Sunday Morning Book Thread 11-01-2015: All Saints' Day [OregonMuse]


Keith Richards library.jpg
Mr. Keith Richards, Esq., Relaxing In His Library

Good morning to all of you morons and moronettes and bartenders everywhere and all the ships at sea. Welcome to AoSHQ's stately, prestigious, internationally acclaimed and high-class Sunday Morning Book Thread. The Sunday Morning Book Thread is the only AoSHQ thread that is so hoity-toity, pants are required. Or kilts. Also, assless chaps don't count. Serious you guys. Kilts are OK, though. But not tutus. Unless you're a girl.


“When you are growing up there are two institutional places that affect you most powerfully: the church, which belongs to God, and the public library, which belongs to you.”
— Keith Richards


Keith Richards Is Not Just Another Pretty Face

I like to make fun of Rolling Stones guitarist Keith Richards because he's the gold standard of ugly. But I'll give him props for (a) getting off heroin and (b) putting up with Mick Jagger for, like, 50 years. And I'm not sure which one's the greater achievement. Also, as was pointed out to me in last week's book thread, (c) he likes to read:

It appears that the guitarist has made a rather startling confession: He is in fact an avid bookworm who has taken great pride in developing libraries inside his homes in Sussex and Connecticut.

Sources in the publishing world who are familiar with the contents of his memoirs, claim he admits to once considering 'professional training' to manage his vast collection of books.

The 66-year-old is said to have started painstakingly arranging copies of rare books about the history of early American rock and the Second World War using libraries standard Dewey Decimal classification system.

Hmmm... So inside this rock guitarist, there's a librarian screaming to get out?

And not only is Keith a reader, he's also a writer. In addition to Life, his memoirs, he's also written a children's book, Gus & Me: The Story of My Granddad and My First Guitar which is illustrated by Theodora Richards, his daughter by his first second wife.

Long before there was a band, there was a boy: a young Keith Richards, who was introduced to the joy of music through his beloved granddad, Theodore Augustus Dupree, who was in a jazz big band...This unique autobiographical picture book honors the special bond between a grandfather and grandson and celebrates the artistic talents of the Richards family through the generations.

But then there was the long overdue library books:

Rolling Stones guitarist Keith Richards has been pardoned by the Dartford Library in England, after he admitted in an interview that he never returned some books that he had borrowed from the library more than 50 years ago. In a Daily Mirror article that was published on May 24, 2013, a library official said that any fees would be waived if Richards made a personal visit to the library.

Which, apparently, he did. I like seeing this side of Richards, that shows he's something more than the wasted rock-n-roller stereotype that he spent years earning. But I can't resist leaving you all with this bit:

He also once claimed to have snorted his father's ashes along with a line a cocaine.

Either that or he was just telling the interviewer what he wanted to hear.

I think I believe him, though.

[Addendum]: I have a Keith Richards story, but it has nothing to do with books: I have a friend who has been a semi-professional rock/blues/whatever musician in the Bay Area for many years. So about a year ago, WB (that's his nic) tells me the story that one time in the early 80s, he's sitting on a bench in a small public park in Oakland on a Sunday afternoon, just hanging out and drinking wine from a bottle in a paper bag (which, I'm told, is not unusual behavior for musicians) and then a nondescript car drives by, slows down, and stops. Driver gets out and he's just massive. WB says to himself, "Whoa, this guy looks just like he could be somebody's bodyguard." Big dude looks around carefully at WB and the rest of the park like he's checking things out (nobody else was there) and after a bit, he opens the back door and Keith Richards emerges, walks over to WB and introduces himself. Which was unnecessary, of course, but the Stones are in town on one of their tours and he's got some time to kill. So they share the wine and talk about music for a couple of hours. Had some choice words to say about Mick Jagger. Apparently, Richards' relationship with him wasn't all that good at that time. He also gave WB the advice that if you're playing on stage in front of an audience and you make a mistake, if you've hit a wrong note or whatever, you should repeat the mistake, and then repeat it a third time. That way, they'll think you did it on purpose. and it's meant to be that way. Which actually would explain much of rock music.

At the end of the conversation, Richards offered WB a backstage pass and an invite to hang out with the Stones after the concert. You'd think that he'd jump at the chance, but actually, WB turned him down, said it would be kind of weird, and said good-bye. Curiously, I think I can understand this.

Day Of The Mule

I read Isaac Asimov's Foundation trilogy back when I was in high school. It must have not made much of an impression on me, because I don't remember that much about it, at least not like other science fiction books I read back then that seemed to stick with me a lot more, for whatever reason, like Stranger In A Strange Land or Roger Zelazny's Amber series. And I guess Asimov wrote a couple more Foundation books later on years after the original trilogy, but I never read them and know nothing about them.

But one thing I do remember, one of the plot points of the original trilogy was that there was a historian/scientist named Hari Seldon who formalized a branch of science called "psychohistory" wherein you could predict the future of human history because the behavior of large masses of people was knowable. So a group uses this in an attempt to ameliorate the effects of an impending galactic civilizational collapse, predicted well in advance by Seldon before his death.

All is going according to plan until some guy called "The Mule" shows up and starts building his own empire, which turns out to be totally unpredicted by the group's previously dependable psychohistorical analysis. This is because the Mule is a galactic anomaly, a one-off mutant, and thus not part of the mass numbers of humans that psychohistory requires to be accurate. And so now a monkey wrench has been thrown into their calculations and they have to scramble for a solution to get future history back on track, else galactic civilization is doomed to a 30,000 years-long dark age.

Anyway, we don't have psychohistory, at least not yet, but I think Donald Trump is the present day's equivalent of The Mule.

Normally, our political candidates are chosen for us by the donor classes of both parties, they are the gatekeepers because they control the cash spigots. Step out of line, do or say something they don't like, and the money dries up. People have been lamenting this for decades, saying "there's not a dime's difference between the two parties" and complaining about "Tweedledum and Tweedledee" candidates. But no matter how loud the complaining, every election cycle is the same, nothing ever changes, nothing is ever really different, and no matter who wins, the donor classes always have things well in hand. The winners of every election is the donor classes.

But maybe not this time.

Because along comes Donald Trump, an egotistical, loudmouthed boor who has, in effect, dropped his pants and mooned the entire election establishment. He's a man who has his own money and is not beholden to any of the donors, not Wall Street, not unions, not any corporate interest or K Street lobbyist group. So they don't have any leverage over him at all, he's totally outside the predictable path within which elections are designed to go. Which is why the anti-Trump rhetoric coming from the GOPe sounds so panicky: he's just totally outside their experience. They can't control him, they can't tell him what to do. You can just smell the flop sweat emanating from the GOPe.

The Mule has entered the building.

Time will tell if the Controlling Class will be able to figure out a way to neutralize The Mule. In the meantime, I have to say I'm greatly enjoying their panic and butthurt. They're in the grip of a "Seldon crisis", only there's no Seldon to save them.


Tolkien Auction

I think most of us have seen that map of Middle Earth that's in pretty much all the editions of Lord of the Rings, right? Well, they found a special copy of it, with comments on it by Tolkien himself:

The map was found loose in a copy of the acclaimed illustrator Pauline Baynes’ copy of The Lord of the Rings. Baynes had removed the map from another edition of the novel as she began work on her own colour Map of Middle-earth for Tolkien, which would go on to be published by Allen & Unwin in 1970. Tolkien himself had then copiously annotated it in green ink and pencil, with Baynes adding her own notes to the document while she worked.

It's on sale, but the price, as you might guess, ain't cheap.

Blackwell’s, which is currently exhibiting the map in Oxford and selling it for £60,000, called it “an important document, and perhaps the finest piece of Tolkien ephemera to emerge in the last 20 years at least”.

I figure it'll be snapped by a flush Tolkien fan before too long.

Thanks to Laurie David's Cervix in last week's thread for the tip.


New Group on Goodreads

'Ette commenter @votermom e-mailed me this week to announce the formation of an AoSHQ-oriented reading group on Goodreads:

It's meant to support horde writers and to talk about the great books that come up on the book thread. Right now it is pretty bare bones but we are well-supplied with valu-rite. It's called AoSHQ Moron Horde and the link to it is https://www.goodreads.com/group/show/175335-aoshq-moron-horde.

Once again, that's https://www.goodreads.com/group/show/175335-aoshq-moron-horde.


Give Me Some Skin

I had this piece ready to go for last week's book thread, but I somehow dropped it and it didn't make it in to the published version.

So, without further ado...

How about books bound with human skin?

According to experts, the practice of binding books with human leather ended around the late 19th century, and there are no known 20th-century examples. Today, the idea seems disrespectful if not repugnant, and there are often strong objections to the public display of such books, even as historical specimens. That's why libraries and museums increasingly want to know whether the books in their collections purportedly bound in human skin are the real thing.

Of course, until you take a little inevntory, you never know what will turn up:

On October 5, staff at the Mütter Museum of the College of Physicians of Philadelphia—a renowned collection of medical specimens, artifacts and equipment—announced the results of scientific testing on five of their books whose inscriptions indicated they had been bound in human leather. The testing proved the bindings really did come from people, making the Mütter home to the largest known collection of books bound in human skin in the United States.

So why was this grisly practice er, practiced?

Many of the earliest examples relate to punishment. England’s Murder Act of 1751 stipulated that those convicted of murder would not only be executed but, as an additional deterrent, could not be buried. Until its repeal in 1832, the law required that murderers either be publicly dissected or “hanged in chains.” In some cases, making items out of criminals’ skins provided yet another way to ensure the body stayed aboveground.

Of course, this could also be done voluntarily:

Others gave their skin willingly for the purposes of memorialization. One example of this is on display at the Boston Athenaeum Library. The book, published in 1837, has the highly informative title of Narrative of the life of James Allen : alias George Walton, alias Jonas Pierce, alias James H. York, alias Burley Grove, the highwayman : being his death-bed confession, to the warden of the Massachusetts State Prison. Allen had requested that his skin be used after his death as the cover for two copies of a book chronicling his crimes. One copy would go to John Fenno Jr., the only man known to have stood up to him, and another to his doctor.

Of course, binding books in human skin has a technical term, and it sounds all science-y and stuff: "anthropodermic bibliopegy".

Ask for it by name.

This was yet another tip from Laurie David's Cervix.


Books By Morons

Longtime moron commenter and unrepentant punster Seamus Muldoon has been flapping his gums for a number of months now about writing a novel based on his father's WWII diary. Well, the good news is that he finally published it. To Save Us All From Ruin: A Muldoon Adventure is now available on Kindle at the Amazon, and will soon be out in paperback. Here's how Seamus described it to me in the email he sent:

This lively tale follows the adventures of three brothers (farm boys from Colorado) during WWII. It features Army life, the Anzio invasion, artillery exploits, a hamster, the fearsome Anzio Annie cannon and includes bonus features of a beautiful Italian songstress, all woven on a background of family love. It is accessible to military buffs and non-military buffs alike. Oh, and it features pie quite prominently. The story was drawn from my dad's real life WWII diary and actual excerpts from the diary help to tie the story together. I welcome any reader feedback either in the comments or via email to seamus_muldoon at the yahoo thingy with dotcom ending. Enjoy!

Trigger warnings for war violence, Italian sirens, and gratuitous flaunting of pie.


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There's good news for all of us fans of Old Sailor Poet's Amy Lynn stories, the third book Amy Lynn, The Lady of Castle Dunn is finally available as a Kindle edition.


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I heard from a new moron author this week. Long time lurker Vince is the author what he calls his "Challenged World" series. He describes them as "action-packed spiritual thrillers". The first one is The Unknown Element, which is actually Vince's debut novel, which a number of Amazon reviewers say is one of those you can't put down.

Ebola, ISIS, Drug Cartels – and Dark Forces driving events.

In pursuit, an eclectic team of three very dissimilar individuals. A reserved small town sheriff on a reluctant quest for justice. A beautiful and eccentric technology genius striving to piece together international clues to terrorism. An epicurean French priest committed to combat. Can they work together to challenge a nightmarish conspiracy without driving each other crazy?

The second book, Pretty Little Creatures, continues the story - and the action.

Speaking of the 3 main characters, one of the Amazon reviewers wrote:

Yet they are clearly Christian. The characters grow in faith and that is one of the major threads of both books. The three hero/heroines are a delight: a typical, 21st century sheriff suddenly confronted with the reality of spiritual evil; a computer geek supreme, completely worldly—confronted with the same; and a Vatican exorcist who acts more like a spiritual Chuck Norris, a la Friar Tuck.

And Vince tells me he is already hard at work on the third book in the series.

I'm guessing there should be trigger warnings in these books for depictions of Actual Good and Actual Evil.


___________

So that's all for this week. As always, book thread tips, suggestions, bribes, rumors, threats, and insults may be sent to OregonMuse, Proprietor, AoSHQ Book Thread, at the book thread e-mail address: aoshqbookthread, followed by the 'at' sign, and then 'G' mail, and then dot cee oh emm.

What have you all been reading this week? Hopefully something good, because, as you all know, life is too short to be reading lousy books.

Posted by: Open Blogger at 08:58 AM




Comments

(Jump to bottom of page)

1 I am on the last of the Mitch Rapp series not counting the new one that is co-authored. I have two new books that I got when Amazon put them on sale.

Posted by: Vic-we have no party at November 01, 2015 09:55 AM (t2KH5)

2 Ilario Pantano, Grand Theft History: How Liberals Stole Southern Valor in the American Revolution

Ilario Pantano, if you couldn't tell from the name, is from the North. But he is also from a demographic of the North which the Yankees press-ganged into the Union army - think "Gangs of New York". So he is at least willing to give the South a listen.

What Pantano finds is a huge battle in 1780, Kings Mountain - in which South Carolina's peckerwoods delivered to its loyalist militia a sound beating. Being a Brit myself I cannot say that this beating was undeserved. Banastre Tarleton had been a thug and a rotten commander, and his arrogance and brutality turned what could have been a northern New England affair (with some scattered partisan riots) into a thirteen-colony Revolution. At Kings Mountain the Loyalist commander Patrick Ferguson wasn't as thuggish but was twice as stupid. The Brits were lucky they hadn't stationed similar losers in Canada and the Caribbean (and "the Tristate-Area" by the way, it mostly stayed loyal too, until Yorktown).

But that's not really what the book's about. The book is about how is itother books haven't mentioned this event.

At the time the British press raised a huge stink, and demanded that the generals Clinton and/or Cornwallis be punished; and for decades after Yorktown the blame-game went on in the old country, to "credit" Clinton or Cornwallis with the debacle.

Winston Churchill (part American, part Brit) counts the battle as an early example of Southern valour. It was remembered up to 1972 in popular American culture. And apparently the academic historians still remember it because "Battle of Kings Mountain" today boasts a comprehensive Wikipedia page. Pantano documents all of this (except Wikipedia).

But I got here in 1978, disembarking at Boston; and I'd not heard of this battle until now. Pantano notes several historians who should have mentioned it and didn't. Some are names that I've long known as "respected historians": David McCullough, Ken Burns, Joseph Ellis. (Also Foner and Zinn.) It turns out that a lot of them are Obama donors. And Joseph Ellis is a notorious liar:
http://www.nytimes.com/2001/08/21/opinion/the-lies-of-joseph-ellis.html

Pantono concludes that since these historians range from biased to dishonest, they have committed a similar act of scholarly treachery here. These are not historians as we know it. They are propagandists out to erase Southern history. The ultimate aim is to recast America as Social Justice Nation.

I can confirm that this erasure is still going on - and it might even have become unconscious. I also saw Richard H. Brown and Paul E. Cohen, "Revolution: Mapping the Road to American Independence, 1755-1783". Guess what battle's not there?

Brown is this guy:
http://maps.bpl.org/highlights/ar/richard-h-brown-revolutionary-war-map-collection

Cohen is this guy:
http://www.arkway.com/nyc-gallery/paul-cohen.html

They seem to be genuine map-buffs, not propagandists themselves; but they are both from the northeast, and they seem just to have swallowed what the "respected historians" told them.

So although I don't share Pantano's religious faith, and although I find him to be excitable... I have to say I'm getting to be convinced by his book. Especially about Ellis - that slimeball should be publishing his work through CreateSpace, in between shifts hoovering the Holyoke faculty lounge.

Posted by: boulder terlit hobo at November 01, 2015 09:57 AM (B6gF4)

3 Morning All! Hope you enjoyed the extra hour!

Posted by: Beth M at November 01, 2015 10:01 AM (kiy9d)

4 Friday I received a thick manila envelope. Inside was a book by Chuck Swindoll entitled "The Owner's Manual - An essential guide for a God-honoring life". I have no idea who sent it to me. I haven't begun to read it yet because I've been hanging around here too much.



Anyway, I'll be late to church if I don't get going. Have a good morning, and if you receive a book in the mail, it isn't from me.


Posted by: grammie winger, uff da at November 01, 2015 10:01 AM (dFi94)

5 TLR


*Kidding!*

Posted by: Village Idiot's Apprentice at November 01, 2015 10:02 AM (VPLuQ)

6 I really like your "Donald Trump is The Mule" idea. Spot on.

Over on archive.org, there's an eight part BBC radio play of the Foundation trilogy (it's been mentioned here before). It's pretty good, especially if you have read the books. It's been said that listening to that radio play inspired Douglas Adams to write the Hitchhiker four-book trilogy.

Posted by: AltonJackson at November 01, 2015 10:02 AM (ZQfW9)

7 Hi Oregon Muse! Thank you for the shout out to goodreads group.

We are up to 29 members now and growing. Hope y'all will join us.

The link to the group is also in my nic. Just click on Join Group and me or co-mod cool breeze will approve it - just let us know what your HQ nic is. ( If you are a lurker who never comments, how about delurking on this thread to say hello, before joining.)

Thanks!

Posted by: The Raven at November 01, 2015 10:03 AM (cbfNE)

8 Keith Richards is still alive?
That's incredible.

Posted by: Abe Vigoda at November 01, 2015 10:04 AM (eteeV)

9 Keith Richards is also bound in human leather.

Posted by: Pappy O'Daniel at November 01, 2015 10:05 AM (oVJmc)

10 Meh, books bound in human skin don't faze me too much. As long as there isn't a wizened human face on the cover, I'm cool with it. And for an autobiography it's kind of apt, yes?

Human vellum might be a bridge too far.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, Michigangsta at November 01, 2015 10:05 AM (jR7Wy)

11 Just thought I'd share with you how much "time" I had to take to reset my clocks (I have quite a few all over the house).

Less than a tenth of a second.

That was to push the button that switches between DST or regular time on one clock.

How is this possible you ask?

I never change more than one in the spring.

The clock with the button is the main one is it. All the others I leave alone and automatically add an hour during the summer if I need to know what time everyone else is on.

It's time to rebel against this wasteful, unhealthy and useless "tradition". I say tradition because that's all it is. NO ONE, repeat NO ONE can tell us that there's any savings or benefit from doing this. It's become a matter of faith and a ritual that we all complain about but leave alone.

And it's proven to be unhealthy by upsetting one's sleep pattern twice a year.

Next year don't do it and let others know you're not doing it. Maybe we can end this stupid archaic and harmful "tradition".

If we can't change something most of us agree is useless, how will we get the courage to change the stuff that's harder to do? And riskier?

Posted by: Bitter Clinger and All That at November 01, 2015 10:05 AM (Xo1Rt)

12 Historians have always glossed over the portion of the Revolutionary War that occurred in the South. It took Mel Gibson to actually make a movie about it. That was the first movie about the war in the South since Walt Disney did the Swamp Fox series back in the 50s if I am not mistaken.

Posted by: Vic-we have no party at November 01, 2015 10:07 AM (t2KH5)

13 I like today's library picture, has a nice homey feel. But then I enjoy nosing around in people's libraries and leave mine proudly open to other's perusal, even the embarrassing cheezy paperbacks.

Is that methadone on Keith's coffee table?

Posted by: All Hail Eris, Michigangsta at November 01, 2015 10:07 AM (jR7Wy)

14 Ooops, posted abput the goodreads group under The Raven sock.

How embarrassing.

*blush*

Posted by: @votermom at November 01, 2015 10:09 AM (cbfNE)

15 I crawled out of my habitual illiteracy to read most of the Baskervilles but (i) I didn't finish it in time for the thread, and (B) I was kind of passed out when the thread happened.

Posted by: Bandersnatch, Opus/Bill the Cat 2016 at November 01, 2015 10:09 AM (1xUj/)

16 The mule concept is interesting. I'm watching a series, 'How we got to now' on Amazon. It's fascinating how in history one person came along in the right place at the right time and changed the world through nothing but hard work and persistence.

Two examples of the many were the (unapproved) introduction of chlorine into drinking water. Up until then cholera was routine in this country. Until then, things were bad, and getting worse.

Another example was a man who fought to bring uniform time across the country and four times zones. A radical concept at the time. Up until then things were bad and getting worse.

Right now things are bad and getting worse. Those who do not learn from history, thinking that one man does not have the power to change a downward spiral, are destined to annoy me.

Posted by: se pa moron at November 01, 2015 10:12 AM (7v/r5)

17 The local library's book sale was a bit of a bust this time. Not surprising, because it tends to be cyclical, ranging all the way from Gold Mine to Toxic Waste Dump in its selection. The locals have bizarre reading habits, to put it mildly.

So no good history or biographies, but I did score a copy of John Brunner's Stand on Zanzibar, which was considered by critics one of the best sci-fi books evah. Don't really know about the "sci-fi" aspect, as it has neither space travel, other worlds or startling new technology, but it's a hell of a book. The scenarios he imagines are totally believable, and never seem contrived to me.

Not sure I would recommend Brunner; he's something of an acquired taste. Some chapters of Stand read like the products of a computer-age James Joyce, while others are more normal. He liked to make up words, as well, though not the Joycean gibberish sort.

I'm going to have to hunt up some more Brunner. Read some in the past, enjoyed them, but I find them even more entertaining now.

Posted by: MrScribbler at November 01, 2015 10:13 AM (qiCMH)

18 Hi all! Long time lurker here. Used to comment here and there awhile back as 'Zuke'. Glad to see we have a new Goodreads page up and running.

Posted by: Zuke at November 01, 2015 10:13 AM (ejLjm)

19 Theodora is Keith's daughter with his second wife-Patti Hansen.

Posted by: ABC HASKINS at November 01, 2015 10:15 AM (ljSO2)

20 I am always impressed by the literary talent here at the HQ

What about forming an HQ publishing imprint or a literary guild?

Posted by: chemjeff - go chiefs at November 01, 2015 10:16 AM (uZNvH)

21 This week I read The Survivor by Vince Flynn and Kyle Mills. I heard an interview of Mills. He said that when he was contacted by the Flynn family to finish this book, he was both honored and thunderstruck by the task at hand. After accepting the offer, the first thing Mills did was to go back and read the Mitch Rapp novels in order. He was well-served by this decision as this book is a fitting memorial to both Vince Flynn and his character, Mitch Rapp.

On my Kindle I finished The Fourth Turning: An American Prophecy by William Strauss and Neil Howe. In this book they apply their generational theories of their previous works to the cycles of history. They conclude that there is a pattern of four periods, which they label turnings. Each turning is 20-25 years in duration, so a cycle is 80-100 years. The turnings are High - Awakening - Unraveling - Crisis followed by another High.

It is no surprise that we now are in the middle of the Crisis turning. Writing this in the mid-90's, during the middle of the Unraveling, Strauss and Howe are uncertain about the outcome because, "History is seasonal, but outcomes are not foreordained. The crisis may only be a resetting of culture or style of governance; or if a large-scale nuclear war occurs or there is a world-wide economic collapse, the very foundations and existence or our country may be at peril. I found this book to be interesting and thought-provoking.

Posted by: Zoltan at November 01, 2015 10:17 AM (THsLo)

22 This has been a great week for reading.

I finished The Christmas Cantata by Mark Schweizer, the tenth book in the Liturgical Mysteries series. It isn't a murder mystery but a story of discovery. It has the same cast of fun characters and is even slighty predictable but it's still a lovely story. Well worth the read and so appropriate for the Christmas season.

Schweizer knows the power of music. For me, the most poignant aspect was when he described the rare moment when disparate human voices coalesce into a perfect wholeness. One that infuses the world with a new unity and brings all who produce and experience it closer to a state of wonder and grace. That peak can't be sustained but the embers remain, softly glowing and warm, for a lifetime. I've been blessed to partake of a few such moments.

I know the above sounds overly passionate but the book provides a context for it, at least to me. It was a remarkable and unexpected delight.

Posted by: JTB at November 01, 2015 10:19 AM (FvdPb)

23 I like the surprises that tumble out of old books left unopened for ages. I just reached for a crumbling copy of "Stanley in Africa: the Paladin of the Nineteenth Century" (1889).

Out fell a bookmark with my dad's handwriting saying "The steel for the finest swords is thrust into the fire ten thousand times". So strange to see his distinctive penmanship.

Also, a news clipping entitled "With right motivation, even right-brained people can get organized". It has a photo of a sleek modern bookcase with a cool minimalist recliner, all the very antithesis of my, uh, eclectic style. I think I tucked it in there unread!

Also found a leather Balinese bookmark (not human skin...I think).

Posted by: All Hail Eris, Michigangsta at November 01, 2015 10:20 AM (jR7Wy)

24 Amity Shlae's The Forgotten Man led me to see Trump as this era's Wendell Willie. A dem businessman hurt by dem policies who realized the administration was completely out of control and the Rs had no plans for stopping them. Trump knows that unfiltered immigration is the existential threat of our time, which makes Rs hate him, just as Willie knew the U.S. would *have* to fight the Nazis at some point which made the Rs hate him.

Posted by: Polliwog the 'Ette at November 01, 2015 10:20 AM (GDulk)

25 I agree with the Trump = The Mule analogy.

Back when I was a kid I thought Foundation was so cool. But as an adult I realize that Hari Seldon is really a techno-Marx, isn't he?

Posted by: @votermom at November 01, 2015 10:21 AM (cbfNE)

26 For the masochist writers, or is that redundant, today starts NaNoWriMo. Local group will be meeting this afternoon. I've signed up but after finishing this contest twice, loses any real appeal. So will be using the month to write more of the Golden Isis sequels. I have about 4,000 words already written.

In the mean time please buy my book.
http://astore.amazon.com/aoshq-20/detail/B014BTSEYO

Posted by: Anna Puma at November 01, 2015 10:21 AM (fD00r)

27 Anyway, we don't have psychohistory, at least not yet, but I think Donald Trump is the present day's equivalent of The Mule.

I laughed at this.

I think the internet has reached a critical mass point - or a node along that path, anyway. People are finding out the truth or non-truths, or are now convinced that EVERYONE is lying and it's all been a charade in politics.

Funny, Sandra Bullock just said the same thing in a recent interview with Greta (of all people). Because her new film sounds very much like this. Exposing what goes on behind the scenes of dirty, dirty politics.

Posted by: artisanal 'ette at November 01, 2015 10:22 AM (qCMvj)

28 15 I crawled out of my habitual illiteracy to read most of the Baskervilles but (i) I didn't finish it in time for the thread, and (B) I was kind of passed out when the thread happened.
Posted by: Bandersnatch, Opus/Bill the Cat 2016 at November 01, 2015 10:09 AM (1xUj/)
---
Me too. I was rushing to get through the book, which I am enjoying by the way, but the push to finish was ruining the experience and it felt like cramming for a book report.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, Michigangsta at November 01, 2015 10:23 AM (jR7Wy)

29 Quoth the Votermom nevermore?

Posted by: Anna Puma at November 01, 2015 10:24 AM (fD00r)

30 Books I'm reading:

I just finished Life Unworthy by fellow moron Christopher Taylor. It's about a werewolf vs Nazis in occupied Poland. The historical details are well researched and the characters think in-period. I liked it a lot.
Left a review on amazon & goodreads.

Starting on Loyal Valley Assassination by 'ette Elisabeth G. Wolfe which starts out in Texas just as the Civil War starts.

Posted by: @votermom at November 01, 2015 10:25 AM (cbfNE)

31 Hi, vmom! I'm a long-time lurker what lurks that sent a request for goodreads. AND, I highly recommend Old Sailor Poet's Amy Lynn books!!

Posted by: Lilredhen at November 01, 2015 10:25 AM (GaIDK)

32 All Hail Eris, the Hillary! statuette as a substitute for Kali. Would that be considered Occult Horror or just Horror?

Posted by: Anna Puma at November 01, 2015 10:27 AM (fD00r)

33 I recommend Keith Richard's autobiography. The story of the Stones being stopped by an Arkansas Deputy Sheriff alone is worth reading the book, but there is much more.

Posted by: tmitsss at November 01, 2015 10:27 AM (Pa9vP)

34 Oh, I do like today's library picture. So much more comfy and personal, although the institutional libraries are awesome.

I've been working on the last little bits of the book that my daughter and I are writing together - The Chronicles of Luna City ... or what happens when a town like Cecily, Alaska (of Northern Exposure) happens to be situated in South Texas.
Trying to get it done and launched in time for the round of Christmas fairs coming up. The other book for the year - Sunset and Steel Rails - is finally up on Amazon in both print and kindle, although the look inside feature isn't activated yet. I'll send the links for next week's Book Thread.

Posted by: Sgt. Mom at November 01, 2015 10:28 AM (95iDF)

35 1) Keith Richards: It is what you read, not how many books which effects you. While Mr. Richards might love reading, it does not seem to helped him live his life better. Also, when he visited that library, did he pay for the books he did not return?

2) Foundation Series: If you are a avid fan of old SF, you have to read the Foundation and Robot series by Asimov. While I found some of these a little dull as Asimov began to write his books with dialogue only, how he fashioned these series and linked them was very good.

Posted by: Zogger at November 01, 2015 10:28 AM (wwKtS)

36 The problem with the I snorted grandpa story is that it's not going to be absorbed thru the mucous membranes. It will remain as an irritant to your lungs and cause pneumonia.

Posted by: Bruce With a Wang! at November 01, 2015 10:29 AM (iQIUe)

37 I think the internet has reached a critical mass
point - or a node along that path, anyway. People are finding out the
truth or non-truths, or are now convinced that EVERYONE is lying and
it's all been a charade in politics. Posted by: artisanal 'ette at November 01, 2015 10:22 AM


I would say a majority of what is found on the Intarwebz is either skewed at best or flat-out dung. You really have to sift through the incredibly large piles of excreta found online and use your own critical-thinking skills to dig out the nuggets of veracity.

Not that it's a new phenomenon. Printed books have more than their share of distortions, falsehoods and misinformation, but the ease with which anyone can say anything via a computer tends to bring out the wackos.

Posted by: MrScribbler at November 01, 2015 10:29 AM (qiCMH)

38 32 All Hail Eris, the Hillary! statuette as a substitute for Kali. Would that be considered Occult Horror or just Horror?
Posted by: Anna Puma at November 01, 2015 10:27 AM (fD00r)
---
Ha ha, I grew up in a house with Kali statues (explains a lot, doesn't it?). It was explained to me that Kali was all about righteous, creative destruction. Does that describe the Haggard Queen?

Posted by: All Hail Eris, Michigangsta at November 01, 2015 10:30 AM (jR7Wy)

39 I love the analogy between the Foundation series and Trump. Bravo! It's both accurate and entertaining.

Posted by: JTB at November 01, 2015 10:31 AM (FvdPb)

40 Back when I was a kid I thought Foundation was so
cool. But as an adult I realize that Hari Seldon is really a
techno-Marx, isn't he?

Posted by: @votermom at November 01, 2015 10:21 AM (cbfNE)

Yeah, it seems to me that Hari Seldon is really just the logical extension of Marx's predictions

Posted by: chemjeff - go chiefs at November 01, 2015 10:31 AM (uZNvH)

41 Aaaargh ace! Help me, ace! Save me, ace! Save me!

Posted by: Daylight at November 01, 2015 10:31 AM (jRs7b)

42 No time to loae!

Posted by: Daylight at November 01, 2015 10:32 AM (jRs7b)

43 OregonMuse,

The Mule was a very, very smart guy, which makes him rather unlike Trump, whose public blather sounds like a man who is covering up his ignorance with jingoistic pronouncements and cheerleading.

Other than that, I love the comparison! And...I am trying to think of other characters in major works who were unexpected. The only one I can think of off-hand is Paul Atreides in Dune.

Posted by: CharlieBrown'sDildo at November 01, 2015 10:33 AM (Zu3d9)

44
Anybody hear of Arthur Ransome? He was an engish reporter over in Russia during the revolution. Went bolshie b/c he was in love. Returned bc he saw how people were getting murdered by his best bud Lenin. He returned and wrote a series of children's books that are still popular called the Swallows and Amazon series. They involved adventures in the Lake District with sailing and camping. They are suppose to go into detail about those activities. It sounds like a good idea for a kid's book. Teaching them how to do things.

Posted by: Bruce With a Wang! at November 01, 2015 10:33 AM (iQIUe)

45

For those authors...

Maximize Your KDP Select Free Days

http://digitalbooktoday.com/maximize-your-kdp-select-free-days/

interesting reading

Posted by: artisanal 'ette at November 01, 2015 10:33 AM (qCMvj)

46 So Kali is right out. My grasp of the various religions and deities of the Indian sub-continent is a bit weak.

Hillary! could be described as the Grand Thugee??

Posted by: Anna Puma at November 01, 2015 10:34 AM (fD00r)

47 We call him Bloody Tarleton still

Posted by: tmitsss at November 01, 2015 10:34 AM (Pa9vP)

48 Yes! It's a cult that demands blood sacrifices.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, Michigangsta at November 01, 2015 10:35 AM (jR7Wy)

49 Foundation Series: If you are a avid fan of old SF,
you have to read the Foundation and Robot series by Asimov. While I
found some of these a little dull as Asimov began to write his books
with dialogue only, how he fashioned these series and linked them was
very good.

Posted by: Zogger at November 01, 2015 10:28 AM


Having recently revisited the "Foundation" series, I agree. Asimov was a better-than-average wordsmith who occasionally fell prey to dragginess. Back in the day, I could -- and did -- read several of his books in succession, but can't now. The basic structure of his novels, however, was excellent.

Posted by: MrScribbler at November 01, 2015 10:37 AM (qiCMH)

50 Oregon Muse, I got this question from a moron out in Singapore (I suspect timezones make it hard for him to catch morning threads):

"Could you ask OM has there been a review or poll on which e-reader Rons and Ettes use?

Heading to Bangkok next weekend to visit a mate that goes to Siam Uni and it is the only city in Thailand where I can get a Kindle."

Posted by: @votermom at November 01, 2015 10:37 AM (cbfNE)

51 Big day yesterday. After three months, my SJW 17 yr old daughter ended her self-imposed 'silent treatment' toward me. Although she no doubt still thinks i am the epitome of a white-privileged, racist, Euro-centric oppressor, one-percenter capitalist flag-waving imperialist, at least she has come to the conclusion that i mean no immediate direct harm to her and the world. My wife's cautionary strategy to 'give her time' appears to have worked.

Posted by: goatexchange at November 01, 2015 10:37 AM (Nd4YY)

52 Posted by: MrScribbler at November 01, 2015 10:29 AM (qiCMH)

I won't argue the point about how much of the written word is total bullshit, because if anything you are underestimating the inaccuracy.

However, I would suggest that the works of the so-called professional journalists are, on the whole, worse than the random blogger spouting his personal political philosophy and novel explanations of....whatever.

Posted by: CharlieBrown'sDildo at November 01, 2015 10:38 AM (Zu3d9)

53 Posted by: goatexchange at November 01, 2015 10:37 AM (Nd4YY)

How can she accept food and clothing and shelter and cell phones and internet service from such an evil man?

Posted by: CharlieBrown'sDildo at November 01, 2015 10:39 AM (Zu3d9)

54 Hi to the Goodreads group.

40
Back when I was a kid I thought Foundation was so

cool. But as an adult I realize that Hari Seldon is really a

techno-Marx, isn't he?



Posted by: @votermom at November 01, 2015 10:21 AM (cbfNE)
Yeah, it seems to me that Hari Seldon is really just the logical extension of Marx's predictions


Posted by: chemjeff - go chiefs at November 01, 2015 10:31 AM (uZNvH)

Same reaction here.

Posted by: redclay06 at November 01, 2015 10:41 AM (n5+7R)

55 I read Isaac Asimov's Foundation trilogy back when I was in high school. It must have not made much of an impression on me, because I don't remember that much about it, at least not like other science fiction books I read back then that seemed to stick with me a lot more, for whatever reason, like Stranger In A Strange Land....

Must be something about "polyamorous" messiahs from Mars that sticks with you better than dry scientific eons-spanning psychodrama. Especially if you're a high-schooler.

Posted by: mindful webworker - awake, anyway at November 01, 2015 10:41 AM (Dqfn9)

56 Lousy week for getting any reading done. Too much work, which I complain about, and too much grandkids time, which I never complain about. Reading The Violent Man by A.E. Van Vogt and a unusual non-fiction called Jock: a memoir of the counter-culture by Robert Coe, a former Stanford runner.

Glad to see a gatekeeper at the Goodreads group. Don't have the time and energy to put up with the 'mean girls' attitude over there. Looking forward to seeing all the other Horde authors.

Not doing NaNoWriMo. I'm a grinder, in running and writing.

Switch one of my computers to Linux - all the buttons actually work on the comment section. A relief from Windows 10 suckitude.

Posted by: Long Running Fool at November 01, 2015 10:41 AM (L0bUn)

57 You forgot 'community college tuition.' Did i mention she was 17, and thus unbound by logic, common sense, observational skills, irony, hypocrisy....? i *did* mention SJW, so all that is covered though.....

Posted by: goatexchange at November 01, 2015 10:41 AM (Nd4YY)

58 *pauses*

Well since I had Catherine take a pot-shot at the tin-pot from Corsica rewriting his own history into victories, guess in the Alexandria story should mention how Ramesses the Great recast his draw at Kadesh as a victory when he got home. He had it chiseled in stone no less.

Posted by: Anna Puma at November 01, 2015 10:42 AM (fD00r)

59 Heh. Unrepentant, eh?

I'll have you know that at last count there was but a single pun in the entire book.

And I think there is one "this, this and that but mostly that" line.

Thanks for the plug, OM. It's not great literature like say, Hound of the Baskervilles, but I had fun writing it and hope readers enjoy it.

Please use Ace's Amazon link to click through to Amazon and search

"To Save Us All From Ruin"

Posted by: Seamus Muldoon at November 01, 2015 10:42 AM (mvenn)

60 From about age 10 to 15 I was a huge Isaac Asimov fan. I read all his fiction, a lot of his popular science and pop-Shakespeare writings, and his bulky autobiography. I even talked with him once on the phone.

But now . . . when I re-read his stuff it's not as great. And the Foundation series -- probably the best thing he ever wrote -- has suffered the most. It's almost a catalogue of mid-century Northeastern liberal shibboleths:

-- History can be predicted, and planned.
-- A massive centralized state is the only proper form of civilization.
-- Religion is a useful superstition, nothing more.
-- It is not only possible but necessary and proper for "experts" to manipulate the people without their knowledge or consent.

It diminishes him.

Posted by: Trimegistus at November 01, 2015 10:42 AM (VvMUk)

61 Yep, I have the same Tolkien map, hanging just to the right of my pooter screen here... I didn't pay 60 thousand pounds for it.

Posted by: BurtTC at November 01, 2015 10:43 AM (Dj0WE)

62 I cannot read Asimov. I remember when I was young that interviewers always made a big deal over the fact that he had written over 200 books. Then I picked up I.A.'s Guide to Shakespeare thinking it might help me with English class. It was awful - he got plot points wrong and his interpretations must have come to him on LSD trips. I concluded that it can't be all that hard to write 200 books if you're just randomly putting words on the page. I don't think I ever confronted such comprehensive stupidity again until I tried to read David Brooks' Bobos in Paradise - and I had to read both Rousseau and Marx in college.

Posted by: Emmett Milbarge at November 01, 2015 10:43 AM (nFdGS)

63 This week I've been reading the books of Booth Tarkington. I read "The Turmoil" several days ago, and today I expect to finish "The Magnificent Ambersons". Next is "The Midlander", and those 3 are a trilogy about the coming of the industrial age to a midland town (based on Indianapolis, I think), and how it mushroomed into a huge city and lost the graces of its early existence.

I was always puzzled by Orson Welles's movie of Ambersons, and wondered why he was so struck by the story that he wanted to film it. The book also won a Pulitzer Prize. Well, now that I'm into it, it really has a lot to recommend it. It's not just a story about the rise and fall of a family that fails to move with the times. It's a story about America in a way. I guess Tarkington couldn't have foreseen that eventually America itself would be the Amberson family, living on and using up its accumulated capital, ossifying into a sort of careless certainty that it would always be on top because that was just the nature of things.

Posted by: Dr. Mabuse at November 01, 2015 10:43 AM (gjLib)

64 Posted by: boulder terlit hobo at November 01, 2015 09:57 AM (B6gF4)

Patrick Ferguson also
a) invented and pushed the Ferguson breech loading flintlock that, among other things, could fire (between 6 and shots a minute aimed fire and be cleared and fired within 5 minutes of being soaked in a tub of water for 5 minutes;
b) was a gentleman and declined to shoot General Washington from an ambush personally when he had the chance;
and c) was in command at the only set-piece battle that the personal rifle equipped militia beat the musket equipped professional British army.

It may be more that they have to discredit that part of it, and that the militia was Sothron is secondary.

Ferguson was killed and his breech loader concept abandoned.

H. Beam Piper had a short story where he posited that the Ferguson not being a gentleman, shot Washington, and his type rifles were what led the British army to sweeping Napoleon's troops from the field.

Posted by: Kindlto at November 01, 2015 10:44 AM (3pRHP)

65 I suppose shots a minute is valid too.

Posted by: Kindlto at November 01, 2015 10:44 AM (3pRHP)

66 ron wood is bad ass

Posted by: phoenixgirl, i was born a rebel at November 01, 2015 10:46 AM (0O7c5)

67 Yeah, it seems to me that Hari Seldon is really just the logical extension of Marx's predictions. Posted by: chemjeff - go chiefs at November 01, 2015 10:31 AM

In sci-fi's Golden Age, a lot of authors went for the idea of one federation/ruler governing great chunks of the universe. Not sure whether Marx had much to do with it; it's easier to imagine -- and write about -- a host of populated worlds if there is a central structure keeping order.

As for the Mule-Trump analogy: I don't buy it. IIRC, the Mule ran his worlds through despotism and threats/acts of violence. I don't see Trump that way, though I can understand how many of his detractors do.

Anyway, one of the marks of a good story is its ability to appear relevant to (and create analogues in) Real Life. Asimov was pretty good at doing that.

Posted by: MrScribbler at November 01, 2015 10:46 AM (qiCMH)

68 19 Theodora is Keith's daughter with his second wife-Patti Hansen.

Posted by: ABC HASKINS at November 01, 2015 10:15 AM (ljSO2)


Corrected, thank you.

Posted by: OregonMuse at November 01, 2015 10:46 AM (mRvHu)

69 artisnal'ette, can you re-post that link from last week of all the promotion sites?

I can't seem to find where I put the bookmark. Thanks.

Posted by: Anna Puma at November 01, 2015 10:46 AM (fD00r)

70 I thought about trying to write something for NaNoWriMo, but lately my mind has turned to the idea of writing a manual along the lines of "this is what you need to know by the time you're 18, but your high school probably won't teach you." I have a young daughter, and I want to have some sort of road map for teaching her practical skills as well as "thinking skills."

Posted by: PabloD at November 01, 2015 10:46 AM (+T2o3)

71 or the masochist writers, or is that redundant, today starts NaNoWriMo. Local group will be meeting this afternoon.

I wasn's planning on NaNoWriMo this year because it looked like work was going to be hell. But one of my projects was cancelled and the other pushed to Q12016. So I may have time to do something.

What I would like to do is finish two short stories in the Worlds Apart 'verse and add a bunch of pages to the Wiki.

Posted by: V the K at November 01, 2015 10:47 AM (c/Ipt)

72
Asimov's Foundation Trilogy is pretty much crap, which is a complete reversal of how I thought about it forty years ago. "Psychohistorical analysis", my ass.

Posted by: Krebs v Carnot: Epic Battle of the Cycling Stars (TM) at November 01, 2015 10:47 AM (BK3ZS)

73 Thanks much for the gracious post on the Challenged World series. Sincerely. And thanks to The Raven and Cool Breeze for setting up the Goodreads group. Should be a hoot!
Now, back to wondering why the scene I wrote this morning sucks giant cantaloupes. Vince

Posted by: outthere at November 01, 2015 10:48 AM (hMxnF)

74 9 Keith Richards is also bound in human leather.

Posted by: Pappy O'Daniel at November 01, 2015 10:05 AM (oVJmc)


Ha, good one.

Posted by: OregonMuse at November 01, 2015 10:48 AM (mRvHu)

75 I cannot read Asimov. I remember when I was young that interviewers always made a big deal over the fact that he had written over 200 books. Then I picked up I.A.'s Guide to Shakespeare thinking it might help me with English class. It was awful - he got plot points wrong and his interpretations must have come to him on LSD trips. I concluded that it can't be all that hard to write 200 books if you're just randomly putting words on the page. I don't think I ever confronted such comprehensive stupidity again until I tried to read David Brooks' Bobos in Paradise - and I had to read both Rousseau and Marx in college.
Posted by: Emmett Milbarge at November 01, 2015 10:43 AM (nFdGS)



I think I thought at the time Bobos in Paradise was supposed to be sort of a Spy magazine type skewering of pretention. I don't know why I never bothered to pick it up. Needless to say these days I'm glad I didn't waste my time/money.

Posted by: BurtTC at November 01, 2015 10:48 AM (Dj0WE)

76 artisnal'ette, can you re-post that link from last week of all the promotion sites?

I can't seem to find where I put the bookmark. Thanks.
Posted by: Anna Puma at November 01, 2015 10:46 AM (fD00r)


this one?


http://bit.ly/1kqBbMe

Posted by: artisanal 'ette at November 01, 2015 10:49 AM (qCMvj)

77
I'd appreciate Daylight Savings Time more if I earned interest.

Split the difference reset the clocks forward 30 minutes next March and then drop DST altogether.

Posted by: Krebs v Carnot: Epic Battle of the Cycling Stars (TM) at November 01, 2015 10:49 AM (BK3ZS)

78 The Halloween book sale is still going on, if you need some nice cheep books and who doesn't? http://nocturnal-lives.com/?p=1738 Jinxers for less than a buck!

And in human skin binding news, Camille Flammarion (French astronomer) had a fan so devoted that when she died, she left him her skin to bind a book with--and he did. Supposedly she was a countess, even. [NOTE TO MY FANS: this is perhaps excessive. Do not die, take care of yourselves so you can buy more of my books :-D ]

The writing goes well. I am about to dump my characters on a planet stuffed to the gills with ravening giant monster beasties, and the AI has been left to take care of the cat all by itself. Screaming ensues.

Posted by: Sabrina Chase at November 01, 2015 10:49 AM (GG9V6)

79 Asimov's Federation or Piper's Federation/Empire both seem to have been influenced by the writings of Toynbee.

Posted by: Anna Puma at November 01, 2015 10:50 AM (fD00r)

80 Also I can't spell my name worth a darn

Last night I was talking about Solzhenitsyn's Gulag Archipelago. It is a long book with a lot of footnotes, a lot of misery and social cannibalism in the pursuit of dogma. It is truly an example of how socialist thought degrades humanity.
Solzhenitsyn was denounced, tried and imprisoned during the final push against Germany in 1945, and was released to internal exile in 1953, and released and pardoned after Stalin's death.

If you don't have the months to read it, he also wrote another book called A Day In the Life of Ivan Denisovich, which is about the culture and life in a Soviet labor camp in short novel form - and it is a short novel, even for non-Russian writers.

Posted by: Kindltot at November 01, 2015 10:52 AM (3pRHP)

81 Hi. I'd like to join your goodreads group.

Posted by: Makoshark at November 01, 2015 10:52 AM (2XpZ0)

82 20 I am always impressed by the literary talent here at the HQ

--

chemjeff, me too! Lots of talent.

--

29 Quoth the Votermom nevermore?

*starts tapping on Anna Puma's bedroom door*

--

Hi lilredhen!
Are you in the group or did you just send a request now?

Posted by: @votermom at November 01, 2015 10:53 AM (cbfNE)

83 Just finished Larry Correia's Son of the Black Sword on Kindle and lo and behold the print copy showed up. So Mrs Hades is reading it now.

Also read Worlds Apart book 11 and Life Unworthy by our very own Moron authors Gregory of Yardsdale and Christopher Taylor. Highly recommend both.

Now reading the second Sparrowhawk book. I read a lot of fiction because real life is just too f'n irritating.

Posted by: GGE Hades of the Moron Horde, NC Chapter at November 01, 2015 10:54 AM (UQGss)

84

For the authors, again.

This is a great cause, helping out our troops.

Authors Supporting Our Troops

https://www.facebook.com/groups/ASOT2014/

pass it on
it's a Public Group

Posted by: artisanal 'ette at November 01, 2015 10:54 AM (qCMvj)

85 However, I would suggest that the works of the
so-called professional journalists are, on the whole, worse than the
random blogger spouting his personal political philosophy and novel
explanations of....whatever.


Posted by: CharlieBrown'sDildo at November 01, 2015 10:38 AM


A valid point, Mr Dildo. Certainly, the "Professionals" should be held to a higher standard for the accuracy of their work.

However, the "random bloggers" -- including some who run successful and often-read (and quoted) websites -- should take a little time to do research and ask questions before baldly asserting that Well-Known Author/Pundit X said so, and it must be true.

There are millions of readers who accept whatever they read as the truth because it's words on a screen. I don't excuse them for this stupidity, but don't hold with perpetuating it, either.

Posted by: MrScribbler at November 01, 2015 10:54 AM (qiCMH)

86 i think the plan for trump is to keep Carson in the running, split his supporters and destroy Carson at leisure in the long game

Posted by: Bigby's Knuckle Sandwich at November 01, 2015 10:55 AM (Cq0oW)

87 Re: Keef's book "Life"

Always loved him as a musician, but I assumed he was a real flake. My opinion of the man went up immensely after reading the autobiography.

Highly recommended.

Posted by: doug at November 01, 2015 10:55 AM (4u4li)

88 I'd appreciate Daylight Savings Time more if I earned interest.

Split the difference reset the clocks forward 30 minutes next March and then drop DST altogether.
Posted by: Krebs v Carnot: Epic Battle of the Cycling Stars (TM) at November 01, 2015 10:49 AM (BK3ZS)


I had my cell phone jump forward an hour on Friday, and my alarm clock (with auto-correction function) jump back one hour on Saturday... yes, I got up an hour late for work, thank you.


Technology and quaint, pointless concepts... a bad combination.

Posted by: BurtTC at November 01, 2015 10:55 AM (Dj0WE)

89 Once again NaNoWriMo comes and I look at all the half-finished stuff I should just buckle down and finish, but I know I'll still be staring at the same half-finished stuff when it comes around again next time.

Posted by: Pappy O'Daniel at November 01, 2015 10:56 AM (oVJmc)

90 81 Hi. I'd like to join your goodreads group.
Posted by: Makoshark at November 01, 2015 10:52 AM (2XpZ0)

Great! You have to be a goodreads member ( you can sign up with any email and pseudonym if you like, or you can use your FB identity.)
While signed in to goodreads, click on the link in my nic and hit the Join Group button.

Posted by: @votermom at November 01, 2015 10:56 AM (cbfNE)

91
Official Soothsayer Prediction:

I guarantee, that within the next 5 years, this whole turning the clocks back/forward will be deemed racist, if it hasn't already.

Posted by: Soothsayer, with arms akimbo at November 01, 2015 10:56 AM (DgBcT)

92 Official Soothsayer Prediction:

I guarantee, that within the next 5 years, this whole turning the clocks back/forward will be deemed racist, if it hasn't already.
Posted by: Soothsayer, with arms akimbo at November 01, 2015 10:56 AM (DgBcT)


Most of my clocks are black, so...

Posted by: BurtTC at November 01, 2015 10:58 AM (Dj0WE)

93 I only remembered that I enjoyed reading all of Asimov's stuff as a young adult. I don't think I have the time or inclination to go back through it read it through the lens of 25 years or so of adult life experience and knowledge. I'll probably be disappointed.

Posted by: Burn the Witch at November 01, 2015 10:58 AM (Wckf4)

94 There are a couple of books about deep-states.

Jean-Pierre Filiu, "From Deep State to Islamic State". The Arab nations' deep-states got involved, because they didn't trust their people to manage democracy (read: the people were going to execute everyone involved in the deep-states). During the Arab Spring, the deep-states all did their best to support Islamists so as to claim they were indispensible.

ISIS is Islamists getting into bed with one Baathist deep-state (Iraq's) to fight another (Syria's).

Nixon and Kissinger seem to have founded their own deep-state right here: Ray Locker, "Nixon's Gamble".

Posted by: boulder terlit hobo at November 01, 2015 10:58 AM (Hly10)

95 I read Asimov's Foundation trilogy recently and enjoyed it, which has the idea that historical trends are knowable and can be used to predict the future. I liked the scene in book two where the Mule is conquering the universe and people have gathered around Seldon's tomb (?) hoping for assurance that his plan would handle the Mule. When the Seldon apparition speaks and clearly had not anticipated the Mule there was panic.

I've read Hound of the Baskervilles several times and have seen it on video, and really enjoyed the discussion this weekend, that was a good selection.

I like the idea of an AOSHQ group and asked to join, will be interesting to see where that goes. Maybe we could read some Moron books, I know I have a backlog.

Read Black In The Box (Black #5) by Russell Blake, a new Black mystery. Black still has his ball-busting assistant, Swiss artist girlfriend and fat destructive cat and is looking into a murder at a Best Buy-type store. Fun story, though I'll never turn my back on their employees again.

Listened to Nostromo by Joseph Conrad, which is the story of an Italian immigrant to a fictional South American country, living in a coastal town with a valuable silver mine and a revolting populace. Not his best story but well-written, enjoyed it. Just two more Conrad books to read by year-end.

Listened to Screw The Galaxy (Hard Luck Hank #1) by Steven Campbell, a sci-fi story centered on a mutant named Hank, a thug on a space station who is exceptionally hard to hurt, and his adventures dealing with gangs, killer robots, other mutants and more. Pretty good story and liked the characters, will be interested in checking out the sequels.

Read Johnny Carson by Henry 'Bombastic' Bushkin, Carson's business manager and lawyer for many years. Good warts-and-all biography that isn't a hit job.

Posted by: waelse1 at November 01, 2015 11:00 AM (b/JEC)

96 OK, I've joined the Goodreads and sent in my request too!

Posted by: Dr. Mabuse at November 01, 2015 11:00 AM (gjLib)

97 Greg Graffin (Bad Religion) has a PhD in Zoology, Brian May is a PhD astrophysicist, so sure, I can buy that Keith Richards has an archival/literary bent.

Posted by: Country Singer at November 01, 2015 11:00 AM (GUBah)

98
Of Solzhenitsyn's works, I have read One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovitch, Cancer Ward, The First Circle and August 1914.

I liked the last the best and am tempted to read it again since he added at least two more books, November 1916 and March 1917, to the storyline.

I tried reading The Gulag Archipelago, but couldn't bring myself to get more than a chapter or two into it.

Posted by: Krebs v Carnot: Epic Battle of the Cycling Stars (TM) at November 01, 2015 11:00 AM (BK3ZS)

99 Thanks artisanal'ette, that was the link I was looking for.

Posted by: Anna Puma at November 01, 2015 11:01 AM (fD00r)

100 Woohoo! I'm in! Thanks, VM!

Posted by: Dr. Mabuse at November 01, 2015 11:01 AM (gjLib)

101 Sarah Hoyt' s blog According to Hoyt (sorry, can't link since I'm writing on Kindle) has a list of books by commenter-authors which are on sale (including our own Sabrina Chase).

I got the second Cat Among Dragons book by Alma TC Boyton (TXRed) and a book by Robrt Hoyt about a hard-bitren Tom cat trying to save his favorite microbrew from the forces of evil.

Posted by: Polliwog the 'Ette at November 01, 2015 11:01 AM (GDulk)

102 >>>He was an engish reporter over in Russia during the revolution. Went bolshie b/c he was in love.

Reminds me of Woody Allen's description from the Condemned: "She was a Marxist as well. His favorite kind. The kind with long, tanned legs.

Posted by: Bruce Boehner at November 01, 2015 11:02 AM (jRs7b)

103 I read 'Stranger in a Strange Land' as a very young teenager and was entertained yet unimpressed. Recalling but a few key elements decades later I just read the Wiki article on the book.

I now have zero interest in reading it again. Does that make me a bad person? Or was it so popular then because we knew so little of Mars and there was some element of plausibility to the story? Anyway, I don't get it.

I'll just sit in the corner over here with the dunce cap on.

Posted by: se pa moron at November 01, 2015 11:02 AM (7v/r5)

104 The writing goes well. I am about to dump my
characters on a planet stuffed to the gills with ravening giant monster
beasties, and the AI has been left to take care of the cat all by
itself. Screaming ensues.


Posted by: Sabrina Chase at November 01, 2015 10:49 AM (GG9V6)



Excellent!

Posted by: GGE Hades of the Moron Horde, NC Chapter at November 01, 2015 11:03 AM (UQGss)

105 I guarantee, that within the next 5 years, this whole turning the clocks
back/forward will be deemed racist, if it hasn't already.


Yeah I can see that. "Blacks have been oppressed so much by the evil white man, they aren't able to turn their clocks forward and backward"

Posted by: chemjeff - go chiefs at November 01, 2015 11:03 AM (uZNvH)

106 I don't really like Joseph Conrad that much. Nostromo was made into a film some years ago; I think Antonio Banderas played Nostromo and an English actor I liked - Colin Firth? - was in it too. It was alright, but not particularly interesting.

Posted by: Dr. Mabuse at November 01, 2015 11:03 AM (gjLib)

107 10 Meh, books bound in human skin don't faze me too much. As long as there isn't a wizened human face on the cover, I'm cool with it. And for an autobiography it's kind of apt, yes?

Human vellum might be a bridge too far.
Posted by: All Hail Eris, Michigangsta at November 01, 2015 10:05 AM (jR7Wy)
=========
Quite a thing in the 1800s and yes, I think some have at least an ear. It was a popular thing to do with executed murderers. Now, murder groupies would probably covet them to fap all over. In TX I know they rush the body to the funeral home so the family can touch the body while it is still warm. I saw a video were women were climbing all over this dead murderer, I shit you not. I've also seen them make death masks. These people are creepy.

Posted by: Bruce With a Wang! at November 01, 2015 11:03 AM (iQIUe)

108

For Authors...

Someone was looking for a Christian link a week or so ago, and I had given them a link to the Christian Rebel (or something like that).

I ran across another, but it has many, many more sites to list your, for example, your free book, to get it shouted out.

Scroll down to the very bottom, and you'll see various icons to click. One is Christian Kindle News.

http://authormarketingclub.com/members/submit-your-book/

Posted by: artisanal 'ette at November 01, 2015 11:03 AM (qCMvj)

109 Hi Dr Mabuse, I think cool breeze got you in - he's always right on top of group requests. Worth his weight in quatloons, that one.
Welcome to the group!

Posted by: @votermom at November 01, 2015 11:04 AM (cbfNE)

110 I really enjoyed revisiting Hound of the Baskervilles. I'll be dipping into the other Holmes stories more often

In keeping with the season I read The Raven again. I'm convinced that some of Poe's poems are meant to be read aloud, certainly The Raven and The Bells. I mentioned Ace's book thread that I've never heard a good recitation of the poem. It's usually delivered in that flat, staccato, faux-Shakespeare manner. Even John Astin made that mistake. The poem is about a man descending into rage and despair screaming at an unkind fate. A recitation should show that.

Posted by: JTB at November 01, 2015 11:04 AM (FvdPb)

111 Asimov's Federation or Piper's Federation/Empire both seem to have been influenced by the writings of Toynbee.


Posted by: Anna Puma at November 01, 2015 10:50 AM (fD00r)


Piper openly discusses the concept of human action from the point of view of Toynbee v Marx at one point (in Lord Kalvan?), whether the individual makes the difference or is just a hand of the inevitable culture.

Future histories were a big thing once, Heinlein, Asimov and Piper had them.
Piper saw it as a review from the past, although his Edge of the Knife talked about clairvoyant seeing the entire sweep of history from the wrong end. and Asimov seems to have seen it as fixed and predictable.

Mmm, a quick view indicates that Toynbee was quite concerned, as was Piper, about nuclear war.

Posted by: Kindltot at November 01, 2015 11:05 AM (3pRHP)

112
or...Why do we allow old White men to decide what time it is for everyone?

Posted by: Soothsayer, with arms akimbo at November 01, 2015 11:05 AM (DgBcT)

113 Finished book IX of History of Frederick II in which it was Frederick has his young adult training under the overbearing watch of his father and covers a long terminal illness of Frederick I. onto book X
Saw Keith Richards at Knebworth festival 1979
, as I remember he had to pay off a drug fine and the Deal was he and one other Rolling stone had to perform.

Posted by: Skip at November 01, 2015 11:06 AM (gE2Li)

114 Yeah I read Stranger in a Strange Land too as a teenager and now it just seems like it was just a giant sneer against those sexual prudes who have the temerity to think that polygamy and brother-sister incest are questionable practices.

Posted by: chemjeff - go chiefs at November 01, 2015 11:06 AM (uZNvH)

115 Any experts here know how long the WH can "block" the release of Hitlery's emails to Barky and company. Seems like a FOIA should release them. But that's in a normal rule of law world.

Posted by: Brave Sir Robin at November 01, 2015 11:06 AM (5buP8)

116 (and "the Tristate-Area")

Soon.

Posted by: Dr. Heinz Doofenshmirtz at November 01, 2015 11:07 AM (kpqmD)

117 Edge of the Knife's little nuclear conflict was started by the assassination of an Arab leader. The US had nuclear Lunar bases also. And like Piper, the future seeing teacher in the story had file cabinets full of notes.

Posted by: Anna Puma at November 01, 2015 11:07 AM (fD00r)

118 Posted by: goatexchange at November 01, 2015 10:37 AM (Nd4YY)
---------------------------
That's very sad. They are bombarded on all sides by media, friends, etc. so it impossible to eliminate all chance of that happening. But at least there's hope. If she's talking to you then perhaps she can be persuded eventually. Best of luck.

Posted by: Bruce Boehner at November 01, 2015 11:07 AM (jRs7b)

119
Posted by: Polliwog the 'Ette at November 01, 2015 10:20 AM (GDulk)

Wendell Willkie

Posted by: Krebs v Carnot: Epic Battle of the Cycling Stars (TM) at November 01, 2015 11:07 AM (BK3ZS)

120 I just sent my request for the Goodreads group, too. (Waves at Votermom)

Posted by: Sgt. Mom at November 01, 2015 11:07 AM (95iDF)

121 Mostly lurker, but want to sign up for Goodreads.

I've been re-reading the Patrick O'Brian series. One thing I noticed is that from The Yellow Admiral on, the series loses its energy. I know that O'Brian was getting old (and probably under pressure from his publisher to Just Keep Turning Out the Product), and also his beloved wife Mary died around the time those books were being written. But the drastic change in quality writing bugs me. It is almost as if there was a ghost writer trying to be the old O'Brian, but couldn't quite do it. Has anyone read bios of him and come up with any clues about this? If I was a new reader and started with, say, The Hundred Days, I would wonder what the fuss was all about. I got turned on by a chance pickup at the British Council Library -- Post Captain I think was my first volume -- and then I was hooked, and couldn't wait for each new book to come out. But after The Yellow Admiral, I found my interest flagging.

Posted by: Alifa at November 01, 2015 11:08 AM (pvF9n)

122 I read Gulag Archipelago in bits and pieces as a kid.
That's what happens when you grow up with no tv and a house full of books.

Posted by: @votermom at November 01, 2015 11:08 AM (cbfNE)

123 Finished Bella Dodd's School of Darkness. Need to read Life Unworthy so I can review it on Amazon.

Posted by: Polliwog the 'Ette at November 01, 2015 11:08 AM (GDulk)

124 Yeah, Ferguson's reputation could well have suffered from commanding an army that got beat. Stuff like that happens.

I suggest, though, that in war, having the ability to kill your enemy and then not doing it, is dumb. The English generally agree - they executed John Byng for not attacking at Minorca.

As I'd said earlier, Pantano wasn't focusing on the battle itself so much as why it's been ignored, up North and now nationally.

Posted by: boulder terlit hobo at November 01, 2015 11:09 AM (Hly10)

125 Reminds me of Woody Allen's description from the Condemned: "She was a Marxist as well. His favorite kind. The kind with long, tanned legs.
Posted by: Bruce Boehner at November 01, 2015 11:02 AM (jRs7b)

==============
Some thought he committed treason. His wife was a card carrying commie and also smuggled in a million bucks of jewels to use for bolshie work in the UK. Since most of the money probably went to espionage and assassinations, they hardly had clean hands.

Posted by: Bruce With a Wang! at November 01, 2015 11:09 AM (iQIUe)

126 Read somewhere it's only a small stretch for Barky to claim executive privilege to keep Hildabeast e-mail secret. On the bright size so much for Barky who claimed he didn't know Hildabeast had a private account.

Posted by: Skip at November 01, 2015 11:10 AM (gE2Li)

127 TY Bruce (and others). she's a good kid, smart as a whip. as you noted, the external influences are pervasive. she'll come 'round; it'll take some life experiences.

Posted by: goatexchange at November 01, 2015 11:11 AM (vP/2F)

128 Listened to Jim Butcher's Aeronaut's Windlass which is the first in a new series. Really liked it. A lot of numerous dialogue, plenty of action, and a little philosophy to round everything out.

Posted by: Polliwog the 'Ette at November 01, 2015 11:11 AM (GDulk)

129 I hate november. Its a sucky month. And i find holidays stressful. Oct is great but it also turned out to be sucky for various reasons beyond my control. I welcome SMOD or the zombie apocalypse. At least it would take my mind off of my own troubles.

Posted by: Bruce With a Wang! at November 01, 2015 11:11 AM (iQIUe)

130 I am always impressed by the literary talent here at the HQ

What about forming an HQ publishing imprint or a literary guild?
Posted by: chemjeff - go chiefs at November 01, 2015 10:16 AM (uZNvH)


I dunno. That made me think of the writers' group from Throw Momma From the Train

Posted by: Kindltot at November 01, 2015 11:11 AM (3pRHP)

131 †it was just a giant sneer against those sexual prudes who have the temerity to think that polygamy and brother-sister incest are questionable practices.Posted by: chemjeff - go chiefs at November 01, 2015 11:06 AM (uZNvH)

I think I just threw up a little bit. My older sister was the one who bought the book and insisted I *had* to read it.

Now I think I need a shrink. Brb.

Posted by: se pa moron at November 01, 2015 11:12 AM (7v/r5)

132 I read Stranger in A Strange Land as a teenager. It was about sex, pure and simple. I tried reading it again a few years ago and realized that it was actually a ghastly book.

Posted by: Vic-we have no party at November 01, 2015 11:12 AM (t2KH5)

133 One of my favorite novels is called "Celia Garth" and it is set in the Revolutionary War in Charleston. The Swamp Fox, Col. Francis Marion, plays a significant, albeit off-"screen" role, and although the Battle of Kings Mountain doesn't play a starring role, I know it's mentioned. Mostly it's a spy novel of sorts, although also a romance for the girls. Author is Gwen Bristow whose books I have always enjoyed. They are always historical, and the starring role is a girl with one particular talent. In "Celia Garth" she has a talent for sewing.

Otherwise, I am still reading "The Africans" by David Lamb, "What Happens In Mass" by Fr. ? Driscoll, OSB, "Devil's Night" by Zev Chafets, and I started "Shirt of Flame" subtitled something like "A year with St. Therese of Lisieux" which I probably just misspelled.

I will be spending the next month studying up on the Eucharist because I'm teaching an RCIA class on it on December 6. Prayers greatly appreciated so I don't mess up anything significant. In my fantasy, I go in, I say "It's a Mystery" and we're done, and everyone congratulates me for my succinct teaching skills. HA!

Posted by: Tonestaple at November 01, 2015 11:12 AM (dCTrv)

134 The Mule was a very, very smart guy, which makes him rather unlike Trump, whose public blather sounds like a man who is covering up his ignorance with jingoistic pronouncements and cheerleading.

Posted by: CharlieBrown'sDildo at November 01, 2015 10:33 AM (Zu3d9)


You're quite right, but I didn't want to get into Trump's obvious personal failings, because that would have have only detracted from the comparison I was setting up.

Posted by: OregonMuse at November 01, 2015 11:12 AM (mRvHu)

135 Molon Labe Publishing LLC.

Posted by: Anna Puma at November 01, 2015 11:12 AM (fD00r)

136 Oh yeah, I totally believe that WB story.

Posted by: gp at November 01, 2015 11:13 AM (+Jpqc)

137 Have to figure out how to get in also but would love to join in Goodreads though doubting much connection as I read mostly military history, but do read some other things.

Posted by: Skip at November 01, 2015 11:14 AM (gE2Li)

138 I know that O'Brian was getting old (and probably
under pressure from his publisher to Just Keep Turning Out the Product),
and also his beloved wife Mary died around the time those books were
being written. But the drastic change in quality writing bugs me.

Posted by: Alifa at November 01, 2015 11:08 AM


O'Brian was hardly alone in that. Many "series" books tend to get either dull, repetitive, contrived or all of the above. I suppose it's unavoidable, as pressure mounts to create fresh Massive #1 Bestsellers out of familiar characters and situations.

Did I hear someone mention Robert B. Parker?

I'd suggest that any aspiring or relatively new writer think long and hard before starting down the "series" path.

Posted by: MrScribbler at November 01, 2015 11:14 AM (qiCMH)

139 62 I cannot read Asimov. I remember when I was young that interviewers always made a big deal over the fact that he had written over 200 books. Then I picked up I.A.'s Guide to Shakespeare thinking it might help me with English class. It was awful...

Posted by: Emmett Milbarge at November 01, 2015 10:43 AM (nFdGS)


His "Asimov's Guide to the Bible" was even worse.

Posted by: OregonMuse at November 01, 2015 11:15 AM (mRvHu)

140
135 Molon Labe Publishing LLC.
Posted by: Anna Puma at November 01, 2015 11:12 AM (fD00r)


Pants Optional Publishing

Barrel Books

Posted by: Krebs v Carnot: Epic Battle of the Cycling Stars (TM) at November 01, 2015 11:15 AM (BK3ZS)

141 Thanks for the add to the Moron Horde Goodreads Group!

Posted by: baldilocks at November 01, 2015 11:16 AM (ys2UW)

142 137 Have to figure out how to get in also but would love to join in Goodreads though doubting much connection as I read mostly military history, but do read some other things.
Posted by: Skip at November 01, 2015 11:14 AM (gE2Li)

There are a lot of mil history buffs on goodreads in general, and probably also among the horde. It's a neat site because once ypu start rating books you've read you start finding books to read.

Posted by: @votermom at November 01, 2015 11:17 AM (cbfNE)

143 Should I perhaps create a Wikipedia page for Golden Isis??? Does such a page help in any way tangible?

Posted by: Anna Puma at November 01, 2015 11:18 AM (fD00r)

144
I'd suggest that any aspiring or relatively new writer think long and hard before starting down the "series" path.

Philip Josť Farmer and the "Riverworld" schtick. Once was good, after that, the dreck flowed like... a river of molasses.

Posted by: Krebs v Carnot: Epic Battle of the Cycling Stars (TM) at November 01, 2015 11:18 AM (BK3ZS)

145 His latest Album "Amnesia" is the awesome too!

Posted by: CSMBigBird at November 01, 2015 11:18 AM (xInes)

146 What about forming an HQ publishing imprint or a literary guild?

Valu-Rite Publishing

Posted by: V the K at November 01, 2015 11:18 AM (c/Ipt)

147 If anyone of the horde wants to have some fun, be sure to join the "prayer" conference call for the liberal Democratic governor candidate in Louisiana Sunday night.

https://t.co/pow2X3wCTD

Be sure to call the candidate out about lying about his pro-life credentials.

http://thehayride.com/2015/10/is-john-bel-edwards-pro-life-according-to-this-survey-answer-nope/

He also lied about planned parenthood not performing abortions in Louisiana(Oct 1 debate), even though they said the new new orleans facility is for that.

Posted by: Biscuits Mahoney at November 01, 2015 11:19 AM (OlRlT)

148 Ok I'm joining the GoodReads group. I am a lurker, mostly because I don't get to this group until later in the afternoon or early evening. I never miss it, though. I have found so many great reads and useful comments on other books I'm curious about. Thanks so much OM for this.

Posted by: Abby Coffey at November 01, 2015 11:19 AM (HBU7W)

149 osted by: Krebs v Carnot: Epic Battle of the Cycling Stars (TM) at November 01, 2015 11:07 AM (BK3ZS)

Downside of TTS is that I don't see how the names are spelled, and never knew Willkie existed until I was an adult (and that was only because of a biography about the guy who ran OSS during WW2 and was desperate to get Roosevelt reelected) because he was never mentioned in school.

Spelling aside, what do you think of the idea?

Posted by: Polliwog the 'Ette at November 01, 2015 11:20 AM (GDulk)

150 I read parts of Asimov's Guide to the Bible in January 1994 (girlfriend's house at the time). The Genesis 34 episode, especially, stuck out to me as having a lot of speculation. Maybe this was a memory of a Judges-era "Tribe of Dinah" retrojected to the era of the Patriarchs, Asimov guessed. "Whaaaa?", I remember thinking at the time.

The "Guide" has more value as a work of science fiction.

Posted by: boulder terlit hobo at November 01, 2015 11:20 AM (Hly10)

151 Ace, Publishing Division, "Books by morons, for morons."

Ace would make millions.

Posted by: Hayfield Volkovski at November 01, 2015 11:21 AM (eJymf)

152 Decades ago (so, take my biomemory with a shaker of salt), I recall reading that Asimov was in front of his typewriter at 9am and worked through (presumably with lunch break) until 5pm. Probably wearing a tie.

Product aside, I always admired that work ethic for a self-employed arteest. Although it may say something about the dryness of his ouvre.

Posted by: mindful webworker - on a glorious morning at November 01, 2015 11:23 AM (Dqfn9)

153 Can't be Ace Publishing since Ace Books is the science fiction imprint of Penguin. Unless you like paying for lawyers.

Posted by: Anna Puma at November 01, 2015 11:23 AM (fD00r)

154 91
Official Soothsayer Prediction:

I guarantee, that within the next 5 years, this whole turning the clocks back/forward will be deemed racist, if it hasn't already.
Posted by: Soothsayer, with arms akimbo at November 01, 2015 10:56 AM (DgBcT)


Good. Maybe that's how we can get DST overturned.

Posted by: rickl at November 01, 2015 11:23 AM (sdi6R)

155
I dunno. That made me think of the writers' group from Throw Momma From the Train




*Hides manuscript for '100 Women I'd Like To Pork' under his Trapper Keeper*

Posted by: Pappy O'Daniel at November 01, 2015 11:24 AM (oVJmc)

156 Pudding Publishing, LLC. Look for the Valu-Rite discount section. Genuine hobo-skin bound books for collectors.

Posted by: goatexchange at November 01, 2015 11:24 AM (vP/2F)

157
Spelling aside, what do you think of the idea?
Posted by: Polliwog the 'Ette at November 01, 2015 11:20 AM (GDulk)


The parallels you pointed out are interesting, particularly since, like in 1940, the GOP was not an effective party of opposition because of their low numbers in Congress.

Unlike then, however, they now appear to be crypto-, hell, open, collaborators with the Ds.

Posted by: Krebs v Carnot: Epic Battle of the Cycling Stars (TM) at November 01, 2015 11:24 AM (BK3ZS)

158 Horde writers,

Please don't forget to add your own books to the Horde Writers bookshelf in the goodreads group.

I agree that Asimov's Foundation series was dismayingly sympathetic to the notion that citizens need to be ruled by an elite caste of their betters.

For a much more philosophically compatible sci-fi read, try Robert Heinlein's The Moon Is A Harsh Mistress.

Posted by: cool breeze at November 01, 2015 11:25 AM (6Cu7i)

159 Pappy, sounds like an excellent concept to challenge Fifty Shades. Go write it!

Posted by: Anna Puma at November 01, 2015 11:26 AM (fD00r)

160 The "Guide" has more value as a work of science fiction.

Posted by: boulder terlit hobo at November 01, 2015 11:20 AM


It must be tough to be a genius. I gather a lot of people thought of Asimov that way, and told him so.

But the real problems start when said genius starts believing it of himself. I gather -- from reading his autobio many years ago -- that Asimov considered himself a quick study, and skimmed a lot of his research material. That suggests to me his in-depth knowledge of the Bible came right off the top of his head.

A real genius, IMO, is someone who knows what he does not know.

Posted by: MrScribbler at November 01, 2015 11:26 AM (qiCMH)

161 Off to bed so I can work all night tonight. Later roonz and roonettez, fear no evil!

Posted by: GGE Hades of the Moron Horde, NC Chapter at November 01, 2015 11:26 AM (UQGss)

162
157

Ineffective opposition in 1940 because of low numbers

Ineffective opposition now because collaborators

Posted by: Krebs v Carnot: Epic Battle of the Cycling Stars (TM) at November 01, 2015 11:26 AM (BK3ZS)

163 Posted by: Dr. Mabuse at November 01, 2015 11:03 AM (gjLib)


Conrad's an acquired taste, it's literary but I like his musical way with words. I actually sought out a Nostromo film to buy or Netflix and didn't find one available. I did recently buy Lord Jim on video with Peter O'Toole, probably his most accessible book.

Posted by: waelse1 at November 01, 2015 11:27 AM (b/JEC)

164 I'm pretty sure Keith has only had one wife. He had children with Anita Pallenberg but theynever married. He has commented a number of times that he is old fashioned and only marries once, for life

Posted by: Nano at November 01, 2015 11:27 AM (YHxjr)

165 Speaking of lawyers, just an fyi, the goodreads group is not officially affilated with Ace in anyway.
We are just a group of ewok stalkers, so he's not on the hook for any property damage that may or may not occur when the horde congregates on goodreads.

Posted by: @votermom at November 01, 2015 11:28 AM (cbfNE)

166 _Stranger_ has definitely NOT aged well. I guess it must have been mind-blowing in the hippie era. (All those moral rules are just made-up shit! We can make up our own rules! If you can open your mind you can, like, make shit disappear just by thinking!)

From what I've read about Heinlein, he started _Stranger_ in the late 1940s/early 1950s, but decided it would be too controversial so put it aside for a decade. It came out in 1962, and was probably just perfectly avant-garde then.

Trouble is, all the "hypocrisies" of Christian morality he rails against in the book have long since been smashed to dust. In effect, _Stranger_ won, and thereby made itself irrelevant. Without the "shocking" and polemical aspects, it's just a talky book.

Posted by: Trimegistus at November 01, 2015 11:31 AM (VvMUk)

167 †I read Stranger in A Strange Land as a teenager. It was about sex, pure and simple. I tried reading it again a few years ago and realized that it was actually a ghastly book.†Posted by: Vic-we have no party at November 01, 2015 11:12 AM (t2KH5)

That's kinda interesting. I had little interest in sex at that age and most likely skimmed over the pruient parts.

While the sister was a radical leftist from the earliest age, fell in with the radical leftist groups, got kicked out of college for some sexual misbehavior, ended up getting a degree at some radical leftist college in sociology, and spent most of her life preaching the benefits of the benevolent massive government.

While I Infinitely preferred dystopian novels warning of an overreaching government. Got married, stayed married for like ever. Her life was a hot mess.

Posted by: se pa moron at November 01, 2015 11:31 AM (7v/r5)

168 I don't think I'll get to read a good book about the Torah (or Joshua) in my lifetime. We're lacking contemporary literature, basically.

At least with Kings we can correlate a lot of that stuff with Assyrian, Moabite, and Lebanese literature. And ostraca.

Maybe someone will dig up an earlier edition of these texts in some ruined temple in Egypt or Sinai. That's pretty much the only event that will fix things.

Posted by: boulder terlit hobo at November 01, 2015 11:31 AM (Hly10)

169 21
On my Kindle I finished The Fourth Turning: An American Prophecy by William Strauss and Neil Howe. In this book they apply their generational theories of their previous works to the cycles of history. They conclude that there is a pattern of four periods, which they label turnings. Each turning is 20-25 years in duration, so a cycle is 80-100 years. The turnings are High - Awakening - Unraveling - Crisis followed by another High.

Posted by: Zoltan at November 01, 2015 10:17 AM (THsLo)


I thought "The Fourth Turning" was fascinating, and I've recommended it here before.

One thing is for sure: it has made me regard the Millennial generation with respect. Their most recent historical analogue was the WWII generation. You know, those silly jitterbugging teens in the 1930s.

Posted by: rickl at November 01, 2015 11:34 AM (sdi6R)

170 So Kali is right out. My grasp of the various religions and deities of the Indian sub-continent is a bit weak.

Hillary! could be described as the Grand Thugee??


Posted by: Anna Puma at November 01, 2015 10:34 AM (fD00r)


I would suggest the Old Man of the Mountain. Promising earthly Paradise for doing his bidding, mostly assassination, destruction, and mayhem.

The Old Man of the Mountain is a perennial character in European thinking of the Orient, like Prester John, from the middle ages on. This is the interesting thing, like Prester John he was considered still active somewhere, from Syria to China depending on what area was just beyond the known world.

Posted by: Kindltot at November 01, 2015 11:34 AM (3pRHP)

171 I agree that Asimov's Foundation series was dismayingly sympathetic to the notion that citizens need to be ruled by an elite caste of their betters.

Huh! I thought the 'principle' behind the Sheldon crisis was you couldn't do anything about it. If you tried to manage it you made it worse. The crisis would be solved by the group dynamic where individuals going about their individual business had already taken the steps necessary and it would be an individual who did the one thing that resolved the crisis.

Posted by: Hayfield Volkovski at November 01, 2015 11:34 AM (eJymf)

172 Posted by: Krebs v Carnot: Epic Battle of the Cycling Stars (TM) at November 01, 2015 11:26 AM (BK3ZS)

I see the ineffectiveness coming from the same place really. Fear. Rs were afraid to speak out against Roosevelt's politics since they didn't have the courage of their convictions/principles and modern Rs are in the same boat because "minority president" and no principles.

Posted by: Polliwog the 'Ette at November 01, 2015 11:34 AM (GDulk)

173 Psycho-history: when history is determined by people like Alinsky, Hillary and Zero.

Asimov wasn't even a proper liberal. In his robot series, he, like most liberals felt like a member of a superior elite. But most libs today feel guilty about being superior, and try not to see that the stinking masses are motivated more by envy than true grievances.

But IIRC, Asimov mocked the teaming billions of peons on Earth, in contrast to the sophisticated, elite "Spacers". Very un-pc.


May be that's why despite his totalitarian tendencies (pointed out by Trimegistus above), he never moved to the USSR to experience their 5 year plans firsthand. Perhaps if they offered him a position in the Politburo as Sectretary of Historico-Scientific Engineering.

Posted by: Bruce Boehner at November 01, 2015 11:36 AM (jRs7b)

174 I]Conrad's an acquired taste, it's literary but I like his musical way with words. I actually sought out a Nostromo film to buy or Netflix and didn't find one available. I did recently buy Lord Jim on video with Peter O'Toole, probably his most accessible book.


Posted by: waelse1 at November 01, 2015 11:27 AM


Looking it up on IMDb, I see it was a 1996 miniseries. It wasn't Banderas in the title role, but I was right about Colin Firth. Not available on dvd so far, it appears. Maybe it's out there to download.

Posted by: Dr. Mabuse at November 01, 2015 11:37 AM (gjLib)

175 Morning all

I am reading "Rebel Yell" about Stonewall Jackson

Great Book

Posted by: Nevergiveup at November 01, 2015 11:40 AM (DUoqb)

176 Please use Ace's Amazon link to click through to Amazon and search
"To Save Us All From Ruin"

Posted by: Seamus Muldoon at November 01, 2015 10:42 AM (mvenn)


The problem is, this doesn't work. That is, ace doesn't get credit for digital purchases. Once you click through to the Kindle version, all of the identifying information for the 'aoshq' store has been stripped away.

Posted by: OregonMuse at November 01, 2015 11:43 AM (mRvHu)

177 Posted by: MrScribbler at November 01, 2015 11:14 AM (qiCMH)

Parker had a good run. He wrote about 40 Spenser books, and perhaps half were at least good. That's not bad!

Although....some towards the end were awful. Caricatures of his early work.

Posted by: CharlieBrown'sDildo at November 01, 2015 11:46 AM (Zu3d9)

178 The problem is, this doesn't work. That is, ace doesn't get credit for digital purchases. Once you click through to the Kindle version, all of the identifying information for the 'aoshq' store has been stripped away.

--

Well that sucks.
Is there any way for Ace to get credit for ebooks?
And for purchases from non US buyers?

Posted by: @votermom at November 01, 2015 11:47 AM (cbfNE)

179 "This book is largely concerned with Hobbits, and from its pages a reader may discover much of their character and a little of their history."

Well, it's November and time for the annual reading of LOTR. This is my fiftieth year and as close to a personal tradition as I will likely ever get. Just completed chapter one. Takes a while to finish since I read it slowly but I'll get there. A tag line I've always enjoyed and thought was appropriate: "I may be slow but I've got direction."

Posted by: JTB at November 01, 2015 11:49 AM (FvdPb)

180 . I was rushing to get through the book, which I am enjoying by the way, but the push to finish was ruining the experience and it felt like cramming for a book report.
Posted by: All Hail Eris, Michigangsta at November 01, 2015 10:23 AM (jR7Wy)


I do that too often. Instead of reading for the pure pleasure I read as if it's going to be on the mid-term.

Posted by: Bandersnatch, Opus/Bill the Cat 2016 at November 01, 2015 11:49 AM (1xUj/)

181 Seems I am doing most of my reading in Airports and on Planes...thank G-D for delays

Posted by: Nevergiveup at November 01, 2015 11:51 AM (DUoqb)

182 Posted by: OregonMuse at November 01, 2015 11:43 AM (mRvHu)


It's convoluted, but if you use the search engine and choose "Kindle Store," it seems to work.

http://astore.amazon.com/aoshq-20/detail/B017AKV03I

Posted by: CharlieBrown'sDildo at November 01, 2015 11:52 AM (Zu3d9)

183 Abracadabra! Can you see me? ...No? Rats let me try again.
I'll huff and I'll puff. Wait wrong spell. Ok, this one always works. Ta Da! See me now? Crap. Looks like that sneaky kid wearing the invisible man costume stole my magic delurker cape last night. Guess I have to do this the old fashioned way.

Morning everyone. Joined the book club and this is my first post on this site after lurking for a few years. (Assuming it wasn't willowed). Gotta run because the grandkids are coming over for grandpa's Halloween pumpkin pancakes.

Posted by: Octiparan at November 01, 2015 11:53 AM (g5IwS)

184 Anyone with an interest in old manuscripts will find the blog, medieval books.nl, worth following. It's written by a Dutch scholar, Erik Kwakkel, and is endlessly fascinating as is his previous blog, medievalfragments.wordpress.com.

Muse...you will find lovely photos of libraries old and new on both sites.

Too bad about Keith Richards' looks. I remember seeing The Stones on The Ed Sullivan Show back in the mid sixties and Richards was not bad looking back then. Drugs, liquor and cigarettes have taken their toll.

Posted by: Tuna at November 01, 2015 11:53 AM (JSovD)

185 140
135 Molon Labe Publishing LLC.
Posted by: Anna Puma at November 01, 2015 11:12 AM (fD00r)

Pants Optional Publishing

Barrel Books
Posted by: Krebs v Carnot: Epic Battle of the Cycling Stars (TM) at November 01, 2015 11:15 AM (BK3ZS)

But First Publishing

Posted by: Insomniac at November 01, 2015 11:53 AM (kpqmD)

186 The Pilots of that doomed Airbus that crashed in the Sinai have been quoted as saying their plane had mechanical problems and the Egyptians and Russians ( who are about as reliable as a 3 year old with a cookie in her hand) are saying it was in perfect condition....Ya gotta love 3rd world countries and communists

Posted by: Nevergiveup at November 01, 2015 11:53 AM (DUoqb)

187 97 Greg Graffin (Bad Religion) has a PhD in Zoology, Brian May is a PhD astrophysicist, so sure, I can buy that Keith Richards has an archival/literary bent.

Dexter Holland has a science PhD. "You gotta keep 'em seperated" refers to cooling off petri dishes.

Posted by: BourbonChicken at November 01, 2015 11:55 AM (VdICR)

188 Valu-Rite Publishing

Posted by: V the K at November 01, 2015 11:18 AM (c/Ipt)


Molon Bacon LLC

Posted by: Kindltot at November 01, 2015 11:55 AM (3pRHP)

189 Somebody HAS to have beaten me to it but.....if Trump is The Mule, then Ob+mao is The Ass

Posted by: torabora at November 01, 2015 11:57 AM (JIg9z)

190 122 I read Gulag Archipelago in bits and pieces as a kid.
That's what happens when you grow up with no tv and a house full of books.
Posted by: @votermom at November 01, 2015 11:08 AM (cbfNE)

Reading was one of the up-sides of my parents not letting me go anywhere when I was disobedient.

Posted by: baldilocks at November 01, 2015 11:59 AM (ys2UW)

191 Nevergiveup! Rebel Yell! Looking at it right here on my desk. I haven't started it yet, but want to. Heh

Posted by: Yip at November 01, 2015 11:59 AM (e7T6D)

192 NorthernHistorians have always glossed over the portion of the Revolutionary War that occurred in the South.
------------------
See also, Battle of Ninety Six, Battle of Cowpens, & etc.

When I was a kid, we played at 'Swamp Fox' games in the woods. Francis Marion was well known to all of us.

On several occasions I have stayed at the Francis Marion Hotel in Charleston.

As for Kings Mountain, it's history is (or used to be) taught in elementary school. My fifth grade class spent a day there on a field trip.
---
See: Hornets' Nest: the Story of Charlotte and Mecklenburg County
Jan 1, 1961
by Blythe, Legette And Brockmann, Charles Raven
----
Also, this from Wiki, re Mecklenberg County NC:

"Nicknamed the Queen City,[9] Charlotte and its resident county received its name in honor of Charlotte of Mecklenburg-Strelitz, who had become queen consort of Great Britain the year before the city's founding. A second nickname derives from the American Revolutionary War, when British commander General Cornwallis occupied the city but was driven out by hostile residents, prompting him to write that Charlotte was "a hornet's nest of rebellion", leading to the nickname The Hornet's Nest."
---------------------

Posted by: Mike Hammer, etc., etc. at November 01, 2015 12:00 PM (9mTYi)

193 Hey, bookies, I've been sitting here this morning talking with my mom about movies, politics, history, and morons on the book thread. Hope I can hold such intelligent conversations when I'm 95.

She told me she has problems with her Kindle. Too many buttons/controls that force her to hold it in a way that causes her hands to cramp up. Maybe someone here can suggest a more ergonomic digital reader? Not that she will buy it - she generally prefers dead trees editions. Understandably.

Can't tell you the model she had - she gave it away. It was quite a while back she got it, though.

Posted by: mindful webworker - inquiringly at November 01, 2015 12:01 PM (Dqfn9)

194 Greetings:

I'm still serving my deportation to the San Francisco Bay area, hiding out several soviets south of what the locals for some arcane reason other like to refer to as "The City" with two semi-idiotic capital letters.

The local municipal, if that's not too hyperbolic, library has overthrown the oppressive and patriarchal Dewey decimal system in favor of a new improved politically correcter system based on specific descriptive English words.

Is this going on elsewhere or is our democratically ensconced bureaucracy just, once again, making my life more perfect?

Posted by: 11B40 at November 01, 2015 12:03 PM (evgyj)

195 Nevergiveup! Rebel Yell! Looking at it right here on my desk. I haven't started it yet, but want to. Heh
Posted by: Yip at November 01, 2015 11:59 AM (e7T6D)

I am 3/4 the way thru....it is an easy read. You will enjoy it

Posted by: Nevergiveup at November 01, 2015 12:04 PM (DUoqb)

196 Avenge me!

Posted by: Dewey decimal system at November 01, 2015 12:05 PM (e7T6D)

197 Hi to the Goodreads group!

Posted by: Agnes B. Bullock at November 01, 2015 12:05 PM (KM78p)

198 For the person who wanted a good recording of "The Raven", Glenn Beck does a very good version of it, "The Tell Tale Heart" and a couple of other Poe pieces, complete with music and sound effects. He plays it on the radio for every Halloween - Friday morn this year - and said it is available on his website.

I've also read Keith Richard's autobiography "Life", and was surprisingly impressed with the man and what goes into his music. I recommend it, especially to musicians.

Posted by: Just Wondering at November 01, 2015 12:06 PM (APSEi)

199 The establishment (Hari Seldon) never predicted Trump (the Mule). I like it.

Thanks Raven and Cool Breeze for the Goodreads group. Just sent a request to join up.

And now, back to writing (or editing, rather).

Posted by: Craig Allen at November 01, 2015 12:07 PM (Bu03j)

200 I was reading about the burials of brit kings. Man, once you died, no one gave a crap. All kings are tyrants. They would strip the body of anything of value and just let you rot. They did do embalming but it was mostly removing the innards and washing the inside and outer body which of course delayed rotting by a few minutes. It seems like every time one kicked the bucket, they left the country bankrupt. For all the money Henry 8 stole from the churches and nobles, he hardly had enough money to bury him. Henry II was the same in that they just stripped his body and ran as they did with William the Conqueror.

Posted by: Bruce With a Wang! at November 01, 2015 12:07 PM (iQIUe)

201 Utah Inmate That Chose Death By Firing Squad Denied Appeal

Firing squad

The ingredients used by a firing squad can be bought over the counter.

Weasel Zippers

Speaking of 'The Executioner's Song"

Posted by: Nevergiveup at November 01, 2015 12:08 PM (DUoqb)

202 Not about a book, but since you mentioned All Saints Day" here is a version of the great hymn For All The Saints". For Protestants, the "Saints" are not only those canonized but those who followed Jesus:

http://tinyurl.com/oguokj4

Posted by: FenelonSpoke at November 01, 2015 12:08 PM (No/ki)

203 192
I don't know if you're old enough to remember the old Disney serial, The Swamp Fox. It starred Leslie Nielson as Francis Marion. I think Slim Pickins was in it too. As kids' entertainment, it was very enjoyable.

Posted by: Tuna at November 01, 2015 12:09 PM (JSovD)

204 How come you morons won't mention my books? The part where I liberate Auschwitz is just a small example of my great future.Or where I save the town as a young boy by putting my finger in the dike is prescient of my future when I save America from it's racist colonialist past by spending money like it's water and call cops stupid.

Posted by: B+arry Ob+mao at November 01, 2015 12:10 PM (JIg9z)

205 When I was a kid, we played at 'Swamp Fox' games in the woods. Francis Marion was well known to all of us.

===========
Oh, yeah! That was a favorite.

Posted by: Bruce With a Wang! at November 01, 2015 12:10 PM (iQIUe)

206 [...]
From what I've read about Heinlein, he started _Stranger_ in the late 1940s/early 1950s, but decided it would be too controversial so put it aside for a decade. It came out in 1962, and was probably just perfectly avant-garde then.

Trouble is, all the "hypocrisies" of Christian morality he rails against in the book have long since been smashed to dust. In effect, _Stranger_ won, and thereby made itself irrelevant. Without the "shocking" and polemical aspects, it's just a talky book.

Posted by: Trimegistus at November 01, 2015 11:31 AM (VvMUk)


It reads a lot like Beyond This Horizon without the action, and seems to be a transformational book like I remember of a lot of his stories at that time.

This one is more a tranformation of society and culture, and did bring to mind the messiah thing from Judeo-christian roots that I remember being fairly openly pushed in the book. I wondered when I read it if Mike was supposed to be Jesus or John.

Posted by: Kindltot at November 01, 2015 12:11 PM (3pRHP)

207 178 The problem is, this doesn't work. That is, ace doesn't get credit for digital purchases. Once you click through to the Kindle version, all of the identifying information for the 'aoshq' store has been stripped away.

--

Well that sucks.
Is there any way for Ace to get credit for ebooks?
And for purchases from non US buyers?
Posted by: @votermom at November 01, 2015 11:47 AM (cbfNE)

I *think* he has to add Kindle Store to his Search list. Not sure, though.

Posted by: baldilocks at November 01, 2015 12:12 PM (ys2UW)

208
192 Northern Historians have always glossed over the portion of the Revolutionary War that occurred in the South.

Posted by: Mike Hammer, etc., etc. at November 01, 2015 12:00 PM (9mTYi)


It certainly doesn't get the play the MA / NY / PA region gets.

Lived in Camden, SC for five years and during that time I grew to appreciate just how big the role of SC was in the Revolutionary War. From most accounts, you weren't at liberty to be neutral if you lived there: Andrew Jackson's lifelong hatred of the British began then.

Posted by: Krebs v Carnot: Epic Battle of the Cycling Stars (TM) at November 01, 2015 12:12 PM (BK3ZS)

209 Just sent a request to join the Goodreads group, votermom....

Posted by: Lizzy at November 01, 2015 12:12 PM (NOIQH)

210 97 Greg Graffin (Bad Religion) has a PhD in Zoology, Brian May is a PhD astrophysicist, so sure, I can buy that Keith Richards has an archival/literary bent.
Posted by: Country Singer at November 01, 2015 11:00 AM (GUBah)



And Al Stewart is an avid history buff. Many of his songs reference historical themes. His 1973 song "Roads to Moscow" was clearly influenced by his reading of "The Gulag Archipelago".

Like many of my generation, I only knew him from "Year of the Cat", which was a monster hit single and album in the mid-70s. After that he dropped off the face of the Earth, or so I thought.

But not so. I was reintroduced to him a few years ago by a post by Baron Bodissey at Gates of Vienna. Turns out Stewart is still active, both recording and touring. He has a small but devoted following, of which I am proud to be a member.

One of his best albums was "Between the Wars", released in the early 90s. The songs all concern events from the 1920s and 30s, and the music has a jazzy flavor suitable for the period.

He has tons of live material on YouTube. Check him out. If you only remember him from "Year of the Cat", you're in for a treat.

Now that's a guy who really ought to write an autobiography. From the stories he tells between songs at his shows, he was practically a Zelig in the mid-60s British music scene.

Posted by: rickl at November 01, 2015 12:13 PM (sdi6R)

211
If I were to be executed, I wd pick firing squad. Traditionally, it is a more noble death than hanging and LI is for pussies or should I say putheys.

Posted by: Bruce With a Wang! at November 01, 2015 12:13 PM (iQIUe)

212 Nevergiveup! Rebel Yell! Looking at it right here on my desk. I haven't started it yet, but want to. Heh
Posted by: Yip at November 01, 2015 11:59 AM (e7T6D)

I am 3/4 the way thru....it is an easy read. You will enjoy it
Posted by: Nevergiveup
-------------------
Oh. Momentarily I thought the conversation had turned to bourbon.

Posted by: Mike Hammer, etc., etc. at November 01, 2015 12:13 PM (9mTYi)

213 I love this rather messy personal library of Keith Richards:

Here is a book I haven't read but sounds good, It's coming out in February. It is about the healing of painful memories by a RC writer now in the process of writing her dissertation:

http://preview.tinyurl.com/or4vera

Posted by: FenelonSpoke at November 01, 2015 12:13 PM (No/ki)

214 181 Seems I am doing most of my reading in Airports and on Planes...thank G-D for delays
Posted by: Nevergiveup at November 01, 2015 11:51 AM (DUoqb)

An up-side to using public transportation.

Posted by: baldilocks at November 01, 2015 12:13 PM (ys2UW)

215 "Aim Straight, You Bastards!"

Posted by: Breaker Morant, noted literary person at November 01, 2015 12:15 PM (vP/2F)

216
Stoaty Weasel had a recording made by the Smithsonian of a real rebel yell on he site.

Posted by: Bruce With a Wang! at November 01, 2015 12:15 PM (iQIUe)

217 I think the internet has reached a critical mass
point - or a node along that path, anyway. People are finding out the
truth or non-truths, or are now convinced that EVERYONE is lying and
it's all been a charade in politics.

-
I wonder if the era of political scandal is ending, not because politicians are getting any less corrupt but because the leaders of both parties will realize that they have much more in common with each other than with us knuckledraggers. They have managed to convince us that they all are so corrupt that we are reaching for the torches and pitchforks. Any further demonstrations of their lies and thefts will enable only the uniparty's enemies so they will need to kiss and make up.

P.S. We'll still get screwed.

Posted by: The Great White Snark at November 01, 2015 12:17 PM (Nwg0u)

218
You know what is cruel and unusual punishment is slitting the throats of a mother and her new born child. Firing squad -- not so much.

Posted by: Bruce With a Wang! at November 01, 2015 12:18 PM (iQIUe)

219 Just wrapping up 'Battle of Wits'. The depth of discussion of cryptology is considerable. Has required a bit of re-reading here and there.

The de-coding effort put forth in WWII by the allies was simply staggering.

In between, I made the mistake of picking up 'State of Fear'. Hard to put down.

Posted by: Mike Hammer, etc., etc. at November 01, 2015 12:19 PM (9mTYi)

220 One of his best albums was "Between the Wars", released in the early 90s. The songs all concern events from the 1920s and 30s, and the music has a jazzy flavor suitable for the period.

-
And with an ironic optimism given what we know is coming as we are Dancing Into 1939. Reminiscent of today.

Posted by: The Great White Snark at November 01, 2015 12:20 PM (Nwg0u)

221 Hi, just applied to join the Goodreads book group.

Posted by: Rana at November 01, 2015 12:21 PM (SGtKJ)

222 218

You know what is cruel and unusual punishment is slitting the
throats of a mother and her new born child. Firing squad -- not so
much.


An interesting out there is that pesky and. If it it's cruel, but you do it a lot, then it's not cruel AND unusual.

Posted by: Anachronda at November 01, 2015 12:21 PM (o78gS)

223 "Right now I'm a Freshman in my fourth year at UCLA. . ."

Posted by: Hayfield Volkovski at November 01, 2015 12:22 PM (eJymf)

224 Posted by: Craig Allen at November 01, 2015 12:07 PM (Bu03j)

My contention is that if they weren't the DOPe they *would* have been able to predict him since this isn't the first time someone like him has shown up. There is at least one time in relatively recent history when the "opposition" party was completely paralyzed although the administration was ignoring the Constitution and destroying the country so a guy with FU money who didn't hate the country stepped forward. Didn't get a lot of thanks for it either.

Posted by: Polliwog the 'Ette at November 01, 2015 12:22 PM (GDulk)

225 220
And with an ironic optimism given what we know is coming as we are Dancing Into 1939. Reminiscent of today.

Indeed. Today is a well-known optimistic period.

Posted by: Anachronda at November 01, 2015 12:22 PM (o78gS)

226 I think the internet has reached a critical mass
point - or a node along that path, anyway. People are finding out the truth or non-truths, or are now convinced that EVERYONE is lying and it's all been a charade in politics.
---------------

Allow me to suggest that you feel that way because you are informed by other than the mass media.

Any of the typical 'Man on the street' interviews show that the populace is stuck with stubborn perspectives that have been provided by the media. I do not see that changing.

Posted by: Mike Hammer, etc., etc. at November 01, 2015 12:23 PM (9mTYi)

227 just thought i'd add to the paragraphs on richards that he's a terrific musician. he wrote most of the rolling stones' catalogue. he's really very underrated as a guitarist because he's not one of those lead guitar whizzes. instead, he's a rhythm guitarist. but listen to his openings & progressions. brilliant. very few pop musicians can point to 40 years of original production. i could go on. maybe i will.

he's also a very decent guy.

Posted by: musical jolly chimp at November 01, 2015 12:23 PM (WTSFk)

228 OM, Thanks for the always great job on the book thread. Sadly, the annotated Tolkien map is a little over my budget.

I've found that many of the avant garde books of my teens have not held up well. The one value I retain from "Stranger in a Strange Land" is an appreciation of Rodin's sculpture. The Foundation series, River World, etc., meh.

But authors I read at the same time like Rider Haggard, Jules Verne, Conan Doyle, ER Burroughs, Robert Howard, even Louis L'Amour and others remain enjoyable. They weren't making a 'point' about society (well, Dickens was too damn often), they were telling good stories.

Posted by: JTB at November 01, 2015 12:24 PM (FvdPb)

229 Haha, gotta be to work at 3, clock says its 12:30, but I know different. What a burn on you clock! You POS.

Posted by: OP at November 01, 2015 12:26 PM (TzeLs)

230
The autopsy report in the shooting in StL proves that the kid shot himself. When you have contact marks under your chin, it's pretty clear what happened. Of course, all the weirdos who come out of the wood work and swear he was begging for his life and the cops shot him will never be called to retract their bs. Nor will the msm who knows they are publishing pure crap. crap.

Posted by: Bruce With a Wang! at November 01, 2015 12:26 PM (iQIUe)

231 It's convoluted, but if you use the search engine and choose "Kindle Store," it seems to work.

http://astore.amazon.com/aoshq-20/detail/B017AKV03I

Posted by: CharlieBrown'sDildo at November 01, 2015 11:52 AM (Zu3d9)


Thank you, this seems to work. If I click through, I can see the 'aoshq' identifier in the Kindle edition's URL, so I assume this means ace will get credit.

Dang. I wish I had paid attention and found out about this before now.

Posted by: OregonMuse at November 01, 2015 12:28 PM (mRvHu)

232 This week I read Christopher Taylor's older book Snowberry's Veil and started on Hound of the Baskervilles. I liked Snowberry's veil quite well. I am looking forward to Life Unworthy, a good yarn that includes some history is right up my alley.

Posted by: PaleRider at November 01, 2015 12:29 PM (iA/+T)

233 Just delurking for the book group.

Posted by: jic at November 01, 2015 12:29 PM (oCvv5)

234 U.S. Defense Secretary Ash Carter called on North Korea to shrink and eventually eliminate its nuclear weapons program, while acknowledging during a visit Sunday to the Demilitarized Zone dividing the two Koreas that prospects for reconciling with the defiant North are dim.

Does the DOD have a new HQ at fantasy Land in Orlando?

Posted by: Nevergiveup at November 01, 2015 12:31 PM (DUoqb)

235 Hi votermom (waving), I'd love to join the goodreads group. And, thanks to OregonMuse for this thread. And, thanks to all for the book recommendations. I will never read everything on my Kindle (or my bookshelves), but who cares? Wheeeeee! (Back to lurking).

Posted by: Suz at November 01, 2015 12:31 PM (v782u)

236 U.S. Defense Secretary Ash Carter called on North Korea to shrink and eventually eliminate its nuclear weapons program,...
------------

*!*
Hey, wait, is this guy kin to Jimmy?

I halfway expect Obama to offer them a trade deal.

Posted by: Mike Hammer, etc., etc. at November 01, 2015 12:33 PM (9mTYi)

237 Actually, I think that the "Wendell Wilkie" of the modern age was Mitt Romney.

Ayn Rand campaigned for Wendell Wilkie in 1940 (the one and only time she involved herself in politics) because she was appalled by FDR, his third term and the New Deal. After the election, she had an opportunity to meet Wilkie and thought he was a limp-wristed milk-toast (my words, not hers). She was disappointed in his lack of driving philosophy (quelle surprise).

Trump is a populist, and enjoys acting crazy in public. He is not stupid, but is bombastic and egotistical, to say the least.

Posted by: Bossy Conservative....lost in America at November 01, 2015 12:33 PM (+1T7c)

238 220
And with an ironic optimism given what we know is coming as we are Dancing Into 1939. Reminiscent of today.
Posted by: The Great White Snark at November 01, 2015 12:20 PM (Nwg0u)


Actually, it's "Laughing Into 1939", but the people in the song were certainly dancing.

I have not seen the movie, but he said there is a scene in "The King's Speech" that is a perfect visual representation of the song.

Posted by: rickl at November 01, 2015 12:36 PM (sdi6R)

239 Al Stewart is an avid history buff. Many of his songs reference
historical themes. His 1973 song "Roads to Moscow" was clearly
influenced by his reading of "The Gulag Archipelago".


The singer for the Pet Shop Boys sounds a lot like him.

Posted by: V the K at November 01, 2015 12:36 PM (c/Ipt)

240 The singer for the Pet Shop Boys sounds a lot like him.

I take that back. The singer the singer from the PSB reminds me of most is Eric Idle singing the Lumberjack Song.

Posted by: V the K at November 01, 2015 12:37 PM (c/Ipt)

241 Why does the NFL insist on playing London every week?

Posted by: Nevergiveup at November 01, 2015 12:44 PM (DUoqb)

242 227: Keith is everything you say and more. guy is living life on his terms. Nothing wrong with that. His book is one hell of a read too.

Posted by: Chavez the hugo at November 01, 2015 12:45 PM (sExLn)

243 Boy does Detroit suck

Posted by: Nevergiveup at November 01, 2015 12:45 PM (DUoqb)

244 Turkeys AK Party appeared to be closing in on its goal of recovering a single-party majority and governing alone, partial general election results showed on Sunday, in what would be a major turnaround for embattled President Tayyip Erdogan.

Democracy my ass

Posted by: Nevergiveup at November 01, 2015 12:47 PM (DUoqb)

245 And Al Stewart is an avid history buff. Many of his songs reference historical themes. His 1973 song "Roads to Moscow" was clearly influenced by his reading of "The Gulag Archipelago"...

Posted by: rickl at November 01, 2015 12:13 PM (sdi6R)


I've been listening to Stewart since the 70s, and have always liked him. I got to see him in 2008 in a small venue auditorium and he puts on a great show. His voice still sounds like it did when I first discovered him. My only disappointment was that he restricted his performance to his happy, upbeat songs (also YotC, of course). I would have loved it he had done "Roads to Moscow", my favorite AS song.

Got to meet him afterwards, too, when he came out to sign autographs. He's also quite the wine connoisseur, but you probably already know this.

Posted by: OregonMuse at November 01, 2015 12:48 PM (mRvHu)

246 Another way to look at the Foundation/Robot series is Asimov was showing how planned societies with people following a single voice are disasters. Spoiler alert but the Mule destroyed Hari Seldon's whole predictions which made the people realize they could no longer depend upon a prophet to guide them. Even when we find out how the robots and the Foundation are linked, we see that things are not "planned" but are attempted to be guided.

So was Asimov promoting a single benevolent group of leaders or saying it doesn't work?

Posted by: zogger at November 01, 2015 12:50 PM (wwKtS)

247 how could I have forgotten? Aeronaut's Windlass has a "just in time" cavalry charge........by cats. I thought Butcher did a good job of world building as well.

Posted by: Polliwog the 'Ette at November 01, 2015 12:53 PM (phT8I)

248 Good morning again, Hordelings. Back from church and it's such a lovely day, I think a boat cruise on Lake Geneva is in order before the bad weather sets in for good. There are a couple of attractive books featuring the magnificent mansions that line the shores of Lake Geneva (including the Wrigley estate) but they appear to be out of stock on Amazon. If I have time, I could drop into one of the shops and see if they possibly have copies.

Posted by: grammie winger, uff da at November 01, 2015 12:56 PM (dFi94)

249 Unlike then, however, they now appear to be crypto-, hell, open, collaborators with the Ds.
Posted by: Krebs v Carnot
------------------

I think you have coined a term, if it isn't already, 'Crypto-collaboraters'. See: GOPe

I intend to use it, generously.

Posted by: Mike Hammer, etc., etc. at November 01, 2015 12:59 PM (9mTYi)

250 241 Why does the NFL insist on playing London every week?

Posted by: Nevergiveup at November 01, 2015 12:44 PM (DUoqb)



Because Roger Goodell is a jackass. I think this is the last game there this year. I wouldn't be surprised if he doesn't eventually try to get a game every week in a foreign country.

Posted by: buzzion at November 01, 2015 01:02 PM (zt+N6)

251 Actually, it's "Laughing Into 1939", but the people in the song were certainly dancing.

-
I like The Age of Rhythm, too. It's bouncy and happy covering a forced gaiety."New York has no time for your tears."

Posted by: The Great White Snark at November 01, 2015 01:03 PM (Nwg0u)

252 NOOD

Posted by: Steck at November 01, 2015 01:05 PM (ibSYs)

253 Posted by: Tonestaple at November 01, 2015 11:12 AM (dCTrv)

You and I have eerily similar taste in books. I loved Gwen Bristow when I was a teenager and have been trying to find new (er than I have at least) copies of her stuff. I especially liked Jubilee Trail.

Posted by: Tammy al-Thor at November 01, 2015 01:06 PM (JqEq4)

254 OregonMuse,

Old Sailor's Poet, author of the Amy Lynn series, has been pixy banned, probably inadvertently. Could you possibly contact the powers that be about getting this fixed?

Posted by: cool breeze at November 01, 2015 01:06 PM (6Cu7i)

255 161. I shall "Fear no evil"

Probably one of RAH's worst books.

A of course, it was written while he was at probably the lowest point of his life and creativity, and was probably pushed out to satisfy his publisher.

Or at least, such is the conventional wisdom.

Posted by: Fox2! at November 01, 2015 01:08 PM (brIR5)

256 50
Oregon Muse, I got this question from a moron out in Singapore (I
suspect timezones make it hard for him to catch morning threads):

"Could you ask OM has there been a review or poll on which e-reader Rons and Ettes use?

Heading to Bangkok next weekend to visit a mate that goes to Siam Uni and it is the only city in Thailand where I can get a Kindle."

Posted by: @votermom at November 01, 2015 10:37 AM (cbfNE)


Sorry I'm late with this, @votermom, I missed it the first time through. Hope you're still here.

1.) Short answer: no. Long answer: I've been meaning to do a poll on e-readers, but have never gotten around to it.

2.) My advice: if you're indecisive about which e-reader to purchase, I recommend doing what I did: get an all-purpose tablet, either Android or iPad (in my case, a Nexus), download the various free Kindle, Nook, Kobe, and other e-Reader apps, and you'll be good to go for any e-book.

Posted by: OregonMuse at November 01, 2015 01:08 PM (mRvHu)

257 254 OregonMuse,
Old Sailor's Poet, author of the Amy Lynn series, has been pixy banned, probably inadvertently. Could you possibly contact the powers that be about getting this fixed?

Posted by: cool breeze at November 01, 2015 01:06 PM (6Cu7i)


Unfortunately, I have no clout over the AosHQ powers-that-be. But I have emailed OSP privately and have suggested ways to get around the ban. So either my suggestions haven't worked, or he hasn't tried them, or perhaps he never got my e-mail.

Posted by: OregonMuse at November 01, 2015 01:13 PM (mRvHu)

258 Brian May also has also authored as least one (maybe two) book, "The Cosmic Tourist". This isn't a heavy read but a journey from near to far through the structures found in the universe. Lots of pictures too for the Moron. I recommend it.

Posted by: dogfish at November 01, 2015 01:14 PM (0O2Lr)

259 She told me she has problems with her Kindle. Too many buttons/controls that force her to hold it in a way that causes her hands to cramp up. Maybe someone here can suggest a more ergonomic digital reader? Not that she will buy it - she generally prefers dead trees editions. Understandably.

Can't tell you the model she had - she gave it away. It was quite a while back she got it, though.

Posted by: mindful webworker


I'd try finding an ergonomic cover/case with a stand feature before purchasing a new unit. Amazon should have at least one that helps.

Posted by: weft cut-loop at November 01, 2015 01:18 PM (JmGFJ)

260 Dexter Holland has a science PhD.
Posted by: BourbonChicken


Not sure if he has completed it PhD yet. Don't forget to try his Gringo Bandito hot sauce. One of my favorites for eggs.

Posted by: dogfish at November 01, 2015 01:20 PM (0O2Lr)

261 Welcome all you lurkers, and do please stay delurked!

The best way to get unbanned is to email Pixy directly. He has to do something with your IP.

Posted by: Tammy al-Thor at November 01, 2015 01:22 PM (JqEq4)

262 "Read Johnny Carson by Henry 'Bombastic' Bushkin, Carson's business manager and lawyer for many years. Good warts-and-all biography that isn't a hit job."

Seconded. A very engaging book, I read it in a couple of days. Couldn't put it down.

Posted by: navybrat at November 01, 2015 01:24 PM (ETxiG)

263 Other than being appalled as usual at the way FLOTUS is dressed for a public occasion, I am glad I saw these pictures.

President Obama seems to be enjoying being around all the babies. He looks genuinely happy, not like he'd rather be golfing. It warms my heart to see it, which I need because I am normally enraged at him.

Posted by: Tammy al-Thor at November 01, 2015 01:32 PM (JqEq4)

264 #246, I seem to remember reading that Asimov didn't believe in Psychohistory but wrote the first book at the behest of his editor (Martin Greenberg?). I think The Mule was introduced in the second book as a way to refute the idea that you could predict the actions of large groups because a single anomaly could influence events.

Posted by: Mutantman at November 01, 2015 01:37 PM (iBLpv)

265 Oh, lord, wrong thread...sorry!

Posted by: Tammy al-Thor at November 01, 2015 01:38 PM (JqEq4)

266 *waves* Not dead, just busy! Introduced students to The Federalist Papers this past week, which some of them hadn't yet read, so I feel I've done my patriotic duty for the week. This week, introducing one class to de Tocqueville and Chesterton and the other to Goethe by way of Schubert and Mozart. Tough as it is sometimes to keep up due to health wonkiness, and frustrating as some moments can be, I really do love my job.

Speaking of Chesterton, I have to repeat my plug for What I Saw in America, which I finally finished reading. Not only did he discern where certain trends in 1920s thought and politics were likely to lead, but he also picks up on important points about American character that liberals would rather we forgot. Everybody needs to read this book.

Posted by: Elisabeth G. Wolfe at November 01, 2015 01:46 PM (iuQS7)

267 I think Asimov's best contribution is his 3 laws of positronic brains:

1. A robot may not injure a human being or, through inaction, allow a human being to come to harm.

2. A robot must obey the orders given it by human beings except where such orders would conflict with the First Law.

3. A robot must protect its own existence as long as such protection does not conflict with the First or Second Laws.

I am not totally sure these insure that robots don't go wild and kill us all, but they seem to cover most cases.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Three_Laws_of_Robotics

Posted by: Zogger at November 01, 2015 01:48 PM (wwKtS)

268 infrequent delurker here, VoterMom ... just asked to join the Goodreads group

Posted by: WingNut at November 01, 2015 01:58 PM (HfHQH)

269 it never ceases to amaze me how people confuse the persona with the person.

Posted by: musical jolly chimp at November 01, 2015 02:02 PM (WTSFk)

270 "wrote the first book at the behest of his editor (Martin Greenberg?)."

Possibly John W. Campbell.

Posted by: BeckoningChasm at November 01, 2015 02:06 PM (B8JRQ)

271 I have seen Al Stewart in concert twice. My friend went backstage to get his vinyl album of "Year of the Cat" signed. A good guy, with lots of good music. "Running Man" is appropriate for today, methinks.


I want to here his story on what made him give his last few pounds to Yoko Ono in London. Was he a lucky man or what?

Posted by: NaCly Dog at November 01, 2015 02:11 PM (u82oZ)

272 #200 Bruce with a Wang! - William the Conqueror's carcass exploded [!] while it was being stuffed into its final resting place (William was fat and the body had expanded with gases after being left unattended for a while after death before being transported by the clergy to its final resting spot). Going out with a bang? Sounds like something Keith Richards would do.

Posted by: AMartel at November 01, 2015 02:14 PM (WWgnZ)

273 I adore Keef but the Mick animosity is bullshit. Someone's gotta keep their eye on the prize and Keith was slumped over in a daze for decades. It's the combination of the very opposite personalities that accounts for the longstanding popularity. Laugh all you want but we'll miss them when they go. Icons.

Posted by: AMartel at November 01, 2015 02:17 PM (WWgnZ)

274 inspired by the above i am listening to "monkey man" by richards, jagger, et al. amazing.

clang

Posted by: musical jolly chimp at November 01, 2015 02:19 PM (WTSFk)

275 now, "can't you hear me knocking". remarkable.

clang

Posted by: musical jolly chimp at November 01, 2015 02:20 PM (WTSFk)

276 Posted by: mindful webworker - inquiringly at November 01, 2015 12:01 PM (Dqfn9)

Mindful webworker, check if her local library has ereaders they loan out?

Mine has a few nooks one can borrow preloaded with some popular titles. I imagine the got it on some kind of BN program so other libs might have it too.

Posted by: @votermom at November 01, 2015 02:22 PM (cbfNE)

277 "... soft and low..."

clang clang clang clang clang

Posted by: musical jolly chimp at November 01, 2015 02:23 PM (WTSFk)

278 Posted by: OregonMuse at November 01, 2015 01:08 PM (mRvHu)

Thanks OM. That's what I do - use ebook apps on a tablet and my phone.

Posted by: @votermom at November 01, 2015 02:25 PM (cbfNE)

279 "gimme shelter". who could not take this fellow seriously?

clang clang

Posted by: musical jolly chimp at November 01, 2015 02:28 PM (WTSFk)

280 eg "midnight rambler"

clang

Posted by: musical jolly chimp at November 01, 2015 02:32 PM (WTSFk)

281 and that's just one short period in his oeuvre.

who are the greatest pop music composers of all time? in quality, originality, longevity.

jagger richards are up there. but not the greatest.

hammerstein?

mccartney?

the greatest is...

Posted by: musical jolly chimp at November 01, 2015 02:39 PM (WTSFk)

282 irving berlin

Posted by: musical jolly chimp at November 01, 2015 02:48 PM (WTSFk)

283 actually, looking over the jaguars/righards book, they have a 20 year run that is pretty extraordinary.

clang!

Posted by: musical jolly chimp at November 01, 2015 02:50 PM (WTSFk)

284 Random comments:

My niece is working on a counted cross-stitch map of Middle Earth. She posted her progress on FB the other day. It's taken her 8 months to finish the top 1/8th, so she should be finishing it in 5 years. That's commitment!

A few years ago I read "The Lampshade" by Mark Jacobson. Shortly after Hurrican Katrina, a friend of Jacobson's came across an odd lampshade at a yardsale in New Orleans. He was told it was made from the skin of Jews, bought it for $35, then sent it to Jacobson to figure out if it was real. DNA testing proved it was, and Jacobson did further investigation. Interesting book, and it really is hard to fathom the awfulness of some human beings.

I read "Celia Garth" in junior high and loved it. I would love to reread this book, but it's $10 on kindle. Should I ever come across a good used copy, I'd buy it in a second.

I'm currently rereading Jane Eyre for my book club. I first Jane Eyre when I was a kid and so much of it was over my head. It's so refreshing to read a book where the author has a moral point of view and isn't afraid to express it.

Posted by: biancaneve at November 01, 2015 02:54 PM (37TvV)

285 124 and above related

Kings Mountain features the following: South+guns+militia.

Always causes flareups of Chronic Secessionist Hysteria Disease. Often results in the sufferer decending into obsessive paranoia involving armed banjo players. No known cure. Therapeutic treatment focuses on restoring contact with reality.

Posted by: Man from Wazzustan at November 01, 2015 03:08 PM (uPxUo)

286 jaguars/righards?

damn spell check

jaggers/richaqrds

Posted by: musical jolly chimp at November 01, 2015 03:12 PM (WTSFk)

287 richaqrds?

i give up

Posted by: musical jolly chimp at November 01, 2015 03:14 PM (WTSFk)

288 you mean Jagger/Richards?

Posted by: OregonMuse at November 01, 2015 03:24 PM (jQkxj)

289 I am not cursed with auto-cucumber.

Posted by: OregonMuse at November 01, 2015 03:26 PM (jQkxj)

290 I'm coming back to "Brothers Karamazov." I have to tell you about a scene.

Mitya's wanna-be girlfriend, Grushenka, has just run off with her former lover. Mitya has gone crazy with jealousy, and runs after her to throw himself at her feet in a self-flagellant fit to show how much he loves her, before he sort-of plans on self-destruction, either by killing himself, or killing his father and then himself, or some other thing he hasn't figured out yet.

We follow Mitya around as he feverishly, manically runs from person to person trying to raise money, in crazy schemes and babbling nuttiness. He races on his horse in an attempt to catch Grushenka before she disappears from his life forever. Racing, running, blistering feverishness. Your heart is pounding as he discovers she is still at the inn, and her lover is there. He bursts in on them.

And then Dostoyevsky drops you into the middle of this ridiculous conversation, in which all these Polish officers, whoever they are, are blathering on and on (and relentlessly on) about inconsequentials. Your sense of tension keeps rising as you wait for *something* to happen. Mitya is mostly off stage, and the narrator just keeps describing all the annoying mannerisms of these guys, and their bad Russian, and their little jokes, and the way they open the bottle of champagne, and so on.

It's utterly masterful. Just like Mitya, you're feeling breathless running to the action, and then . . . you have to just sit there and wait. It's the feeling you get when you use one of those people movers at the airport, and suddenly you get off, and you feel vertigo when you suddenly change speed.

What surprises me about Bros. K is that it's such an easy read. Yes, it's three inches thick and 800 pages long or whatever; and yes, it's a translation from Russian; and Yes, it's from one of those Important Authors. But if you can stand to read something long, the reading itself is a breeze, and such a pleasure. The reason this book is famous is because it's good, not because it wins you Snob Points.

Posted by: Smallish Bees at November 01, 2015 03:32 PM (yjhOG)

291 Strict lurker, though maybe I have posted a few times over the years. Wanted to say hi and join the GoodReads Group.
So, Hi!
Love this place and never miss the book thread.

Posted by: GigHarborGary at November 01, 2015 03:32 PM (NIWEM)

292
I let Richards talk with his guitar. When he does, I'm all ears. Anything else he communicates is uninteresting and pedestrian gobbledygook one hears from anyone related to the popular music business.

Posted by: Levin at November 01, 2015 03:37 PM (SpGXB)

293 yes jagger/richards

Posted by: musical jolly chimp at November 01, 2015 03:56 PM (WTSFk)

294 and rogers/hammerstein

Posted by: musical jolly chimp at November 01, 2015 03:56 PM (WTSFk)

295 oh, btw, brava bravo (as the case may be) and thanks.

Posted by: musical jolly chimp at November 01, 2015 04:06 PM (WTSFk)

296 Mostly-lurker here, saying Hi! to the Goodreads AoSHQ groupies.

Posted by: RigelDog at November 01, 2015 04:25 PM (pfVPE)

297 When I was a kid, we played at 'Swamp Fox' games in the woods. Francis Marion was well known to all of us.

As I recall, Walt Disney did a series on TV about the Swamp Fox back in the '50s.

Posted by: The Oort Cloud - Source of all SMODs at November 01, 2015 04:31 PM (AYY6Y)

298 #17

The direst inspiration for Brunner's style in 'Stand on Zanzibar' was John Dos Passos' USA Trilogy, published in the 1930s.

Keep in mind, Stand... was published in 1968 and set several decades into the then future, which should be SF enough but also featured a massive computer revealed to be self-aware. ("Christ, what an imagination I've got.") Also, the elements of the Benin natives having an evolutionary trait allowing them to slowly conquer invaders is plenty SF-iness in my book.

It's a given that a book set mere decades in the future rather than centuries ahead is not going to age as well. You have to try to take on the perspective of the era to properly assess its impact at the time.

If you want something to hold against Brunner, he was a serious leftist. Some of the stuff he wrote in the 80s really disappointed me. There is a good exchange between him and Jerry Pournelle in one of the 'There Will Be War' anthologies, in which Pournelle takes him to task for casually dismissing much of Europe falling under Soviet rule post-WWII, which Brunner seemed to regard as entirely right and just.

Posted by: Epobirs at November 01, 2015 04:42 PM (IdCqF)

299 Hey, I just joined the Moron GoodReads group. The Platinum membership was quite reasonable - $250 - to the moderator.

The check is in the mail!!

I am reading, Gut: The Inside Story of Our Body's Most Underrated Organ, by G. Enders. NonFiction. of course. An international best seller accessible and witty and recommended for the bearing it surely will have on your health.

For military history buffs: I recommend Max Hastings. I last read "Retribution" his history of the last year of the war in the Pacific. I was surprised to learn that at the time of the Hiroshima bomb, and before the anticipated invasion of Japan, war causalities were running 250,000 people a month. Consider that Jon Stewart (you putz).

Thanks, Ace.

Posted by: (not J.J.) Sefton at November 01, 2015 05:31 PM (wi0rD)

300 Requisite Hello for the Goodreaders moderators.

Oh and I think that the book thread should take a look at the good pulp, trashy pulp and the pulp that is just fun. Whether we are talking Tarzan and his 26 adventures, the various Micky Spillane detective novels, or some of those wonderfully cheesy "Men's Adventure" novels with the like of Mack Bolan in them or some other multi-author sharing the same name novel series that are like in the hundreds and for guys too old for comic books but you don't want to take some classic lit on an airplane ride.

Posted by: Charles at November 01, 2015 05:48 PM (sdgg8)

301 Oh and I think that the book thread should take a look at the good pulp, trashy pulp and the pulp that is just fun....

Posted by: Charles at November 01, 2015 05:48 PM (sdgg


Oh yes, we've done "pulp" threads before, and you can be sure we'll revisit this topic again in the future.

Posted by: OregonMuse at November 01, 2015 05:51 PM (mRvHu)

302 I have a request for anybody who is coming late to today's book thread:

Do you know of any books that are written at a third grade reading level but with subject matter that is more appropriate for 7th and 8th graders? My wife is a teacher who gets a lot of kids who would be embarrassed to be seen with a kids book but who's reading skills are not yet at grade level. Being young adolescents, they are very sensitive to peer pressure and ridicule but they need to read to improve their reading skill and they need the satisfaction of succeeding at something.

Posted by: Obnoxious A-Hole at November 01, 2015 06:08 PM (QHgTq)

303 @OregonMuse,

The reason I bring it up was a book thread a few weeks ago talked about the death of heroism in literature. Most modern literature for kids disregards fighting and standing up for either people or beliefs and instead tries for some sort of "hug it out and sing a loving song" method of conflict resolution. Where I was going to school almost 25-30 years ago we had some of those pulps on our required reading list. As well as some classic lits like the R.L. Stevenson adventure novels, Dumas's novels and even some Zane Grey. For some of the idea of modern lit in HS class that was tied to modern American History we read Hammet's Maltese Falcon and Chandler's Big Sleep while on a section about 20's and 30's America. Our teacher's opinion was that this was a better idea of what most people viewed life was like, not the Fitzgerald version that no one can really grasp. Anyhow, that is why I get a kick out of some pulp and been going back since I have discovered the fun of both adventure pulp at the turn of the 20th century and the sci-fi pulp in the golden age of the 30s to the 50s.

Posted by: Charles at November 01, 2015 06:23 PM (sdgg8)

304 253, Tammy al-Thor, Gwen Bristow's books are now on Kindle. They weren't the last time I went looking. Kind of pricey, about $10.00, but for favorites....

Posted by: Tonestaple at November 01, 2015 06:58 PM (dCTrv)

305 Posted by: Obnoxious A-Hole at November 01, 2015 06:08 PM


Honestly, I was assigned and read Tom Sawyer in third grade. Not sure that's even possible now days.

Posted by: dogfish at November 01, 2015 07:12 PM (0O2Lr)

306 Eh, Keith Richards is almost 72 y/o .

Posted by: deepred at November 01, 2015 08:00 PM (xv5cf)

307 When I was in college at Marquette in milwaukee in
the 80s I was having dinner with my uncle who was president of the university at the time . I saw I was reading LOTR and asked how interested I was in the series . I told him I had read it 5 or 6 times before . Turns out Marquette has the majority of his manuscripts . My uncle asked me if i was interested in in seeing them !! one day later I was in the library archives reading JRR's original handwriiten manuscripts
...doodle and all . It was a great 4 hours .

Posted by: larry at November 01, 2015 08:33 PM (cXlIW)

308 Hi, goodreads group! Please add me.

I'm halfway through "American Sniper".

Posted by: sinalco at November 01, 2015 08:39 PM (yODqO)

309 307 ... larry, I am officially envious. But even Tolkien's papers couldn't get me to go to Milwaukee these days.

Posted by: JTB at November 01, 2015 09:04 PM (FvdPb)

310 I asked to join the Goodreads book group, but since I never comment over here, like, hardly ever, I thought I'd at least pop in and say hello.

Posted by: Jessica at November 01, 2015 09:05 PM (KZsTO)

311 "The 66-year-old is said to have started painstakingly arranging copies of rare books"???

Keith Richards wishes he was 66 years old, try 72 years old this December 18th.

Posted by: roger martin at November 01, 2015 09:19 PM (cnUhk)

312 Checking in to join the Goodreads group. And thanks to whoever recommended "Smartass of Mars." Very entertaining.

Posted by: That SOB Van Owen at November 01, 2015 09:22 PM (xrET7)

313 Hello!!!Just sent request to join book group on Goodreads an d let the fun begin!

Posted by: Rgallegos at November 01, 2015 10:22 PM (49Jfq)

314 Greetings Goodreads Book Group! Please add me. Thank you!

Posted by: Long time person who lurks at November 01, 2015 11:38 PM (oGb5d)

315 237 Based on what I read in The Forgotten Man, I'd take Wendell Willkie over pretty much anyone who has run for President this past quarter century.

To anyone joining the Goodreads group, we need more voters in the Moron Goodreads Listopia lists!

I've been reading Bastiat lately. Damn but the man was a genius. Imagine all the human misery that could have been avoided if people had listened to him instead of the Socialists.

Posted by: BornLib at November 02, 2015 12:55 AM (zpNwC)

316 And finally, long after everyone has left, comes a voice crying out in the willow-ness ...

OK, I know this might be a dead thread, but I have a question. I have rarely used Goodreads, and I access it through Facebook. So if I want to join the AoSHQ group, is it better to just rejoin GR under my HQ nic?

Posted by: RovingCopyEditor at November 02, 2015 03:46 AM (q18QJ)

317 Test... test...

@ RovingCopyEditor,

No, I bet if you just post here include the email address that you use for Facebook (don't post it just put it in the email box when you post a comment) they will be able to figure it out. I'm posting here for the same reason.

Posted by: Buddy Bizarre at November 02, 2015 04:14 AM (W6m9k)

318 That last comment could use an editor:

Don't put your email in the comment, just in the email box that is required to post a comment.

I also just noticed the time stamp hasn't fallen back. I'm sure Pixy will fix it just before its time to Spring Forward.

Posted by: Buddy Bizarre at November 02, 2015 04:17 AM (W6m9k)

319 Hi! I would like to join the moron horde at goodreads.

Thank you,

Michael Goffinet

Posted by: RutgersMike at November 02, 2015 01:43 PM (7lVxX)

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