Sunday Morning Book Thread 02-14-2016: Valentine's Day Edition [OregonMuse]


book love.jpg

Good morning to all of you morons and moronettes and bartenders everywhere and all the ships at sea. And to all you young lovers wherever you are, we hope your problems are few. Welcome to AoSHQ's stately, prestigious, internationally acclaimed and high-class Sunday Morning Book Thread. The Sunday Morning Book Thread is the only AoSHQ thread that is so hoity-toity, pants are required. But since today is Valentine's Day, they can be pink.


108 Reading is fundamental: fun and mental!

Posted by: Joe Biden at February 07, 2016 10:07 AM (UBS9M)


Books For Valentine's Day

By the grace of God, I have been married to the lovely Mrs. Muse for over 30 years. I think it's a miracle that she has put up with my BS for that long. One of the things that has helped me reduce the amount of BS I'm pumping into the relationahip is this book, Men Are from Mars, Women Are from Venus: Practical Guide for Improving Communication by John Gray. Generally, I avoid the pop psychology and self-help stuff, but my pastor recommended it. "Yeah, I know it's not explicitly Christian" he told me, "but read it anyway, it's got some good insights." And he was right, it does. Mrs. Muse read it, too, and we've both benefited. We understand each other better, and what I found amusing was that it helped me in my phone tech support job, particularly in establishing rapport (and trust) with women callers.

And, as an added bonus, this book describes men and women behaving in characteristically masculine and feminine ways, therefore feminists will hate it. As will other sexually maladroit and ignorant progressives who have expanded their revolt against their parents into a full-scale war on reality.

I haven't read, but have been recommended The 5 Love Languages: The Secret to Love that Lasts by Gary Chapman:

Unhappiness in marriage often has a simple root cause: we speak different love languages, believes Dr. Gary Chapman. While working as a marriage counselor for more than 30 years, he identified five love languages: Words of Affirmation, Quality Time, Receiving Gifts, Acts of Service, and Physical Touch. In a friendly, often humorous style, he unpacks each one. Some husbands or wives may crave focused attention; another needs regular praise. Gifts are highly important to one spouse, while another sees fixing a leaky faucet, ironing a shirt, or cooking a meal as filling their "love tank." Some partners might find physical touch makes them feel valued: holding hands, giving back rubs, and sexual contact. Chapman illustrates each love language with real-life examples from his counseling practice.

Of course, both of these books spun off their own little cottage industry of additional books, speaking tours, seminars, etc.

Just for grins, I ran "history of romantic love" through the Amazon search engine, and it came up with

How the French Invented Love: Nine Hundred Years of Passion and Romance by Marilyn Yalom

How the French Invented Love is an entertaining and masterful history of love à la française by acclaimed scholar Marilyn Yalom. Spanning the Middle Ages to the present, Yalom explores a love-obsessed culture through its great works of literature—from Moliere’s comic love to the tragic love of Racine, from the existential love of Simone de Beauvoir and Jean-Paul Sartre to the romanticism of George Sand and Alfred de Musset. A thoroughly engaging homage to French culture and literature interlaced with the author’s delicious personal anecdotes.

This led me to What French Women Know: About Love, Sex, and Other Matters of the Heart and Mind by Debra Ollivier, an American-born Francophile author who, for example,

...pointedly debunks the myth that French women deprive themselves of fattening foods and drink in order to maintain a suitable weight, but reveals that French women are masters of portion control. She...came to the realization that, in France, women genuinely love men, and vice versa; both strive for more compatibility between the sexes, radically diminishing the "battle of the sexes" mentality so commonplace in American society. Intriguingly, Ollivier contrasts the French desire for mystery against the American need for knowledge and control, finding in the discrepancy a possible reason for the ever-escalating American divorce rate.

The problem is that in America, we've got an entire academic discipline (women's studies), which goal is the destruction of marriage, trying to set men and women permanently against each other. Not sure if they have that in France. However, having said this, I think our divorce rate was ridiculously high even before the crybullies and Frankfort School grievance jockeys showed up to throw sand in the social machinery.

Lastly, there's Adult Coloring Books: St.Valentines Sample Patterns: 33 Beautiful, Romantic Stress Relieving Designs. The funny thing is, this is a Kindle book. Now how does that work? When you buy it, it contains a link to a FREE pdf version that you can download and print out.

Threadwinner

Nothing to do with books, but I have to repost this comment from yesterday:

152 The Pope needs to give up Communism for Lent.

Posted by: buzzion at February 13, 2016 12:05 PM (zt+N6)

Heh. Not bad for a dead guy.


the-love-of-my-life-book-quote.jpg


Collecting Books

Here's an interesting web page I found while looking for something else: Book Collecting 101. If you're interested in collecting books and don't know how to start, this will give you a few points. Topics include 'I Love Books, but what should I collect?', 'How and where do I start?', 'Internet Resources' and 'What gives a book its value?' I was interested in what they had to say about that last question, and after an informative discussion of contributing factors to book value such as condition, edition, provenance and association, signatures and inscriptions, this is what they said about supply/desirability & demand:

The fair market value of books depends on supply and demand. A hard-to-find book in great demand will have a higher value than a book available in large quantities that no one is buying. I refer you to those flash-in-the-pan diet and miracle-cure book authors who've had their moment of tv talk-show fame, and whose books now bask in obscurity, forgotten and unwanted.

So ultimately it depends on how badly people want it. I'm pleased to see econ 101 applied to a real-world example.


New Potter Books

There's a new Harry Potter book coming out this summer.

But let's back up a bit.

Late last year, they did a Harry Potter stage play:

The West End play Harry Potter and the Cursed Child is to pick up Potter’s story where the last novel left off. Rumours that the play would be a prequel were dispelled by author JK Rowling earlier this year. It has now been declared a sequel, and the official eighth story in the series. It will focus on Harry’s youngest son, Albus Severus, who in the epilogue to Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows is about to start his first year at Hogwarts.

This has already been officially entered into the Potter canon as the 8th story in the series. The script will be released as a book on July 31st. Here is the Amazon blurb:

It was always difficult being Harry Potter and it isn’t much easier now that he is an overworked employee of the Ministry of Magic, a husband and father of three school-age children.

While Harry grapples with a past that refuses to stay where it belongs, his youngest son Albus must struggle with the weight of a family legacy he never wanted. As past and present fuse ominously, both father and son learn the uncomfortable truth: sometimes, darkness comes from unexpected places.

I am completely ignorant of the Potterverse, never having read any of the books, so I have no idea what this might mean, i.e where the danger could come from.

Meanwhile, back in the past, children's author Beatrix Potter started to work on a story she called "The Tale of Kitty-in-Boots". We know this because a researcher recently found a reference to this story in a 1914 letter from Potter to her editor. So the researcher

...went to the Potter archives at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London and, with the help of archivists, found three drafts of the story, handwritten in children’s school notebooks, along with a color sketch of Kitty-in-Boots, a pencil rough sketch of the villain, Mr. Tod, and a dummy book with some of the manuscript laid out. Though the story was not unknown to Potter scholars, Potter’s publisher apparently did not realize that there was a complete story stashed among her papers until Ms. Hanks read the manuscript...

The story centers on a rebellious cat with a protective owner, who sneaks out at night, at one point stalking an older, wiser and chubbier Peter Rabbit. Other familiar Potter characters, including Mr. Tod, Mrs. Tiggy-Winkle, Ribby and Tabitha Twitchit, have cameos.

Apparently, they delayed announcing their publishing plans, to coincide with 150th anniversary of Beatrix Potter's birth this year. This new old story will be published in the fall.


Moron Recommendations

Fair warning: I don't read every single one of the AoSHQ threads during the week, but if I catch any of you morons posting comments such as "I'm reading this book..." or "this book is great..." in a non-book-thread thread, you might find you and your book as a book thread topic. Like Donna here:

I am now reading a book, "On Becoming An American" that I picked up at an estate sale about a month. The author was born a French count, Sanche de Gramont. He found life as a French aristocrat stultifying dull and narrow. He emigrated here in the 1970's with his American wife, became a citizen, and changed his name to Ted Morgan (an anagram of deGramont).

His father was the son of his grandfather's third wife. His grandfather's second wife was a Rothschild so those kids got all the moola. He had a title but no money. So when he came to America, he and his wife furnished their place with Goodwill furniture. And he said most Europeans simply have no idea how well you can live in the US with stuff other people throw away.

He also said he was startled by Americans who were willing to loan friends the use of their cars. He wrote that cars are so precious in France, a Frenchman would rather loan you his wife.

Posted by: Donna and V. (sans ampersands) at February 10, 2016 01:20 PM (u0lmX)

So the book Donna is reading, On Becoming American: A Celebration Of What It Means And How It Feels, no longer appears to be in print, but is available used. The book is

...an inquiry into American identity--what it is that sets Americans apart from the rest of the world. Ted Morgan discusses America through the prism of his own experience: he was a French aristocrat, Sanche de Gramont, who became Ted Morgan and an American citizen in 1977...A Pulitzer-Prize winning journalist, Morgan's experience illustrates why immigration is central to the American experience. He sees us with fresh eyes, and writes with humor about our passion for fast cars, fast food and the freedom we take for granted...An antidote to facile put downs of America. Morgan makes the case that America is the greatest success story the world has ever known.

So a French guy with a froofy name moves to America, chucks his fancy title, and changes his name to "Ted Morgan" (one step removed from "John Smith"). Yeah, he's an American all right. He was an American before he got here.

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In response to ace musing about a pickup line used in the movie version of "50 Shades of Grey" in the hilarious live-blogging thread, moron commenter weft cut-loop advised:

Pro-tip: just be seen reading this shiz:

What Jane Austen Ate and Charles Dickens Knew: From Fox Hunting to Whist - the Facts of Daily Life in Nineteenth-Century England

It's actually a fun read. *wink* *wink* *wink*

Posted by: weft cut-loop at February 11, 2016 12:12 AM (wCF3s)

So here is the book wcl is talking about: What Jane Austen Ate and Charles Dickens Knew: From Fox Hunting to Whist-the Facts of Daily Life in Nineteenth-Century England by Daniel Pool.

For anyone who has ever wondered whether a duke outranked an earl, when to yell “Tally Ho!” at a fox hunt, or how one landed in “debtor’s prison,” this book serves as an indispensable historical and literary resource. Author Daniel Pool provides countless intriguing details (did you know that the “plums” in Christmas plum pudding were actually raisins?) on the Church of England, sex, Parliament, dinner parties, country house visiting, and a host of other aspects of nineteenth-century English life—both “upstairs” and “downstairs.”

By the way, whist is a fun 4-player card game, full of challenges and opportunities for skilful play, but not as complicated as contract bridge, the game into which it eventually evolved. The play of the cards is similar, but there's no round of bidding prior to each hand being played.

Horatio Hornblower was a demon whist player, who had near-total recall of the cards that had been played, which bedeviled his opponents to no end. As I remember, he played for money and he used his winnings to tide him over during periods of naval inactivity.

(and which is why I'm a lousy card-player -- I can't remember squat}

Here's the "bible" used by serious whist players in the 19th century, which you can read or download for free: The Laws and Principles of Whist Stated and Explained and Its Practice Illustrated on an Original System by Means of Hands Played Completely Through by "Cavendish" (the nom de plume of the British writer and games expert Henry Jones). Love those long titles.


___________

And this is not, strictly speaking, a moron recommendation, but I came across it while looking at weft cut-loop's recommendation, and I thought it might be of interest:

Medieval Underpants and Other Blunders: A Writer's (& Editor's) Guide to Keeping Historical Fiction Free of Common Anachronisms, Errors, & Myths by Susanne Alleyn which advertises itself by saying it's "not a book on how to write historical fiction. It is a book on how not to write historical fiction."

Medieval Underpants will guide you through the factual mistakes that writers of historical fiction—both beginners and seasoned professionals—often make, and show you how to avoid them. From fictional characters crossing streets that wouldn’t exist for another sixty (or two thousand) years, to 1990s slang in the mouths of 1940s characters, to South American foods on ancient Roman plates, acclaimed historical novelist Susanne Alleyn exposes the often hilarious, always painful goofs that turn up most frequently in fiction set in the past.

I'd like to see some of the examples. I'll bet they're a real hoot.

In a wide assortment of chapters including Food and Plants; Travel; Guns; Money; Hygiene; Dialogue; Attitudes; Research; and, of course, Underpants, she offers tips on how to avoid errors and anachronisms while continually reminding writers of the necessity of meticulous historical research.

If the chapters on "dialog" and "attitudes" are any good, I think they'd be worth the price of the book ($4.99 Kindle).


Books By Morons

You never know who's out there lurking. Got an e-mail from (very) infrequent moron commenter DrC. He is a practicing physician, and a pain management specialist, board certified in Anesthesiology and in Pain Medicine by the American Board of Anesthesiology. You can read about the rest of his qualifications here. Bottom line: he knows his stuff.

So with the knowledge gained from his practice, DrC has written a book on chronic pain management: Unraveling the Mystery of Chronic Pain: What You Need to Know to Get Relief. It's written for

...people who suffer from chronic pain, as well as their families and friends. It begins with the biology of acute and chronic pain and what we know about why chronic pain develops. It includes discussions of treatments including exercise and meditation, dietary options, alternative therapies, medications, injections, and devices used in the treatment of chronic pain. The organization of the chapters reflects the author's strong belief that the most valuable information he can give you is centered on what you can do for yourself.

The good doctor tells me

Being shy and taciturn by nature, I've done absolutely nothing to promote the book. In fact I have resisted even mentioning it to the AoSHQ book thread until now.

I'm almost 60, and I've been blessed by God with a pretty much pain-free existence Which is pretty amazing considering what a train wreck my body is. I see a surprisingly large number of people my age with chronic back/knee/joint/other problems and break-downs that cause them frequent or constant pain. So this book may be of help to you morons with these sorts of problems.


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Moron author Christopher Taylor is giving away 2 signed print copies of his novel Life Unworthy (the one about the Nazis accidentally creating a werewolf that gets loose in WWII Poland).

You can enter the drawing at this goodreads link from now until February 22nd.


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Please note that moron commenter AllenG's new novel, Fire and Frost, which I told you about in a previous book thread, is now available on Kindle for $3.49.

What I'm Reading

So this week I thought it was high time I read me some Brad Thor. So I decided to begin at the beginning with The Lions of Lucerne, but in the first chapter, some highly placed Washington DC types were planning to kidnap the President, a plot idea that is just too fantastic for me to suspend my disbelief for. An assassination attempt I can buy, but kidnapping? (I remember reading The Golden Gate by Alistair Maclean when I was in high school, a thriller which also involved the kidnapping of the President, only instead of running away to some secret hideout, the bad guys parked a big convoy of vehicles surrounding the President's limo right in the middle of the Golden Gate Bridge and stayed there while negotiating with the authorities. Wow, talk about a ludicrous plot!). And then one of the kidnap plotters turned out to be secretly gay, so I thought, oh forget it, I'll move on to something else.

So I skipped ahead a few books in the series and started on The Last Patriot. I had heard that it had upset the usual crybully crowd because it said bad things about jihadis and Islam. Like for what? Well, maybe for stuff like this:

“Sunday night there was a murder at the Jefferson Memorial,” said Rasmussen.

Ozbek finished scanning the file and handed it back to his colleague. “And?”

“Somebody whacked an employee of the Foundation on American Islamic Relations. Are you familiar with them?”

Ozbek was. The Saudi-funded Foundation on American Islamic Relations, or FAIR as it was ironically known, was one of the biggest Islamist front organizations in the United States. It had offices across the country with representatives who rushed to the microphones any time a Muslim was accused of anything. They were knee-jerk reactionaries who trotted out the dreaded Islamophobia slur before knowing any of the facts of a case.

Ha ha. Yeah, I'm sure that went over real well with the crybully scolds at CAIR and their progressive enablers.

So I figured TLP was worth reading, and I must say I'm happy to say I'm enjoying it. It's a competently executed page-turner that I had to force myself to put down, otherwise I'd be up all night.


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A couple of weeks ago, I mentioned I was reading Patrick O'Brian's Aubrey/Maturin series and the difficulty in negotiating the nautical terminology in addition to the antiquated words, and this brought an e-mail response from a moron who pointed me to some books that explain some of this stuff.

A Sea of Words, Third Edition: A Lexicon and Companion to the Complete Seafaring Tales of Patrick O'Brian which pretty much doesn't need an explanation, but I'll provide one, anyway:

This comprehensive lexicon provides definitions of nautical terms, historical entries describing the people and political events that shaped the period, and detailed explanations of the scientific, medical, and biblical references that appear in the novels.

$7.99 for the Kindle edition.

Then there's Harbors and High Seas, 3rd Edition : An Atlas and Geographical Guide to the Complete Aubrey-Maturin Novels of Patrick O'Brian, Third Edition:

This indispensable guide to navigating the well-loved Aubrey-Maturin novels has been updated, with new chapters devoted to the final books in the series. Harbors and High Seas includes maps created exclusively for each of the novels in this world-renowned series.

Also $7.99 on Kindle, but be advised that all those detailed maps push the size of the book up to 43 Mb. That's uuuge.

And speaking of uuuuge, Patrick O'Brian's Navy: The Illustrated Companion to Jack Aubrey's World is going for the uuuge price of $30.00 on Kindle, so I linked to the dead tree version instead, which is less expensive by about a third:

This first full-color illustrated companion to the Aubrey-Maturin series...explains the fascinating physical details of Jack Aubrey's fictional world. An in-depth historical reference, it brings to life the political, cultural, and physical setting of O'Brian's novels. Annotated drawings, paintings, and diagrams reveal the complex parts of a ship and its rigging, weaponry, crew quarters and duties, below-deck conditions, and fighting tactics, while maps illustrate the location featured in each novel.

Sounds like it might be one of those gorgeously illustrated books you can put on your coffee table.

Lastly, Patrick O'Brian himself wrote a small book about the historical details of the time of his novels: Rum, Sodomy, and the Lash: It's a Man's Life in The Royal Navy, ha ha, no, the title is actually Men-of-War: Life in Nelson's Navy, a

...companion to Patrick O'Brian's sea novels, a straightforward exploration of what daily life in Nelson's navy was really like, for everyone from the captain down to the rawest recruit. What did they eat? What songs did they sing? What was the schedule of watches? How were the officers and crew paid, and what was the division of prize-money?...Line drawings and charts help us to understand the construction and rigging of the great ships, the types and disposition of the guns, and how they were operated in battle. A number of contemporary drawings and cartoons illustrate aspects of naval life from the press gang to the scullery. Finally, a generous selection of full-color paintings render the majesty and the excitement of fleet actions in the age of fighting sail.

The Kindle version is $13.49 spendy. I'd go $9.00 for the hardback edition.

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Don't forget the AoSHQ reading group on Goodreads. It's meant to support horde writers and to talk about the great books that come up on the book thread. It's called AoSHQ Moron Horde and the link to it is here: https://www.goodreads.com/group/show/175335-aoshq-moron-horde.

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So that's all for this week. As always, book thread tips, suggestions, bribes, rumors, threats, and insults may be sent to OregonMuse, Proprietor, AoSHQ Book Thread, at the book thread e-mail address: aoshqbookthread, followed by the 'at' sign, and then 'G' mail, and then dot cee oh emm.

What have you all been reading this week? Hopefully something good, because, as you all know, life is too short to be reading lousy books.

Posted by: Open Blogger at 08:56 AM




Comments

(Jump to bottom of page)

1 1st?

Posted by: Skip at February 14, 2016 08:57 AM (BkhW6)

2 Suns up, 0 F, what more could you ask for.....

Posted by: colin at February 14, 2016 09:00 AM (AwzXD)

3 Wow, got that over with.
Reading The Post Captain thanks to the book thread from last week.
But afraid I'm going to go back soon to my old haunts as I found a website site leading me back to the last book on German nationals and their fate after the war.

Posted by: Skip at February 14, 2016 09:00 AM (BkhW6)

4 Went to get the others but it was already done.

Posted by: Skip at February 14, 2016 09:02 AM (BkhW6)

5 I have found You Just Don't Understand: Women and Men in Conversation by Deborah Tannen quite useful in married life.

Nicholas Monsarrat had a collection of 3 love short stories: Depends on What You Mean by Love.

Old school (published in 1947) but satisfying.

Posted by: NaCly Dog at February 14, 2016 09:03 AM (u82oZ)

6 If the length of this is to keep us from beng depressed, you're wrong!

Posted by: Bruce With a Wang! at February 14, 2016 09:04 AM (iQIUe)

7 Wondering about the new Potter book, will it be as good? In the same style? I'm guessing I'll find out when it gets here.

Posted by: Skip at February 14, 2016 09:06 AM (BkhW6)

8 I've said it before and I'll undoubtedly say it again.

I've given up navel gazing for lint.

Posted by: Seamus Muldoon at February 14, 2016 09:06 AM (NeFrd)

9 What Jane Austen Ate and Charles Dickens Knew: From Fox Hunting to Whist - the Facts of Daily Life in Nineteenth-Century England

Very informative book; My friend gave me a copy for Christmas about ten years ago and I enjoyed it.

I am reading an excellent biography of the English artist Stanley Spencer by Kenneth Pople. I hadn't really known anything about Spencer and was more familiar with his landscapes-which he did to make money- than with his religiously themed works which he was more interested in. Odd paintings but very intriguing.

I am also reading a book of selections from the letters of St (Padre) Pio. I have another book on the same subject but this is a longer work, containing not only letters he wrote to his spiritual children but letters he also wrote to his own spiritual director.

Posted by: FenelonSpoke at February 14, 2016 09:06 AM (w4NZ8)

10 I'm currently feasting on "I Am Dandy: The Return of the Elegant Gentleman" by Nathaniel Adams and Rose Callahan. Men In Suits is one of my favorite sub-genres of visual stimulation.

We seem to be in a rootless period of sartorial doldrums. I'd chalk it up to Fin de siècle fashion flux, but we're already 16 years into Au début du siècle and there's still no definitive style. For that reason, I guess, dandies must harken back to earlier eras: Classic Hollywood, Madison Avenue, Virginia Gentry, Regency, Edwardian, or even the Romanov court.

My hero of the book is an 18 year old gentleman in England who kits up in full High Victorian togs, from his top hat and pince-nez down to his spats. He makes his own waistcoats! That's dedication. Why suffer being called a dandy? "It's better than some of the other things they call me!" As someone who likes to indulge in a bit of vintage flash, I think he is wise beyond his years. "I don't dress like this to attract attention, but because life is too short to be dull."

Always, one must fight boredom.

The scrupulous aesthetic of dandyism seems obscurantist because we're living in a time of no fashion rules, which is both liberating and confusing. Says Massimiliano di Coggiola, "There are rules because it is a language. The better you can master the language, the better you can express yourself...it's difficult for a young man to dress in a classic sense. There's a certain self-consciousness that previous generations didn't have."

Posted by: All Hail Eris, Literate Savage at February 14, 2016 09:07 AM (jR7Wy)

11 Last book I've read was this post.

Posted by: Max Rockatansky at February 14, 2016 09:09 AM (MNgU2)

12 Oooh! Morning, glorious fellow sapients! I see I got here early for the book thread. Yay!

You know, if the dream I was just having is any indication, the future may not be as fearsome as we thought.

I was being arrested for borrowing a couple of small pieces of paper to write a note. But apparently the special snowflakes were unable to hold me. A display of anger sent the officer to her safe space, and the fellow who tried to help her was reduced to tears when I threatened him with something in the shape of a gun.

Now to see what the O'Muse has brought us today....

Posted by: mindful webworker - is it tomorrow already? at February 14, 2016 09:10 AM (Q1QrS)

13 Why is Rowling such a transphobe? Why isn't this next book about Harriet Potter?

Posted by: Caitlyn Jenner at February 14, 2016 09:10 AM (LM6ky)

14

V-Day. Bah, humbug.

Posted by: Moron Delux at February 14, 2016 09:11 AM (+zqYj)

15 I just finished reading "North Korea Undercover" by British Journalist John Sweeney. It is a good read, nothing really new or earth shattering on the information on the hell that is that country but I did enjoy the history lesson on how the country was formed and the leadership that the First Kim that ruled. Pretty good read.

Posted by: Picric at February 14, 2016 09:11 AM (QnQ+g)

16 I have A Sea of Words.

Quite useful for the entire panoply of Napoleonic sea authors, Douglas Reeman writing as Alexander Kent, C. S. Forester, and Patrick O'Brian.

Posted by: NaCly Dog at February 14, 2016 09:12 AM (u82oZ)

17 On the basis of several recommendations made here, I read Once An Eagle by Anton Myrer. It did not disappoint. It is a novel with a great story, great characters, great dialogue, and great descriptions, particularly of battle scenes. It is the story of Sam Damon as he rises in rank from private to three-star general over a period of over forty years and two world wars. An excellent read.

I also finished Knifepoint by Edward W. Robertson. It is the third in The Breakers series. The series centers around aliens who release a virus that kills most of the people, and the survivors fighting back. Sometime back I got the first three volumes for the Kindle for free. There were too many implausible plot changes for me, so I won't be reading further in the series.

I saved the best for the last. I read Sacrilege, the third (Heresy and Prophecy) in the excellent series by S. J. Parris, the pen name of Stephanie Merritt. Based on the real life of Giodano Bruno, ex-monk and now a spy for Queen Elizabeth I in 1584. In this book Bruno is in Canterbury foiling yet another plot to bring Mary, Queen of Scots, to the English throne and to bring back Catholicism with her. An excellent story told with excellent writing. I'm looking forward to reading the next one in the series, Treachery.

Posted by: Zoltan at February 14, 2016 09:13 AM (JYer2)

18 The scrupulous aesthetic of dandyism seems obscurantist because we're living in a time of no fashion rules, which is both liberating and confusing.

My days of Wall Street Drag are behind me (there was a time when it was strictly French cuffs, Trafalgar braces, and ties that were an ironic play on Herpes).

According to my friends who are still in the game it's all about socks these days. The uniform is still uniform and socks are where the self-expression plays out.

Posted by: Bandersnatch, Opus/Bill the Cat 2016 at February 14, 2016 09:14 AM (1xUj/)

19 Outside of a dog, a book is man's best friend.

Inside of a dog, it's too dark to read.


-Groucho Marx

Posted by: BackwardsBoy at February 14, 2016 09:14 AM (LUgeY)

20 Not saying you're promoting the idea, but the whole "romantic love is a medieval concept" thing grates on me.


It's like the written word didn't exist in Greece or Rome, or that we somehow lost access to the volumes of ancient literature describing romantic love.


/short rant off

Posted by: Burn the Witch at February 14, 2016 09:15 AM (Wckf4)

21 Still Reading World War I by S.L.A. Marshall.

Posted by: NaCly Dog at February 14, 2016 09:16 AM (u82oZ)

22 Kindle coloring book, eh?

I laughed at that one.

Posted by: Kindltot at February 14, 2016 09:17 AM (q2o38)

23 5 I have found You Just Don't Understand: Women and Men in Conversation by Deborah Tannen quite useful in married life

Posted by: NaCly Dog at February 14, 2016 09:03 AM (u82oZ)

Yes, that is a great book. Kind of like Linguistics for Dummies. Helped me to understand that women say "I'm sorry" they are not seeking forgiveness, they are empathizing. Happy Valentines Day Mrs. Franpsycho!

Posted by: San Franpsycho at February 14, 2016 09:17 AM (EZebt)

24 re: Adult Coloring Books -

I found this one...seems custom made for the Horde...

Swear Word Coloring Book

http://amzn.to/20TKOXf

Posted by: antisocialist at February 14, 2016 09:17 AM (cDs+4)

25 Kindle coloring book, eh?

I laughed at that one.



That would get the screen sorta messy, wouldn't it?

Posted by: BackwardsBoy at February 14, 2016 09:18 AM (LUgeY)

26 Medieval underpants? like (ugh)... codpieces?

Posted by: Caitlyn Jenner at February 14, 2016 09:18 AM (LM6ky)

27 According to my friends who are still in the game it's all about socks these days. The uniform is still uniform and socks are where the self-expression plays out.
Posted by: Bandersnatch, Opus/Bill the Cat 2016 at February 14, 2016 09:14 AM (1xUj/)
----
Yes, Ralph Lauren has some traffic cone orange socks for when the boys go wilding.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, Literate Savage at February 14, 2016 09:20 AM (jR7Wy)

28 I read "And Then There Were None" by Agatha Christie last week. First of her books for me...I enjoyed it immensely, but it was too short!!
Recommendations for the next one to read, anyone?

Posted by: antisocialist at February 14, 2016 09:20 AM (cDs+4)

29 The book thread of lurrrv! Yay!

Monsieur Casanova get a huge spike of 390 new readers from getting posted here mid January, and a few dozens more over the week. Not bad for a niche work.

So, thanks again OregonMuse for posting that and I did hit ace's tip jar. The Book Thread does get results.

Posted by: boulder terlit hobo at February 14, 2016 09:21 AM (/SQmC)

30 "... ties that were an ironic play on Herpes). "
---

You must walk me through this one. Did they suddenly pop up right before a big date?

Posted by: All Hail Eris, Literate Savage at February 14, 2016 09:22 AM (jR7Wy)

31 Spent two and a half days listening to Brandon Sanderson's Words of Radiance (second in his Stormlight Chronicles). I read the deadtree of Way of Kings and it was a huge book. I hate to think of how large this one is in physical form.

It did a surprising job (for a second book, as those so often end in cliffhangers) of answering questions and wrapping up current action while creating space for new. Also, I seemed to hear echoes of The Wheel of Time and I don't know if it's what caused Sanderson to be chosen to finish that series or something he picked up while doing so (having they same two readers may well be part of, or cause of, the effect as well).

Posted by: Polliwog the 'Ette at February 14, 2016 09:22 AM (GDulk)

32 Holy shnikies is it cold out there. Good day to not be out there.

Posted by: JackStraw at February 14, 2016 09:25 AM (/tuJf)

33 Good morning everyone. Happy Valentines Day and happy reading.

Posted by: Anna Puma at February 14, 2016 09:26 AM (nzaaz)

34 With Scalia's death in mind, I'm re-reading Mark Levin's The Liberty Amendments.


Look for sales of that book to begin flying off the shelves again.

An article V might be all the recourse that is left us now before the shooting war breaks out.



Posted by: Kreplach at February 14, 2016 09:26 AM (WVvzl)

35 What no Lovecraft?

Posted by: freaked at February 14, 2016 09:27 AM (BO/km)

36 "... ties that were an ironic play on Herpes). "
---

You must walk me through this one. Did they suddenly pop up right before a big date?
Posted by: All Hail Eris, Literate Savage



*sigh*

One dates oneself. In the 80s everyone wore ties by Hermes, pronounced air-mezz, mispronounced as her-mees, and mocked as herpes.

Posted by: Bandersnatch, Opus/Bill the Cat 2016 at February 14, 2016 09:28 AM (1xUj/)

37 "She...came to the realization that, in France, women genuinely love men, and vice versa"

"...a Frenchman would rather loan you his wife"


One thing that hasn't been noted in this discussion of French amour is that, in French relationships, it is common for the parties to have a lover or two on the side. All of their elected leaders in modern times have, and it hasn't hurt them a bit with the voting public. It is just accepted as the normal state of affairs, mais bien sur!

Posted by: cool breeze at February 14, 2016 09:29 AM (ckvus)

38 33 Anna Puma

Happy V-D to you and yours. May your writing and research prosper.

Posted by: NaCly Dog at February 14, 2016 09:30 AM (u82oZ)

39 Ah! Of course! I should have picked up on that, Bander.

So, French cuffs, my kryptonite. Describe your cufflinks.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, Literate Savage at February 14, 2016 09:32 AM (jR7Wy)

40 All Hail Eris, sartorial sacrilege is just another sign of the decay of Western Civilisation where the Commissars of Thought Police have decreed that no decision is bad.

I see Bandersnatch has somehow survived another Imperial Audit. And Happy Birthday.

Posted by: Anna Puma at February 14, 2016 09:32 AM (nzaaz)

41 Another possibility staying in the Napoleoic age would be the Sharpe series. The tv series did stray somewhat from the books I know.

Posted by: Skip at February 14, 2016 09:33 AM (BkhW6)

42 26 Medieval underpants? like (ugh)... codpieces?

Posted by: Caitlyn Jenner at February 14, 2016 09:18 AM (LM6ky)


Since when do YOU need a codpiece?

Posted by: OregonMuse at February 14, 2016 09:34 AM (08fIE)

43 In light of Trump's rhetoric last night I am recommending every moron read Norman Podhoretz's World War IV. He published this in 2007. How soon some people forget facts or worse, choose never to accept.

Posted by: Max Rockatansky at February 14, 2016 09:34 AM (MNgU2)

44 Is this Ace's movie review?
I dub this post .78 LongCats.

Posted by: OneEyedJack at February 14, 2016 09:35 AM (kKHcp)

45 I see Bandersnatch has somehow survived another Imperial Audit. And Happy Birthday.

Thank you, Anna Puma.

*sees paw waving imperiously out of the corner of my eye*

She says the audit went well.

And yes, it's my birthday. In my state they put a heart symbol next to your birthday if you're an organ donor. When I first got my license here I thought they were goofing on me.

Like, what, if I were born on 3/17 would you give me a shamrock?

Posted by: Bandersnatch, Opus/Bill the Cat 2016 at February 14, 2016 09:35 AM (1xUj/)

46 Since when do YOU need a codpiece?

So hir's new name is Bruce Smallberries?

Posted by: Anna Puma at February 14, 2016 09:35 AM (nzaaz)

47 In the post...

...The story centers on a rebellious cat with a protective owner, who sneaks out at night...

The cat is rebellious but the owner sneaks out at night? (Okay, the "with" clause makes that not entirely a construction error, but I had to say it anyway.)

...1990s slang in the mouths of 1940s characters...

Can't think of any examples offhand, but that is one that has bothered me sometimes, when I am pretty sure some usage was developed later.

Thinking of just having seen a trailer for "Risen" - even in ancient historical settings where they're all speaking "English" so you have to allow some leeway, use of some modern phrase will be jarring.

Of course, one man's plain modern jargon is another man's inappropriate hip lingo.

And in the comments:

Seamus Muldoon: I've said it before and I'll undoubtedly say it again....

It's sad how Muldoon has run out of new material. May have to change his name to Seamus Rubio.

I'll tell you what I've been reading, but, have to go feed the pets first. BBiaM.

Posted by: mindful webworker - cool, dude at February 14, 2016 09:36 AM (Q1QrS)

48 Good morning fellow Book Threadists. Thanks to OM for the thread, the exceptionally great content today, and I love that photo at the top.

This past week I started "The Daily Bible". The editor divided up the Bible into 365 sections, one to be read and contemplated each day. I will say the concept works and it helps keep matters from getting overwhelming.

However, with the news of Scalia's death yesterday and all the political crap regarding his passing, I am going to break the pattern. I'm in no mood for the Old Testament with a vengeful God and endless generations of mankind and their stupidity. (Take a hint after the Flood, people.) At least for a while, I'm going to read the Gospels. I need any sign of hope I can get right now.

Posted by: JTB at February 14, 2016 09:37 AM (FvdPb)

49 I am sure it was a recommendation from this thread, which I can't find it now, that prompted me to get Loconte's "A Hobbit, a Wardrobe, and a Great War: How J.R.R. Tolkien and C.S. Lewis Rediscovered Faith, Friendship, and Heroism in the Cataclysm of 1914-18", mostly because I have wanted to gain some C. S. Lewis background before reading his works. It is not easy reading, but the lead-in commentary about the decline of the Christian religion and the moral decay that is on the ascendant in the West seem almost as if it was written yesterday. This is one I intend to finish, although I doubt I will do it quickly as it seems to be a book you should read and think about in small doses.

Posted by: Hrothgar at February 14, 2016 09:37 AM (wYnyS)

50 45 Bandersnatch, Opus/Bill the Cat 2016

Happy Birthday!

Let's all now sing you the birthday song.
Adjust your USB port for tunes without a bucket.

Posted by: NaCly Dog at February 14, 2016 09:37 AM (u82oZ)

51 For some reason I decided to re-read Dune. Last time I read it was a long time ago in a college far far away, and all the Muzzy stuff was very exotic to me then. Now, it's just strangely irksome and I'm wondering if Herbert put all that in just because he wanted there to be lots of sand. Have sand, must have Arabs. Have Arabs, must have Islam. Eh. I'm tired of that whole shtick. How about we do a revival of Norse gods, some Odin love for a change.

Posted by: Last at February 14, 2016 09:39 AM (8HiDF)

52 Salty Dog, thank you so much.

Princess Who Caused Fear II is just over 34,000 words with introductions. Playing with the formatting. The post-San Francisco story stands at 59,100 words and I need to overcome the trepidation that I am currently feeling because the story is at the point where the various plot lines will have to come together for a resolution.

Posted by: Anna Puma at February 14, 2016 09:39 AM (nzaaz)

53 When my husband does something thoughtful, he always says, "That's right, baby, I speak all of the love languages." Usually, he follows that up with "I got your love language right here." I laugh a lot.

Posted by: no good deed at February 14, 2016 09:40 AM (GgxVX)

54 Imperial Audit.
---

Ha!

Organ donor indeed.

And Happy Birthday!

Posted by: All Hail Eris, Literate Savage at February 14, 2016 09:40 AM (jR7Wy)

55 Still reading "Back to Blood" and hoping for a plot. It showed a tempting sign but I can't see how both of the apparently primary characters will be involved. I suspect I'm being way too optimistic about this book. The punctuation is incredibly annoying.

And still reading "Jesus: a biography by a believer" which is excellent even though I haven't been reading much this week, and here's why:

I bought a new Kindle and when i turned the page, the letters would break up and reassemble on the next page. It took a visibly noticeable time for this to happen. So I called amazon and they said we will send you a new one; send it back. And the new one is doing the same thing, a bit faster so it's annoying, but not as annoying as the first one.

This is a Kindle Paperwhite, the one currently going for $119. I was very happy with my first Paperwhite and never ever noticed the page turning. So is anyone else having this problem?

Posted by: Tonestaple at February 14, 2016 09:40 AM (RtCTo)

56

Have to increase the depth of the Burning Times library, as we won't be able to leave the house much after DOPUS packs the SCROTUS with Alinskyites...

Posted by: 3rd Degree Berns at February 14, 2016 09:41 AM (+zqYj)

57 49 ... Hrothgar, I mentioned the Loconte book last week. Glad you like it. It is still selling for 3.99 on Kindle and Nook, which is a price drop from a few weeks ago. I found the book very instructive and disturbingly relevant.

Posted by: JTB at February 14, 2016 09:42 AM (FvdPb)

58 "Harry Potter and the Cursed Child" or, "JK Rowling and Her Alarmingly Low Bank Account".

Posted by: Citizen Cake at February 14, 2016 09:45 AM (ppaKI)

59 Now, it's just strangely irksome and I'm wondering if Herbert put all that in just because he wanted there to be lots of sand. Have sand, must have Arabs. Have Arabs, must have Islam. Eh.

No, the Arabs were the point. Herbert was telling a parable about the fall of the Sasanians (and Byzantines).

Posted by: boulder terlit hobo at February 14, 2016 09:47 AM (o9vm9)

60 I remember liking "The Inklings: C.S. Lewis, J.R.R. Tolkien, Charles Williams, and their Friends" quite a lot. Their informal literary circle met at a local pub to discuss their latest works, drink, smoke, and debate theology. Lewis went from skeptical atheist to Christian through his discussions with Tolkien.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, Literate Savage at February 14, 2016 09:48 AM (jR7Wy)

61 49 ... Hrothgar, I mentioned the Loconte book last
week. Glad you like it. It is still selling for 3.99 on Kindle and Nook,
which is a price drop from a few weeks ago. I found the book very
instructive and disturbingly relevant.

Posted by: JTB at February 14, 2016 09:42 AM (FvdPb)

I wanted to give you credit, but couldn't find my notes, I have a Book Thread Extracts log on my desktop, but I couldn't find the link to you. So thanks for the book reference.

"Disturbingly relevant" is an almost perfect description of my assessment after I got through the first few pages. I kept feeling I was somehow reading the wrong book and that it had to have been written quite recently.

Posted by: Hrothgar at February 14, 2016 09:48 AM (wYnyS)

62 "Medieval Underpants" sounds like an interesting book to be added to my collection in the reference pile. I am pretty well-versed in the 19th century - of what was available, existing, in use, common practice and all that, but earlier centuries - should I ever decide to explore them, are somewhat more problematical.

There was a long discussion thread in a website for authors who wrote historical - and one of the topics was which era/location we favored; I think that most of us had settled on one or another because we were already well versed on how different they would be, in writing about it. One of the contributors pointed out that - even should we take to writing a very different era, we would already have a mindset of knowing that it WOULD be different, and perhaps we would not lightly commit such errors as putting potatoes on the menu in a novel set in Medieval England.

Posted by: CeliaHayes at February 14, 2016 09:48 AM (95iDF)

63 28 ... antisocialist, Try "Murder In The Calais Coach" for your next Agatha Christie. It's better know as Murder on the Orient Express.

Posted by: JTB at February 14, 2016 09:49 AM (FvdPb)

64 Posted by: All Hail Eris, Literate Savage at February 14, 2016 09:48 AM (jR7Wy)


I gave up buying books for Lent, so thanks Eris, I really needed another book recommendation!

Posted by: Hrothgar at February 14, 2016 09:50 AM (wYnyS)

65 Libraries are still Lent-compliant, Hrothie!

Posted by: All Hail Eris, Literate Savage at February 14, 2016 09:51 AM (jR7Wy)

66 Finally getting around to The Road to Serfdom by F.A. Hayek.

My book, Last In a Long Line of Rebels, came out in September and I think I'll send a copy to Trump. A) It's about a girl about to lose her house to eminent domain, and B) It's for middle schoolers.

Posted by: Living Large at February 14, 2016 09:52 AM (QNoS6)

67 Libraries are still Lent-compliant, Hrothie!

Posted by: All Hail Eris, Literate Savage at February 14, 2016 09:51 AM (jR7Wy)

After a most unfortunate incident (that I am loath to discuss further), I have been PNG'd from the local library. Maybe the next county has library reciprocity?

Posted by: Hrothgar at February 14, 2016 09:53 AM (wYnyS)

68 In honor of Justice Scalia, one would be most interested in Mark Levin's "Men In Black" regarding the SC. Most interesting is the case of Wickard v. Filburn in which the Court ruled that by not engaging in interstate commerce an Ohio farmer thereby affected interstate commerce. Interstate commerce is the Court's playground and one can foresee what may come of the present situation.

Posted by: Libra at February 14, 2016 09:53 AM (GblmV)

69 Had my World Lit students read parts of Chretien de Troyes' Lancelot last semester. Unanimous response: "WOW, that was very, very French!" (Me: "Be glad I didn't make you read The Romance of the Rose....")

To Burn the Witch's point, though, my Humanities 101 students have been equally shocked by the art in Pompeii. The French really don't have a monopoly on that sort of thing.

@antisocialist: YAY! There's *lots* to love about Agatha Christie. I'd suggest going with one of the main series: Poirot (start with The Mysterious Affair at Styles), Miss Marple (start with The Murder at the Vicarage), or Tommy and Tuppence (start with The Secret Adversary). Or you can choose one of the mixed short story collections like Double Sin and Other Stories or The Regatta Mystery and Other Stories, which can give you a taste of the various detectives. I haven't read many of the Parker Pyne or Mr. Quin books, but I can recommend the rest. (BTW, best adaptations: David Suchet as Poirot, Joan Hickson as Miss Marple, and James Warwick and Francesca Annis as Tommy and Tuppence. Some of the recent Poirot films depart from the books way too much, but Suchet is still wonderful.)

Canterbury Tales for the Brit Lit class this week. Next week: Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, Pearl, and Sir Orfeo.

Posted by: Elisabeth G. Wolfe at February 14, 2016 09:54 AM (vRQPU)

70 I am most of the way through At Wit's End by Erma Bombeck.

Erma was a humorous syndicated columnist in the late 60's and 70's, and really was the first "adult" type author I ever read - first in the paper and later by getting the various books.

A couple of things struck me (besides the costs listed for things - remember when a new sweater was $5.95?) that I didn't notice when I was 10. Erma talks a lot about depression, but never in a wailing way. She talks with affectionate exasperation about the son who would rather pull up the heating registers and investigate the heating ducts instead of playing with toys, and talks with exasperated affection for her husband, and raising kids and running a family.

The one that really got to me was when she talked about how one of the best things about grandmas is that they made your mom cool again - she mentioned that her grandma told her that her mom got in trouble with the principal in grade school for writing on the cover of a school book "in case of fire, throw this in first".

That made me miss my mom and grandmothers a lot.

Posted by: Kindltot at February 14, 2016 09:54 AM (q2o38)

71 JTB

I am glad that you will be reading the Gospels for something hopeful. It I might make a suggestion (?)-you might also enjoy Philippians which is a very upbeat letter-even more so considering it was written from prison. It's sometimes knows as the "joy" letter.

Posted by: FenelonSpoke at February 14, 2016 09:55 AM (w4NZ8)

72

Given that we are now allowed to not only watch inet pron at the library, but also beat off to, that must have been some PNG there Hrothgar!

Asked for a copy of the Bible or Boy Scout field manual or something?

Posted by: 3rd Degree Berns at February 14, 2016 09:56 AM (+zqYj)

73 For a period of time I had to commute from SC to Washington DC. I would take along books on tape.

I took Men are from Mars one trip. Hearing it read you hear how much the author was in love with this phrasing. I think reading it would not be as obvious but hearing you realize.

It was useful but the learning is easily parsible into a 2 page tract. I think the most important thing I learned was to answer "aww honey" when my wife complained, because she was just looking for sympathy. But then I got divorced so maybe it didn't work that well.

I am more subtle with it now.

Posted by: blaster at February 14, 2016 09:56 AM (2Ocf1)

74 Elisabeth G. Wolfe hope you are doing better. Your class sounds like a hoot.

I'm partial to The Decameron myself. Especially the story of the frustrated uncle dealing with his completely stuck-up self-absorbed niece Francesca whom he calls 'Cesca who can't understand why everyone else can't be as perfect as she is.

Posted by: Anna Puma at February 14, 2016 09:59 AM (nzaaz)

75 So Hrothgar's real name is Jiminez Hoffmann, then?

(Apologies to those of you who don't read Girl Genius.)

Posted by: Elisabeth G. Wolfe at February 14, 2016 10:00 AM (vRQPU)

76 71 ... FenelonSpoke, You certainly may make a suggestion and thanks. I will check into the Philippians. This is mostly new to me so any help is appreciated.

Posted by: JTB at February 14, 2016 10:01 AM (FvdPb)

77 Emotionally better, thanks, AP. Physically, more of the same.

Posted by: Elisabeth G. Wolfe at February 14, 2016 10:02 AM (vRQPU)

78

My favorite Valentines book

The Sonnets: Poems of Love

~ William Shakespeare

Posted by: artisanal 'ette at February 14, 2016 10:02 AM (qCMvj)

79 Phil Folgio for the win! Though I still take umbrage at his comic strip pondering if Cat-Girls were Real the owners would have to deal with them coughing up hair-balls and clawing the furniture. He reached for the low hanging fruit with that one, really is that all we would be known for?

Oh wait, there is Nano. Never mind. Humans with delusions, baugh!

Posted by: Anna Puma at February 14, 2016 10:03 AM (nzaaz)

80 Oregon Muse congrats on the marriage of over 30 years. You must be doing something right

Posted by: Misanthropic Humanitarian at February 14, 2016 10:05 AM (voOPb)

81

Secondary Valentines books

My all time favorite as a gift (hard to find, I think now):

The Griffin & Sabine Trilogy Boxed Set: Griffin & Sabine/Sabine's Notebook/The Golden Mean

and, one book I have given to many for all special occasions

Tao of Pooh

Posted by: artisanal 'ette at February 14, 2016 10:05 AM (qCMvj)

82 This past week I re-read Isaac Asimov's original Foundation trilogy. I had been recommending it to my early-teen son, but he was less than enthusiastic, so I went back to see if my memory was fooling me.

It was. I understand why my son didn't like it.

It has great ideas, but the first book is kind of ineptly written (with some gold nuggets here and there), the second book is pretty good, and the third book falls apart completely.

Some random problems:

Asimov's mid-century Northeast liberal sensibilities are a LOT more obtrusive than I remember, and his MCLN blind spots are a LOT more obvious. His depiction of religion verges on contempt. His depiction of a trade-based empire makes no damned sense at all (as near as I can figure, he based his merchant adventurers on door-to-door salesmen). All of the "how could that possibly happen?" moments are steamrollered by his all-purpose "It's in the Plan!" excuse.

The second book is better. The Mule is an interesting character, the hunt for the Second Foundation is exciting, and there are real people with real emotions in it. I liked that one a lot.

The third book just gets tedious. Once the Second Foundationers become an on-stage presence, everything gets boring. They're always right (because of the Plan!) and oh by the way they have super-duper mind control powers (because Psychology!). If you wanted to come up with a way to eliminate dramatic tension, this is how to do it. Plus this was the beginning of Asimov's regrettable slide into writing books that are nothing but people having conversations in rooms.

I was always disappointed in the sequels he wrote (Foundation's Edge, and a couple of others I don't even remember the names of), but I had a fond spot in my heart for the original trilogy. Now I have to put some other book into that spot.

Posted by: Trimegistus at February 14, 2016 10:05 AM (Uxz7G)

83 "in case of fire, throw this in first"

Students need to do that to their assigned copy of Edward Said's "Orientalism"

Posted by: boulder terlit hobo at February 14, 2016 10:05 AM (o9vm9)

84

The Mars and Venus book is really a must read. I told my husband he had to read it before we got married.

Posted by: artisanal 'ette at February 14, 2016 10:06 AM (qCMvj)

85 I've read or at least glanced through the ancillary Patrick O'Brien books OM mentioned. They all have their value and are just plain fun. One surprise bonus: I grew up in an old seaport town, founded shortly after Plymouth, and was shocked at how many outdated sailing terms were still in use when I was a kid. It added a bit more interest to the books.

Posted by: JTB at February 14, 2016 10:06 AM (FvdPb)

86 So a French guy with a froofy name moves to America, chucks his fancy title, and changes his name to "Ted Morgan" (one step removed from "John Smith"). Yeah, he's an American all right. He was an American

He might even be a moron

Posted by: Misanthropic Humanitarian at February 14, 2016 10:07 AM (voOPb)

87

Women are from Venus; Men are from Theiranus...

Posted by: 3rd Degree Berns at February 14, 2016 10:08 AM (+zqYj)

88 JTB

I think I mentioned this author last week-Peter Kreeft. He is a professor of philosophy at Boston College. He has a book-"You Can Understand The Bible" which has a good introduction to each of the books of the bible. I like him; His a very smart man and seems like a good man as well.

Posted by: FenelonSpoke at February 14, 2016 10:08 AM (w4NZ8)

89 Valentines Day. Harrumph.

Posted by: Insomniac at February 14, 2016 10:09 AM (kpqmD)

90 I like that Deborah tanned book on semantics.

Posted by: FenelonSpoke at February 14, 2016 10:10 AM (w4NZ8)

91 Typo pixies again

Deborah Tannen, not tanned.

Posted by: FenelonSpoke at February 14, 2016 10:11 AM (w4NZ8)

92 A while back I was writing a mystery story so I read a bunch of Agatha Christies to figure out how to do it right. I came away with new respect for her.

She seems to have absolutely understood, at a very detailed mechanical level, how the standard early 20th century English mystery story worked. Having figured that out, she then made a career out of picking one of the rules in each story and breaking it.

What's impressive is how fast all this happened. The modern mystery only really got rolling with Doyle's Sherlock Holmes stories in the 1890s, but by the 1920s the genre had gotten completely formalized, so that Christie could play with genre assumptions in complete confidence that the reader would have those assumptions. (Which I think may mean modern readers won't be fooled by her quite so easily, as we know those assumptions can be subverted.)

Posted by: Trimegistus at February 14, 2016 10:12 AM (Uxz7G)

93 91 Typo pixies again


At least nobody died. This time.

Posted by: Insomniac at February 14, 2016 10:12 AM (kpqmD)

94 ... Sir Gawain and the Green Knight...


Posted by: Elisabeth G. Wolfe at February 14, 2016 09:54 AM (vRQPU)

I have a copy that I have been intending to read for years but never got around to actually reading it. If you're using it in a course, I'll take that as an indication that it will worth my effort.

Posted by: Hrothgar at February 14, 2016 10:13 AM (wYnyS)

95 Thanks for posting about the pain book. I think I'll be purchasing it

Posted by: Misanthropic Humanitarian at February 14, 2016 10:13 AM (voOPb)

96 About nautical terms and terminology : The key is to start early and easy . The Hornblower novels and the Bounty trilogy should get your middle schooler started . The final exam is the chapter in N -word of the Narcissus where they right their knocked down ship . I advise having the Norton Critical Edition on hand for that one because it is truly complicated . Norton Critical editions were once the go-to texts for litchur , but have been dumbed down and loaded with PC garbage . BTW ,a real howler is that the Norton Edition of Moby Dick informs the reader that Ahab's first mate and the coffee chain are not related . O tempore , o mores .

Posted by: jay hoenemeyer at February 14, 2016 10:14 AM (uvj0z)

97 Pets fed. Also myself.

After I read old HG Wells Moon Men, then new The Time Traveler's Wife, so I was looking for something old again. Picked up The Sketch Book, by Washington Irving. A "Merrill's English Texts" study edition, 1911. Charles Addison Dawson, Ph.D, Head of the Dept of English, Central High School, Syracuse, NY, editor.

Inside the front cover is penciled a name and address here in town, the note "Junior High," and the days and times of English and "Anc History" classes. I wonder what year she was studying with this volume. I find the "study edition" notes and footnotes sometimes distracting as I keep flipping to the back, but more frequently informative and helpful with old usage and references and unfamiliar scenes. My distaste for "study volumes" is from my 1960s and 1970s studies, not this learned text from over a century ago.

I thought I was familiar with Irving pretty much only by name, although when I finished the sixth "sketch," Rip Van Winkle, I realized I had read that before, maybe a half-century ago. Fresh and amusing.

I quoted from the opening chapter, "The Author's Account of Himself" in the Art Thread a couple of days ago, regarding his choice of topics to "sketch."
http://acecomments.mu.nu/?blog=86&post=361493#c24825015

My follow-up comment will quote a St. Valentine's Day-appropriate selection, from "The Wife." The editor notes that "This sketch of pathetic sentiment, in its forms of expression and figures of speech, will seem to many trite and out of date." Really? I read the whole thing aloud to Milady and we both wept freely.

Posted by: mindful webworker - sketchy character at February 14, 2016 10:15 AM (Q1QrS)

98 I HAVE often had occasion to remark the fortitude with which women sustain the most overwhelming reverses of fortune. Those disasters which break down the spirit of a man, and prostrate him in the dust, seem to call forth all the energies of the softer sex, and give such intrepidity and elevation to their character, that at times it approaches to sublimity. Nothing can be more touching than to behold a soft and tender female, who had been all weakness and dependence, and alive to every trivial roughness, while treading the prosperous paths of life, suddenly rising in mental force to be the comforter and support of her husband under misfortune, and abiding, with unshrinking firmness, the bitterest blasts of adversity.

As the vine, which has long twined its graceful foliage about the oak, and been lifted by it into sunshine, will, when the hardy plant is rifted by the thunderbolt, cling round it with its caressing tendrils, and bind up its shattered boughs; so is it beautifully ordered by Providence, that woman, who is the mere dependent and ornament of man in his happier hours, should be his stay and solace when smitten with sudden calamity; winding herself into the rugged recesses of his nature, tenderly supporting the drooping head, and binding up the broken heart.

I was once congratulating a friend, who had around him a blooming family, knit together in the strongest affection. "I can wish you no better lot," said he, with enthusiasm, "than to have a wife and children. If you are prosperous, there they are to share your prosperity; if otherwise, there they are to comfort you." And, indeed, I have observed that a married man falling into misfortune is more apt to retrieve his situation in the world than a single one; partly because he is more stimulated to exertion by the necessities of the helpless and beloved beings who depend upon him for subsistence; but chiefly because his spirits are soothed and relieved by domestic endearments, and his self-respect kept alive by finding that though all abroad is darkness and humiliation, yet there is still a little world of love at home, of which he is the monarch. Whereas a single man is apt to run to waste and self-neglect; to fancy himself lonely and abandoned, and his heart to fall to ruin like some deserted mansion, for want of an inhabitant.

-Washington Irving, "The Wife"

Posted by: mindful webworker - happily married, really!! at February 14, 2016 10:15 AM (Q1QrS)

99 88, Fenelon and JTB, I was eavesdropping in a small crowded room at a church thing and I heard one of my friends say something along the lines of "Peter Kreeft is a good writer but what he says about Muslims is just awful." It sounded like he was not in favor of them, so I take that as a huge recommendation, given that I'm in Seattle

Posted by: Tonestaple at February 14, 2016 10:16 AM (RtCTo)

100 Re-read The Ringworld Engineers, a classic sci-fi book by Larry Niven. Bit less comic and more serious this time around, the Ringworld is in trouble and it's up to Louis Wu and hit cat pal to save it. Great read.

Read The Chronicles of Luna City by Celia Hayes, which focuses on a celebrity chef Richard from England who is spending some time in Luna City, but the book's main character is the town itself, and it shows Richard learn about the town and its residents. Enjoyed it, apparently is first of a planned series.

Listened to Angles of Attack (Frontlines #3) by Marko Kloos, third in a series of military sci-fi books. The alien race called the Lankies have now invaded our solar system and have
humanity on the ropes. Mankind is viewed with a jaundiced eye, many behaving
badly even as possible extinction raises its head. Good story and OK characters, enjoyed it and looking forward to reading book #4 soon.

Posted by: waelse1 at February 14, 2016 10:16 AM (RTZbN)

101 Eris, my cufflinks are blocky goldish things, with a broad mesh chain that slips over the french cuffs to attach to the toggle in the back, and it has a large opaque yellow stone that is set to look like a blind, half-closed eye.

I got them because they made me think of the Eye of Sauron.

Posted by: Kindltot at February 14, 2016 10:16 AM (q2o38)

102 Kreeft is excellent. So is N. T. Wright; I think his "Bible for Everyone" series is under the nic Tom Wright. If it matters, Kreeft is Catholic and Wright is Anglican.

Which reminds me, because I heard Kreeft speak at a C. S. Lewis Foundation conference in '05: Someone was complaining--last week, was it?--about the CSL class from The Teaching Company. I happen to know Louis Markos through the CSLF as well and like him a lot... but I don't think I've ever heard him get through more than half of his planned points when he speaks. Whoever it was might prefer Markos in print (Lewis Agonistes and On the Shoulders of Hobbits come to mind; full disclosure: I did the index on the latter).

Posted by: Elisabeth G. Wolfe at February 14, 2016 10:17 AM (vRQPU)

103 Posted by: 3rd Degree Berns at February 14, 2016 09:56 AM (+zqYj)

Whatever you do, don't ask an SJW librarian for an inter-library loan of the Tyndale Bible! I've probably said far too much!

Posted by: Hrothgar at February 14, 2016 10:17 AM (wYnyS)

104 Posted by: Insomniac at February 14, 2016 10:12 AM (kpqmD)

Just watch yourself, buddy. ;^)

Posted by: FenelonSpoke at February 14, 2016 10:20 AM (w4NZ8)

105

...Whatever you do, don't ask an SJW librarian for an inter-library loan of the Tyndale Bible!...

Lucky you got alive!

Posted by: 3rd Degree Berns at February 14, 2016 10:21 AM (+zqYj)

106 104 Posted by: Insomniac at February 14, 2016 10:12 AM (kpqmD)

Just watch yourself, buddy. ;^)
Posted by: FenelonSpoke at February 14, 2016 10:20 AM (w4NZ

Uh oh.

Posted by: Insomniac at February 14, 2016 10:22 AM (kpqmD)

107 *ponders*

Mrs. Malaprop is gifted a magic typewriter by a Djinn on her travel down the Nile. Anything she types becomes reality. Hilarity ensues and the murder mystery goes overboard.

Posted by: Anna Puma at February 14, 2016 10:24 AM (nzaaz)

108 Hrothgar, SGGK is very worth your while--a ripping good yarn with loads of spiritual implications if you look closely. Longstanding favorite of mine, and the subject of roughly a third of my dissertation.

Posted by: Elisabeth G. Wolfe at February 14, 2016 10:24 AM (vRQPU)

109 BTW BTW , as this is Valentine's Day . You want litchur for' love' ?? Well as the song says " Love Sucks" . Hence I recommend Madame Bovary and Anna Karenina . As to Bovary , the bonus is that it is the finest novel qua novel we have . As to Karenina , viz russian lit , even a blind squirrel finds a nut . The preceding note is dedicated to my friend and colleague , Michael , who was served divorce papers , at work , by his wife's attorney , on Valentines Day . Yes indeed " Love Sucks " .

Posted by: jay hoenemeyer at February 14, 2016 10:24 AM (uvj0z)

110 Try a flashlight, Groucho.

They were invented in 1899.

Posted by: Billy Barty, Inside a Dog at February 14, 2016 10:25 AM (JA5Qu)

111 AP, what happens when she backspaces?

Posted by: Elisabeth G. Wolfe at February 14, 2016 10:25 AM (vRQPU)

112 Agatha Cristie exclaims, "Curses! Been deleted from the plo..."

Posted by: Anna Puma at February 14, 2016 10:26 AM (nzaaz)

113 After a most unfortunate incident (that I am loath to discuss further), I have been PNG'd from the local library...

Posted by: Hrothgar at February 14, 2016 09:53 AM (wYnyS)


What, did you forget the pants requirement?

Posted by: OregonMuse at February 14, 2016 10:28 AM (08fIE)

114 Posted by: Elisabeth G. Wolfe at February 14, 2016 10:24 AM (vRQPU)

Thanks, I'll definitely move that up in the must read list!

Posted by: Hrothgar at February 14, 2016 10:29 AM (wYnyS)

115 What, did you forget the pants requirement?


Posted by: OregonMuse at February 14, 2016 10:28 AM (08fIE)

Full disclosure, it was the kilt that did it!

Posted by: Hrothgar at February 14, 2016 10:30 AM (wYnyS)

116
>>Full disclosure, it was the kilt that did it!


Say Yes to the Dress!

...or, the Skirt.

Posted by: garrett at February 14, 2016 10:32 AM (X5+7H)

117 Oh Kami, Hrothgar has Kilt the Thread.

Posted by: Anna Puma at February 14, 2016 10:32 AM (nzaaz)

118 AP, what happens when she backspaces?


Posted by: Elisabeth G. Wolfe at February 14, 2016 10:25 AM (vRQPU)

A carriage return has all sorts of interesting possibilities as well!
And think of the shiftless characters she can introduce!

Posted by: Hrothgar at February 14, 2016 10:33 AM (wYnyS)

119
Full disclosure, it was the kilt that did it

Did you go full "Army?"

Posted by: Fox2! at February 14, 2016 10:33 AM (brIR5)

120 And think of the shiftless characters she can introduce!


Posted by: Hrothgar at February 14, 2016 10:33 AM (wYnyS)

Threadwinner!

Posted by: Elisabeth G. Wolfe at February 14, 2016 10:34 AM (vRQPU)

121
Oh Kami, Hrothgar has Kilt the Thread.


Posted by: Anna Puma at February 14, 2016 10:32 AM (nzaaz)

Well, the bagpipe rendition of "Highland Cathedral" just might have been a factor as well!

Posted by: Hrothgar at February 14, 2016 10:35 AM (wYnyS)

122 *face-platens*

Posted by: Anna Puma at February 14, 2016 10:35 AM (nzaaz)

123
A carriage return has all sorts of interesting possibilities as well!
And think of the shiftless characters she can introduce!
Posted by: Hrothgar at February 14, 2016 10:33 AM (wYnyS)


At least with analog she doesn't have to worry about the misrepresentation of special characters.

Posted by: Kindltot at February 14, 2016 10:35 AM (q2o38)

124 After the comments last week about enjoyable, space opera science fiction, I dug out my copy of 'Grand Central Arena' by Ryk E. Spoor and his homage to Doc Smith. That did it! I had to start the Skylark series again Damn! They are still fun. But this time I intend to finish the Spoor book instead of getting completely side tracked.

Posted by: JTB at February 14, 2016 10:36 AM (FvdPb)

125 At least with analog she doesn't have to worry about the misrepresentation of special characters.


Posted by: Kindltot at February 14, 2016 10:35 AM (q2o3

WYSIWYG!

Posted by: Hrothgar at February 14, 2016 10:36 AM (wYnyS)

126 Oh, hey SF geeks -- has anyone read Ian McDonald's "Luna" series? The premise sounds intriguing -- five families who control the resources and industry on (in) the moon, and all their attendant machinations and infighting. BUT, I read that McDonald is intrigued by the influence of technology on 2nd World societies and his worldbuilding seems strenuously multicultural (which means, of course, without having any U.S. culture in the mix), and that sends red flags up (as it were).

Feelings?

Posted by: All Hail Eris, Literate Savage at February 14, 2016 10:36 AM (jR7Wy)

127 70 I am most of the way through At Wit's End by Erma Bombeck.
Erma was a humorous syndicated columnist in the late 60's and 70's, and really was the first "adult" type author I ever read - first in the paper and later by getting the various books.


"The Grass Is Always Greener Over The Septic Tank"

Posted by: OregonMuse at February 14, 2016 10:36 AM (08fIE)

128 As to great literary love stories, my favorite by far is Much Ado About Nothing. Beatrice and Benedict are a wonderful couple. Some other stuff happens, but nobody really cares about it, including WS himself.

What I don't understand is why anyone thinks Romeo and Juliet is a great love story. It's a cautionary tale, very cynical. Both the main characters mistake passing infatuations for eternal love, concoct a lunatic scheme to defy their parents, and get themselves killed.

Posted by: Trimegistus at February 14, 2016 10:40 AM (Uxz7G)

129 jay h -- Now I am laughing because I had to read Bovary and Anna K in the same semester (with the Red and the Black). Talk about angst! Wonder if that reading list had something to do with my transfer out of that university that year. Just could not find anything whatsoever positive to say about the Romantic agonies.

Posted by: mustbequantum at February 14, 2016 10:41 AM (MIKMs)

130 *side-bar* Rubio fan-fiction?

Suddenly the dino-pron or the Kirk-Spock love affairs seem passe.

Posted by: Anna Puma at February 14, 2016 10:44 AM (nzaaz)

131 Be careful with those 'What Jane Austen Ate' and 'Medieval Underpants' books. I read through them a while back. They are fun but I was shocked at much I knew. It was disturbing to realize I had so much irrelevant crap stored in my brain. Then I wasted time trying to figure out where I might have come across all this dreck. Sigh!

Posted by: JTB at February 14, 2016 10:45 AM (FvdPb)

132 "The Grass Is Always Greener Over The Septic Tank"


Posted by: OregonMuse at February 14, 2016 10:36 AM (08fIE)
___________Will put out another recommendation for 'Life Among the Savages' by Shirley Jackson.

Posted by: mustbequantum at February 14, 2016 10:45 AM (MIKMs)

133 As this is the Book Thread , let us recall what the Nicholson character in As Good As It Gets says about writing so well from a woman's POV : " I just write like a man and then leave out all the parts about common sense and reason "

Posted by: jay hoenemeyer at February 14, 2016 10:45 AM (uvj0z)

134 I agree that Men Are From Mars... is a great book on basic comprehension of the differences between men and women, and I learned much from it.

As for other books about love and relationships I'd strongly recommend (but take my recommendation with a grain of salt: I'm single) --

The Four Loves, C.S. Lewis, his magnificent examination of love from its simplest and least powerful form (patriotism, friendship, etc) to its most pure (agape).

Reforming Marriage by Douglas Wilson, an incredible look at how to craft a long term, healthy, and beneficial relationship in marriage. I never got to practically attempt these ideas but his basic principles are amazingly informative and perceptive.

For example, Wilson points out how men will tend to more readily respect in a relationship so they need to work harder on love and demonstration of love. But Women will more readily love in a relationship and need to focus and work on respect. And without both from each partner, it cannot work.

Posted by: Christopher Taylor at February 14, 2016 10:48 AM (39g3+)

135 Thanks for the Peter Kreeft suggestions. His books go on the ever bigger list of religious books I'm compiling.

Posted by: JTB at February 14, 2016 10:49 AM (FvdPb)

136 58 "Harry Potter and the Cursed Child" or, "JK Rowling and Her Alarmingly Low Bank Account".

Posted by: Citizen Cake at February 14, 2016 09:45 AM (ppaKI)


Ha! I did wonder why Rowling thought that she needed to write another Harry Potter book.

Posted by: OregonMuse at February 14, 2016 10:50 AM (08fIE)

137

Let me not to the marriage of true minds
Admit impediments; love is not love
Which alters when it alteration finds,
Or bends with the remover to remove.
O, no, it is an ever-fixed mark
That looks on tempests and is never shaken;
It is the star to every wand'ring bark,
Whose worth's unknown, although his height be taken.
Love's not Time's fool, though rosy lips and cheeks
Within his bending sickle's compass come;
Love alters not with his brief hours and weeks,
But bears it out even to the edge of doom.
If this be error and upon me proved,
I never writ, nor no man ever loved.


Sonnet 116

Posted by: artisanal 'ette at February 14, 2016 10:51 AM (qCMvj)

138 I'm reading The Witcher series on which the video games are based.

They did a great job on the adaptation, especially considering the actual story lines are not usually repeated.

Posted by: Lauren at February 14, 2016 10:51 AM (f3Iw2)

139 133 As this is the Book Thread , let us recall what the Nicholson character in As Good As It Gets says about writing so well from a woman's POV : " I just write like a man and then leave out all the parts about common sense and reason "

Posted by: jay hoenemeyer at February 14, 2016 10:45 AM (uvj0z)



Its "reason and accountability"

Posted by: buzzion at February 14, 2016 10:52 AM (zt+N6)

140 The preceding note is dedicated to my friend and colleague , Michael , who was served divorce papers , at work , by his wife's attorney , on Valentines Day .

My fiance dumped me on Christmas Eve. She really had a festive spirit that year.

Posted by: Christopher Taylor at February 14, 2016 10:53 AM (39g3+)

141

Re-reading 'The Nameless Dwarf' trilogy for light stuff.

Posted by: 3rd Degree Berns at February 14, 2016 10:54 AM (+zqYj)

142 133 As this is the Book Thread , let us recall what the Nicholson character in As Good As It Gets says about writing so well from a woman's POV : " I just write like a man and then leave out all the parts about common sense and reason "
Posted by: jay hoenemeyer at February 14, 2016 10:45 AM (uvj0z)

The line is "I think of a man. Then I take away reason and accountability."

Posted by: Insomniac at February 14, 2016 10:54 AM (kpqmD)

143 Nicholson's character in As Good As It Gets was a masterpiece in writing an unlikable character that you still somehow like. He was excellent casting, though, because he can pull it off so well. I imagine Satan is a lot like Jack Nicholson.

Posted by: Christopher Taylor at February 14, 2016 10:56 AM (39g3+)

144 136 58 "Harry Potter and the Cursed Child" or, "JK Rowling and Her Alarmingly Low Bank Account".

Posted by: Citizen Cake at February 14, 2016 09:45 AM (ppaKI)

Ha! I did wonder why Rowling thought that she needed to write another Harry Potter book.
Posted by: OregonMuse at February 14, 2016 10:50 AM (08fIE)

That seems doubtful considering the insane bank she's made from book sales, movie deals, stage plays, movie rights, merchandise, the licensing deal with Universal for Harry Potter World, etc.

Posted by: Insomniac at February 14, 2016 10:56 AM (kpqmD)

145 99 88, Fenelon and JTB, I was eavesdropping in a small crowded room at a church thing and I heard one of my friends say something along the lines of "Peter Kreeft is a good writer but what he says about Muslims is just awful." It sounded like he was not in favor of them, so I take that as a huge recommendation, given that I'm in Seattle

Posted by: Tonestaple at February 14, 2016 10:16 AM (RtCTo)


I don't know what Kreeft said, but it could have been something as mild as "you know, Islam is a great religion and most Muslims are kind and peace-loving and all, but Islam does have a teensy little problem with violent extremists that kill people, and perhaps it would be good if the peace-loving, moderate Muslims did something about it."

Posted by: OregonMuse at February 14, 2016 10:56 AM (08fIE)

146 The preceding note is dedicated to my friend and colleague , Michael ,
who was served divorce papers , at work , by his wife's attorney , on
Valentines Day .



>>>

My fiance dumped me on Christmas Eve. She really had a festive spirit that year.


>>>

I got my walking papers one Thanksgiving.

Posted by: Count de Monet at February 14, 2016 10:56 AM (JO9+V)

147
*side-bar* Rubio fan-fiction?

Suddenly the dino-pron or the Kirk-Spock love affairs seem passe.


Posted by: Anna Puma at February 14, 2016 10:44 AM (nzaaz)
__________
Watch how the old men of the senate literally pet him.

Posted by: mustbequantum at February 14, 2016 10:56 AM (MIKMs)

148 A recent FB post about a legendary lost shotgun reminded me about "De Shootinest Gent'man and Other Tales " by Nash Buckingham, published in 1934 and still (I believe) in print. Buckingham wrote for all the major outdoor magazines of the day, and his stories evoke a strong nostalgia in Southern boys of a certain advanced age who remember sitting in a cold duck blind or shooting rising quail over a good bird dog. The dialects may be somewhat indecipherable to many, and the paternal attitude toward race relations of the era off-putting to even more, but the stories themselves still stand the test of time.

Posted by: That SOB Van Owen at February 14, 2016 10:57 AM (KSzvh)

149 Seconding The Four Loves, which is one of the only books of CSL's that's available as an audiobook *read by the author*. It was broadcast by the BBC, and by some miracle those recordings survive. (I don't think they've found more than a snippet of Broadcast Talks, which became Mere Christianity, but I could be misremembering.) I love listening to it, both because of the content and because of CSL's voice.

Posted by: Elisabeth G. Wolfe at February 14, 2016 10:57 AM (vRQPU)

150
Nicholson's character in As Good As It Gets was a masterpiece in
writing an unlikable character that you still somehow like. He was
excellent casting, though, because he can pull it off so well. I
imagine Satan is a lot like Jack Nicholson.




Oh, he is! *giggle*

Posted by: Witches of Eastwick at February 14, 2016 10:58 AM (JO9+V)

151

Re-reading Miller's 'The Body In Question' for a little brain strain...

Posted by: 3rd Degree Berns at February 14, 2016 10:59 AM (+zqYj)

152 Reforming Marriage by Douglas Wilson, an incredible look at how to craft a long term, healthy, and beneficial relationship in marriage. I never got to practically attempt these ideas but his basic principles are amazingly informative and perceptive.
For example, Wilson points out how men will tend to more readily respect in a relationship so they need to work harder on love and demonstration of love. But Women will more readily love in a relationship and need to focus and work on respect. And without both from each partner, it cannot work.
Posted by: Christopher Taylor at February 14, 2016 10:48 AM (39g3+)


I have Wilson's book, it's full of great insights, and the one you mentioned I think is particularly good.

Posted by: OregonMuse at February 14, 2016 10:59 AM (08fIE)

153 Along with Erma Bombeck and Jackson's 'Life Among the Savages' try Jackson's 'Raising Demons'. I may have mentioned this in the past but try to find copies of Alan King's two books 'Help, I'm a Prisoner in a Chinese Bakery' and 'Anyone who owns his own home Deserves It'. Written in the mid-1960s and still hilarious.

Posted by: JTB at February 14, 2016 10:59 AM (FvdPb)

154 It was useful but the learning is easily parsible into a 2 page tract.

This was my reaction upon reading Men Are From Mars... as well. He covered it all pretty quickly, then repeated himself and applied the lessons a few times to fill out the book. Which I guess is good for a slow learner, but really 10 books later, we get it dude.

Posted by: Christopher Taylor at February 14, 2016 11:00 AM (39g3+)

155 My fiance dumped me on Christmas Eve. She really had a festive spirit that year.

Posted by: Christopher Taylor at February 14, 2016 10:53 AM (39g3+)


Ouch.

Posted by: OregonMuse at February 14, 2016 11:00 AM (08fIE)

156

Your V-D PSA: http://tinyurl.com/hapnu57

Posted by: 3rd Degree Berns at February 14, 2016 11:01 AM (+zqYj)

157 The preceding note is dedicated to my friend and colleague , Michael , who was served divorce papers , at work , by his wife's attorney , on Valentines Day .

My fiance dumped me on Christmas Eve. She really had a festive spirit that year.
Posted by: Christopher Taylor at February 14, 2016 10:53 AM (39g3+)

I have a friend whose husband left her and their three children on Mothers' Day.

Posted by: Jen the original at February 14, 2016 11:03 AM (K0Iz7)

158 It's my understanding J.K. is the wealthiest woman in the world and the new Potter book is written by someone else.

Posted by: Skip at February 14, 2016 11:03 AM (BkhW6)

159 "I have a friend whose husband left her and their three children on Mothers' Day."

Ex friend I take it?

Posted by: Lauren at February 14, 2016 11:05 AM (3DIzJ)

160 159 "I have a friend whose husband left her and their three children on Mothers' Day."

Ex friend I take it?

Posted by: Lauren at February 14, 2016 11:05 AM (3DIzJ)



Why an ex friend? The husband left the friend, the friend didn't leave the husband.

Posted by: buzzion at February 14, 2016 11:07 AM (zt+N6)

161 I have a friend whose husband left her and their three children on Mothers' Day.

Some people know how to make a holiday memorable.

the new Potter book is written by someone else.

She'll still get money from the sales, but yeah. She's one of the richest people on earth now. And she doesn't seem to be blowing it all on idiotic crap, either.

Posted by: Christopher Taylor at February 14, 2016 11:07 AM (39g3+)

162 "Why an ex friend? The husband left the friend, the friend didn't leave the husband"

Oh I misread it as her friend leaving her family on mother's day!

Yeah, screw that guy.

Posted by: Lauren at February 14, 2016 11:08 AM (3DIzJ)

163 161 I have a friend whose husband left her and their three children on Mothers' Day.

Some people know how to make a holiday memorable.

the new Potter book is written by someone else.

She'll still get money from the sales, but yeah. She's one of the richest people on earth now. And she doesn't seem to be blowing it all on idiotic crap, either.
Posted by: Christopher Taylor at February 14, 2016 11:07 AM (39g3+)

I haven't seen any reports of Ms. Rowling rolling with a posse of freeloading hangers-on in a fleet of gold-plated Escalades, so...

Posted by: Insomniac at February 14, 2016 11:10 AM (kpqmD)

164 I've always said, When you truly want to know the truth/substance or heart of a spouse,go through a divorce with them.

All the ugly reality appears like magic.

Posted by: willow at February 14, 2016 11:10 AM (9XzdI)

165 that isn't exactly a valentine post.
sorry.

Posted by: willow at February 14, 2016 11:11 AM (9XzdI)

166 For some of us, Valentine's Day isn't exactly fraught with joy and happy memories, Willow.

Posted by: Christopher Taylor at February 14, 2016 11:12 AM (39g3+)

167 gak, i better wander off now.

Posted by: willow at February 14, 2016 11:12 AM (9XzdI)

168 165 that isn't exactly a valentine post.
sorry.
Posted by: willow at February 14, 2016 11:11 AM (9XzdI)

166 For some of us, Valentine's Day isn't exactly fraught with joy and happy memories, Willow.
Posted by: Christopher Taylor at February 14, 2016 11:12 AM (39g3+)

Count me among them.

Posted by: Insomniac at February 14, 2016 11:13 AM (kpqmD)

169 Christopher, i know.

Posted by: willow at February 14, 2016 11:13 AM (9XzdI)

170
My wife would divorce me if I read that mars/venus book. OTOH, she did read the Austen/Dickens book mentioned above and liked it alot. She has a thing for 19th century england. Mostly cookbooks.

I am reading a book called Think of a Number by John Verdon. Detective mystery, so far so good, I'll let you know.

Posted by: Guy Mohawk at February 14, 2016 11:13 AM (ODxAs)

171 ok bl, when i have something better to offer.

Posted by: willow at February 14, 2016 11:14 AM (9XzdI)

172 My divorce from my husband was a mutual thing, and we're still friends.

It took awhile, but I'm finally comfortable being alone as opposed to be unhappy with someone just because I felt that I needed to be with someone to feel "complete".

As far as ever getting married agin, not even worth thinking about.

Won't happen.

But kudos to y'all that managed to find someone willing to put up with years of bullshit.

Posted by: SMFH at February 14, 2016 11:15 AM (rlfds)

173 before i leave here is a series i've been reading , not a book, as i'm in a self help mode right now.

so and article within a series of articles.
http://www.aish.com/sp/k/48954596.html

Posted by: willow at February 14, 2016 11:16 AM (9XzdI)

174 Fret not, willow. A lot of us are in the same boat. And it's a pretty damn big boat.

Posted by: Insomniac at February 14, 2016 11:16 AM (kpqmD)

175 While I understand the holidays being stressful, I feel like people who dump their partners on holidays are doing it to be a bit sadistic.

Posted by: Lauren at February 14, 2016 11:20 AM (0C2f1)

176
SMFH, I've always believed there is a partner, soulmate ,life journey partner for everyone, but yeah, some relationships are so hard it isn't wotrth the hell of it. perhaps living solo can be a happier/more peaceful journey .

ok out for real.

now shoves my rear out the door.

Posted by: willow at February 14, 2016 11:21 AM (9XzdI)

177 175 While I understand the holidays being stressful, I feel like people who dump their partners on holidays are doing it to be a bit sadistic.

Posted by: Lauren at February 14, 2016 11:20 AM (0C2f1)



Its like they're trying to ruin that holiday for them, not just that year, but forever.

Posted by: buzzion at February 14, 2016 11:21 AM (zt+N6)

178 Mrs. JTB and I have over 30 years of the best marriage I can imagine and several years of a wonderful friendship before that. I really am blessed (and know it).

A suggestion: If you are going to read Shakespeare's sonnets (and you should) try reading them aloud, to a loved one or even to yourself. The words take on additional magic when spoken.

Posted by: JTB at February 14, 2016 11:22 AM (FvdPb)

179 "not just that year, but forever"

Yeah, exactly.

Posted by: Lauren at February 14, 2016 11:22 AM (0C2f1)

180 New Thread. Podcast

Posted by: buzzion at February 14, 2016 11:24 AM (zt+N6)

181 Posted by: Lauren at February 14, 2016 11:20 AM (0C2f1)

Yeah, I can't imagine doing such a thing on purpose (a massive, blow-up, walk-out argument that just *happened* to be that day...maybe.)

Posted by: Polliwog the 'Ette at February 14, 2016 11:28 AM (GDulk)

182 149 ... Elisabeth, There are a few bits and pieces of Lewis' BBC broadcasts on Youtube but I didn't know about 'The Four Loves' as a complete audio book. Thanks for mentioning it. An order to Amazon is in the near future.

Posted by: JTB at February 14, 2016 11:29 AM (FvdPb)

183 C.S. Lewis' day job involved the study of the development of chivalry and romance in Europe. His scholarly works take a little of the romance out of romance.

Posted by: KT at February 14, 2016 11:30 AM (qahv/)

184 Horatio Hornblower was a demon whist player, who had near-total recall of the cards that had been played, which bedeviled his opponents to no end. As I remember, he played for money and he used his winnings to tide him over during periods of naval inactivity.

Yeah, Horatio kept himself barely alive during the Peace of Amiens playing Whist with gentlemen for cash. He usually won, but not always. He'd use it to kill time before a battle started as well; it took a while for ships to get within range of each other and start actually fighting. Also, he'd use it to generate a reputation for icy calm and fearlessness before the battle with his officers mostly because he was terrified and was worried they would be able to tell.

Posted by: Christopher Taylor at February 14, 2016 11:30 AM (39g3+)

185 I can almost guarantee that anyone who has relationship problems, the problems are rooted in their childhood upbringing.

Which is why it's so important for anyone who has these problems to either not breed or even raise children.

And some of it goes so deep that even a professional therapist can take years to dig it all out and try to correct it.

So. Love your kids no matter how much they're pains in the asses, teach them how to be loving parents by example. Keep them away from those that are dysfunctional (and that includes the grandparents.)

Take them to church but don't let them be distorted by some zealot.

Too many people either treat children as pets or as stupid adults. They're neither. And even if it seems they're doing they're very best to screw with you, it's mostly all subconscious so don't take it so personal.

Golden rule; treat them as you wanted to be treated as a kid. (just don't over indulge because that doesn't really help. Well sometimes is ok.)

Be kind to each other and remember that this is all we'll ever have so treat every day like the blessing that it is.

Posted by: Bitter Clinger 1.0 and All That at February 14, 2016 11:31 AM (Xo1Rt)

186 My problem with "Men are from Mars..." is the author. I saw him smarm his way through too many infomercials (maybe they were regular TV appearances but they seemed like infomercials) and found him so completely repellent, downright reptilian, that I don't think I could read the book and not think of him.

I would be more inclined to read something by John Gottman (great name, no?) who is a long-time researcher on marriage. His primary thesis is that without respect between husband and wife, the marriage will absolutely positively fail.

Posted by: Tonestaple at February 14, 2016 11:35 AM (RtCTo)

187 Just finished The Shepherd's Crown - the last Terry Pratchett Book ever. It was the culmination of the Tiffany Aching arc, and a fine valedictory for sir Pratchett.

We wont't see his like again, most likely. Great plots, fantastic characters, and the best use of footnotes ever seen.

Posted by: RightWingProf at February 14, 2016 11:39 AM (DfSls)

188 Greetings:

I'm re-reading James McPherson's "War on the Waters" about the naval aspects of our Civil War. It's a rather small book, 230 or so pages, but there's a lot packed into those pages. Most Americans have at some point heard about the naval blockade and the Monitor vs Merrimac bit, but the Navy was out there on the rivers, in the bays, and up your estuaries making its own and its "combined arms" contributions with the Army. While I find the action moments most interesting, the author does a good job covering the machinations, inanities, and inabilities of some of America's first Admirals, David Farragut to name but one. (I was aware of his "Damn the torpedos" attack on Mobile Bay but not his attack on New Orleans.)

I give close scrutiny to maps in military history books and have, it seems, rather high standards in that regard. McPherson's maps are pretty well done graphic arts wise but some actions didn't qualify for one and some locations mentioned in the text didn't show up on the illustrations. Grade-wise, I could live with an historian's "B" for them.

Posted by: 11B40 at February 14, 2016 11:41 AM (evgyj)

189 Not book related, just fun. The Westminster Dog Show is tomorrow and Tuesday night. Always fun and Mrs. JTB and I never miss it.

Posted by: JTB at February 14, 2016 11:44 AM (FvdPb)

190 There's a Hornblower Companion out there for the C.S. Forrester books as well, by the way. Its much less extensive than the Dean King books, but very handy when reading the books. Plus it has some terrific thoughts from Forrester on how he writes and comes up with ideas.

Posted by: Christopher Taylor at February 14, 2016 11:46 AM (39g3+)

191 "So a French guy with a froofy name moves to America, chucks his fancy title, and changes his name to "Ted Morgan" (one step removed from "John Smith"). Yeah, he's an American all right."

I'll put that on the list. I'm also going to read Philippe Petit (either Man on Wire, To Reach the Clouds, or both). After seeing The Walk (GREAT frakking movie), I want to know more about Petit (who is still in New York, I think).

Posted by: Mentor of Arisia at February 14, 2016 11:47 AM (ybzJi)

192 good morning all
good news, only one month until steak and blowjob day

Posted by: chemjeff - PuppyMonkeyBaby '16 at February 14, 2016 11:47 AM (uZNvH)

193 192-what on earth is steak and blowjob day? How did I miss this particular holiday?

Posted by: Moki at February 14, 2016 11:50 AM (7q2ch)

194 March 14th
you know, valentine's day for guys

Posted by: chemjeff - PuppyMonkeyBaby '16 at February 14, 2016 11:53 AM (uZNvH)

195 194-Ahhhhh
It's a week after hubby's and my anniversary, so he will get his present a week early!

Posted by: Moki at February 14, 2016 11:54 AM (7q2ch)

196 How did I miss this particular holiday?

You've never heard of it because its one men came up with and wanted, which means it is relegated to father's day status. Mother's day gets huge events, advertising blitzes, special aisles in stores, even sermons about it. Father's day you get a small section in the Hallmark aisle. Next to "Happy Birthday to my cousin's best friend" cards.

Posted by: Christopher Taylor at February 14, 2016 11:54 AM (39g3+)

197 Father's day you get a small section in the Hallmark aisle. Next to "Happy Birthday to my cousin's best friend" cards.

Posted by: Christopher Taylor at February 14, 2016 11:54 AM (39g3+)

Thanks for the tip, I've never been able to find a Father's Day card in a Hallmark store, so now I know where to look.

Posted by: Hrothgar at February 14, 2016 11:56 AM (wYnyS)

198 I'm a bit of a technophobe. I wonder if a future thread could have a section on how to download books from non amazon sources and get them onto one's kindle?

Reading Jeff Wheeler this week. Poisonwell. Amazon is good in that when I went to buy this they informed me I already had it.

Posted by: PaleRider at February 14, 2016 11:58 AM (wLU3U)

199 194 March 14th
you know, valentine's day for guys
Posted by: chemjeff - PuppyMonkeyBaby '16 at February 14, 2016 11:53 AM (uZNvH)


3.14 is also Pi Day, which has caught on in recent years. I think the Steak and Blowjob people should pick another date.

Posted by: rickl at February 14, 2016 11:58 AM (sdi6R)

200 I think the Steak and Blowjob people should pick another date.

How about "tuesday." Is one day a week so much to ask?

Posted by: Christopher Taylor at February 14, 2016 12:01 PM (39g3+)

201 Any day ending in a "y" is good by me

Posted by: cool breeze at February 14, 2016 12:03 PM (ckvus)

202 Of course, there's nothing wrong with Pie and Blowjob.

Posted by: rickl at February 14, 2016 12:05 PM (sdi6R)

203 #196, I once heard a minister say, as to his sermons, "Mothers' Day is when we encourage the mothers and Fathers' Day is when be beat up on the fathers."

Posted by: OregonMuse at February 14, 2016 12:06 PM (08fIE)

204 198 I'm a bit of a technophobe. I wonder if a future thread could have a section on how to download books from non amazon sources and get them onto one's kindle?

Posted by: PaleRider at February 14, 2016 11:58 AM (wLU3U)

I briefly talked about this a few book threads ago, but I can revisit it.

Posted by: OregonMuse at February 14, 2016 12:07 PM (08fIE)

205 New thread up and over 200 comments. I hope it's okay, then, for me to post this Valentine's Day oddity.



The Urantia Book (what, that again? yes) helped me resolve several fundamental theological conflicts I had developed in reading from various religions including and beyond my native Christianity. It gave me an appreciation of the Trinity, about which I had been taught next to nothing when young and which concept meant nothing to me when I began my spiritual searching. The "Life and Teachings of Jesus" part reinforced my love for Jesus of the Gospels, and inspired me greatly to a life of spiritual service (poor as I have been at it). The book is not a science or history text, but it even gave me a great framework for appreciation of all knowledge, cosmology, anthropology, and the development of civilization.

That said, the part which has been especially valuable to me was the three "Marriage and Family Life" papers. Like the rest of the book, they can't be fully appreciated outside the whole teaching, but they stand out for me because, I really needed to learn the place of marriage and family in my own life.

Milady and I read the UB, and those three papers in particular, with great interest when we first got together. Our having done so has helped two young wild idiots of the 1960s to sustain our union for over forty years, and, I'd like to think, gave us good guidance on the basics of family life. I don't claim to be good at any of that, but I would have been much worse without the saving grace of those papers describing the historic development, valuable ideals, and practical aspects of making a home.

"Mars/Venus" was mentioned above. The marriage papers might even go farther than that book:

Male and female are, practically regarded, two distinct varieties of the same species living in close and intimate association. Their viewpoints and entire life reactions are essentially different; they are wholly incapable of full and real comprehension of each other. Complete understanding between the sexes is not attainable.
http://bit.ly/UP84-6-3
(Links go to the Urantia Foundation website)

Not attainable. Just accept that, and it becomes easier, guys!



Romance is fine, but the romantic relationship is a means to the greater purpose, not the end. True love for a lifetime is hard work for both parties to a marriage. (Hums "Do You Love Me?" from Fiddler.) This passage is more true today than when it was written in 1935:

The real test of marriage, all down through the ages, has been that continuous intimacy which is inescapable in all family life. Two pampered and spoiled youths, educated to expect every indulgence and full gratification of vanity and ego, can hardly hope to make a great success of marriage and home building - a lifelong partnership of self-effacement, compromise, devotion, and unselfish dedication to child culture.
http://bit.ly/UP83-7-6

That "unselfish dedication to child culture" was one of the great lessons for me.



Finally, the last paragraph of the three marriage papers should resonate with most folks here:

Let man enjoy himself; let the human race find pleasure in a thousand and one ways; let evolutionary mankind explore all forms of legitimate self-gratification, the fruits of the long upward biologic struggle. Man has well earned some of his present-day joys and pleasures. But look you well to the goal of destiny! Pleasures are indeed suicidal if they succeed in destroying property, which has become the institution of self-maintenance; and self-gratifications have indeed cost a fatal price if they bring about the collapse of marriage, the decadence of family life, and the destruction of the home - man's supreme evolutionary acquirement and civilization's only hope of survival.
http://bit.ly/UP84-8-6

Posted by: mindful webworker - family matters at February 14, 2016 12:12 PM (Q1QrS)

206 One of the things that has helped me reduce the amount of BS I'm pumping into the relationahip is this book, Men Are from Mars, Women Are from Venus: Practical Guide for Improving Communication by John Gray.


Not a fan of Gray's; he makes a point of styling himself John Gray, Ph.D.. Turns it IIRC he received his "Ph.D." from "Close Cover Before Striking" University when the check cleared, i.e., he's a bogus credentialist, much like our "Constitutional law scholar" President.

Posted by: Jay Guevara at February 14, 2016 12:12 PM (oKE6c)

207 Finished Bernard Cornwell's latest Saxon Tales entry, "Warriors of the Storm". All I can say is that the older Lord Uhtred gets the better he gets. Those who love the Game of Thrones type fantasies should start reading this series which chronicles the real life game of thrones played between the Saxons and their Viking invaders.
BTW we get to learn some surprising info on Uhtred's Irish friend and comrade-in-arms, Finan. One of Uhtred's old lovers makes a very unpleasant and painful return and Uhtred continues slashing his way through shield walls in service to Aethelflaed of Mercia. All this while marching toward his final goal of recapturing his ancestral lands stolen from him while still a boy.

Posted by: Tuna at February 14, 2016 12:13 PM (JSovD)

208 Father's day you get a small section in the Hallmark aisle. Next to "Happy Birthday to my cousin's best friend" cards.
Posted by: Christopher Taylor at February 14, 2016 11:54 AM (39g3+)



And right in between the Happy Earth Day and Happy Kwanzaa cards.

Posted by: Jay Guevara at February 14, 2016 12:14 PM (oKE6c)

209 Wasn't gonna post, then did, then deleted, and now I'm gonna post this.

There's a link on Instapundit by Sarah Hoyt about how the book "The valley of the Dolls" became a bestseller.

Short answer, It's a scam. Readers and authors should both read that article.

Then for writers there is another post on madgeniusclub.com about 'Editors: The Good, The Bad, and The Ugly'.

Posted by: Esker Lateman at February 14, 2016 12:18 PM (0LmgR)

210 Just finished "Life at the Bottom," by Theodore Dalrymple. Excellent analysis of the origins and mores of the underclass, especially valuable in that, being concerned with the UK underclass, it avoids convolution of its analysis of the underclass with race, as would inevitably happen here.

Now reading "Lawrence in Arabia," by Scott Anderson. Anderson writes well, and provides a plethora of background information and analysis of the life and times of T. E. Lawrence.

Posted by: Jay Guevara at February 14, 2016 12:18 PM (oKE6c)

211 I'm wrapping up The Caine Mutiny, a great book which I cannot believe I had not read before now.

I found the description of life aboard the Caine in WW2 riveting. The people simply thought differently in those days than now. The story itself was fascinating, and reading it feels like being transported back in time to a totally different era.

Highly recommended.

Posted by: RM at February 14, 2016 12:19 PM (U3LtS)

212 Whew, if I had known OregonMuse would highlight an offhand comment of mine, I would have taken more care in writing it! Thanks, though, I am having fun reading Morgan's book.

Regarding the French and their mistresses:

All of their elected leaders in modern times have, and it hasn't hurt them a bit with the voting public. It is just accepted as the normal state of affairs, mais bien sur!
Posted by: cool breeze at February 14, 2016 09:29 AM (ckvus)

The great exception was Charles DeGaulle, a pain in the ass to us and to most people, but a model of moral rectitude in private life. In fact, his wife crusaded against miniskirts in the 1960's. Obviously, she didn't have a lot of success.

I can vouch for "What Jane Austen Ate and Charles Dickens Knew." I read it about 10 years ago and it's filled with interesting facts about the Victorian Era.

"I Am Dandy" sounds like fun. Thanks to All Hail Eris for the tip. I am so depressed by the news these days that I don't want to read any heavy DOOM!! books right now.

Congrats on those 30 years, OregonMuse and a happy Valentine's Day to all couples. Since the feminists hate it so much and want to turn it into Vajayjay Day, I want people to celebrate it, just to give those harpies a poke in the eye.

Posted by: Donna&&&&V (a white) (whitely brandishing ampersand privilege ) at February 14, 2016 12:21 PM (P8951)

213 I'm late to the book thread and will have to read the comments this evening. Finished "How Green Was My Valley", which I loved. I want to know what happened to all the characters after the book ends, but I've been told the sequel isn't as good, so I will just have to imagine a future for them myself.

Just started "The Sherlockian" by Graham Moore. It jumps between Arthur Conan Doyle killing off Sherlock Holmes and a present-day Holmes fan who is trying to track down Doyle's lost journal and investigating the murder of the number one Holmes scholar. I'm only a few pages in so can't really comment on the quality, but I like the premise.

Posted by: biancaneve at February 14, 2016 12:25 PM (e98eb)

214 Posted by: Esker Lateman at February 14, 2016 12:18 PM (0LmgR)

couldn't find the hoyt-dolls link on insty?

Posted by: Hrothgar at February 14, 2016 12:31 PM (wYnyS)

215 I haven't read Gary Chapman's "4 Love Languages" yet, although it's on one of the shelves in my garage. My daughter loaned it to me after she was finished with it. I do listen to him on the radio, and I'm currently working my way through his Bible study book "A Couple's Guide to a Growing Marriage", which just reminded me now that I was supposed to read through Philippians this week. Oops.

Posted by: grammie winger, sign of The Time at February 14, 2016 12:33 PM (dFi94)

216 Posted by: RM at February 14, 2016 12:19 PM (U3LtS)

Just think what we can accomplish with a few more generations marinated in progressivism!

Posted by: HRClinton.com at February 14, 2016 12:34 PM (wYnyS)

217 Sarah just provided the link. The actual article is by Martin Chilton at the Daily Telegraph. Here: http://preview.tinyurl.com/jn5m2fv

Posted by: Trimegistus at February 14, 2016 12:35 PM (Uxz7G)

218 You guys recommended The Great Courses a couple of weeks ago. I found some of them at my local library. I've started with Foundations of Western Civilization Part I, will follow with Part II, then The American Civil war.

Each set consists of 48 half-hour lectures. So far pretty good. During the lecture, I take a few notes, then afterwards I supplement what he said by looking up a couple of the topics on the web.

So thanks for the tip, morons!

Posted by: gp at February 14, 2016 12:49 PM (mk9aG)

219 Happy V-D to you and yours.

V-D is nothing to clap about.

Hail, fellow book threadists. Currently reading The Truth and Other Lies by Sascha Arango, about a (suspected) psychopath blending in with real life. I'm only on page 59 but can highly recommend it.

For those with a taste for Southern Gothic, rave reviews for The Gates of Evangeline, which I touted a week or so ago after everyone had left. More red herrings than a sardine shop.

Re the depressing state of affairs we're all slogging through, a commenter at iOTW Report posted a mind-blowing video featuring one of Reagan's CIA guys whose job it was to brief him on the state of the globe as well as trends.

Herb Meyer is the man, and I see he has plenty of videos at YT, but this one was from '14, when he addressed a Charlotte, NC, sales force re the coming opportunities to look for.

Seeing that it was from '14, I almost clicked off, but I'm glad I hung in. It was WELL worth the time (an hour and 40 minutes). Meyer spoke without a single note or prompt that I could detect, was delightful to listen to and put an entirely different spin on the way we're conditioned to feel by the media. Some real zingers about what we've been "told" and "not told."

I can't imagine what one of his speaking engagements goes for $$$$$.

http://bit.ly/1Qfzqtk

Posted by: RushBabe at February 14, 2016 12:54 PM (/NEnw)

220 Currently working my way through the Discworld novels. My lord, they're hilarious. And full of all sorts of comic references to other literary works. Highly, highly recommended.

Posted by: Mandy P. (Not Patinkin), lurking lurker who lurks at February 14, 2016 01:03 PM (KkVB6)

221 Late to the thread because i was Helping my ballet teacher to publish a new book! Really!

But late as it is, I want to add if no one had yet, that the main character in Jules Verne's, Around the World in Eighty Days, does almost nothing but play whist! Goes around the world and just plays whist instead of seeing the sights! A great character!

Posted by: Sugar Plum Fairy #176-671 at February 14, 2016 01:46 PM (lmYrx)

222 Funny thing about John Gray, relationship guru: he used to be married to Barbara DeAngelis, another relationship guru. I think they parted ways over ownership of the shtick.

Posted by: Epobirs at February 14, 2016 01:47 PM (IdCqF)

223 A man who has truly loved one woman, has surely loved them all.

A man who has never read a book, has only lived one life, whreeas the man who reads many books, has lived many lives.

Posted by: ChocoCheese at February 14, 2016 02:01 PM (OvUux)

224 My book, Last In a Long Line of Rebels, came out in September and I think I'll send a copy to Trump. A) It's about a girl about to lose her house to eminent domain, and B) It's for middle schoolers.

Posted by: Living Large at February 14, 2016 09:52 AM (QNoS6)

Speaking of eminent domain, Glenn Beck did a piece on the sanctity of private property until our lawless current day. Next time you see Rockefeller Center, check out the two tiny, old buildings that flank it. Rockefeller wanted that property for a bigger building, and one owner wouldn't sell. The other was holding out for an exorbitant sum. Long story short: even in the Great Depression, when construction jobs would've been seen as a gift from Heaven, Rockefeller nor his attorneys never considered trying to get the courts to take those properties because private property was sacrosanct. They're still there.

Posted by: RushBabe at February 14, 2016 02:04 PM (/NEnw)

225 Posted by: Mandy P. (Not Patinkin), lurking lurker who lurks at February 14, 2016 01:03 PM (KkVB6)

Middlest Kidlet is reading her first Disc World novel. She's going through Brandon Sanderson's YouTube writing classes and her homework for this week was to read a Disc World novel of her choice to see an example of comedic writing. We have most of them but the majority got moved when we painted a couple of months ago so she only had about 6 to choose from. She chose Interesting Times and is getting enough of the jokes (I was worried a modern 14 year old might not) to find it amusing.

Posted by: Polliwog the 'Ette at February 14, 2016 02:16 PM (GDulk)

226 I can't remember the name of it, but Ray Bradbury wrote a short story about a married couple where the wife had grown tired of the marriage and looked for a way out. Now she had heard that science had discovered that all the cells in one's body are replaced every 7 years, and since they had been married over 7 years, then surely she wa a new woman, not even the woman that he had married. Thus they could separate amicably. He mulled over it for awhile and then reasoned that if 7 years had surely passed, and she was indeed a new woman, well then, he was a new man. So he introduced himself to her and set out to court her anew.

It really is a sweet story told in that simple way that Bradbury could illuminate nuances of human interaction.

Posted by: ChocoCheese at February 14, 2016 02:18 PM (OvUux)

227 I suspect that Jules Verne making Phineous Fogg play whist all the time was a gentle poke at the English gentleman's travel tendencies. But it made sense for the character; it kept him out of sight from the cop chasing him, made him seem elusive when it wasn't clear if he was the thief or not.

I really need to read the book, though. I love Jules Verne's writing.

Posted by: Christopher Taylor at February 14, 2016 02:46 PM (39g3+)

228 Just got back from "Pride and Prejudice and Zombies." A bit draggy in the second act, but still great fun.

And boy oh boy, if you've been watching "War and Peace" and thinking, "It's good, but I sure would like to see Natasha Rostova's breasts half-naked and heaving", well, they're here, they're half-naked, and they heave magnificently and often.

Posted by: Taro Tsujimoto at February 14, 2016 02:58 PM (/pB9Z)

229 Well Horde, please wish me well. Writer looking for researcher for their great WWII novel has called. Unknown number so let it go to voice-mail. Now about to call back.

"You may fire when ready Gridley."

Posted by: Anna Puma at February 14, 2016 03:25 PM (nzaaz)

230 Bon chance, AP!

Posted by: Elisabeth G. Wolfe at February 14, 2016 03:26 PM (vRQPU)

231 Can't think of a better applicant, Anna! Good luck!

Posted by: All Hail Eris, Literate Savage at February 14, 2016 03:31 PM (jR7Wy)

232 101 Eris, my cufflinks are blocky goldish things, with a broad mesh chain that slips over the french cuffs to attach to the toggle in the back, and it has a large opaque yellow stone that is set to look like a blind, half-closed eye.

I got them because they made me think of the Eye of Sauron.
Posted by: Kindltot at February 14, 2016 10:16 AM (q2o3
---
I love this. Magic-forged manacles for the cuffs!

Posted by: All Hail Eris, Literate Savage at February 14, 2016 03:36 PM (jR7Wy)

233 I recommend Tristan Jones for those who like the Patric O'Brien novels. Tristan actually lived his life as a sailor and adventurer. His books are non fiction(mostly) and a Lytton easier going than the Aubrey Maturin books. Another fun author in the same vein is Alexander Kent. He writes very similar stories to Patrick O'Brien.
I also read a book by OBrien titled "Hussein" which was one of his earliest works. It was set in India during the colonial days and is a little like Kim, by Rudyard Kipling

Posted by: DrC at February 14, 2016 03:45 PM (FdFgz)

234 Had an interesting idea for a book. A butch woman with same sex desires has been celibate because she is a devout Christian. She meets an effeminate man who has always wanted to be a woman, and he tries hard to be an adequate woman for her. Has anyone ever tried that idea?

Posted by: Caitlyn Jenner at February 14, 2016 04:09 PM (dRfkS)

235 Bernard Cornwell's latest Saxon Tales

I've been watching the BBC adaptation. Wonderful stuff. Alfred comes off as a duplicitous weasel but it's clear that he has to be one, to restore Britain from the Dark Age. His brother Aethelraed "the unready" comes off better than usual too; maybe because that one's biggest mistakes were behind him.

Posted by: boulder terlit hobo at February 14, 2016 04:33 PM (6FqZa)

236 With a smarmy grin on his face, my father-in-law handed my spouse and me a copy of _Mars & Venus In the Bedroom_ shortly after we were married. The book was replete with stilted generationally-bound ideas (great for Baby Boomers) and rudimentary diagrams like the one showing the location of the clitoris. (Some people really need help, you know.) My Father-in-law the Jackarse had never so much as carried on more than a three word conversation with me, so I have a very negative take on John Gray's Mars/Venus books and the people who read them. (My spouse and I laughed at the book, flipped through the pages, and then gave it back to him and said he ought to give that gag to my new, very uptight sister-in-law when she and my bro-in-law were married. I don't think he ever did give it to them. The only advice the Jackarse ever gave my spouse was (1) Don't take any wooden nickels and (2) Get a lawyer, know your rights and leave your wife.)

That said, I'm reading _Walt Disney: An American Original_. My goal is to read biographies about American men this year. I love the American Man, but I have no affinity for loser-y, fish-handed Jackarse American Men. I'm looking to be inspired by the best of American Men, and I know there are plenty more out there.

I'm the mother of four sons.

Posted by: A Southerner of Honor at February 14, 2016 05:26 PM (26e2V)

237 235
"Alfred comes off as a duplicitous weasel...."

The BBC taking liberties again. Read the books. So much better.

Posted by: Tuna at February 14, 2016 06:30 PM (JSovD)

238 Has anyone here ever read any romance novels by Georgette Heyer? I think her works are fun to read If so, here is what a woman on another site says about her novels:

Georgette Hyer became so popular specifically because of her ability to remain in the soft rape porn genre instead of 'going all the way'.

Soft rape porn? What?? The worst that ever happens in any Heyer novel I have read is that someone gets abducted. There is no rape. There is no "soft "rape. They are not bodice rippers Heyer became popular because she has a fine attention to historical detail, memorable characters, good dialogue and entertaining stories.

I don't know what this woman is on about.

Posted by: FenelonSpoke at February 14, 2016 06:48 PM (w4NZ8)

239 Fen, maybe she means rape in the olde sense of "forcibly abducted"? As in The Rape of the Lock or The Rape of Persephone (carried off into the underworld).

Posted by: All Hail Eris, Literate Savage at February 14, 2016 06:50 PM (jR7Wy)

240 I have a very negative take on John Gray's Mars/Venus books and the people who read them.

I read the very first book and that's it ; I found it helpful.

Fire away? ;^)

Posted by: FenelonSpoke at February 14, 2016 06:50 PM (w4NZ8)

241 Posted by: All Hail Eris, Literate Savage at February 14, 2016 06:50 PM (jR7Wy)

Well, I don't know. Possibly, but it was in an article on pj media about how woman love porn. I would not qualify Heyer as being porn unless porn is meant as someone saying "I would like to tame her"?? Just a weird way to discuss Heyer.

Posted by: FenelonSpoke at February 14, 2016 06:53 PM (w4NZ8)

242 I love the disc world books.

Posted by: FenelonSpoke at February 14, 2016 06:55 PM (w4NZ8)

243 Posted by: FenelonSpoke at February 14, 2016 06:48 PM (w4NZ

I would suspect that whoever wrote that had "issues", and a lot of them. One of the reasons I like Heyer is because the physical stuff is tame (there being more than enough Drama! and general silliness to make up for it). It also means I can recommend them to my adolescent kids. Interestingly enough, John used to enjoy them as well and he *hated* anything reminiscent of rape (had me return the first Game of Thrones book after one chapter).

Posted by: Polliwog the 'Ette at February 14, 2016 07:07 PM (GDulk)

244 I read the very first book and that's it ; I found it helpful.
Fire away? ;^)
Posted by: FenelonSpoke at February 14, 2016 06:50 PM (w4NZ


Yes, that's the book I was discussing. I found it very helpful, and I am not interested in any of of the others.

Posted by: OregonMuse at February 14, 2016 07:12 PM (01PMj)

245 The only thing I could think was that she was thinking f another writer than Heyer. and used her name by mistake For goodness sakes, Heyer was writing in the 40's and 50's and into the 60s for mainstream English audiences; People kiss each other, the men sometimes have lively pasts which are referred to somewhat obliquely. In one of the novels the main male character kidnaps someone thinking she's her sister, but he never actually does anything. He tries to and she gets sick and her looks after her. The bad end badly. The good end well. The not so good are reformed. That's why we call it fiction. ;^) There wouldn't be anything that wouldn't be appropriate for a teen girll to read

Posted by: FenelonSpoke at February 14, 2016 07:18 PM (w4NZ8)

246 Posted by: OregonMuse at February 14, 2016 07:12 PM (01PMj)


The top portion of the comment was from a remark of a poster above.

Posted by: FenelonSpoke at February 14, 2016 07:20 PM (w4NZ8)

247 Er, that Aethelraed was the first one, not the unlucky second one.

Posted by: boulder terlit hobo at February 14, 2016 07:28 PM (6FqZa)

248 Bookworm of BookwormRoom once did a post on Georgette Heyer - she adores Heyer's novels and recommends them highly. I'm 99.9% sure nothing criminal ever happens in them, if you don't count the kidnapping. If the femlitcritchick (FenelonSpoke at February 14, 2016 06:48 PM) mentioned above really meant Heyer, it's just her stereotypes talking and no one should pay her any mind.

Posted by: Tonestaple at February 14, 2016 07:33 PM (RtCTo)

249 I have read that article on Heyer by Bookworm, and I enjoyed it very much.

Posted by: FenelonSpoke at February 14, 2016 07:34 PM (w4NZ8)

250 I read "Hot Air' sometimes, but all the election related threads just turn into particularly vitriolic Trump supporters. vs. non Trump supporter threads. It's so bad; it's almost nauseating.

Posted by: FenelonSpoke at February 14, 2016 08:29 PM (w4NZ8)

251 Oops; wrong thread. Sorry.

Posted by: FenelonSpoke at February 14, 2016 08:30 PM (w4NZ8)

252 I'm reading Matt Lewis's book. It's pretty good and pretty depressing.

Posted by: Bryan Ens at February 14, 2016 08:45 PM (yE2II)

253 Alfred was kind of manipulative even in the books, but more in a fatherly "teach the kid something through circumstances" way rather than "trick Uhtred into doing something" way. Of course BBC writers hate Christianity and Christians, so they're going to find a way to spin it as horrible despite Alfred being one of the most important figures in their history.

You could just figure its Uhtred's perspective and he's not a very nice guy.

Posted by: Sandra Fluke at February 14, 2016 09:57 PM (39g3+)

254 You could just figure its Uhtred's perspective and he's not a very nice guy.

It was his Kernewek witch-queen I didn't trust, but I see why Uhtred trusted her. I'll have more 'bout that on the ONT.

Posted by: boulder terlit hobo at February 14, 2016 10:10 PM (6FqZa)

255 I just finished Allen G's new book, and it is a good one.

Posted by: GGE of the Moron Horde, Mobile Chapter at February 14, 2016 10:35 PM (juhPL)

256
Mid-way into Carlyle's "On Heroes and Heroism..."

Highly recommended on how history works through individuals. Not exactly "great men" theory but illuminating at how real people make real differences in the course of human events.

The guy who wrote "Men are from Mars..." lives in Mill Valley, ground zero for Marin County hot tub culture.

Posted by: Whitehall at February 14, 2016 11:09 PM (cwS0+)

257 It was his Kernewek witch-queen I didn't trust, but I see why Uhtred trusted her.

Well he's a bit of a hose hound. Turns out he probably shouldn't have though...

Posted by: Christopher Taylor at February 15, 2016 12:02 AM (39g3+)

258 Possibility: Heyer and "soft rape porn" makes sense if, and only if, someone is writing from the "PIV is always rape" point of view, or heteronormative "every woman wants a husband" (and every man with a fortune must be in want of a wife... but that's Austin) sort of social expectations as "soft rape porn".

It's completely absurd, but those sorts of feminists exist and they hate hate HATE romance novels.

In one of my favorites (and I always get the titles mixed up because they're not particularly descriptive) social norms demand that a girl *must* marry the man she's been traveling with, though she most certainly is "in love" with him and he does kiss her against her will ("stolen kisses" are not written as if they are some horror or as if the person who "steals" a kiss is a rapist). There are a couple where the "hero" really is rather horrible and sets out on revenge and doesn't care who's life he destroys in the process.

And that's one thing she does do... the *heroes* are sometimes hugely flawed individuals or even "not very nice" for both our understanding of the word "nice" and Historical usages. And sometimes they're super nice, mild mannered, etc., Sometimes they're "fops" and "dandies" and they're still the hero. The reason she's so amazing is that she didn't write 50 books with the "perfect man" and the "perfect woman".

And also, if you read carefully, it's clear that she's written gay characters, too, and that the men in the novels, at least know that this sort of thing goes on. (But also that not every "fop" or "dandy" is gay.) Consider the years these were published...

As for criminality in Heyer romance novels (she's written mysteries which I've not read, and those generally contain criminality) a few of the romances are rather "gothic" and if one reads carefully it's clear that murder is committed by "good" people once or twice.

I would recommend her to any of the men here because they are simply good books, adventures, and just plain fun. They are seldom *mushy*.

The first of hers that I ever read was "The Foundling" which really isn't hardly a romance at all, but just a story about the coddled-from-birth hero asserting himself a bit and escaping into the real world.

Posted by: Synova at February 15, 2016 09:20 PM (Ek0Xs)

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