eppich at December 14, 2014 05:38 PM (sz15i)

150 Posted by: Keith Eppich at December 14, 2014 05:38 PM (sz15i)


Very interesting . You should post more often.

Posted by: grammie winger, joy to the world at December 14, 2014 05:41 PM (3B+O8)

151 Which Avatar? The tall smurf one or the elemental magic one? Unless there's yet another I've forgotten of.

Posted by: Polliwog the 'Ette

The tall smurf one that I've managed to avoid seeing, but I've heard a lot about. It's only like that in the sense that it involves people creating an avatar on the internet in a World of Warcraft kind of way, and pursuing the story in both worlds.

Posted by: JohnJ at December 14, 2014 06:44 PM (TF/YA)

152 82
thanks to Roger for explaining to me how to punctuate dialog.

Yeah. Had a thought about that. I've noticed that books I like don't do a lot of "he said" "she said". More like (not an actual quote):

"Well, I don't know about that." Missy fiddled with her tassels, trying to get them to rotate in opposite directions. "You'd think they'd've thought of that when they built the thing." She'd read a treatise on the subject, but it seemed to involve mastery of the arcane arts of quaternions.

Tells you who's speaking and gives an opportunity to inject color and/or exposition without just "he said" "she asked".

Posted by: Anachronda, whose God-bothering schedule precludes timely posting at December 14, 2014 06:45 PM (o78gS)

153 *puff, puff, puff* (panting) Late to the thread, after breaking down the booth and driving back to San Antonio...
Yes, I remember Bored of the Rings very well - and I might still have a copy, in a box in the garage somewhere.
The sign (The Author -->) didn't result in a stampede to our booth for my books, but it will work again, in locations and markets where there are all sorts of vendors. I plan to use it again, but not until spring. This is the last of our local market events. We didn't take away as much in sales as we had hoped for: and it wasn't us, other vendors had the same woe. Yes, Texas is doing better economically than a lot of other places, but people are still holding on to their money. Some other vendors were radically disappointed, as they had done much better last year, or at an earlier market associated with a local town spectacular. Quite a few packed it in last night, or in mid-afternoon today; I'd hate to think of how badly Christmas-based-retail is doing in other states, I really do.

Posted by: Sgt. Mom at December 14, 2014 07:08 PM (95iDF)

154 The short parodies by Max Beerbom, collected in "A Christmas Garland", written in the styles of various late 19th - early 20th century writers, is our evening reading. The take-off on R. Kipling is quite apropos to certain police activities of late. The whole wry book can be found on-line at Gutenberg . I also recommend The Dark Is Rising (Susan Cooper) for this season. I really appreciate the book ideas and thoughts in this section; thank you to all! P.S. The first day of Hanukkah is this Wednesday, Dec. 17th.

Posted by: Linda Roberts at December 14, 2014 07:13 PM (tKcuX)

155 66
Okay HQ, drop everything you are doing and pick up Andy Weir's "The Martian".



This book is about a smartass NASA botanist dropped off at Mars and
not retrieved until... later. How much later? Lots later. So the
botanist has to find a way to stretch his rations and a few potatoes to
cover for "later", while at the same time not blowing himself up.



There are only a few things wrong with it:



- the book establishes that the air pressure is low on Mars. So
whence does the sandstorm get sufficient total force to blow a comm
array into Mark Watney? Yeah, there has to be an explanation as to why
the crew left him there but this explanation is stupid.

Posted by: boulder terlit hobo at December 14, 2014 10:45 AM (AVEe1)


I just started The Martian today and am afraid that I am going to get sucked in and look up and it will be 3:00 in the morning and I will not have gone to bed yet, although I will have finished the book.



- er... radiation.



- other errors noted in terpkristen's review: http://www.goodreads.com/review/show/925096404



- NASA is treated like a real space agency and not like a playpen
for SJWs and Muslims. Maybe President Cruz has fired all the management.



- Ridley Scott is going to direct the movie and he's cast Matt Damon
as Watney. No, dude. Just... no. Imagine yourself as the Martian
instead; if you're a moron, you're already a smartass. On the other
hand, if Matt Damon was on the mission, it's easier to explain why they
left him behind...



Other than that: gripping read. Also conclusion has one of the best emotional payoffs in any book I've seen.

Posted by: Charlotte at December 14, 2014 09:45 PM (geP+w)

156 Rolling Thunder was recommended here a couple of months ago:

http://www.amazon.com/dp/B0019LNUVA/

Just got around to reading it a little while ago, and finished it last night. Good read...think I'll need to pick up the other titles in the series (as if I don't have enough of a backlog already).

Posted by: salfter at December 15, 2014 12:49 PM (kmvkg)

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