Sunday Morning Book Thread - 07-24-2022 ["Perfessor" Squirrel]

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(ht: Tonypete)

Welcome to the prestigious, internationally acclaimed, stately, and illustrious Sunday Morning Book Thread! The place where all readers are welcome, regardless of whatever guilty pleasure we feel like reading (very handy reference guide for traveling in fantasyland). Here is where we can discuss, argue, bicker, quibble, consider, debate, confabulate, converse, and jaw about our latest fancy in reading material, even if it's nothing more than the federal regulations on regular, susbstantive interactions in online courses. As always, pants are required, especially if you are wearing these pants (needs more pepperoni!)...

So relax, find yourself a warm kitty (or warm puppy--I won't judge) to curl up in your lap, dice up some hashbrowns (scattered, smothered, and covered), and crack open a new book. What are YOU reading this fine morning?

PIC NOTE

Today's pic was provided by Tonypete:


Perfessor Squirrel,

As you requested - a pic of the little library I made for the neighborhood little kids. They think the path is through the deepest, impenetrable woods when, of course, it is simply between me and my neighbor's home. It's right outside my office so I can keep an eye on them if need be but they all are good kids. LOL

My wife painted the hex sign on the sides because, well, you never know.

Tonypete

Comment: This looks like a very relaxing spot. It's nice that you are providing a space for the neighborhood kids to enjoy their reading experience. Of course, it's probably not quite as much fun when it's 100+ degrees outside!

SELF-PUBLISHING

Since we have several Books by Morons this week, here are a couple of videos regarding self-publishing. It's easier than ever to publish your own books. But in order to become successful, it takes an awful lot of hard effort to not only write, edit, and publish your book, but to also market both you and your book to your audience. The quality is something of a mixed bag, but I can honestly say that Moron Authors do seem to be a cut above many other traditional published authors. Kudos to you!

NOTE: The YouTuber below is viewing self-publishing through a fantasy literature lens, but his points are applicable across genres.

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(In memory of Dave in Texas, RIP)

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BOOKS BY MORONS

We have several Books By Morons this week! (y'all are back from vacation!) Before we get to them, OrangeEnt sent me the following quote from J.D. Salinger:


What really knocks me out is a book that, when you're all done reading it, you wish the author that wrote it was a terrific friend of yours and you could call him up on the phone whenever you felt like it. That doesn't happen much, though.

One of the amazing things about the Internet Age is that we *can* reach out and contact authors to let them know how much we appreciate their work. Furthermore, many authors are very happy to engage with their fans. When I took over the Sunday Morning Book Thread, I never imagined that I would have so many interactions with Moron Authors. It's one of the best parts of this gig. Thank you for sharing your stories with us!


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Good Morning Perfessor. I've released my science fiction novel, Metrics, on Amazon, paperback and Kindle. It is an adaptation from the screenplay.
My commenter nic is motionview. Thanks for any publicity, and if you get a chance to read it I hope you enjoy it. Bonus Kaboom homage.

Gene Alexander
https://individualwrites.com/

They were trying to free the human genome - they built a spam filter that destroyed the world.

Metrics is a science-fiction action adventure with plenty of violence and some comedy and a bit of absurdity. A group of young scientists are researching the 60% of human DNA with no known function, trying to open-source the human genome. Through a twist of software fate and some 3,000-year-old Sumerian Urn data, they accidentally modify a Wisdom-Of-Crowds spam filter into a villainous artificial intelligence, SpamKiller. The scientists encode the Urn data into their own junk DNA, unwittingly transforming themselves into super-athletes. They quest for redemption against the AI villain, which rules the world with an iron fist. SpamKiller creates a set of death games, the Metrics, to force-evolve replacements for the scientists, while maintaining a deadly obsession with fighting spam.

Comment: *sigh* It's all fun and games until Skynet (or SpamKiller in this instance) wakes up and decides to take over the world...When will humans learn that AI is a crapshoot? This does sound like a book right up my alley, so I think I will check it out!

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I'm a regular reader of the Sunday Morning Book Thread.

My latest book is a non-fiction story of loss, perseverance, and acceptance entitled How to Run a Marathon in 13 Years.

It's in discounted pre-order on Amazon.

All the best,

John P. McCann

Comment: I'm going to break the rules a bit and do some math. Let's see, a marathon is 26 miles, so in order to run a marathon in 13 years, I only need to run 2 miles a year. That translates into just under 10 yards a day. I think I can manage that! In all seriousness, though, this sounds like an inspirational tale of a runner whose dreams were dashed via severe injury. Over time, he was able to persevere and overcome numerous challenges (including cancer, weight gain, and depression) to once again achieve his goals. This book will be released on September 9, but you can pre-order now on your Kindle for the low, low price of just $0.99!

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Hey Perfessor,

Longtime lurker. I noticed that nobody submitted a book for your AoSHQ Sunday Book Thread this week and wanted to make sure that didn't happen again. I've written four books, and this is my latest. It's a sci fi detective noir story set in a dystopian corporatist future. It would be great if you could post it sometime but no hard feelings if you can't.

The Capella Codex: The Cyber-Locator Files

Best,

Vic

Comment: I absolutely LOVE the cover for this book! It just screams out pulp science fiction from the Golden Age. Like Gene Alexander's book above, this involves an AI going rogue with dire consequences for humanity.

More Books By Morons can be found HERE!

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MORON RECOMMENDATIONS


I finished reading Pierre Berton's The Klondike Fever: The Life and Death of the Last Great Gold Rush. I obtained it in order to learn something about the event because every year scout troops conduct "gold rush" derbies (inter-patrol competitions) during winter camping trips. I learned a lot of new things.

By the time news of the discovery reached the outside world, pretty much all of the sites of the gold had been claimed by those already in Alaska or the Canadian North. All the rushees got was poorer, mostly, or dead.

Berton devoted several chapters to the different routes that folks took to the Yukon. The Dyea and Skagway entry ports are best known; those who took other routes arrived usually as the rush was ending. Beasts of burden were cruelly used and died by the score to the point where the elevations of trails increased over the winter months from their snow encased carcasses.

Berton covers much more, with many anecdotes (he grew up there). This is worth reading.

Posted by: Krebs v Carnot: Epic Battle of the Cycling Stars at July 17, 2022 09:23 AM (ZvxPV)

Comment: When I took German one of the books we were assigned to read was about the California gold rush at Sutter's Mill. Gold rushes tend to bring out the worst in people as they try to strike it rich. I've heard it said that if you really want to get rich during a gold rush, sell picks, shovels, and other mining gear.

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I am a fan of the Random Book feature on Project Gutenberg. Earlier this week, or maybe it was last week, it turned up The Caged Lion by Charlotte Yonge, a historical fiction novel about James II of Scotland. It was pretty entertaining, and the main thing that struck me was how complex the writing was. Most modern people accustomed to Twitter and Instagram would really struggle with this book.

Random Book also turned up a book called An Inquiry into the Permanent Causes of the Decline and Fall of Powerful and Wealthy Nations, which I haven't read yet (too sick to really focus) but which promises to be timely.

Posted by: Mrs. Peel at July 17, 2022 09:31 AM (8548M)

Comment: This random book reading on Project Gutenberg sounds like an interesting idea. Here is how to get started: Simply go to https://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/search/?sort_order=random and select one of the books that pops up. If none of them grab your interest, just refresh the page to get a new batch of random books. At the moment, my search results include El misterio de un hombre pequeñito: novela (Spanish), Around the World in Eighty Days, Child-Land: Picture-Pages for the Little Ones and Three Spacemen Left to Die!

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Reading Improvement: Give them a copy of The Dictionary of Cultural Literacy, ED Hersch.

Most non-readers, slow readers, infrequent readers lack the vocabulary both literal and contextual to make reading enjoyable and something requiring little struggle/effort. The only real way to build the vocabulary of words and ideas needed to make reading easy/fun...is to Read. Until someone does, their mental palette has too few colors to paint within their mind the tableau the page creates that makes it interesting. Many people only have the "little box" of crayons, and still struggle with coloring book outlines...enjoyable reading requires a much more varied/overlapping/tinted/shaded wash...think watercolor Impressionists rather than graphic plates. (fuck that abstract shit) Most people think in pictures, until words on a page can transmit scenes..they are all just Black/White.

Hersch created the Dictionary to overcome that...it makes for Bite Sized reading, that makes further reading easier, comprehensible, each bit of knowledge creates a hook that further knowledge can be hung upon.

Posted by: Birddog at July 17, 2022 10:08 AM (uAI4S)

Comment: A writing professor friend of mine always tells the students in his literature classes that the only way they can become good writers is to be good readers first. I told my students the very same thing. As I mentioned last week, reading takes patience and practice, like any skill. One of the better books I've read on teaching writing uses a lot of colorful imagery to convey the idea that you really are painting pictures in your readers' minds.

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Hi, horde! I am reading William L. Shirer's The Collapse of the Third Republic about the fall of France in 1940. I knew the frogs had screwed up but I never knew the details. Mon dieu, what a shit show that was - generals whose mindset was stuck in 1918, who had no idea how to use tanks and planes, who didn't even have radio communications. It's a bit unfair to blame the average Pierre for the mess - what could he possibly do when the commanders were sitting in their various HQs far from the front with no idea of what was going on? The Germans were stunned by how easy the frogs made things for them.

Posted by: Donna&&&&&&&&V at July 17, 2022 10:40 AM (HabA/)

Comment: In light of recent events, you do have to wonder at how prepared the United State military is at meeting a truly imminent threat. Sure, our military technology is the envy of every other nation on the planet. But what good does all that hardware do if our men and women in uniform are woefully incapable of adopting a "warrior" mindset because they are not trained to destroy the enemy?

More Moron-recommended reading material can be found HERE! (308 Moron-recommended books so far!)

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WHAT I'VE BEEN READING THIS PAST WEEK:


  • Civilization One: The World is Not as You Thought It Was by Christopher Knight and Alan Butler -- A British engineer makes a startling discovery about megalithic structures in Britain, leading the authors to research a fundamental unit of measurement that may have been used across the world to create fantastic structures and form a basis for units of time, distance, weight, and volume that we still use today.

  • The Fuller Memorandum by Charles Stross -- A British bureaucrat working for a secret paranormal ministry uncovers a conspiracy involving his mostly dead boss.

  • Star Wars: Darth Plagueis by James Luceno -- This is the story of Emperor Palpatine's Sith Master, which is alluded to by Palpatine himself in Star Wars, Episode III: The Revenge of the Sith. One of many stories in the Star Wars universe that we didn't know we needed. It's OK, but not great.

  • Azure Bonds by Kate Novak and Jeff Grubb -- This is loosely based on the ancient computer role-playing game Curse of the Azure Bonds, which is based on Advanced Dungeons and Dragons (1st Ed.). As adaptations go, it's pretty decent.

  • Bloom by Wil McCarthy -- The Earth was destroyed by a genetic experiment gone haywire. The survivors now live deep within the moons of Jupiter because the entire inner solar system is uninhabitable. Dr. Fauci's whereabouts at the time of the genetic accident are unknown.

  • The Doomsday Vault by Steven Harper - Victorian steampunk with zombies...

That's about all I have for this week. Thank you for all of your kind words regarding my Sunday Morning Book Thread. This is a very special place. You are very special people (in all the best ways!). The kindness, generosity, and wisdom of the Moron Horde knows no bounds. Let's keep reading!

If you have any suggestions for improvement, reading recommendations, or writing projects that you'd like to see on the Sunday Morning Book Thread, you can send them to perfessor dot squirrel at-sign gmail dot com. Your feedback is always appreciated! You can also take a virtual tour of OUR library at libib.com/u/perfessorsquirrel. Since I added sections for AoSHQ, I now consider it OUR library, rather than my own personal fiefdom...

PREVIOUS SUNDAY MORNING BOOK THREAD - 07-17-22 (hat tip: vmom stabby stabby stabamillion) (NOTE: Do NOT comment on old threads!)

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("Huggy" Squirrel is ready for the zombie / vampire / werewolf Apocalypse! -- Hey! This joke still works!)

Posted by: Open Blogger at 09:00 AM




Comments

(Jump to bottom of page)

1 Hooray!

Posted by: All Hail Eris, Analog Hipster at July 24, 2022 08:59 AM (Dc2NZ)

2 First!

Posted by: I am the Shadout Mapes, the Housekeeper at July 24, 2022 08:59 AM (PiwSw)

3 Missed it by that much...

Posted by: I am the Shadout Mapes, the Housekeeper at July 24, 2022 09:00 AM (PiwSw)

4 Currently doing a re-read of the Harry Potter series

Posted by: vic /s at July 24, 2022 09:00 AM (mZwKe)

5 Tolle Lege
Last Sunday picked up Sharpe's Battle so well into it

Posted by: Skip at July 24, 2022 09:01 AM (2JoB8)

6 That's a great wee library, Tonypete!

The hex signs keep out "spinach" books by Prog authors.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, Analog Hipster at July 24, 2022 09:02 AM (Dc2NZ)

7 Tonypete, that's a nice little book repository! I like that it's at kid height. The ones I've seen aren't.

Posted by: Weak Geek at July 24, 2022 09:03 AM (Om/di)

8 I've been reading the Pern books in chronological order. They started out as science fiction with the discovery and colonization of the planet, then devolved to fantasy as technology stagnated to a medieval level after successive waves of destructive phenomena, and finally it's returning to science fiction now that the old technology, buried for 2500 years, has been rediscovered. Fun ride.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, Analog Hipster at July 24, 2022 09:03 AM (Dc2NZ)

9 Nice chapeau Perfessor!

Posted by: I am the Shadout Mapes, the Housekeeper at July 24, 2022 09:04 AM (PiwSw)

10 Moving neighbor gave me another Mulford Hopalong Cassidy novel. Still reading other stuff. Plugging along on novella.

Posted by: OrangeEnt at July 24, 2022 09:05 AM (7bRMQ)

11 Don't see the hex sign on things today as often as when I was a kid.

Posted by: Cosda at July 24, 2022 09:06 AM (C2qqK)

12 Last week somebody mentioned getting The Secret Sea by Robb White from Scholastic Books. Guess what blast from the retrofuturistic past I just stumbled on? Secret Under the Sea by Gordon R. Dickson. "It's the year 2013 (!) and Robby lives in an underwater research station with his scientist parents." I ordered this from Scholastic Books as a kid and to this day I remember this freaky creature lurking in the depths:

https://tinyurl.com/2rpm6hkp

Posted by: All Hail Eris, Analog Hipster at July 24, 2022 09:06 AM (Dc2NZ)

13 "I've heard it said that if you really want to get rich during a gold rush, sell picks, shovels, and other mining gear."

IIRC, that's how Nordstrom got started.

In reading related news, many thanks to whoever recommended "The Last King of America" about George III. I know a pretty good amount about US history during the revolutionary war so it's highly illuminating to hear that history told from a British perspective. Many of the events that precipitated the war were caused by internal political jockeying in Britain, very little of which was actually directed at the colonies.

Posted by: Art Rondelet of Malmsey at July 24, 2022 09:07 AM (fTtFy)

14 Used to see hex signs on barns as a kid (also horse shoes).

Of course I don't see as many barns these days as I did in my countrified youth.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, Analog Hipster at July 24, 2022 09:07 AM (Dc2NZ)

15 I read the third book in The Mistborn series, The Hero of the Ages, by Brandon Sanderson. This series deserves to be called a classic of the fantasy genre. Sanderson has created an interesting world, populated it with many unique characters and tells a compelling story.


The depth of the characters is amazing. I liked the character Sazed, a keeper of knowledge, very much. He has an internal struggle with maintaining his faith and hope, a struggle many of us have today.

Posted by: Zoltan at July 24, 2022 09:08 AM (wpMS0)

16 Morning again, all,

I shall have to check out those videos. I have several book-length manuscripts in fantasy and mystery, and they have been vetted by my writing group over the years. My editing and storytelling abilities are solid. What deters me right now is the effort that would be required to market the books.

Posted by: Wolfus Aurelius at July 24, 2022 09:08 AM (c6xtn)

17 Cosda me either and in se Pa

Posted by: Skip at July 24, 2022 09:10 AM (2JoB8)

18 Sorry, Col. Hogan -- Sir Kenneth Strong, in his memoirs, "Intelligence at the Top: The Recollections of a British Intelligence Officer," doesn't think that those of you in espionage contributed a lot to the war effort. " A fairly modest place in the hierarchy of sources," he writes. And yet upon the liberation of Paris, he went to see "an old friend, a Frenchman who had been ... sending us excellent information" via couriers. And that's all he says about him. An unsung hero.

Meanwhile, British Gen. Bernard Montgomery continually tries to cut a bigger slice of the pie for himself, at one point proposing that he lead a straight thrust for Berlin instead of following Eisenhower's plan to clear occupied Europe of all enemy forces before crossing the Rhine and entering Germany itself. Monty's plan would pull resources that otherwise would go to U.S. Gens. Bradley and Patton.

This account is opening my eyes as to how commanders can have the same overall goal -- defeat the enemy -- yet be at loggerheads over how best to do so. Strong cites several examples -- and not just with generals, Churchill and Ike were occasionally at odds.

(continued)

Posted by: Weak Geek at July 24, 2022 09:11 AM (Om/di)

19 (resumed)

Strong makes a solid defense of Eisenhower, writing that he put all his proposals to his commanders for comment and debate, an approach that Montgomery considered misguided (why would you consult that fool?). Strong acknowledges that Ike might not always had made it clear when discussion time was over, but Strong declares that Eisenhower was quite in tune with the feelings of the G.I. and showed sound military judgment.

Strong seems so in tune with Eisenhower that it's no surprise that Ike's personal intervention was needed to get Strong on his staff; British Army brass considered Strong to be "too American" in his views.

A final note: Several items in the index have the term "passim." Anybody know what that is?

Posted by: Weak Geek at July 24, 2022 09:12 AM (Om/di)

20 Still working my way through John Mortimer's first volume of Rumpole the barrister stories (Rumpole of the Bailey). They are delightful. Not really mysteries or Perry Mason-like stories. There are often surprising twists in a given case, but the tales are more about how Rumpole works to get his often-difficult clients declared not guilty of the charges, and about his reactions to the various people he defends, works with, and is married to (his wife Hilda is known as "She Who Must Be Obeyed" or simply "She").

Posted by: Wolfus Aurelius at July 24, 2022 09:12 AM (c6xtn)

21 Man, that first video. I just couldn't watch more than a couple of minutes. That guy waves his arms around like Hitler at full froth.

Posted by: bear with asymmetrical balls at July 24, 2022 09:13 AM (KFhLj)

22 There's a Kindle deal today on "The Rose Code", a tale of the Enigma codebreakers through the eyes of three women who work in secrecy to defeat the Nazis. The blurb sounds promising and the ratings are excellent. Rated Amazon's Best for Suspense Thriller. The only thing holding me back is a description in the blurb that talks about female solidarity. I hate female solidarity.

Posted by: grammie winger at July 24, 2022 09:13 AM (45fpk)

23 Good morning everyone. The littles had no idea of what hex signs were/are so, a learning moment for them.

We had them, of course, on the barn at my Grammi's place in Berks County, PA. My Mom had asked me to fashion a box for her ashes before she passed with PA Dutch motifs on it.

Posted by: Tonypete at July 24, 2022 09:14 AM (6WCwE)

24 A final note: Several items in the index have the term "passim." Anybody know what that is?
Posted by: Weak Geek at July 24, 2022 09:12 AM (Om/di)
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Let me Google that for you...

"In indexes and notes, passim indicates that a particular name or subject occurs frequently throughout a particular piece of writing or section of a book."

Posted by: "Perfessor" Squirrel at July 24, 2022 09:14 AM (K5n5d)

25 My grandson, who is almost 13 and an advanced reader, is interested in learning about WW1. Any suggestions for books?

Posted by: TecumsehTea at July 24, 2022 09:14 AM (BjGT6)

26 Secret Under the Sea by Gordon R. Dickson. "It's the year 2013 (!) and Robby lives in an underwater research station with his scientist parents." I ordered this from Scholastic Books as a kid and to this day I remember this freaky creature lurking in the depths:
https://tinyurl.com/2rpm6hkp
Posted by: All Hail Eris, Analog Hipster

I was just remembering the other day how much I enjoyed Johnny Quest as a kid. It pays to have immensely wealthy, genius scientist parents.

Posted by: Anonosaurus Wrecks, Now the Summer of Our Discontent at July 24, 2022 09:15 AM (FVME7)

27 I finished reading Pierre Berton's The Klondike Fever: The Life and Death of the Last Great Gold Rush. I obtained it in order to learn something about the event because every year scout troops conduct "gold rush" derbies (inter-patrol competitions) during winter camping trips. I learned a lot of new things.

Pierre Berton also wrote The Arctic Grail a history of the search for the Northwest Passage. A very thick book, but if you're interested in that sort of thing, certainly a book to get.

Posted by: Mary Poppins' Practically Perfect Piercing at July 24, 2022 09:15 AM (AW0uW)

28 In light of recent events, you do have to wonder at how prepared the United State military is at meeting a truly imminent threat. Sure, our military technology is the envy of every other nation on the planet. But what good does all that hardware do if our men and women in uniform are woefully incapable of adopting a "warrior" mindset because they are not trained to destroy the enemy?
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Simple.
We will never win another war. And that ball started rolling long before OIF/OEF, even Vietnam.
We are losing the ability to maintain what we have.
We no longer "train as we fight". The "leadership" is a joke, and the troops know this.

Plus, the generation currently joining is very risk-averse, to say the least, and need much more coddling. Training accidents are also on the increase due to both shoddy maintenance and an environment where the troops are expendable for political gain.

Draft may be out of the realm of possibility now, but the military cannot go on as is, and be expected to defend this nation, because it will not.
It will likely be used to put down "insurrection" here in the good 'ol USA.
It hurts, but right now, a weak military is our gain for the moment.

Posted by: SMH at what's coming at July 24, 2022 09:15 AM (nzgeU)

29 I ain't readin' no books by no Mormons. Take your magic underwear and get lost.

Posted by: Duane Dibbley at July 24, 2022 09:16 AM (34jwO)

30 This talk about hex signs is new to me, and I did grow up on a farm. Never saw one.

Posted by: Weak Geek at July 24, 2022 09:16 AM (Om/di)

31 On the Kindle, I read Lightning Child, the third book in the Children of the Mountain series, by R. A. Hakok. This YA series is set in a dystopian future and is about a group of children and teens trying to survive by using a series of government-built bunkers set into mountains. I didn't think this work was as good as the first two in the series, but I'll probably buy the next in the series, Fury Rising, when it comes out in September.

Posted by: Zoltan at July 24, 2022 09:17 AM (wpMS0)

32 Read a biography of Reinhard Heydrich by Nancy Dougherty entitled "The Hangman and His Wife: The Life and Death of Reinhard Heydrich". He was called The Blond Beast by his admirers and The Butcher of Prague by his detractors (and probably some of his admirers). Famously the only member of the Nazi inner circle who even remotely resembled the Aryan ideal, he was athletic, a talented musician (a violinist, of course, as all classical villains are), a pilot, had a photographic memory of every transgression, and possessed "Fingerspitzengefühl". According to a saying at the time, if the Germans won the war, Hitler would become king of the world, Goebbels king of the demimonde, and Heydrich king of the underworld.

Dougherty interviewed the lovely Mrs. Beast, who survived him for decades, and it is an interesting angle to approach Heydrich and the Nazis via this hausfrau, who would always flutter her hands and say Oh I know nothing about that! and then gradually spill the tea.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, Analog Hipster at July 24, 2022 09:17 AM (Dc2NZ)

33 My editing and storytelling abilities are solid. What deters me right now is the effort that would be required to market the books.
Posted by: Wolfus Aurelius at July 24, 2022 09:08 AM (c6xtn)


Same here, Wolfus. If you met me, you would not think that self-promotion is like garlic to a vampire to me, but it is. The other day I got an e-mail from the class contact of my old high school, asking people for updates on their lives, projects, &c. - I had to actually sit for an entire day and wonder whether I should mention that my books are out for sale.

It's the 'self-published' stigma. If I were signed to a traditional house, then I'd feel like a real writer. Publishing on Amazon (which sells books about women fucking dinosaurs, for heaven's sake!) makes me feel like a cheat.

Posted by: Mary Poppins' Practically Perfect Piercing at July 24, 2022 09:19 AM (AW0uW)

34 Ah, Zoltan, now you need to read the next three books in the Mistborn series. I think they are even better. Takes place 300 years after the first three and things have changed but you still have the elements that made the first three unique.
Book 4, The Lost Metal due out in November.

Posted by: Sharon(willow's apprentice) at July 24, 2022 09:19 AM (Y+l9t)

35 Per the supervillain origins story playbook, as a boy he was gawky, shy, and had a high-pitched voice that made him a target for bullies, and he was plagued by rumors that he was part Jewish. He could have been a great violinist or a successful naval officer, had he not been drummed out on a morals charge. So he found himself without work and joined the Nazi Party for career advancement. Was he merely a crass opportunist and not a true believer? Why, can you imagine someone glomming onto a poisonous ideology merely for personal gain? Can such people be?!

Posted by: All Hail Eris, Analog Hipster at July 24, 2022 09:19 AM (Dc2NZ)

36 My grandson, who is almost 13 and an advanced reader, is interested in learning about WW1. Any suggestions for books?

Posted by: TecumsehTea at July 24, 2022 09:14 AM (BjGT6)
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Depending on reading level, there's Tuchman's The Guns of August, which is quite readable.

Churchill's (self-abridged) The World Crisis is excellent.

In fiction, you have All Quiet on the Western Front. My daughter read it in high school and loves it. A Farewell to Arms is also accessible.

Posted by: Ace-Endorsed Author A.H. Lloyd at July 24, 2022 09:19 AM (llXky)

37 "In indexes and notes, passim indicates that a particular name or subject occurs frequently throughout a particular piece of writing or section of a book."

To expand on that a bit:

"For example, an entry in an index reading “coal: 78–86 passim” means that coal is mentioned throughout pages 78 to 86. Passim is Latin for “throughout” or “here and there.”."

Posted by: Additional Blond Agent, STEM Guy at July 24, 2022 09:20 AM (ZSK0i)

38 25 My grandson, who is almost 13 and an advanced reader, is interested in learning about WW1. Any suggestions for books?

Posted by: TecumsehTea at July 24, 2022 09:14 AM (BjGT6)


The best WWI book I have ever read was Once An Eagle, the TV series was also great.

Posted by: vic /s at July 24, 2022 09:21 AM (mZwKe)

39 Regarding Gold Rush fiction, let me recommend Don Rosa's Scrooge McDuck stories, in particular "The Life and Times of Scrooge McDuck."

Rosa had a very soft spot for stories of Scrooge in the Yukon. As he put it, Scrooge was in his prime then.

Posted by: Weak Geek at July 24, 2022 09:21 AM (Om/di)

40 I'm reading yet another Travis McGee story. The Scarlet Ruse this time.

Posted by: Cybersmythe at July 24, 2022 09:21 AM (6jmQG)

41 Nice Lieberry!

Those pants....everyone likes pepperoni.

The squirrel's pimp hand is strong this A.M.

Posted by: Hairyback Guy at July 24, 2022 09:23 AM (R/m4+)

42 Nice little nook for the kiddies to read. When I was not yet a teen, my family-sans dad- spent the summer on a Jersey island. There were 2 elderly gals that had a yarn/book shop. The store had a lovely secluded tree backyard filled with shrubs, flowers and places to sit and either have classes on knitting /crocheting or read a book(s). There were also little tables with lemonade and cookies for the enjoying. Thanks for the journey down memory lane.

Posted by: sidney at July 24, 2022 09:23 AM (itAo5)

43 Obligatory book writing update: I've got a working title at least - "China's Eternal Empire: A military history 2500 BC to 2020 AD."

I've reached the 1960s and am basically a chapter and a half from finishing. Over 75,000 words, making this the longest thing I've ever written. I'm hoping to wrap it up by next week.

I do have Mao's Little Red Book and The Odes on order, to see if they can give me a better title.

Posted by: Ace-Endorsed Author A.H. Lloyd at July 24, 2022 09:23 AM (llXky)

44 It's the 'self-published' stigma. If I were signed to a traditional house, then I'd feel like a real writer. Publishing on Amazon (which sells books about women fucking dinosaurs, for heaven's sake!) makes me feel like a cheat.
Posted by: Mary Poppins' Practically Perfect Piercing at July 24, 2022 09:19 AM (AW0uW)
---
And yet I thoroughly enjoyed The Stuff Dreams are Made of. It was a well-written tale with interesting characters that kept me engaged. Easily on par with many other books I've read and definitely above any books I Did Not Finish...

Posted by: "Perfessor" Squirrel at July 24, 2022 09:24 AM (K5n5d)

45 All of these literary geniuses in the book thread, - why don't we see them talking shit in the daily threads like the rest of us illiterate morons? Stop laughing.

Posted by: Dr. Bone at July 24, 2022 09:24 AM (0ocXn)

46 @24 --

Thanks, Prof!

Posted by: Weak Geek at July 24, 2022 09:25 AM (Om/di)

47 My grandson, who is almost 13 and an advanced reader, is interested in learning about WW1. Any suggestions for books?
Posted by: TecumsehTea at July 24, 2022 09:14 AM (BjGT6)[/i

I walked downstairs to look at the WWI-era section of the bookcases in Stately Poppins Manor. Most of my books for the war cover either the events leading to Sarajevo or the first few months of the war. The Fall of the Dynasties: The Collapse of the Old Order, 1905-1922 by Edmond Taylor is as close as I have to anything covering the war period. It might be a bit advanced, even for a precicious 13-year old, though.

Posted by: Mary Poppins' Practically Perfect Piercing at July 24, 2022 09:25 AM (AW0uW)

48 It's the 'self-published' stigma. If I were signed to a traditional house, then I'd feel like a real writer. Publishing on Amazon (which sells books about women fucking dinosaurs, for heaven's sake!) makes me feel like a cheat.

Posted by: Mary Poppins' Practically Perfect Piercing at July 24, 2022 09:19 AM (AW0uW)

Wait, they write books like that?

If you have sales, can't you approach either an agent or publisher with your work?

Posted by: OrangeEnt at July 24, 2022 09:26 AM (7bRMQ)

49 Damn it!

Posted by: Mary Poppins' Practically Perfect Piercing at July 24, 2022 09:27 AM (AW0uW)

50 Same here, Wolfus. If you met me, you would not think that self-promotion is like garlic to a vampire to me, but it is. The other day I got an e-mail from the class contact of my old high school, asking people for updates on their lives, projects, &c. - I had to actually sit for an entire day and wonder whether I should mention that my books are out for sale.

Posted by: Mary Poppins' Practically
Perfect Piercing at July 24, 2022 09:19 AM (AW0uW)
---
I treat it as a running gag. My desk on base has a sample of all my books and I like to reference them in casual conversation when it's totally irrelevant. When people retire, I sign the card with "Best of luck and buy my books!"

I also give away signed copies as presents and try to maintain a stockpile for that purpose.

Posted by: Ace-Endorsed Author A.H. Lloyd at July 24, 2022 09:27 AM (llXky)

51 Read a biography of Reinhard Heydrich by Nancy Dougherty entitled "The Hangman and His Wife: The Life and Death of Reinhard Heydrich".
Posted by: All Hail Eris, Analog Hipster at July 24, 2022 09:17 AM (Dc2NZ)

I remember reading about old Reinhard and that he was also a sex addict and was known to run thru all the whorehouses in Berlin from time to time spreading his filth and terrorizing the whores there in.

Kinda like a 1930's-40's Hunter Biden.

Posted by: Hairyback Guy at July 24, 2022 09:28 AM (R/m4+)

52 And yet I thoroughly enjoyed The Stuff Dreams are Made of. It was a well-written tale with interesting characters that kept me engaged. Easily on par with many other books I've read and definitely above any books I Did Not Finish...
Posted by: "Perfessor" Squirrel at July 24, 2022 09:24 AM (K5n5d)


*blushes*

Well, thank you. I'm glad you liked it.

Posted by: Mary Poppins' Practically Perfect Piercing at July 24, 2022 09:28 AM (AW0uW)

53 Speaking of cozy little book reading spots...

Posted by: The Barrel at July 24, 2022 09:28 AM (oTZbj)

54 Thanks for the promo Perfessor, I guess I'll spend the time today to watch those videos. Or should I have done that before releasing? Ah well.

Posted by: motionview, divisive arch-conservative at July 24, 2022 09:28 AM (1fZmp)

55 The best WWI book I have ever read was Once An Eagle, the TV series was also great.

Posted by: vic /s at July 24, 2022 09:21 AM (mZwKe)
---
I found that to be uneven and somewhat disappointing. It started well and its portrayal of the interwar military (and the cliques) was really interesting, but then it bogged down in WW II and hyper-detailed tactical stuff that I found tedious.

I also felt that the development of the families just sort of stopped, like the author got bored with the plot line. Not sure I could recommend it.

Posted by: Ace-Endorsed Author A.H. Lloyd at July 24, 2022 09:30 AM (llXky)

56 Just finished “The Terminal List” by Jack Carr. Interesting bit of escapist reading. Now to watch the show.
Started “A Brave and Cunning Prince” by James Horn. It’s about the Spanish and eventually the British and their war with the various Virginia Indian tribes in the mid-sixteenth century. The prince refers to Opechancanough, the older brother of Powhatan. The Conquistadors were brutal in their efforts to convert the Indians to Catholicism. An interesting book that provides a bit of a different view of the Indians.

Posted by: RetSgtRN at July 24, 2022 09:30 AM (NVtgT)

57 Good morning.

Next up is To Have and Have Not, the real book not the Howard Hawkes movie version.

I'm still rereading the more perceptive passages from Of Time and the River.


Posted by: CN at July 24, 2022 09:30 AM (ONvIw)

58 if you really want to get rich during a gold rush, sell picks, shovels, and other mining gear.

And durable denim jeans.

Posted by: Levi Strauss at July 24, 2022 09:30 AM (m8+xt)

59 Been reading a lot of Adrian Tchaikovsky. "Children of Time" (and its lesser sequel, "Children of Ruin"), "Elder Race" and "Shards of Earth."

Entertaining and very different from each other. "Children of Time" is cerebral, millenia-spanning world-building about alien spiders accidentally bootstrapped intellectually by a human-engineered nanovirus. "Elder Race" is a fun novella that expands on Clarke's notion that to a primitive society, advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic. And "Shards of Earth" is a pretty standard (and rollicking) space opara complete with a motley crew of space salvagers with hearts of gold.

My only beef is that the author is a soy-boy who seems to have a thing for strong women and weak men. Oh, and he writes "vice" instead of "vise". But since both of those annoyances are damn near universal now, I can roll my eyes and ignore them.

Posted by: Taro Tsujimoto at July 24, 2022 09:31 AM (5YmYl)

60 Good Sunday morning, horde.

Love the little library in the deep, dark forest, Tonypete!

Posted by: April--dash my lace wigs! at July 24, 2022 09:32 AM (OX9vb)

61 53 Speaking of cozy little book reading spots...
Posted by: The Barrel at July 24, 2022 09:28 AM (oTZbj)
---

The methane gas lamps and skull tuffets make for a very pleasant reading nook.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, Analog Hipster at July 24, 2022 09:32 AM (Dc2NZ)

62 Read a biography of Reinhard Heydrich by Nancy Dougherty entitled "The Hangman and His Wife: The Life and Death of Reinhard Heydrich".
Posted by: All Hail Eris, Analog Hipster at July 24, 2022 09:17 AM (Dc2NZ)


I just finished Hitler: The Memoir of the Nazi Insider Who Turned Against the Fuhrer by Ernst Hanfstaengel.

For those who don't know, "Putzi" Hanfstaengel was a half-American German art dealer who was an early follower of Hitler (though he didn't join the Party until years later). He was their foreign press chief until the rise of Goebbels and a sort of 'court jester' to Hitler, always there to play the piano whenever Schickelgruber needed relaxation.

He was always mistrusted by the inner circle and made enemies of Goering and Goebbels. At last, he was sent on a phony 'mission' to Franco's troops which was to end with him being thrown out of a plane into no man's land, where he would be 'accidentally' shot.

Posted by: Mary Poppins' Practically Perfect Piercing at July 24, 2022 09:33 AM (AW0uW)

63 Errr, space OPERA, that is.

Posted by: Taro Tsujimoto at July 24, 2022 09:33 AM (5YmYl)

64 Hanfstaengel spends the book jusitfying himself, saying that he put up with Hitler's tirades, the Blood Purge and all the rest in order to be a modifying voice in Hitler's ear and, most especially, to keep him from declaring war on America.

He says not a word about the death camps except in passing.

Posted by: Mary Poppins' Practically Perfect Piercing at July 24, 2022 09:34 AM (AW0uW)

65 About to go to South of the Border.
Let's see if it lives up to the billboard hype. Probably not.

Posted by: Cat Ass Trophy at July 24, 2022 09:35 AM (lNLXk)

66 It's a bit unfair to blame the average Pierre for the mess - what could he possibly do when the commanders were sitting in their various HQs far from the front with no idea of what was going on? The Germans were stunned by how easy the frogs made things for them.
____

Thanks for this book recommendation.

Will be interesting to see the similarities between then and now.

Posted by: SMH at what's coming at July 24, 2022 09:35 AM (nzgeU)

67 >>>He was always mistrusted by the inner circle and made enemies of Goering and Goebbels. At last, he was sent on a phony 'mission' to Franco's troops which was to end with him being thrown out of a plane into no man's land, where he would be 'accidentally' shot.

>I love a story with a happy ending. Fucking Germans.

Posted by: Dr. Bone at July 24, 2022 09:35 AM (0ocXn)

68 Mr. April and I started watching The Old Man on FX. We were intrigued (I know some of youse morons are not impressed, but we like it for the most part).

Season is about over, so we decided to read the book it's based on, same title, by Thomas Perry. It is quite a bit different in setting than the series. The woman he kidnaps has reasons to stay with the old man, but when that reason was revealed, it was so dumb that it just about ruined the book, which is otherwise interesting.

Posted by: April--dash my lace wigs! at July 24, 2022 09:35 AM (OX9vb)

69 I don't know from 'hex' signs, but it looks like a compass rose to me. Avoid problems and find north and put an 'N' on the spike.

I have a compass rose from my dad that I am trying to hang outside, but I don't have a good outside wall.

Posted by: mustbequantum at July 24, 2022 09:36 AM (MIKMs)

70 25 My grandson, who is almost 13 and an advanced reader, is interested in learning about WW1. Any suggestions for books?

Posted by: TecumsehTea at July 24, 2022 09:14 AM (BjGT6)

Can't go too far wrong w/Barbara Tuchman's Guns of August

Posted by: yara at July 24, 2022 09:36 AM (hBsVD)

71 I never sausage pants.

Posted by: Guy who does not think those pants are fine at July 24, 2022 09:36 AM (sn5EN)

72 And yet I thoroughly enjoyed The Stuff Dreams are Made of. It was a well-written tale with interesting characters that kept me engaged. Easily on par with many other books I've read and definitely above any books I Did Not Finish...
Posted by: "Perfessor" Squirrel at July 24, 2022 09:24 AM (K5n5d)

Seems mysteries about Old Hollywood from that period would indeed be the stuff of dreams for TV types. Especially after the success of the Downton nonsense, a costume rich opportunity with great characters and an actual plot, should be welcomed. When I think of the whole Theda as detective idea, it seems like a perfect Masterpiece Mystery thing.

Posted by: CN at July 24, 2022 09:36 AM (ONvIw)

73 My grandson, who is almost 13 and an advanced reader, is interested in learning about WW1. Any suggestions for books?
Posted by: TecumsehTea

Winston Groom, author of Forrest Gump, also wrote a number of popular (as opposed to academic) histories. I thought his A Storm In Flanders was quite good. He uses the five battles around the Belgian town of Ypres to present a microcosm of the war. Hitler fought on one side, Churchill on the other. The lines moved only very little despite massive casualties, poison gas, huge subterranean mines.

Hew Strachan's First World War is also good but emphasizes the global nature of the war by including such things as the war in sub Saharan Africa, the Eastern Front, and the war at sea.

The Beauty and the Sorrow by Peter Englund tells the personal and intimate stories of numerous people, military and civilian, famous and unknown, great and infamous. Some of the stories are pathetic and heartbreaking. It may be difficult to follow if you're not generally familiar with the events in the war but, of course, that the way these people lived it, seeing only what was happening immediately around them.

Posted by: Anonosaurus Wrecks, Now the Summer of Our Discontent at July 24, 2022 09:37 AM (FVME7)

74 Let's see if it lives up to the billboard hype. Probably not.

Wall Drug > South of the Border

Posted by: Mr Aspirin Factory at July 24, 2022 09:38 AM (89T5c)

75 At last, he was sent on a phony 'mission' to Franco's troops which was to end with him being thrown out of a plane into no man's land, where he would be 'accidentally' shot.
Posted by: Mary Poppins' Practically Perfect Piercing at July 24, 2022 09:33 AM (AW0uW)
---
Tossed out of a plane AND shot? Just to be sure, I guess.

I noticed a ton of "I Was Hitler's [X]" books. My favorite is "With Hitler To The End: The Memoir of Hitler's Valet".

Posted by: All Hail Eris, Analog Hipster at July 24, 2022 09:38 AM (Dc2NZ)

76 Rereading QB VII. A favorite that I go to every few years. Still own a couple Scholastic books I purchased in grade school. There's nothing like juvenile fiction that comforted me when I was young to smooth out rough times.

Posted by: neverenoughcaffeine at July 24, 2022 09:38 AM (2NHgQ)

77 Taro Tsujimoto, I also read Tchaikovsky when he has new material out. Generally good stuff with the occasional wince for the woke BS.

Posted by: motionview, divisive arch-conservative at July 24, 2022 09:38 AM (1fZmp)

78 Same here, Wolfus. If you met me, you would not think that self-promotion is like garlic to a vampire to me, but it is. The other day I got an e-mail from the class contact of my old high school, asking people for updates on their lives, projects, &c. - I had to actually sit for an entire day and wonder whether I should mention that my books are out for sale.

It's the 'self-published' stigma. If I were signed to a traditional house, then I'd feel like a real writer. Publishing on Amazon (which sells books about women fucking dinosaurs, for heaven's sake!) makes me feel like a cheat.
Posted by: Mary Poppins' Practically Perfect Piercing at July 24, 2022


***
Oh, I have no problem with self-promotion per se. It's the effort involved of going to various sites and hyping the works. If I could simply write the blurbs and have someone else post them, I'd be fine.

On the other hand, I've never done it. I might find it to be fun after a time.

Posted by: Wolfus Aurelius at July 24, 2022 09:38 AM (c6xtn)

79 CAT, everyone's a wiener at South of the Border!

Drove by yesterday- the kids had no desire to stop in.

Posted by: Tonypete at July 24, 2022 09:39 AM (+1VT6)

80 Tolle Lege
Last Sunday picked up Sharpe's Battle so well into it
Posted by: Skip

I read that as Sharp's Bottle.....

Posted by: JT at July 24, 2022 09:40 AM (T4tVD)

81 45 All of these literary geniuses in the book thread, - why don't we see them talking shit in the daily threads like the rest of us illiterate morons? Stop laughing.
Posted by: Dr. Bone at July 24, 2022 09:24 AM (0ocXn)

We're all busy reading books so that we can post a comment on next Sunday's book thread.

Posted by: Zoltan at July 24, 2022 09:40 AM (wpMS0)

82 hiya

Posted by: JT at July 24, 2022 09:40 AM (T4tVD)

83 I do have Mao's Little Red Book and The Odes on order, to see if they can give me a better title.

Stuff the Chinese Said, Vol I

Posted by: Oddbob at July 24, 2022 09:40 AM (nfrXX)

84 >I love a story with a happy ending. Fucking Germans.

The plane's pilot recognized Hanfstaengel and told him of the plot, then faked engine trouble so he could escape to Switzerland.

Goering then had a letter sent in which he protested that the whole thing was a joke to frighten Hanfstaengel because he ran his mouth too much. Goering promised that if he came back, Hanfstaengel would be under his "personal protection."

"I expect you to accept my word," he ended in a postscript. Hanfstaengel didn't believe him and made his way to England, where he was interned as an enemy alien. He later learned that his name was tenth on a list of people who were to be immediately executed if the Nazis invaded England.

Posted by: Mary Poppins' Practically Perfect Piercing at July 24, 2022 09:40 AM (AW0uW)

85 Not a book, but I have an issue of Strategy & Tactics magazine from the '70s that focused on the early maneuvers of WW I. It contained the game Tannenbaum. The accompanying article was informative. (A Russian general killed himself after his army was defeated.)

I never played the game although I went to school with a wargamer. He would set up the maps and counters and play against himself.

The few times we did play, he wiped me out.

Anyway, that issue might be up for sale online.

Posted by: Weak Geek at July 24, 2022 09:41 AM (Om/di)

86 One of the books I consulted is Communist China: The Early Years, 1949-55 by A. Doak Barnett.

Barnett is a journalist from an age where that actually meant something. He covered China and worked in Hong Kong and the book is a series of essays about various aspects of the Communist takeover.

I was able to pull some good information out of it, but it's true value to me was to be reminded of an age when it was expected that someone writing about a topic had actual expertise - practical experience - in order to be taken seriously.

Also of note is the lack of credentials - even famous professors might not have a doctorate (Tolkien never did) because it was quality of knowledge rather than credentials that counted.

Posted by: Ace-Endorsed Author A.H. Lloyd at July 24, 2022 09:41 AM (llXky)

87 I'm reading yet another Travis McGee story. The Scarlet Ruse this time.
Posted by: Cybersmythe at July 24, 2022


***
My memory of that specific one is dim, but wasn't it a stab at the classic "locked room/impossible crime" by John D.? And it has a remarkable portrait of Travis's lady of the moment too, I think.

Posted by: Wolfus Aurelius at July 24, 2022 09:42 AM (c6xtn)

88 sort of 'court jester' to Hitler, always there to play the piano whenever Schickelgruber needed relaxation.

-
Honky Cat was a favorite.

Posted by: Anonosaurus Wrecks, Now the Summer of Our Discontent at July 24, 2022 09:42 AM (FVME7)

89 I don't think the pants guy owns a weedwhacker (if you cfatch my drift.....)

Posted by: JT at July 24, 2022 09:43 AM (T4tVD)

90 Off to rinse the car and pick up a few things at Dollar-and-a-Quarter Tree. Later, all.

Posted by: Wolfus Aurelius at July 24, 2022 09:43 AM (c6xtn)

91 Not a book, but I have an issue of Strategy & Tactics magazine from the '70s that focused on the early maneuvers of WW I. It contained the game Tannenbaum. The accompanying article was informative. (A Russian general killed himself after his army was defeated.)

Posted by: Weak Geek at July 24, 2022 09:41 AM (Om/di)
---
I think you mean Tannenberg.

Posted by: Ace-Endorsed Author A.H. Lloyd at July 24, 2022 09:43 AM (llXky)

92 It's the 'self-published' stigma.

Just practice the reasons John Swartzwelder, Sage of “The Simpsons”, gives in one of his very few interviews:

It’s easier, faster, and there are no arguments, because all the decisions are yours. If you want to write your book with multiple misspellings, badly misplaced commas, and juvenile bodily-function jokes, your publisher (that’s you!) is with you a hundred per cent on that. He’ll back you up all the way. It’s the kind of control writers dream of having. Of course, a traditional publisher can arrange book tours for you, which I don’t want to go on anyway, and get your book displayed prominently in bookstores, which don’t exist anymore, and, theoretically, at least, make you more money, which I hate, but those, I think, are sacrifices worth making to have that control.

Posted by: motionview, divisive arch-conservative at July 24, 2022 09:44 AM (1fZmp)

93 Boker Tov Patriots

Gassed up my wife's car and put air in her tires. I did my duty for G-D and Country

Posted by: Nevergiveup at July 24, 2022 09:44 AM (Irn0L)

94 "Free speech is overrated, but not overly so."

I never thought of Jefferson as being an ironical sort, but this comment is nonsensical on its face. Self contradictory. The only way to make sense of it is to assume that he was making a joke of some type.

Posted by: Muldoon at July 24, 2022 09:45 AM (kXYt5)

95 Greetings:

"We will never win another war..."

Reading "Directorate S" by Steve Coll. this week. It's like a "How To" book for that assertion.

Drunk on compassion and stupid about the human rights ideology we're trapped in is no way to do war.

Posted by: 11B40 at July 24, 2022 09:45 AM (uuklp)

96 I don't know if anyone else remembers Judge Dee as a detective series (van Gulik). I ran into a movie on one of the free channels and watched the whole thing. Sammo Hung (one of my favorites, Martial Law) choreographed the fight scenes. Very sumptuous but hard to follow because of cultural differences, I guess.

Now I have to find those books and see if they are as good as I remember or if I have trouble following like the subtitled movie.

Posted by: mustbequantum at July 24, 2022 09:46 AM (MIKMs)

97 All of these literary geniuses in the book thread, - why don't we see them talking shit in the daily threads like the rest of us illiterate morons? Stop laughing.
Posted by: Dr. Bone at July 24, 2022 09:24 AM (0ocXn)

We're all busy reading books so that we can post a comment on next Sunday's book thread.

Posted by: Zoltan at July 24, 2022 09:40 AM (wpMS0)
---
I've posted a bit more during the week, but the problem is that so many threads are hair on fire sorts of things like the 200th iteration of "Manchin Will Betray Us!"

And yes, I'm also busy reading and then writing stuff up. Can't wait for this to be over.

Posted by: Ace-Endorsed Author A.H. Lloyd at July 24, 2022 09:46 AM (llXky)

98 Boker Tov Patriots

Gassed up my wife's car and put air in her tires. I did my duty for G-D and Country
Posted by: Nevergiveup

Your orderly should do that for ya !

Posted by: JT at July 24, 2022 09:47 AM (T4tVD)

99 I remember reading about old Reinhard and that he was also a sex addict and was known to run thru all the whorehouses in Berlin from time to time spreading his filth and terrorizing the whores there in.

Kinda like a 1930's-40's Hunter Biden.
Posted by: Hairyback Guy at July 24, 2022 09:28 AM (R/m4+)
---

And he ran his own brothel, Salon Kitty, where he bugged/filmed famous patrons for blackmail purposes. Of course he also partook. And boy was he pissed when his flunkies forgot to turn off the equipment!

Posted by: All Hail Eris, Analog Hipster at July 24, 2022 09:47 AM (Dc2NZ)

100 I've got a book on WW1 from 1918. "The History Of the Great War". It's great because the content is unfiltered by time. There are a few photos in it, and a lot of recollections by veterans.

The book I would recommend though, as others have, is Barbara Tuchman's.

Posted by: fd at July 24, 2022 09:47 AM (sn5EN)

101 OK, folks, going to sit in the garden and smoke a cigar before it gets too hot.

Hope you all have a lovely day.

Posted by: Mary Poppins' Practically Perfect Piercing at July 24, 2022 09:48 AM (AW0uW)

102 "Free speech is overrated, but not overly so."

I never thought of Jefferson as being an ironical sort, but this comment is nonsensical on its face. Self contradictory. The only way to make sense of it is to assume that he was making a joke of some type.
Posted by: Muldoon at July 24, 2022 09:45 AM (kXYt5)
---
I'm pretty sure Dave in Texas just made it up in order to counter-troll an obnoxious commenter at AoSHQ a long time ago...

Posted by: "Perfessor" Squirrel at July 24, 2022 09:48 AM (K5n5d)

103 "Free speech is overrated, but not overly so."

I never thought of Jefferson as being an ironical sort, but this comment is nonsensical on its face. Self contradictory. The only way to make sense of it is to assume that he was making a joke of some type.
Posted by: Muldoon

That's a quote by the Late Dave in Texas......

Posted by: JT at July 24, 2022 09:49 AM (T4tVD)

104 @91 --

Dammit, yes! Tannenberg.

Thanks for the catch.

Posted by: Weak Geek at July 24, 2022 09:49 AM (Om/di)

105 102. Seems an obvious fake quote.

Posted by: CN at July 24, 2022 09:49 AM (ONvIw)

106 Has a lovely day, MP4!

Posted by: All Hail Eris, Analog Hipster at July 24, 2022 09:50 AM (Dc2NZ)

107 TonyPete -

Nice job on the bench and Library !

Posted by: JT at July 24, 2022 09:50 AM (T4tVD)

108 88 sort of 'court jester' to Hitler, always there to play the piano whenever Schickelgruber needed relaxation.

Well- just picked up a copy of Erik Larson's "In the Garden of Beasts", which has that guy in it, as it is the story of the U.S. Ambassador to Germany in 1933.
His daughter, who was a bit of a "free spirit", had several affairs with various Nazi officials.

Like all Larson's work it is very good.

To make it even more interesting, my copy, which I got at Golden's Books (a famous used book store in Waco), is full of the underlinings and marginalia of the former owner. He apparently is/was a young anarchist.

Posted by: sal at July 24, 2022 09:51 AM (y40tE)

109 I'm pretty sure Dave in Texas just made it up in order to counter-troll an obnoxious commenter at AoSHQ a long time ago...

******

Ahhh. I did not realize that it originated with Dave. I guess there's a reason my mind couldn't wrap around it as a TJ quote. My mistake.

Posted by: Muldoon at July 24, 2022 09:51 AM (kXYt5)

110 And yet I thoroughly enjoyed The Stuff Dreams are Made of. It was a well-written tale with interesting characters that kept me engaged.

I can only give my + 1/3 because I'm only about 1/3 through it but yeah, that^^. So far, it's looking like a more intricate mystery than Director's Cut.

Something I would like to see in future books is more historical facts/trivia. For example, between books 1 and 2, the whole movie industry moved from New York to Los Angeles. I would be interested to hear more about how and why that happened.

Posted by: Oddbob at July 24, 2022 09:51 AM (nfrXX)

111 That Capella Codex does have a pretty cool cover. It definitely has that "pulp science fiction from the Golden Age" thing happening.

Posted by: Berserker-Dragonheads Division at July 24, 2022 09:51 AM (VwHCD)

112 55 The best WWI book I have ever read was Once An Eagle, the TV series was also great.

Posted by: vic /s at July 24, 2022 09:21 AM (mZwKe)
---
I found that to be uneven and somewhat disappointing. It started well and its portrayal of the interwar military (and the cliques) was really interesting, but then it bogged down in WW II and hyper-detailed tactical stuff that I found tedious.

I also felt that the development of the families just sort of stopped, like the author got bored with the plot line. Not sure I could recommend it.
Posted by: Ace-Endorsed Author A.H. Lloyd at July 24, 2022 09:30 AM (llXky)

Morning everyone! As I have said in the past, best fiction WW2 series for me hands down is WEB Griffin's Brotherhood of War.

Posted by: Secret Squirrel, author of sci fi, kids books and one silly army play on Amazon at July 24, 2022 09:51 AM (mr1KG)

113 Seems an obvious fake quote.

Posted by: CN at July 24, 2022 09:49 AM (ONvIw)
---
It''s from Stuff Jefferson Said, Vol. XVII, University of Virginia Press, 1956. There were only 200 copies printing and they haven't been digitized yet. MSU had one in the 90s, and I photocopied the page, but the book's been stolen and I lost the copy, but I did write it down in a term paper.

Posted by: Ace-Endorsed Author A.H. Lloyd at July 24, 2022 09:52 AM (llXky)

114 : All Hail Eris, Analog Hipster

You have mail !

Posted by: JT at July 24, 2022 09:52 AM (T4tVD)

115 A Farewell to Arms is also accessible.
Posted by: Ace-Endorsed Author A.H. Lloyd

Yes, A Farewell to Arms is great, an exaggeration of Hemingway's actual WWI experiences.

Posted by: Anonosaurus Wrecks, Now the Summer of Our Discontent at July 24, 2022 09:53 AM (FVME7)

116 I’ve been enjoying a YA series called Percy Jackson. I had not heard of it before, but a waitress who asked me what I was reading had.

It’s a 5 book series focused on the titular character, and others, who are descended from Greek gods, who are alive and well in the modern era. Fun stuff, well-written, good characters, telling an interesting story that made me want to keep turning pages.

Also the first book was free on Kindle, which made it easy to check things out. As it turned out, I just ripped through all 5 books, buying each as I finished the prior one. Now I’m reading the follow up 5 book series, where the Roman gods get involved.

Posted by: Splunge at July 24, 2022 09:54 AM (cm/80)

117 Good morning fellow Book Threadists. I hope everyone had a great week of reading. I certainly did.

A bit late to the thread this morning. Don't you hate it when life gets in the way of important stuff like this thread?

Posted by: JTB at July 24, 2022 09:54 AM (7EjX1)

118 22 There's a Kindle deal today on "The Rose Code", a tale of the Enigma codebreakers through the eyes of three women who work in secrecy to defeat the Nazis. The blurb sounds promising and the ratings are excellent. Rated Amazon's Best for Suspense Thriller. The only thing holding me back is a description in the blurb that talks about female solidarity. I hate female solidarity.
Posted by: grammie winger at July 24, 2022 09:13 AM (45fpk)

The suspense and character development override the Grrrl Power. I liked it pretty well and I'm death on female solidarity.

Posted by: sal at July 24, 2022 09:54 AM (y40tE)

119 Nice thread today. Metrics sounds like a hilarious read!

Currently re-reading "The Mote in Gods Eye" by Niven and Pournelle, who are a fantastic writing duo.

Inferno, their take on Dante's Inferno, is another great one. This sees a 1970s science fiction writer waking up in hell after a night of drinking with his fans.

Posted by: Secret Squirrel, author of sci fi, kids books and one silly army play on Amazon at July 24, 2022 09:54 AM (mr1KG)

120 I've begun "The History of the English Speaking Peoples" by Winston Churchill.
I'm up to the War of the Roses.

Posted by: gourmand du jour, 59 degrees and foggy at July 24, 2022 09:54 AM (jTmQV)

121 @110 --

From what I've read, the U.S. film industry moved to southern California because the sunshine was more abundant.

Yet so many Perry Mason novels mention downpours.

Posted by: Weak Geek at July 24, 2022 09:55 AM (Om/di)

122 Guten morgen horden!

I am barely here, as I woke early this morning with what appears to be a bad stomach bug.

Posted by: vmom stabby stabby stabby stabby stabamillion at July 24, 2022 09:55 AM (kf6Ak)

123 Also the first book was free on Kindle, which made it easy to check things out. As it turned out, I just ripped through all 5 books, buying each as I finished the prior one. Now I’m reading the follow up 5 book series, where the Roman gods get involved.
Posted by: Splunge at July 24, 2022 09:54 AM (cm/80)

Splunge, my kids enjoyed the books. The movies are great as well.

Posted by: Secret Squirrel, author of sci fi, kids books and one silly army play on Amazon at July 24, 2022 09:55 AM (mr1KG)

124 45 All of these literary geniuses in the book thread, - why don't we see them talking shit in the daily threads like the rest of us illiterate morons? Stop laughing.
Posted by: Dr. Bone at July 24, 2022 09:24 AM (0ocXn)
---

The snark flies too thick and fast for me to keep up! It takes all my focus just to get through a fraction of the links.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, Analog Hipster at July 24, 2022 09:55 AM (Dc2NZ)

125 Great book thread, Perfessor!

Posted by: Ladyl at July 24, 2022 09:55 AM (+4oV5)

126 Tony Pete, what a magical oasis for the kids!

Posted by: vmom stabby stabby stabby stabby stabamillion at July 24, 2022 09:56 AM (kf6Ak)

127 I recently read a memoir titled "Dumb, Dumb, Dumb: My Mother's Book Reviews" by Mary Jo Pehl. The author is a comedienne, actress and writer best known for her work on MST3K and Rifftrax. It is a look back on her mother's life through the lens of book reviews her mother kept written on index cards, which she found after her mother's death from lung cancer. (When her mother disliked a book she rated it "dumb.")

It's moving, funny and I liked the organization of the book: it's divided into sections which begin with a few of her mother's reviews, organized by topic. Mary Jo deals with the low points of their relationship as well as the high points; when her mother was diagnosed with cancer she moved back to Minnesota from Texas to care for her during chemotherapy.

My own mother recently passed away, which does have a lot to do with why I liked this book so much... but I think anyone could enjoy it. The last review in the book really had me in tears. Mary Jo had written a previous book which she felt was so bad that she bought up as many copies as possible (it was privately published). But her mother somehow got hold of a copy, read it, rated it 10/10. And never told Mary Jo.

Posted by: Alice at July 24, 2022 09:56 AM (79O2/)

128 "About to go to South of the Border.
Let's see if it lives up to the billboard hype. Probably not.
"

Go to the Restaurant and get the soup and salad bar.

It's quite good, and the old guy, Pops makes the soups from scratch daily.

And the consider following I-95 south to exit 170 outside of Florence.
That would be the newest Buc-ee's gas station.
120 gas pumps, and a supermarket of stuff.
Probably will put SoB out of business within two years.

Posted by: Village Idiot's Apprentice at July 24, 2022 09:56 AM (1n+EO)

129 *toddles off*

Have fun storming the mystical dwarvish medieval castle in some dystopian future parallel universe inhabited by fantastic mythical creatures and Nazi-like space aliens and scantily clad bosomy Martian seductresses, or whatever your preferred genre.

Endeavour to persevere!

Posted by: Muldoon at July 24, 2022 09:56 AM (kXYt5)

130 The suspense and character development override the Grrrl Power. I liked it pretty well and I'm death on female solidarity.

Posted by: sal at July 24, 2022 09:54 AM (y40tE)


Thanks sal. Good to know. Maybe I'll give it a try.

Posted by: grammie winger at July 24, 2022 09:56 AM (45fpk)

131 >>>Ahhh. I did not realize that it originated with Dave. I guess there's a reason my mind couldn't wrap around it as a TJ quote. My mistake.

Posted by: Muldoon

>Don't make me get Dave in here to bust your balls.

Posted by: Dr. Bone at July 24, 2022 09:56 AM (0ocXn)

132 I just started reading A Blood Wheeled Sky by Brad Torgersen

Posted by: vmom stabby stabby stabby stabby stabamillion at July 24, 2022 09:56 AM (kf6Ak)

133 His daughter, who was a bit of a "free spirit", had several affairs with various Nazi officials.

-
It's been years since I read that but if I remember correctly, she was banging both the head of the Gestapo and the NKVD head in Berlin.

Posted by: Anonosaurus Wrecks, Now the Summer of Our Discontent at July 24, 2022 09:57 AM (FVME7)

134 TonyPete,
I love your Little Library setup. And the jungle adventure for the wee ones to get to it. Kudos to your wife for the hex sign. Wish I could paint that well, or even close.

Posted by: JTB at July 24, 2022 09:57 AM (7EjX1)

135 124 45 All of these literary geniuses in the book thread, - why don't we see them talking shit in the daily threads like the rest of us illiterate morons? Stop laughing.
Posted by: Dr. Bone at July 24, 2022 09:24 AM (0ocXn)

Eh, for me, I don't' post because I am at work. And The Man be constantly watching!

But I do lurk

Posted by: Secret Squirrel, author of sci fi, kids books and one silly army play on Amazon at July 24, 2022 09:57 AM (mr1KG)

136 I am barely here, as I woke early this morning with what appears to be a bad stomach bug.
Posted by: vmom stabby stabby stabby stabby stabamillion at July 24, 2022 09:55 AM (kf6Ak)
---

From hell's stomach I stab at thee!

Posted by: Vmom's supervillain tummy bug at July 24, 2022 09:57 AM (Dc2NZ)

137 Just a small rant-type observation:

I love footnotes -- on the bottom of the page, please.

A constant irritation for me is to move the page markers for text, footnotes, index, and bibliography. Modern word processors make footnotes on the page easy, so please, please, please, use that facility.

Thank you, and sorry for the derail.

Posted by: mustbequantum at July 24, 2022 09:57 AM (MIKMs)

138 Great book thread, Perfessor!
Posted by: Ladyl

Seconded !

Posted by: JT at July 24, 2022 09:58 AM (T4tVD)

139 Reading this week I finished up Christopher Rouffio's Kingdoms of Death, Book 4 in the Sun Eater Series. I do like the books, but there is a little bit of the complaint that Ace had with video content these days - yes, yes, mood and artistry, but could you actually move the story along please?

Posted by: motionview, divisive arch-conservative at July 24, 2022 09:58 AM (1fZmp)

140 Well I got it all wrong about the title of that old WWI book. I went and got it and the name is "The Pictorial History of the World War of Liberty". The year is 1919, not 18 as I thought.

Inside the front cover is stamped ""Spring City Library". That would be Spring City Tennessee, where my grandparents lived in the 80s and 90s. I think I got it at a flea market around there.

There are lots of obscure little recollections in there like "There was great deal on hand to hand fighting and bayonet work on the Ourcq, which resulted in the terrible Magdeburg regiment beating a retreat".

Posted by: fd at July 24, 2022 09:58 AM (sn5EN)

141 Eh, for me, I don't' post because I am at work. And The Man be constantly watching!
---

When I worked for The Man I surreptitiously read the HQ and I was always waiting to be called on the carpet for accessing an Ultra Far Right Insurrectionist blog. With boob, dick, and fart jokes -- even worse!

Posted by: All Hail Eris, Sans-Culottes (except for the Book Thread) at July 24, 2022 09:59 AM (Dc2NZ)

142 Yes, A Farewell to Arms is great, an exaggeration of Hemingway's actual WWI experiences.

Posted by: Anonosaurus Wrecks, )
---
Well, this points us back to the time-tested truth that you should write what you know.

We can look at Hemingway being vain or we can see that he wanted to make the main character more important, have more responsibility and therefore more interesting to the reader.

An alternative approach is that of Waugh, who used his wartime experiences to illustrate the tedium and hollowness of the effort. Both Brideshead Revisted and Sword of Honour are written from the perspective of a onlooker rather than a man of action.

I wrote Three Weeks with the Coasties as a conscious imitation of Waugh because my "wartime" experience was even more dreary and devoid of excitement than his. You could even say it was a test run for telling the story of my career. Interestingly - and unexpectedly - my plans for retirement have been accelerated in a very unpleasant way, adding a plot twist I did not expect. Soon I'll be out, and that will confer greater freedom - the sort enjoyed by Waugh and Hemingway.

Posted by: Ace-Endorsed Author A.H. Lloyd at July 24, 2022 10:00 AM (llXky)

143 (About The Scarlet Ruse)

My memory of that specific one is dim, but wasn't it a stab at the classic "locked room/impossible crime" by John D.? And it has a remarkable portrait of Travis's lady of the moment too, I think.
Posted by: Wolfus Aurelius at July 24, 2022 09:42 AM


Considering my almost complete inability to go from the title to the plot of any book, you did remarkably well. Yes, some valuable stamps have gone missing from a locked vault. I have some guesses about what happened.

The thing that is remarkable about Travis McGee is how different the stories are from each other. Reading other character-driven stories (like the Spenser novels or the Jack Reacher) the plots are basically all the same because the plots are an excuse for the character to do their thing, but that's not John MacDonald's thing at all.

Posted by: Cybersmythe at July 24, 2022 10:01 AM (6jmQG)

144 @117 --

Don't you hate it when life gets in the way of important stuff like this thread?

Frequently. I've recently started composing my initial post the night before. This way I don't feel like such a tagalong.

Posted by: Weak Geek at July 24, 2022 10:01 AM (Om/di)

145 Seems mysteries about Old Hollywood from that period would indeed be the stuff of dreams for TV types. ...the whole Theda as detective idea, it seems like a perfect Masterpiece Mystery thing.

It would beat the crap outta the "Murdoch" and "Miss Fisher" period pieces.

Posted by: Oddbob at July 24, 2022 10:01 AM (nfrXX)

146 Another excellent job, perfessor!

Posted by: blake - semi lurker in marginal standing(5pTK/) at July 24, 2022 10:02 AM (5pTK/)

147
I finished reading Pierre Berton's The Klondike Fever: The Life and Death of the Last Great Gold Rush.


What the...???

Now, I've got to think of a new title for my book:

"The Klondike Fever: The Life and Death of the Last Great Ice Cream Bar"

*kicks rock*

Posted by: naturalfake at July 24, 2022 10:03 AM (5NkmN)

148 An observation on P. Squirrel's videos regarding self publishing:

Amazon is a great service for publishing your books- especially since the established publishing houses won't take a chance on a new author unless there has been some kind of demonstration of talent through marketing appeal or financial success. So I say go with it. Yeah, you are helping Bezos to make another dick rocket, but if you are self publishing on Amazon, that probably isn't your main source of income anyway.

Now, onto editing. I've gone back and forth about getting my stuff professionally edited- but I end up saying no because the cost of a professional editor is going to eat any small financial gains I make on the books. So, I am left with a couple of options: edit over and over, plead with my wife to edit it, and then I distro copies of my books to friends and ask them to read it over. Is it a perfect system? No, but my friends have made great suggestions and caught some stuff I just missed after proofing.
What's your method for proofing?

Posted by: Secret Squirrel, author of sci fi, kids books and one silly army play on Amazon at July 24, 2022 10:03 AM (mr1KG)

149 A constant irritation for me is to move the page markers for text, footnotes, index, and bibliography. Modern word processors make footnotes on the page easy, so please, please, please, use that facility.

Thank you, and sorry for the derail.

Posted by: mustbequantum at July 24, 2022 09:57 AM (MIKMs)
---
I agree 100%. I hate end notes. Half the time it's just a citation, but every now and then there's a nice aside. I put my citations right there on the bottom of the page so you can see what it is up front.

Who wants to flip back and forth to see "Ibid"?

Posted by: Ace-Endorsed Author A.H. Lloyd at July 24, 2022 10:05 AM (llXky)

150 Does seem a bit plausible due to the notorious disarray of the old MSU library system. As an undergrad I was once tasked with finding a proceedings of a European acid rain conference. Reference failed to find it, so it was punted to Circulation, where I worked. I searched the forestry library, soil science, the general catalogs. The library director wouldn't let up as it was a request from DC. Eventually I found it in a section of the USDA library. President Harden thanked me personally. It was a silly waste of employee time.

Posted by: CN at July 24, 2022 10:05 AM (ONvIw)

151 133 His daughter, who was a bit of a "free spirit", had several affairs with various Nazi officials.

-
It's been years since I read that but if I remember correctly, she was banging both the head of the Gestapo and the NKVD head in Berlin.
Posted by: Anonosaurus Wrecks, Now the Summer of Our Discontent at July 24, 2022 09:57 AM (FVME7)

Yes. She reminds me slightly of Unity Mitford, the English aristocrat who was part of Hitler's inner circle.
Though I hope Miss Dodd smartens up later in the book- I'm only half-way through it.

Posted by: sal at July 24, 2022 10:06 AM (y40tE)

152 What's your method for proofing?

Posted by: Secret Squirrel, author of sci fi, kids books and one silly army play on Amazon at July 24, 2022 10:03 AM (mr1KG)
---
Same as yours, but I've added reading it aloud to my wife as the final step. Crazy how much stuff you find that way.

Posted by: Ace-Endorsed Author A.H. Lloyd at July 24, 2022 10:06 AM (llXky)

153 Now, onto editing.

******

*delurks*

Shouldn't that be "Now, on to editing."

*relurks*

Posted by: Muldoon at July 24, 2022 10:07 AM (kXYt5)

154 Just finished a book by Christopher Nuttall called The Empire's Corps. It is Military sci-fi, Marines in Space. I bought it through a book thread link to a $.99 cents or free book sale. It was written in 2012. He went on to write another 19! books in the series. The galactic empire is dying because Earth is dying. Each chapter starts with a passage from a book written by one of the characters explaining why society has failed. It is very accurate about present day signs of societal collapse.
At the end of the book there is an afterward by the author written recently where he makes that exact connection. It could have been written by any COB on Ace orAce himself. So, my question. Does anyone know if he is a member of the Horde?
Christopher Nuttall if you are here Decloak.
If you are looking for totally based Sci-fi, this is it.

Posted by: Sharon(willow's apprentice) at July 24, 2022 10:07 AM (Y+l9t)

155 Why, can you imagine someone glomming onto a poisonous ideology merely for personal gain? Can such people be?!
Posted by: All Hail Eris, Analog Hipster

Meet the Press@MeetThePress
WATCH: Al Gore compares climate inaction to "failing to walk through the door" in Uvalde. #MTP

"Climate deniers are really in some ways similar to all of those almost 400 law enforcement officers ... waiting outside an unlocked door while the children were being massacred."

Posted by: Anonosaurus Wrecks, Now the Summer of Our Discontent at July 24, 2022 10:07 AM (FVME7)

156 Well- just picked up a copy of Erik Larson's "In the Garden of Beasts", which has that guy in it, as it is the story of the U.S. Ambassador to Germany in 1933.


His 'Devil in the White City', about a serial killer at the 1893 Chicago world's fair, is excellent.

Posted by: Thomas Paine at July 24, 2022 10:08 AM (3tX2G)

157 Now that I'm thinking about it, I'm realizing that Jack Reacher is a total ripoff of Travis McGee.

Posted by: Cybersmythe at July 24, 2022 10:08 AM (6jmQG)

158 I get paid more than $85 every hour for working on the web.
Posted by: Sarah

https://tinyurl.com/5xht73m3

Posted by: JT at July 24, 2022 10:08 AM (T4tVD)

159 Perfessor Squirrel a good topic one day might be "Interesting books you have found old book sales and flea markets. I have a picture of one I will send you to ruminate on. It's not the WW1 book I just mentioned, but another with a closer family connection.

Posted by: fd at July 24, 2022 10:08 AM (sn5EN)

160
Yes. She reminds me slightly of Unity Mitford, the English aristocrat who was part of Hitler's inner circle.
Though I hope Miss Dodd smartens up later in the book- I'm only half-way through it.

Posted by: sal at July 24, 2022 10:06 AM (y40tE)
---
It's an interesting commentary on human nature and the social environment of the time that a lot of young women saw the war as just an extended party, full of excitement and fun.

Waugh (who obviously knew the Mitfords) plays up this angle in his books.

Posted by: Ace-Endorsed Author A.H. Lloyd at July 24, 2022 10:09 AM (llXky)

161 153 Now, onto editing.

******

*delurks*
Shouldn't that be "Now, on to editing."
*relurks*
Posted by: Muldoon at July 24, 2022 10:07 AM (kXYt5)

(An angry and bewildered Capt. James T Kirk holding a microphone) "KHAAAAAANNNN!!!"

Which seems like the appropriate response when I make a nice grammar bolo lol

Posted by: Secret Squirrel, author of sci fi, kids books and one silly army play on Amazon at July 24, 2022 10:09 AM (mr1KG)

162 I hate Algore and climate marxism. The whole "denier" craze needs to go.

Posted by: CN at July 24, 2022 10:09 AM (ONvIw)

163 Perfessor Squirrel a good topic one day might be "Interesting books you have found old book sales and flea markets. I have a picture of one I will send you to ruminate on. It's not the WW1 book I just mentioned, but another with a closer family connection.
Posted by: fd at July 24, 2022 10:08 AM (sn5EN)
----
That would be an excellent topic for discussion! I have a couple of books of my own that would fall into that category.

Posted by: "Perfessor" Squirrel at July 24, 2022 10:10 AM (K5n5d)

164 The M*A*S*H books eventually had footnotes for the footnotes. They were hilarious.

Posted by: Weak Geek at July 24, 2022 10:10 AM (Om/di)

165 I agree 100%. I hate end notes. Half the time it's just a citation, but every now and then there's a nice aside. I put my citations right there on the bottom of the page so you can see what it is up front.
Who wants to flip back and forth to see "Ibid"?
=====

Never thought I would have to buy the little 'flags' again after my kids finished college. Silly me, I had to buy another pack. [curmudgeonly grumbling]

Posted by: mustbequantum at July 24, 2022 10:10 AM (MIKMs)

166 Tonypete,
your Little Library is charming. The littles will remember it in later life. What a kind thing to do.

Posted by: sal at July 24, 2022 10:10 AM (y40tE)

167 The M*A*S*H books eventually had footnotes for the footnotes. They were hilarious.
Posted by: Weak Geek at July 24, 2022 10:10 AM (Om/di)
---
Terry Pratchett's Discworld novels are chock full of hilarious footnotes...He loved inserting those at random points in the text.

The Death Gate Cycle by Margaret Weis and Tracy Hickman also used extensive footnotes, but much more seriously. They're fairly rare in the fantasy/science fiction that I tend to read...

Posted by: "Perfessor" Squirrel at July 24, 2022 10:12 AM (K5n5d)

168 My grandson, who is almost 13 and an advanced reader, is interested in learning about WW1. Any suggestions for books?

Posted by: TecumsehTea at July 24, 2022 09:14 AM (BjGT6)


World War I, by H.P. Wilmott, is a good overview with lots of maps and photographs to provide context for the narrative.

Posted by: HTL at July 24, 2022 10:13 AM (meAg6)

169 I read Shirer's 'Fall of the Third Republic' early in the ear.

It made me really dislike the guy, his Leftist political leanings are all over this book in authorial asides, something I didn't see in 'Rise and Fall of the Third Reich'.

Posted by: Mark Andrew Edwards (Logan Tiberius 2012-2021) at July 24, 2022 10:13 AM (xcxpd)

170 Hmmm, not sure which Mass to go to. They've brought back the Precious Blood, but only one cup is available. I generally like St. Thomas, but I'll have to sit in a different part of the church than usual to have access.

St. Johns has the cup right in line with where I usually sit, but parking is more of a pain and also there are about a half-dozen people who for some reason applaud loudly at the end of a service like it's some sort of performance. It's very grating.

Posted by: Ace-Endorsed Author A.H. Lloyd at July 24, 2022 10:13 AM (llXky)

171 This may be a dumb question, but why does the hex sign on the Little Library have an eight-pointed star design? Doesn't hex denote the number six?

And don't tell me it has something to do with Thomas Jefferson...

...or Dave in Texas

Posted by: Muldoon at July 24, 2022 10:13 AM (kXYt5)

172 Posted by: fd at July 24, 2022 10:08 AM (sn5EN)

I found one yesterday! a 1st of Robert Service's Rhymes of a Red Cross Man with the dust cover largely intact! I had bought an unused set of American made Revereware and noticed the book. The person running the sale said "take it" and called it a "gift with purchase, like Estee Lauder". Seems poetry is not a hot item at an estate sale, and I did spend 20 dollars for a great NIB cookware set. I am delighted.

Posted by: CN at July 24, 2022 10:14 AM (ONvIw)

173 132 I just started reading A Blood Wheeled Sky by Brad Torgersen

**
A STAR wheeled sky

Jeeze, I'm really out of it today

Posted by: vmom stabby stabby stabby stabby stabamillion at July 24, 2022 10:14 AM (kf6Ak)

174 Same as yours, but I've added reading it aloud to my wife as the final step. Crazy how much stuff you find that way.
Posted by: Ace-Endorsed Author A.H. Lloyd at July 24, 2022 10:06 AM (llXky)

Wish Mrs. Squirrel had the patience of your wife. I can barely get mine to read my stuff. She says, "I can't not hear your voice in my head saying this." And she already thinks I utter insanity half of the day as it is.
After 20 years of marriage, the romance is, how shall we say, not as intense as it once was. So, the willingness and passion to set aside precious time in the day from annoying teens or my doggeh and reading my semi-coherent sci fi books or plays is about like going to the dentist for her.
Well, who was it that said, "Marriage is bliss."

Posted by: Secret Squirrel, author of sci fi, kids books and one silly army play on Amazon at July 24, 2022 10:15 AM (mr1KG)

175 - A writing professor friend of mine always tells the students in his literature classes that the only way they can become good writers is to be good readers first. --

This is quite correct. Indeed, when someone approached famed mystery writer Lawrence Block for advice about becoming a mystery writer, his advice was: "Read five hundred mysteries." It works!

Posted by: Francis W. Porretto at July 24, 2022 10:16 AM (z/nZY)

176 Today I found a new editor for my blog posts, but he's just as much of a dumbfuck as my last editor. Don't expect any improvements.

Posted by: Dr. Bone at July 24, 2022 10:16 AM (0ocXn)

177 "Intelligence at the Top" uses both footnotes and endnotes. One footnote has its own endnote.

Posted by: Weak Geek at July 24, 2022 10:16 AM (Om/di)

178 "In the House of Tom Bombadil" by C.R. Wiley delves into who or what Bombadil might be and, more importantly, why he and Goldberry matter to the story. Wiley isn't didactic even though he has his opinions. The writing is enjoyable and has a feel of CS Lewis (and Tolkien) when they are in a playful mood. It's a short book, only a bit over 100 pages, but Wiley reveals a lot of rabbit holes to follow. For those of us who always liked Tom and Goldberry it is a delightful read.

Posted by: JTB at July 24, 2022 10:16 AM (7EjX1)

179 This may be a dumb question, but why does the hex sign on the Little Library have an eight-pointed star design? Doesn't hex denote the number six?
=====

As mentioned above, I would just call it a compass rose. Would be a fitting decoration to the adventurous wilderness for the littles.

Posted by: mustbequantum at July 24, 2022 10:17 AM (MIKMs)

180 Proofing?

My spelling was always pretty good, ditto sentence construction though you probably can't tell that from some of my posts. I usually let spell check catch things like 'hte' for 'the' that I might miss in a read-through. Then repeated read-throughs asking myself 'Would that really work?' or 'Did I contradict something here that I had in chapter 4?'

After a sufficient number of read-throughs, I decide the whole project was a huge misfire and set it aside until either a) the sight of it doesn't make me yark up breakfasts from 1994 or b) SMOD, whichever comes first.

Works for me and saves me any worrying about marketing.

Posted by: Just Some Guy at July 24, 2022 10:18 AM (JzDjf)

181 Wish Mrs. Squirrel had the patience of your wife. I can barely get mine to read my stuff. "

Posted by: Secret Squirrel, author of sci fi, kids books and one silly army play on Amazon at July 24, 2022 10:15 AM (mr1KG)
---
I read it to her *because* she won't read my stuff. Okay, she used to read it, but got out of the habit. I read the Man of Destiny series to her and found a lot of mistakes that I will correct when this book is done.

Posted by: Ace-Endorsed Author A.H. Lloyd at July 24, 2022 10:19 AM (llXky)

182 I've added reading it aloud to my wife as the final step. Crazy how much stuff you find that way.
Posted by: Ace-Endorsed Author A.H. Lloyd at July 24, 2022 10:06 AM (llXky)


Reading things aloud is a great way to save oneself from future embarrassment. I used to read Rev's sermons aloud to him on the Saturday before he preached. Saved his skin more than once.

Posted by: grammie winger at July 24, 2022 10:19 AM (45fpk)

183 Mr. S. has Larson's "Isaac's Storm" in his Texana library.

My maternal grandfather was a survivor of the Galveston Flood as a young boy.

Posted by: sal at July 24, 2022 10:19 AM (y40tE)

184 call it a compass rose

******

That seems a more fitting name.

Posted by: Muldoon at July 24, 2022 10:19 AM (kXYt5)

185 This is quite correct. Indeed, when someone approached famed mystery writer Lawrence Block for advice about becoming a mystery writer, his advice was: "Read five hundred mysteries." It works!
Posted by: Francis W. Porretto at July 24, 2022 10:16 AM (z/nZY)
---
This is very much a common theme among the greats of science fiction. Asimov, Bradbury, Simak, etc., spent much of their free time at the public library in their youth, reading anything and everything they could get their grubby little mitts on...

Posted by: "Perfessor" Squirrel at July 24, 2022 10:19 AM (K5n5d)

186 Read Rise and Fall of the Third Reich not long ago and didn't see his Leftist leaning in it.

Posted by: Skip at July 24, 2022 10:20 AM (2JoB8)

187 Spam Killer needs a namshub shoved into an I/O port sideways.

Paging Hiro Protagonist.

Posted by: Anna Puma at July 24, 2022 10:20 AM (swhgH)

188
I am reading "Sundiver", the first volume of the first Uplift trilogy by David Brin. Having read the next two volumes some years ago, this one seems pretty thin in storyline and characterization by contrast.

The theme that runs throughout the trilogy is that sentient beings on planets throughout the galaxy only became that way because they had a sponsor race that shepherded them through the process. Humans had brought chimpanzees and dolphins to that level of consciousness.

When humans made contact with the rest of the galaxy's races, these others asked, "Well, who was your sponsor?" The answer, "We didn't have one", set off the galactic Karens, who have a strong aversion to "wolfling" races such as us, particularly since we had already elevated two other species to sentience without having followed galactic guidelines. The theme of Earth having been different, and therefore both irritating and a threat, pervades the series.

Posted by: Krebs v Carnot: Epic Battle of the Cycling Stars at July 24, 2022 10:20 AM (ZvxPV)

189 Greetings:

RE: Footnotes

For actual footnotes of not too great length, bottom of the page is first choice.

Also as to book design, separating "notes" from "citations" can be a useful ease of reading tactic.
While flipping back and forth remains, a lot less of it is necessary.

Posted by: 11B40 at July 24, 2022 10:20 AM (uuklp)

190 Okay

*toddles off for real*

Posted by: Muldoon at July 24, 2022 10:21 AM (kXYt5)

191 This talk about hex signs is new to me, and I did grow up on a farm. Never saw one.
Posted by: Weak Geek

I saw a documentary about the dragging death of James Byrd, Jr. They found a symbol several times related to the crime. It was a three pointed star with bars resting on each of the pkints. Turns out it was three Ks connected into a star representing the KKK. And that's what I learned this week.

Posted by: Anonosaurus Wrecks, Now the Summer of Our Discontent at July 24, 2022 10:21 AM (FVME7)

192 Those hex signs I recall were prominent in Pennsylvania Dutch communities (not limited to PA.) along with humorous sentence construction, as in "Throw your father down the stairs his hat".

Posted by: gourmand du jour, 59 degrees and foggy at July 24, 2022 10:21 AM (jTmQV)

193 I read it to her *because* she won't read my stuff. Okay, she used to read it, but got out of the habit. I read the Man of Destiny series to her and found a lot of mistakes that I will correct when this book is done.
Posted by: Ace-Endorsed Author A.H. Lloyd at July 24, 2022 10:19 AM (llXky

Got it. Good method though. Maybe I'll read some chapters into my iphone and play it back when I'm walking the dog.

Speaking of that- has anyone looked into getting their books turned into audio versions? I've had a lot of readers ask me about that. I'd give it a go, but after listening to numerous fiction books on tape, I don't think I have the range of voice talent to make it sound good. Voice actors, like editors, are also outrageously expensive.

Posted by: Secret Squirrel, author of sci fi, kids books and one silly army play on Amazon at July 24, 2022 10:22 AM (mr1KG)

194 I used to proofread my husband's academic papers. Accounting and Finance make dull reading, to me, so I used to yawn throughout the read aloud.

I can see why history and fiction make a more tolerable task.

Posted by: CN at July 24, 2022 10:22 AM (ONvIw)

195 The surest way to find errors is to hit "post".

Posted by: All Hail Eris, Sans-Culottes (except for the Book Thread) at July 24, 2022 10:23 AM (Dc2NZ)

196 Mr. S. has Larson's "Isaac's Storm" in his Texana library.

-
An extremely sad book.

Posted by: Anonosaurus Wrecks, Now the Summer of Our Discontent at July 24, 2022 10:23 AM (FVME7)

197 AH Lloyd, have some of the parishioners started bringing in their Starbucks yet?

Gah!!

Murder is illegal in Ohio - I've checked.

Posted by: Tonypete at July 24, 2022 10:24 AM (+1VT6)

198 Our library is having its summer used book sale. I told myself the fiction that I don't need any more books, but I know in my heart that I'm going.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, Sans-Culottes (except for the Book Thread) at July 24, 2022 10:24 AM (Dc2NZ)

199 Eris, post?

Try publish. Golden Isis and the ever keen readers here pointed out I should use The Great War when referring to World War I because WWII hadn't happened yet.

Live and learn.

Posted by: Anna Puma at July 24, 2022 10:25 AM (swhgH)

200 @189 --

separating "notes" from "citations" can be a useful ease of reading tactic.

That's a better description of what "Intelligence at the Top" uses. Thank you.

Posted by: Weak Geek at July 24, 2022 10:26 AM (Om/di)

201 Recording an audio book can be done with some basic tech like a laptop. Do invest in a decent microphone, find a quiet place and hit the pause button when a fire engine goes by.

Posted by: gourmand du jour, 59 degrees and foggy at July 24, 2022 10:26 AM (jTmQV)

202 Ouch, Anna!

Posted by: All Hail Eris, Sans-Culottes (except for the Book Thread) at July 24, 2022 10:27 AM (Dc2NZ)

203 Our library is having its summer used book sale. I told myself the fiction that I don't need any more books, but I know in my heart that I'm going.
Posted by: All Hail Eris, Sans-Culottes (except for the Book Thread) at July 24, 2022 10:24 AM (Dc2NZ)
----
I tried telling myself that about a month or so ago...Didn't work, as I documented my finds on this here blog...

Have fun! Share your finds with us!

Posted by: "Perfessor" Squirrel at July 24, 2022 10:28 AM (K5n5d)

204 AH Lloyd, have some of the parishioners started bringing in their Starbucks yet?

Gah!!

Murder is illegal in Ohio - I've checked.

Posted by: Tonypete at July 24, 2022 10:24 AM (+1VT6)
---
That's the 'college parish' which is more easygoing (in terms of dress) and has the eccentrics doing their thing. The notion is they are thanking the musicians, but it's grating and inappropriate.

One of our parochial vicars fresh out of seminary tried to put a stop to it, but failed. It's a handful of old people.

My normal solution is to wait until the priest has processed out and then leave before the music stops.

Posted by: Ace-Endorsed Author A.H. Lloyd at July 24, 2022 10:28 AM (llXky)

205 The other day I learned (and was surprised) that HarperCollins is releasing a new hardcover edition of CS Lewis' "English Literature in the Sixteenth Century (Excluding Drama)". This is hardly a page-turning thriller or beach read. It is, in my opinion, Lewis at his academic best, on the same level of his "Preface to Paradise Lost". I guess it says something that even decent used copies are pretty expensive. This edition comes out in a month. I already preordered a copy as my old paperback version is pretty ragged.

Posted by: JTB at July 24, 2022 10:28 AM (7EjX1)

206 I wonder when the term "World War II" came into usage.

Posted by: Weak Geek at July 24, 2022 10:29 AM (Om/di)

207 A.H.-

I just went your website and read your bit on Val Kilmer. Thanks, you affirmed my already reluctance to watch his documentary.

Plenty of depression in the world and in our daily lives. Don't need to sit through that at night after a hard day's rockin.

Posted by: Secret Squirrel, author of sci fi, kids books and one silly army play on Amazon at July 24, 2022 10:31 AM (mr1KG)

208 I used to proofread my husband's academic papers.

Posted by: CN at July 24, 2022 10:22 AM (ONvIw)
---
My father was a copy editor for 35 years, and a stickler for precision in language, so his spirit compels me to point out that "proofreading" is where you compare one text to another text - you're checking to see if it was accurately reproduced, typically when type has been set.

In the old newspaper days, the "proofreaders" took the reporter's copy and compared it to what had been set for publication.

Editing is where you look for mistakes in grammar and spelling, which is a higher order of work. Early on I learned not to ask him to "proofread" something because he'd immediately demand the text he was supposed to compare it to.

Posted by: Ace-Endorsed Author A.H. Lloyd at July 24, 2022 10:32 AM (llXky)

209 205. I bought a used copy a few years back. You must be a professor?

Posted by: CN at July 24, 2022 10:32 AM (ONvIw)

210 When did the little library boxes become a thing? I know of at least eight of them within a one mile radius of my house.

Posted by: G'rump928(c) at July 24, 2022 10:32 AM (hwaFC)

211 The Crimean War was WW0.

Posted by: G'rump928(c) at July 24, 2022 10:34 AM (hwaFC)

212 208. My proofreading involved reading the original aloud while he looked at the galleys. Is that close enough, Alec?

Posted by: CN at July 24, 2022 10:35 AM (ONvIw)

213 I am reading "Sundiver", the first volume of the first Uplift trilogy by David Brin. Having read the next two volumes some years ago, this one seems pretty thin in storyline and characterization by contrast.
=====

I loved the trilogy, different strokes for all of us. I remember waiting for each volume to find out if the dolphins would be allowed to survive.

Posted by: mustbequantum at July 24, 2022 10:35 AM (MIKMs)

214 I just went your website and read your bit on Val Kilmer. Thanks, you affirmed my already reluctance to watch his documentary.

Plenty of depression in the world and in our daily lives. Don't need to sit through that at night after a hard day's rockin.

Posted by: Secret Squirrel, author of sci fi, kids books and one silly army play on Amazon at July 24, 2022 10:31 AM (mr1KG)
---
Glad to help. The promo made it look funny, and there are funny parts, but it's so damn depressing. The scene where he's being feted for his role as Doc Holliday at a Texas film festival and he's filled with self-loathing that he's been reduced to watching his own movies for pay was gut-wrenching.

Posted by: Ace-Endorsed Author A.H. Lloyd at July 24, 2022 10:35 AM (llXky)

215 Frequently. I've recently started composing my initial post the night before. This way I don't feel like such a tagalong.
Posted by: Weak Geek at July 24, 2022 10:01 AM (Om/di)

**files this away for future reference

What a great idea, Weak Geek! Then you can post it early, go do your stuff, and come back and read the responses!

I keep having to leave and come back while I cook the dog food, when I really just want to sit here with my coffee all morning reading about what you've all read.

Posted by: April--dash my lace wigs! at July 24, 2022 10:36 AM (OX9vb)

216 G'rump maybe 3/4, the 7 years war was 1/2

Posted by: Skip at July 24, 2022 10:36 AM (2JoB8)

217 In relation to 205 above, I just learned that HarperOne, a division of HarperCollins, just published CS Lewis' "Preface to Paradise Lost" in an affordable hardcover. I applaud their doing so but am stonkered (and delighted) that there is a market for physical books of this type. I hope my feeling of encouragement about this is justified. A demand for such beautiful writing, even on a rather esoteric subject, would be a counter to the cultural rot we are bombarded with all the time.

Posted by: JTB at July 24, 2022 10:37 AM (7EjX1)

218 Morning Hordemates.
I'll definitely try The Klondike Fever.
My brother was stationed in Alaska for a few years flying Mohawks back when the Army had them. They'd fly IR training missions around the area. He'd look at the films in post-flight looking for just the right colors on streambeds. Then he'd go pan those areas. He made about $20k a year with this "hobby."

Posted by: Diogenes at July 24, 2022 10:37 AM (anj39)

219 42 There were 2 elderly gals that had a yarn/book shop.

IT'S FUNNY BECAUSE MANY BOOKS ARE FULL OF YARNS

Posted by: anachronda at July 24, 2022 10:37 AM (ou87n)

220 Posted by: JTB at July 24, 2022 10:37 AM (7EjX1)

Very encouraging.

Posted by: CN at July 24, 2022 10:38 AM (ONvIw)

221 My proofreading involved reading the original aloud while he looked at the galleys.

Posted by: CN at July 24, 2022 10:35 AM (ONvIw)
---
I LOL'd.

Well done.

Posted by: Ace-Endorsed Author A.H. Lloyd at July 24, 2022 10:38 AM (llXky)

222 The Crimean War was WW0.
=====

Napoleonic wars?

Posted by: mustbequantum at July 24, 2022 10:39 AM (MIKMs)

223 Listened to the first video (had to ckos my eyes because the guys arms were annoying)
Never heard of any of the books he rec'd -

Posted by: vmom stabby stabby stabby stabby stabamillion at July 24, 2022 10:39 AM (kf6Ak)

224 Napoleonic wars?

Posted by: mustbequantum at July 24, 2022 10:39 AM (MIKMs)
---
The Seven Years' War was arguably the first 'world war' since it was fought in Europe, India and the Americas.

Posted by: Ace-Endorsed Author A.H. Lloyd at July 24, 2022 10:40 AM (llXky)

225 >>>When did the little library boxes become a thing? I know of at least eight of them within a one mile radius of my house.

>It's a weird thing, because I've never seen anybody use one. I could fill up two dozen of those boxes but where are the people?

Posted by: Dr. Bone at July 24, 2022 10:40 AM (0ocXn)

226 Nice little library, Tonypete, I am sure the kids love that. Our a/c quit working on Wednesday. The earliest a technician can come to look at it is August 2nd. I went to the local library on Friday and picked up several books to read in the kitchen with the ceiling fan whirring overhead. Yesterday I read a Peter Ash book by Nick Petrie. The book was set in Iceland and it kept me cool all day. I just cracked The Final Case by David Guterson and I am enjoying it so far, he is a wonderful writer. Thanks for another great book thread, Perfessor, I bookmarked the Horde recommendations so I can look for some of these books on the next trip to the library.

Posted by: Debby Doberman Schultz at July 24, 2022 10:40 AM (a4EWo)

227 Try publish. Golden Isis and the ever keen readers here pointed out I should use The Great War when referring to World War I because WWII hadn't happened yet.

-
When I was about a fifth grader, I got into reading a series in which a kid (Encyclopedia Brown?) solved mysteries in very short stories. In one he proved a reputed Civil War presentation sword to be fake because it references heroic acts during the "First Battle of Bull Run" dated before the Second Battle of Bull Run had occurred.

Posted by: Anonosaurus Wrecks, Now the Summer of Our Discontent at July 24, 2022 10:41 AM (FVME7)

228 Proofing?

The best way I've found to proofread is to just walk away from the novel/book/story for a couple of weeks.

Then come back and read the, in my case, novel aloud from start to finish to yourself.

That way you'll catch almost all, if not all, of the misspellings and inconsistencies and story flaws within the text.

By giving yourself a break, you're not so wrapped up in the process and can look at it all more objectively.

Of course, if you've got a good writing group, they can filter out about 90% of that stuff anyway.

Either/or.

Posted by: naturalfake at July 24, 2022 10:42 AM (5NkmN)

229 It's a weird thing, because I've never seen anybody use one. I could fill up two dozen of those boxes but where are the people?

Posted by: Dr. Bone at July 24, 2022 10:40 AM (0ocXn)
---
It's a status symbol in low crime jurisdictions. A humble-brag with literary pretensions.

Lots of them around here, and I thought of buying used copies of Trump's The Art of the Deal and sticking them in there to see what happens.

Posted by: Ace-Endorsed Author A.H. Lloyd at July 24, 2022 10:42 AM (llXky)

230 195 The surest way to find errors is to hit "post".
Posted by: All Hail Eris, Sans-Culottes (except for the Book Thread) at July 24, 2022 10:23 AM (Dc2NZ)

*snort

Posted by: April--dash my lace wigs! at July 24, 2022 10:43 AM (OX9vb)

231 Reading Ten Bears Speaks. A very interesting "as-told-to" autobiography (related by John Neihardt). Obviously there is some interpolation (and perhaps some idealization) in the translation from original narrator, to Neihardt, to the reader.

But what gives it more credibility (IMO) is Neihardt devoted an academically rigorous life to Indian studies, i.e. was not some journalist just coming up with a one-off to sell books. Also, it was written in the 30s, when the rot of revisionism hadn't yet become the default position, and so the less-than-flattering portraits of much of our approach to the Indians in the 19th century was not so much to grind an axe, but simply to relate things as they happened.

There is a lot mysticism in it (Black Elk was, of course, a medicine man). But what I find most intriguing in the book are the matter-of-fact accounts of every day plains Indian life, such as the incredible physicality and risk-taking among very young boys of 6, 7, 8 etc. Anyone who loves Western history or American history for that matter should read more about and by Indians.

Posted by: Zek at July 24, 2022 10:44 AM (OzNIz)

232 Meant "Black Elk Speaks" (there's a lot about Ten Bears)!

Posted by: Zek at July 24, 2022 10:44 AM (OzNIz)

233 "My grandson, who is almost 13 and an advanced reader, is interested in learning about WW1. Any suggestions for books?"

The Lead-Up to the War:
Robert K. Massie's "Dreadnaught". Margaret MacMillan's "The War that Ended Peace". Christina Kroft's "Queen Victoria's Grandsons" portrays Wilhelm II, her oldest grandson.

Fighting the War:
John Keegan's "The First World War". Edward Lengel's "Never In Finer Company", about the Lost Battalion, the American unit that faced some of the worst combat of the war.

Aftermath:
Margaret MacMillan's "Paris 1919". Far and away the best book on the Paris peace talks and the Treaty of Versailles. It's also a CBC documentary that's available on YouTube; well worth viewing.

Posted by: Nemo at July 24, 2022 10:46 AM (S6ArX)

234 232 Meant "Black Elk Speaks"

**"

Our lib system has a 1978 edition and a 2000 edition

Posted by: vmom stabby stabby stabby stabby stabamillion at July 24, 2022 10:48 AM (kf6Ak)

235 Time to get moving.

Perfessor Squirrel, thanks for the great thread.

Morons- may your Sunday be filled with grilled meats and fermented hops. Or whiskey.

Posted by: Secret Squirrel, author of sci fi, kids books and one silly army play on Amazon at July 24, 2022 10:48 AM (mr1KG)

236 A telling indication of the scope of the criminality is provided by a little-known government accounting book, the Social Security Administration’s Earnings Suspense File (ESF). It reflects the earnings of employees whose W-2 wage and tax statements have names and Social Security numbers that do not match official records. The total logged in the file has increased tenfold from $188.9 billion at the dawn of the millennium to $1.9 trillion in 2021.

W told everyone in 2004 and 2005 SSA was a den of snakes and he had a plan to KILL IT over 20 to 30 years. The eGOP fucked him over!!

Posted by: rhennigantx at July 24, 2022 10:49 AM (ex2Cx)

237 It's a status symbol in low crime jurisdictions. A humble-brag with literary pretensions.

Posted by: Ace-Endorsed Author A.H. Lloyd at July 24, 2022 10:42 AM (llXk

Probably some truth to that, but the best-placed one I know of is at a family crisis center next to my work office. I think it's sort of a first stop for abused women and children before they find other shelter. I've loaded that one up lots of times, and it appears to be a well-used box.

Posted by: April--dash my lace wigs! at July 24, 2022 10:51 AM (OX9vb)

238 Black Elk Speaks

"The wise man does not wipe butt with porcupine."

Posted by: Anonosaurus Wrecks, Now the Summer of Our Discontent at July 24, 2022 10:51 AM (FVME7)

239 This week, I read "Across the Airless Wilds: The Lunar Rover and the Triumph of the Final Moon Landings", by Earl Swift. The title says it all. It's a wonderful read for anyone who's interested in the Apollo program, or anyone who's a car guy (or gal). Swift interviewed the engineers (a surprising number of whom were still around in 2019, when he wrote the book), and his descriptions of how the car was designed, sold to NASA, built by Boeing and GM, and then used on the Moon, are absolutely riveting. I've read many books on the Apollo missions (I remember the missions vividly), and this one of the very best. Highly recommended!

Posted by: Nemo at July 24, 2022 10:52 AM (S6ArX)

240 It's a status symbol in low crime jurisdictions. A humble-brag with literary pretensions.

Lots of them around here, and I thought of buying used copies of Trump's The Art of the Deal and sticking them in there to see what happens.
Posted by: Ace-Endorsed Author A.H. Lloyd at July

Um, why do you think they are pretentious? I think they are a cute, community driven outreach to share books. We have them all over the place here. I like to look in and see what's being traded.

If you want to go political, then go for it. But why be mean?

Posted by: nurse ratched at July 24, 2022 10:52 AM (U2p+3)

241 "Our lib system has a 1978 edition and a 2000 edition"

Yes there were many editions, but the original was written in 1932. Shocking also to think about how, in 1932, the capture of Crazy Horse was less than 50 years in the past. Basically in the 30s the Indian Wars were as far in the past as the 1970s are to us now.

Posted by: Zek at July 24, 2022 10:53 AM (OzNIz)

242 @215 --

Thank you. Wish I'd thought of it years earlier.

But the "stuff" I do is -- read the Book Thread until it's time to get ready for church.

Posted by: Weak Geek at July 24, 2022 10:53 AM (Om/di)

243 Black Elk Speaks

"The wise man does not wipe butt with porcupine."


But if that's all ya got, at least be sure you're holding it in the right direction.

Posted by: Oddbob at July 24, 2022 10:53 AM (nfrXX)

244 I never edited my husband's papers, I didn't know enough about the topics. Proofreading was bad enough. He's shout "stop" quite often and I'd have to underline in red so he could contact the journal.

My editing experience largely focused on grad and medical school applications, and not since the 70s except for a few friends' kids. Editing MBA applications was a nice sideline.

Posted by: CN at July 24, 2022 10:53 AM (ONvIw)

245 I like to take a box of books to the local laundry. I'll never read them again, and people seem to appreciate it.

Posted by: Dr. Bone at July 24, 2022 10:54 AM (0ocXn)

246 After a month of plugging away, I finally finished the X-Men: Onslaught omnibus. This cross-over has a generally bad reputation among most comic book fans; it was too bloated and a lot of people didn't like its consequences. But I enjoyed it. And to its credit it actually had consequences (seemingly unlike modern comic events). And the event was the explicit fulfillment of a subplot that had been planted nearly four years earlier. You have to give credit to a story that makes a dire prophesy and then actually follows through on it.

Posted by: Castle Guy at July 24, 2022 10:56 AM (Lhaco)

247
Sitting up in the late night and early morning hours, I read Whatever Happened to the Hall of Fame by Bill James. Published in the mid-90s It's somewhat dated, but it provides some fascinating analyses of who is, who's not and who shouldn't be in Cooperstown.

Sorry, Bill. Pete Rose never should be admitted.

Posted by: Hadrian the Seventh at July 24, 2022 10:56 AM (JVuoD)

248 Lots of them around here, and I thought of buying used copies of Trump's The Art of the Deal and sticking them in there to see what happens.
Posted by: Ace-Endorsed Author A.H. Lloyd at July 24, 2022 10:42 AM (llXky)
---

I seed mine with non-lefty novels, histories, and comic books.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, Sans-Culottes (except for the Book Thread) at July 24, 2022 10:57 AM (Dc2NZ)

249 240. Most of them around here are for kids. The ones for adults are overwhelmingly chick lit or liberal crap. They might be cute, but they are already political, sometimes very.

Posted by: CN at July 24, 2022 10:58 AM (ONvIw)

250 @227 --

Yes, that was Encyclopedia Brown.

Posted by: Weak Geek at July 24, 2022 10:58 AM (Om/di)

251 I started "Annals of a Former World" by John McPhee, that some morons mentioned a few weeks back. I wouldn't call him florid or prosaic, but he uses quite a few words I have to look up....it'll keep me busy.

Posted by: BignJames at July 24, 2022 10:58 AM (AwYPR)

252 8 I've been reading the Pern books in chronological order. They started out as science fiction with the discovery and colonization of the planet, then devolved to fantasy as technology stagnated to a medieval level after successive waves of destructive phenomena, and finally it's returning to science fiction now that the old technology, buried for 2500 years, has been rediscovered. Fun ride.
Posted by: All Hail Eris, Analog Hipster at July 24, 2022

It was just as fun to read the books in (roughly) release order. It starts as fantasy, then the sci-fi origins are a shocking reveal, and you're reading the history get re-discovered at the same time as you read the true account of said history in its own novel...

Posted by: Castle Guy at July 24, 2022 10:59 AM (Lhaco)

253 To market, to market.

Keep it clean, book freaks.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, Sans-Culottes (except for the Book Thread) at July 24, 2022 10:59 AM (Dc2NZ)

254 Sorry, Bill. Pete Rose never should be admitted.

Posted by: Hadrian the Seventh at July 24, 2022 10:56 AM (JVuoD)

Nor Barry Bonds, or any of the other juicers.

Posted by: BignJames at July 24, 2022 11:00 AM (AwYPR)

255 My grandson, who is almost 13 and an advanced reader, is interested in learning about WW1. Any suggestions for books?
Posted by: TecumsehTea at July 24, 2022 09:14 AM (BjGT6)

Like everyone else has recommended, Barbara Tuchman's 'The Guns of August' is excellent. But, it must be placed in context by 'The Proud Tower' and 'The Zimmerman Telegram' to explain how Europe got to that terrible spot in August 1914, and what eventually happened afterwards.

I found John Keegan's 'The First World War' a succinct and gripping history. I have not seen his 'Illustrated History...' but like all of Keegan's work, probably wonderful.

Churchill's history 'The World Crisis' (6 volumes), like Tuchman's, encompasses not only the foundations of the War, but expands upon the results and poisonous remnants that would fester into being again just 20 years after. Churchill wrote it while he was "in the wilderness" in the time between the Wars, and had good recollections not only of the persons involved, many of whom he knew personally, but of the deliberations and issues weighed, because he was involved in many or spoke with those involved.

Above all, I suggest a map!

Posted by: Brewingfrog at July 24, 2022 11:01 AM (yz7X2)

256 248. Good for you! The adult oriented ones around here are pretentious, virtue signaling, far left garbage and include "hopes for the planet" and other bullshit messages.

Posted by: CN at July 24, 2022 11:02 AM (ONvIw)

257
Seeing videos of idiot teachers discussing / sharing their relationship horrors with students causes ne to ask, "Whatever happened to having the teacher simply read a book aloud to a class?" I remember that occurring clear up through sixth grade back in the day.

Of course, the choice of what to read by teachers in the field today in all likelihood would be a horror of its own.

Posted by: Krebs v Carnot: Epic Battle of the Cycling Stars at July 24, 2022 11:03 AM (ZvxPV)

258 My grandson, who is almost 13 and an advanced reader, is interested in learning about WW1. Any suggestions for books?
Posted by: TecumsehTea

See if you can find a biography of Edith Cavell, an English nurse who was running a hospital in Brussels when the Germans invaded, and was also part of a spy network running an underground escape route for down British flyers. She was caught and executed by the Germans.

Posted by: Wethal at July 24, 2022 11:04 AM (ZzVCK)

259 Today I found a new editor for my blog posts, but he's just as much of a dumbfuck as my last editor. Don't expect any improvements.

Posted by: Dr. Bone at July 24, 2022 10:16 AM (0ocXn)

Probably using the same dude I use. lol

Posted by: Berserker-Dragonheads Division at July 24, 2022 11:07 AM (VwHCD)

260 My grandson, who is almost 13 and an advanced reader, is interested in learning about WW1. Any suggestions for books?
=====

Another Tuchman recommendation here. My biggest mistake with my kids was to overwhelm them with too much information and so many books that they just turned it all off. Pick one readable and reliable general overview. The great simplicity of that approach is that Tuchman, like others, has good bibliographies, etc. if the kid wants to read anything else. Discovery on their own is the greatest gift we could give.

Posted by: mustbequantum at July 24, 2022 11:07 AM (MIKMs)

261 Taro Tsujimoto, have you finished "Children of Time?"

Cause that ending, man, it sits wrong even though it's right

Posted by: People's Hippo Voice at July 24, 2022 11:07 AM (Zf0+a)

262 256 248. Good for you! The adult oriented ones around here are pretentious, virtue signaling, far left garbage and include "hopes for the planet" and other bullshit messages.
Posted by: CN

If the contents bother you, why torture yourself by looking?
Or start your own and stock it with books you find interesting and see who bites.

Posted by: nurse ratched at July 24, 2022 11:07 AM (U2p+3)

263 Japanese Meteorological Agency says Sakurajima volcano on Kyushu island has erupted.

Posted by: andycanuck (yikp0) at July 24, 2022 11:08 AM (yikp0)

264 Japanese Meteorological Agency says Sakurajima volcano on Kyushu island has erupted.
Posted by: andycanuck (yikp0) at July 24, 2022 11:08 AM (yikp0)

Hey! I had beans last night.

Sorry about that one.

Posted by: Godzilla, Pissed Off and Gassy at July 24, 2022 11:12 AM (R/m4+)

265 If you want to go political, then go for it. But why be mean?

Posted by: nurse ratched at July 24, 2022 10:52 AM (U2p+3)
---
I'm too lazy to do it, but I think about it because so many of the houses also have "Hate Has No Home Here" and "Wherever You're From, You're Welcome" translated into Spanish and Arabic.

Next to the rainbow-themed "We Believe..." signs, so it's not like I would introducing politics to the neighborhood.

Posted by: Ace-Endorsed Author A.H. Lloyd at July 24, 2022 11:12 AM (llXky)

266
I remember having read to us in fourth grade a story of kid detectives where one of the clues was a parrot who spoke the phrase "To, to, to be or not to, to, to be." At first they thought it had been deliberately taught to stutter that line from "Hamlet", but then one of them figured out that it really was an address, 222B. Does any of this sound familiar to folks here? If so, what was the story?

Posted by: Krebs v Carnot: Epic Battle of the Cycling Stars at July 24, 2022 11:13 AM (ZvxPV)

267 Two WWI books for yutes I recommend are "Fighting the Flying Circus" about Eddie Rickenbacker and "The Balloon Buster" about Frank Luke. I enjoyed them as a kid, as did my children. The grandchildren are closing in on the age to read them now.

Posted by: Pastor Charles the Simple at July 24, 2022 11:13 AM (moMmw)

268 262. I'll look if I want to and see what sort of propaganda is being distributed. The idea that these boxes are all benign is simply wrong, and I am not torturing myself. We also don't let the grandsons go to these things and look at the CRT and LGTBQ propaganda mixed in for kids.
The only torture is nonsense that it's mean to look and see what is being spread about in these free exchanges. Maybe there are areas where it's safe but I think the local ones need curating. Not everyone is well-intentioned.

Posted by: CN at July 24, 2022 11:14 AM (ONvIw)

269 Next to the rainbow-themed "We Believe..." signs, so it's not like I would introducing politics to the neighborhood.
Posted by: Ace-Endorsed Author A.H. Lloyd at July 24, 2022 11:12 AM (llXky)

One of my neighbors has a sign that is a USA map flag abd tge words "Socialism has no home here"

Posted by: vmom stabby stabby stabby stabby stabamillion at July 24, 2022 11:14 AM (kf6Ak)

270 Our a/c quit working on Wednesday. The earliest a technician can come to look at it is August 2nd.

Posted by: Debby Doberman Schultz at July 24, 2022 10:40 AM (a4EWo)

What exactly quit on it? Is it turning on at all,but blowing hot air, or does it just not turn on?

Posted by: Berserker-Dragonheads Division at July 24, 2022 11:14 AM (VwHCD)

271 Having read a dozen or so books about what we now call WWI the big lesson I take away from my studies is, everyone knew it was coming, but no one knew when or where.

Thanks for the thread Perfesser!

Posted by: gourmand du jour, 59 degrees and foggy at July 24, 2022 11:15 AM (jTmQV)

272 Next to the rainbow-themed "We Believe..." signs, so it's not like I would introducing politics to the neighborhood.
Posted by: Ace-Endorsed Author A.H. Lloyd at July 24, 2022 11:12 AM (llXky)

Exactly. The local lib pressure groups, especially the LGTBQs, were quick to see these boxes as an opportunity.

Posted by: CN at July 24, 2022 11:16 AM (ONvIw)

273 Love the book thread. Thanks much, Perfessor. Just added three recommendations made here to my Kindle.

Posted by: Notorious BFD at July 24, 2022 11:17 AM (Xrfse)

274 Frank of the 27th Aero Squadron

Skip, alumni of the 27th Fighter Squadron

Posted by: Skip at July 24, 2022 11:18 AM (2JoB8)

275 Just added three recommendations made here to my Kindle.

Posted by: Notorious BFD at July 24, 2022 11:17 AM (Xrfse)


This thread is spendy.

Posted by: grammie winger at July 24, 2022 11:18 AM (45fpk)

276 > It's a bit unfair to blame the average Pierre for the mess - what could he possibly do when the commanders were sitting in their various HQs far from the front with no idea of what was going on?

In the words of a famous online parody, France is only successful in war when the troops are not led by French commanders.

For example, a Corsican, or a fourteen-year-old girl.

Posted by: Dopey Joe Biden at July 24, 2022 11:18 AM (bW8dp)

277 269. Love it. Not long ago there were virtue signal signs "A CRT reader lives here" on some local lawns. These people are only too happy to add books/propaganda.

Posted by: CN at July 24, 2022 11:19 AM (ONvIw)

278 Having read a dozen or so books about what we now call WWI the big lesson I take away from my studies is, everyone knew it was coming, but no one knew when or where.

Thanks for the thread Perfesser!

Posted by: gourmand du jour, 59 degrees and foggy at July 24, 2022 11:15 AM (jTmQV)
---
Wars are a lot like forest fires - the specific ignition is not as important as the conditions that lead to the blaze.

Oddly, conditions here seem to be improving simply because the degree is fail is so obvious. If the administration still had 45 percent approval, I'd be worried that their overreach might stick, but no one wants to hook a tow line to a sinking ship.

The Feds stepping in on the Zeldin assassination attempt is also a positive sign that someone in DoJ recognizes that if attacking federal officials is now considered "local law enforcement," you're going to get a lot more of it in places you may not like.

Posted by: Ace-Endorsed Author A.H. Lloyd at July 24, 2022 11:19 AM (llXky)

279 Next to the rainbow-themed "We Believe..." signs, so it's not like I would introducing politics to the neighborhood.
Posted by: Ace-Endorsed Author A.H. Lloyd at July 24, 2022 11:12 AM (llXky)

You could always slip in a few copies of The Constitution.

Posted by: nurse ratched at July 24, 2022 11:19 AM (U2p+3)

280 TonyPete... outstanding job. That looks like a wonderful place to sit and enjoy a good book.

Posted by: Dopey Joe Biden at July 24, 2022 11:19 AM (bW8dp)

281 >>> 113 Seems an obvious fake quote.

Posted by: CN at July 24, 2022 09:49 AM (ONvIw)
---
It''s from Stuff Jefferson Said, Vol. XVII, University of Virginia Press, 1956. There were only 200 copies printing and they haven't been digitized yet. MSU had one in the 90s, and I photocopied the page, but the book's been stolen and I lost the copy, but I did write it down in a term paper.
Posted by: Ace-Endorsed Author A.H. Lloyd at July 24, 2022 09:52 AM (llXky)

Where can I find a copy of Stuff Dave in Texas Said?

Posted by: Helena Handbasket at July 24, 2022 11:20 AM (llON8)

282 Early on I learned not to ask him to "proofread" something because he'd immediately demand the text he was supposed to compare it to.
Posted by: Ace-Endorsed Author A.H. Lloyd at July 24, 2022 10:32 AM (llXky)


Thanxs Ace-Endorsed.
I actually did not know that about editing and proofreading.
Dang...the stuff one learns here.

Posted by: Diogenes at July 24, 2022 11:20 AM (anj39)

283 And another nice thread. Thank ya kindly, Perfesser.

Posted by: Just Some Guy at July 24, 2022 11:21 AM (JzDjf)

284 Love it. Not long ago there were virtue signal signs "A CRT reader lives here" on some local lawns. These people are only too happy to add books/propaganda.

Posted by: CN at July 24, 2022 11:19 AM (ONvIw)
---
Yard sign Calvinists - by their signs they are saved.

Posted by: Ace-Endorsed Author A.H. Lloyd at July 24, 2022 11:21 AM (llXky)

285 This thread is spendy.

Sure is!

Posted by: Notorious BFD at July 24, 2022 11:22 AM (Xrfse)

286 This thread is spendy.
Posted by: grammie winger at July 24, 2022 11:18 AM (45fpk)
---
Can you really put a price on great reading?

Posted by: "Perfessor" Squirrel at July 24, 2022 11:23 AM (K5n5d)

287 Yard sign Calvinists - by their signs they are saved.

Posted by: Ace-Endorsed Author A.H. Lloyd at July 24, 2022 11:21 AM (llXky)


They are saviors, chastising me for my sins.

Posted by: grammie winger at July 24, 2022 11:23 AM (45fpk)

288 "A CRT reader lives here"
---
A cathode-ray tube reader?

Didn't that used to be called "watching television?"

Posted by: "Perfessor" Squirrel at July 24, 2022 11:24 AM (K5n5d)

289 > I've heard it said that if you really want to get rich during a gold rush, sell picks, shovels, and other mining gear.

Sure, or just about anything, really. Ask Levi Strauss about that.

I've heard that at one point, people were making a buck by sending laundry from California to Hawaii *by sailing ship* to be washed by Chinese laundrymen. Not exactly One Hour Martinizing.


Posted by: Dopey Joe Biden at July 24, 2022 11:24 AM (bW8dp)

290 Perfect timing! My copy of Mao's Little Red Book and the Odes (aka Most Venerable Book) just arrived.

They shall be waiting for me upon my return from Mass.

Posted by: Ace-Endorsed Author A.H. Lloyd at July 24, 2022 11:24 AM (llXky)

291 Yard sign Calvinists - by their signs they are saved.
=====

Antifa won't burn your house down if you have the right signs. /s

Posted by: mustbequantum at July 24, 2022 11:25 AM (MIKMs)

292 Believe the SCIENCE! Except when billions of dollars in Alzheimer's research appears has been wasted on fraud.

From Science:

https://bit.ly/3Oxwr5g

I particularly like this quote: You can cheat to get a degree. You can cheat to get a grant. But you can't cheat to beat a disease.

Posted by: motionview, divisive arch-conservative at July 24, 2022 11:25 AM (1fZmp)

293 Can you really put a price on great reading?

Posted by: "Perfessor" Squirrel at July 24, 2022 11:23 AM (K5n5d)


*looks in pockets*

What can I get for a buck eighty-nine?

Posted by: grammie winger at July 24, 2022 11:25 AM (45fpk)

294 . . . Is it a perfect system? No, but my friends have made great suggestions and caught some stuff I just missed after proofing.
What's your method for proofing?
Posted by: Secret Squirrel, author of sci fi, kids books and one silly army play on Amazon at July 24, 2022


***
Reading the text aloud -- usually to myself, but I have an actor's ear, and a line of dialogue that sounds clunky usually is. Miss Linda reads the stuff and comments. For years I relied on my writing group, which met once a week. Now we are down to 2 people besides me every 2 weeks, and I don't know if they have anything else to show or teach me. It's time to find, or start, a new one.

Posted by: Wolfus Aurelius at July 24, 2022 11:25 AM (c6xtn)

295 Late here. Hi All, thanks Squirrel!

WWI: SLA Marshall's book on WWI is a really good one-volume account.

John Buchan has a whole series, very traditional.

Tuchman, of course. Pershing's 2-volume memoirs. And of course, my own account about my grandfather, includes his WWI service: "Combat Engineer".

Posted by: goatexchange at July 24, 2022 11:25 AM (APPN8)

296 " Next to the rainbow-themed "We Believe..." signs, so it's not like I would introducing politics to the neighborhood. "

The virtue signalers abound in my neighborhood. One beautifully landscaped yard uses them like lawn ornaments.

Posted by: Tuna at July 24, 2022 11:26 AM (gLRfa)

297 I've been re-reading Larry Correia's Monster Hunter series again, though I'm really looking forward to the rumored new books in his Grimnoir series (not that his other series aren't great, but Grimnoir hasn't had anything out for a while).

"Just how many gun laws does this thing break?"

"...All of them."


Also: FJB sock off.


Posted by: Rodrigo Borgia at July 24, 2022 11:27 AM (bW8dp)

298 >>Where can I find a copy of Stuff Dave in Texas Said?

Here.

https://daveintexas.wordpress.com

Posted by: JackStraw at July 24, 2022 11:27 AM (ZLI7S)

299
A CRT reader lives here


Big deal. Anyone can read closed captioning on an older television screen

Posted by: Krebs v Carnot: Epic Battle of the Cycling Stars at July 24, 2022 11:29 AM (ZvxPV)

300 WWI: SLA Marshall's book on WWI is a really good one-volume account.

Posted by: goatexchange at July 24, 2022 11:25 AM (APPN
---
My dad gave me the four-volume American Heritage boxed set on American wars. I'm not a fan of SLA Marshall in general, and my grandmother said that when they lived on the same street he was a total jerk.

As part of my chapter on WW II I got out the American Heritage book on it and was really disappointed. Total hack job, FDR-worshipping propaganda that in the "road to war" section included the grotesque lie that 40% of Franco's troops in Spain were German or Italian.

Nice pictures, though.

Posted by: Ace-Endorsed Author A.H. Lloyd at July 24, 2022 11:29 AM (llXky)

301 I've been re-reading Larry Correia's Monster Hunter series again, though I'm really looking forward to the rumored new books in his Grimnoir series (not that his other series aren't great, but Grimnoir hasn't had anything out for a while).

"Just how many gun laws does this thing break?"

"...All of them."

Posted by: Rodrigo Borgia at July 24, 2022 11:27 AM (bW8dp)
---
I think the newest one in MHI is supposed to be released on Tuesday, July 26. Looking forward to reading it, though I still have several entries to read first...(Alpha was my last one in MHI).

Posted by: "Perfessor" Squirrel at July 24, 2022 11:29 AM (K5n5d)

302 Two WWI books for yutes I recommend are "Fighting the Flying Circus" about Eddie Rickenbacker and "The Balloon Buster" about Frank Luke. I enjoyed them as a kid, as did my children. The grandchildren are closing in on the age to read them now.
Posted by: Pastor Charles the Simple at July 24, 2022 11:13 AM (moMmw)

I read those as a kid as well. Loved them!
Made the mistake of mentioning Rickenbacker to Les, the old guy at the airport where I grew up. He and I would rebuild old airplanes. It was the only time I ever heard Les swear. He hated Rickenbacher. Called him a cowardly SOB. Apparently Les flew in a neighboring squadron. Said Rickenbacher would only fight if he had the sun and angles. Would dive, shoot, and run. Would never stick around for the fight.
It was a growing experience for my tender little ears.

Posted by: Diogenes at July 24, 2022 11:29 AM (anj39)

303 284. Living in a university town is a very mixed blessing. Many of the people want to lecture every waking hour.

I didn't mind this as much when they were discussing art, literature and music. The landscape has changed.

The syllabi have changed too. Literature and art are focused heavily on contemporary themes and are political.
It was a shock to learn how narrow-minded things ahve become and what it excluded in the search for anti-racism. Hemingway, Wilder, Wolfe, and many others are considered unusable and controversial.

Posted by: CN at July 24, 2022 11:30 AM (ONvIw)

304 It''s from Stuff Jefferson Said, Vol. XVII, University of Virginia Press, 1956. There were only 200 copies printing and they haven't been digitized yet. MSU had one in the 90s, and I photocopied the page, but the book's been stolen and I lost the copy, but I did write it down in a term paper.
Posted by: Ace-Endorsed Author A.H. Lloyd at July 24, 2022 09:52 AM (llXky)


The UW also had a copy back in the early 80s. I found it in the Suzzallo stacks and used it as the basis for a paper I wrote for a US/Poli Sci class. Since there's been interests in finding the book I checked the UW Library system website but alas, the volume seems to have disappeared.

Posted by: LASue at July 24, 2022 11:32 AM (Ed8Zd)

305 Living in a university town is a very mixed blessing. Many of the people want to lecture every waking hour.

Posted by: CN at July 24, 2022 11:30 AM (ONvIw)
---
And yet the required readings at SBS were still pretty traditional. It was reassuring.

I need to get back into the habit of going downtown late in the semester to pick up books on clearance.

Posted by: Ace-Endorsed Author A.H. Lloyd at July 24, 2022 11:33 AM (llXky)

306 Re: SLAM. Yeah, I totally get that. I have a real problem with SLAM on many levels. For example, his "The Battle of the Bulge: The First Eight Days" is a total 101st Airborne love-fest, and doesn't mention engineers or Peiper AT ALL. So I hate him for that.
However, I DO think his writing style is amazing, and I love to read him, even if I disagree.
Also, he is buried in the Fort Bliss Army cemetery, around the corner from my parents. So I visit him when i am in the neighborhood.

Posted by: goatexchange at July 24, 2022 11:34 AM (APPN8)

307
Next to the rainbow-themed "We Believe..." signs, so it's not like I would introducing politics to the neighborhood.
Posted by: Ace-Endorsed Author A.H. Lloyd


A good glue and some time spent in clamps would render the pages of the more egregious tomes inoperable.

Posted by: Krebs v Carnot: Epic Battle of the Cycling Stars at July 24, 2022 11:35 AM (ZvxPV)

308 Yard sign Calvinists - by their signs they are saved.
=====

Antifa won't burn your house down if you have the right signs. /s
Posted by: mustbequantum at July 24, 2022 11:25 AM (MIKMs)

“On that same night I will pass through [MAGA] and strike down every firstborn of both people and animals, and I will bring judgment on all the [gun-loving God-lovers]. The ["We believe"] will be a sign for you on the houses where you are, and when I see the sign, I will pass over you. No Antifa will touch you when I strike [MAGA]."

The Bible, New Inclusive Edition.

Posted by: Wethal at July 24, 2022 11:35 AM (ZzVCK)

309 > I think the newest one in MHI is supposed to be released on Tuesday, July 26.

Hmm... I'm not seeing it. Title?

Posted by: Rodrigo Borgia at July 24, 2022 11:35 AM (bW8dp)

310 The UW also had a copy back in the early 80s. I found it in the Suzzallo stacks and used it as the basis for a paper I wrote for a US/Poli Sci class. Since there's been interests in finding the book I checked the UW Library system website but alas, the volume seems to have disappeared.

Posted by: LASue at July 24, 2022 11:32 AM (Ed8Zd)
---
Such a shame. I loved that book.

Posted by: Ace-Endorsed Author A.H. Lloyd at July 24, 2022 11:35 AM (llXky)

311 The Courage of the Early Morning [a saying of Napoleon's BTW] biography of 'Billy' Bishop, 72 kills confirmed, Canadian RFC fighter pilot, written by his son. Link in my sock. Goodreads banned URL.

I read it as a teen; suitable for younger readers.

https://tinyurl.com/2p9cakea

Posted by: andycanuck (yikp0) at July 24, 2022 11:36 AM (yikp0)

312 305. One of the things some people here like to do is look through the stuff the students leave behind which is tossed out in shallow bins near the dorms. Seems very few Princeton students bother reselling books and many just leave them to be thrown out by the custodial staff.

Posted by: CN at July 24, 2022 11:36 AM (ONvIw)

313 I'm reading Western Self-Contempt by Benedict Beckeld. It's pretty jargon-free, so anyone can dive in. It's about how empires rot from within before they implode--what we are doing now, or what some are doing now. I guess it happens in every civilization, so man parallels with what's happening in the West. Recommended!

Also I'm writing some short stories from a more right-leaning perspective. If I'm allowed to mention it, my substack is Fiction 451. Come visit! I hope to get a collection together and publish.

Posted by: Ultra pj at July 24, 2022 11:37 AM (G1dq6)

314 Well, it's time. Thanks again "Perfesser"!

I'll probably have thoughts about Mao next week.

Posted by: Ace-Endorsed Author A.H. Lloyd at July 24, 2022 11:37 AM (llXky)

315 278 AHL

RE: Zeldin

It's scandalous to me that the attacker wasn't immediately charged federally & detained.

I may very well be paranoid, but I suspect the 24-hour delay may have had to do with DOJ Main Justice bosses considering that not charging THIS man could make a future attempt to put someone in the electric chair (for attacking a leftist) LOOK bad.

Not lodging a federal detainer immediately under these circumstances would've been very unusual in my experience.

Posted by: mnw at July 24, 2022 11:38 AM (NLIak)

316 I think the newest one in MHI is supposed to be released on Tuesday, July 26.

Hmm... I'm not seeing it. Title?

Posted by: Rodrigo Borgia at July 24, 2022 11:35 AM (bW8dp)
---
Monster Hunter Bloodlines, though it looks like it may have been out already in some form or another...(Amazon says it's published on 7/26/2022, but reviewers have already read it...)

Posted by: "Perfessor" Squirrel at July 24, 2022 11:38 AM (K5n5d)

317 Here's an emphatic book recommendation from my children: The Vanderbeekers of 141st Street by Karina Von Glaser. We just finished it as a read-aloud last night, and they were regularly laughing out loud at the big, fun, biracial family living in Harlem. This book introduces the family to us in the course of their attempt to save their home. My four children always appreciate families that aren't the typical 2.3 kids and a dog, and the book is astoundingly well written, especially compared to what is on offer these days. Check it out!

Posted by: Catherine at July 24, 2022 11:38 AM (ZSsrh)

318 I've been reading Fredric Brown's old school noir novel, "Here Comes a Candle".

Brown's better known for his SF, but he wrote several crime/noir novels.

He has a nice direct style and his people seem like people. Very naturalistic set up and development of plot and entertainingly written. Except-

He must've gotten tired of his own style cuz he plops in chapters written like radio plays or film scripts, etc, etc randomly between chapters written in his normal style. There's been no pay off so far or reason for this as far as I can see, and I'm just about at the end.

Maybe I'll be surprised. But, I think I know where the plot is going.

Check his books out in general. Nice clean writing meant to be entertaining.

If you find Brown's fripperies in "HCaC" to be a bit tiresome, well...you're not alone. But, it's still a good read.

Posted by: naturalfake at July 24, 2022 11:39 AM (5NkmN)

319 > Monster Hunter Bloodlines, though it looks like it may have been out already in some form or another...

Ah... yeah, already have that one on Kindle. Thanks!


Posted by: Rodrigo Borgia at July 24, 2022 11:39 AM (bW8dp)

320 >>> 316 I think the newest one in MHI is supposed to be released on Tuesday, July 26.

Hmm... I'm not seeing it. Title?

Posted by: Rodrigo Borgia at July 24, 2022 11:35 AM (bW8dp)
---
Monster Hunter Bloodlines, though it looks like it may have been out already in some form or another...(Amazon says it's published on 7/26/2022, but reviewers have already read it...)

Posted by: "Perfessor" Squirrel at July 24, 2022 11:38 AM (K5n5d)

I bet it's the paperback edition. I've noticed quite a lag from when his Kindle / hardcover versions are released and the paperbacks; haven't paid enough attention to see if that's typical of books in general.

Posted by: Helena Handbasket at July 24, 2022 11:42 AM (llON8)

321 Monster Hunter Bloodlines, though it looks like it may have been out already in some form or another...(Amazon says it's published on 7/26/2022, but reviewers have already read it...)

Posted by: "Perfessor" Squirrel at July 24, 2022 11:38 AM (K5n5d)

Corriea participated quite heavily in the 'early access reading... copy(?)'. EARC, I think they call it. You can download the book before the editing is officially done and when some small changes might still be made.

Posted by: Aetius451AD at July 24, 2022 11:45 AM (dNqv+)

322 It's the 'self-published' stigma. If I were signed to a traditional house, then I'd feel like a real writer. Publishing on Amazon (which sells books about women fucking dinosaurs, for heaven's sake!) makes me feel like a cheat.
Posted by: Mary Poppins' Practically Perfect Piercing at July 24, 2022 09:19 AM (AW0uW)


There are a number of authors who have set up their own publishing houses for just that reason.

David (the) Good is one, with Good Books Publishing. He does his own books, does his own art and covers, and recently started helping with the editing of other people's books.

I think this is the wave of the future in the face of a lot of the gatekeeprs. It will either become the dominant theme, or Samizdat

Posted by: Kindltot at July 24, 2022 11:47 AM (xhaym)

323 Frederic Brown is great. The Mind Thing is excellent SF, but the one book I keep returning to is neither SF nor noir. It's called Night of the Jabberwock, and the whole story happens during the course of a single drunken night. I read it every few years, because I keep wanting to experience that night again.

Posted by: Splunge at July 24, 2022 11:48 AM (cm/80)

324 Wonder if JJ is in Wisconsin.

When someone arrives there, is it customary to cut the cheese ?

Posted by: JT at July 24, 2022 11:49 AM (T4tVD)

325 Back to my Robert Service book. I always enjoyed his Yukon work, the war related poems can be very graphic and sad. I know he wrote some fiction, but I have yet to read any of it. The descriptions don't sound appealing

Posted by: CN at July 24, 2022 11:49 AM (ONvIw)

326 New shows/movies- We enjoyed "The Old Man" and also "The Offer" on Paramount + about the backstory of the making of The Godfather from Al Ruddy's perspective. Interesting how the actors (with 2 exceptions) were one of the least important things...

Posted by: LASue at July 24, 2022 11:50 AM (Ed8Zd)

327 Haven't read it in a while but because of the art thread I have started to re-read Sister Wendy's History of Painting again.

Posted by: Anti doesn't matter at July 24, 2022 11:50 AM (+4XNm)

328 One of the things some people here like to do is look through the stuff the students leave behind which is tossed out in shallow bins near the dorms. Seems very few Princeton students bother reselling books and many just leave them to be thrown out by the custodial staff.
Posted by: CN at July 24, 2022 11:36 AM (ONvIw)

Garbage In, Garbage Out.

Posted by: LeRoy Williams, School Janitor, Union 781 at July 24, 2022 11:51 AM (R/m4+)

329 Posted by: LASue at July 24, 2022 11:50 AM (Ed8Zd)

Nobody told me there was going to be a second season of The Old Man. I wanted them to wrap it up in the finale.

Posted by: Anti doesn't matter at July 24, 2022 11:52 AM (+4XNm)

330 Hiya Cannibal !

I know you're in here, I can smell the Wildroot hair Tonic on yer lunch !

Posted by: JT at July 24, 2022 11:52 AM (T4tVD)

331 Said Rickenbacher would only fight if he had the sun and angles. Would dive, shoot, and run. Would never stick around for the fight.
It was a growing experience for my tender little ears.
Posted by: Diogenes

Well, it ain't horse shoes.

Posted by: Anonosaurus Wrecks, Now the Summer of Our Discontent at July 24, 2022 11:53 AM (FVME7)

332 Said Rickenbacher would only fight if he had the sun and angles. Would dive, shoot, and run. Would never stick around for the fight.
It was a growing experience for my tender little ears.
Posted by: Diogenes

discretion is the better part of valor

Posted by: Anti doesn't matter at July 24, 2022 11:56 AM (+4XNm)

333 That seems a more fitting name.
Posted by: Muldoon at July 24, 2022 10:19 AM (kXYt5)


Almost portolan

Posted by: Kindltot at July 24, 2022 11:58 AM (xhaym)

334 WWI: SLA Marshall's book on WWI is a really good one-volume account.

Posted by: goatexchange

Another good one volume history, even if a Stacy Abrams sized volume, is A World Undone by G.J. Meyer. 708 pages.

Posted by: Anonosaurus Wrecks, Now the Summer of Our Discontent at July 24, 2022 11:59 AM (FVME7)

335 I just bought the free kindle version of Service's The Trail of '98 A Northland Romance. The House of Fear looked too gruesome and had a werewolf theme, so passed.

Posted by: CN at July 24, 2022 11:59 AM (ONvIw)

336 Diogenes, if by "coward" Les meant that Rickenbacker discovered the way to shoot down a lot of planes was to have the sun and the angle, then dive, shoot, and run, then every fighter pilot in WWII was a coward. Almost to a man, surviving pilots said that to live, you tried not to have a turning fight with a Zero. You dove, shot, and skedaddled. Now, Rickenbacker was hated by those who survived at sea with him when their transport was shot down in WWII, but that has some nuance as well.

Posted by: Pastor Charles the Simple at July 24, 2022 12:00 PM (moMmw)

337 I know JoeF is reading the same book right now - Stalin's War, by Sean McMeekin - but I don't know if he does the book thread.

About 1/3 of the way in, and while sometimes it seems like Sean is trying too hard to make the facts fit his thesis, it's full of interesting and new (to me) things.

Like the planning and discussions in the UK and France about aerial attacks on Soviet oil infrastructure in Azerbaijan, to disrupt German oil supply. Attacks would be launched from Iraq and Syria. Two photo recon missions were actually flown, one over Baku and one over Batumi (the Black Sea Georgian port where some oil was exported).

Author has lots to cover and doesn't dwell much on this aspect, but I wish he'd tried to discuss how such an "unprovoked" attack on a huge world power would have ever possibly actually been launched by the UK and France of the time, which had their hands rather full as it was. But interesting.

Posted by: rhomboid at July 24, 2022 12:00 PM (OTzUX)

338 "I've heard it said that if you really want to get rich during a gold rush, sell picks, shovels, and other mining gear."

Wheelbarrows FTW.

Posted by: John Mohler Studebaker at July 24, 2022 12:01 PM (2QZjP)

339 We Haz a Nood

Posted by: Skip advising you of your Nood threads at July 24, 2022 12:01 PM (2JoB8)

340 Frederic Brown is great. The Mind Thing is excellent SF, but the one book I keep returning to is neither SF nor noir. It's called Night of the Jabberwock, and the whole story happens during the course of a single drunken night. I read it every few years, because I keep wanting to experience that night again.
Posted by: Splunge at July 24, 2022 11:48 AM (cm/80)


I've got "NotJ" on Kindle to read next.

Don't think I've read "TMT" before, I'll have to check it out.

Posted by: naturalfake at July 24, 2022 12:01 PM (5NkmN)

341 Made the mistake of mentioning Rickenbacker to Les, the old guy at the airport where I grew up. He and I would rebuild old airplanes. It was the only time I ever heard Les swear. He hated Rickenbacher. Called him a cowardly SOB. Apparently Les flew in a neighboring squadron. Said Rickenbacher would only fight if he had the sun and angles. Would dive, shoot, and run. Would never stick around for the fight.
It was a growing experience for my tender little ears.
Posted by: Diogenes at July 24, 2022 11:29 AM (anj39)

IIANM, this is a pretty common attitude during the gun era (WWI, II and Korea) among the top tier Aces. Remember the point is to kill the enemy, not engage in a long, hard fought dogfight that you barely manage to win. There was an ace on the eastern front in WWII who did the exact same thing you describe. It may not be romantic and sportsmanlike, but war is not a game.

Posted by: Aetius451AD at July 24, 2022 12:01 PM (dNqv+)

342 Hiya Cannibal !

-
Didja see that you've convinced the NYT?

The New York Times@nytimes
Cannibalism has a time and a place. Some recent books, films and shows suggest that the time is now. Can you stomach it?

Posted by: Anonosaurus Wrecks, Now the Summer of Our Discontent at July 24, 2022 12:02 PM (FVME7)

343 My grandson, who is almost 13 and an advanced reader, is interested in learning about WW1. Any suggestions for books?
Posted by: TecumsehTea


I have a number of memoirs of WWI that were written and printed during that war, and I was later clued in on that they were probably also subsidized propaganda by both the British and the Wilson administration. You might want to let him in on the fact that a lot of the works of the time may be heavily slanted.

Posted by: Kindltot at July 24, 2022 12:03 PM (xhaym)

344 The thinking person's thread has arrived.


AKA



NOOD!!!!!

Posted by: Village Idiot's Apprentice at July 24, 2022 12:04 PM (1n+EO)

345 My ignorance of WWI is scandalous, worse even than many of other yawning gaps, but I did find The Sorrow and the Beauty, by Peter Englund, very eye-opening and engaging.

Follows the experiences of a dozen or so wildly diverse individuals on all sides (and the number of "sides" is part of the fascination).

The elite Venezuelan cavalry officer fighting for the Ottomans (and his growing unease at Turkish depredations against Christians in the Caucasus) might be the most amazing of them. Highly recommended, at least to those just starting on WWI.

Posted by: rhomboid at July 24, 2022 12:05 PM (OTzUX)

346 349: When my brother and his friends started getting interested in the two world wars, there were books available on individual battles. They read a lot of those and particularly the ones with maps, so they could set up their little green men and try to reenact on the bedroom floor.

Posted by: CN at July 24, 2022 12:06 PM (ONvIw)

347 I've been reading the Pern books in chronological order. They started out as science fiction with the discovery and colonization of the planet, then devolved to fantasy as technology stagnated to a medieval level after successive waves of destructive phenomena, and finally it's returning to science fiction now that the old technology, buried for 2500 years, has been rediscovered. Fun ride.
Posted by: All Hail Eris, Analog Hipster at July 24, 2022 09:03 AM (Dc2NZ)

Was the fall in technology accompanied by a rise in magic? Or do the events in the "fantasy" realm have naturalistic explanations?

Posted by: Alberta Oil Peon at July 24, 2022 12:08 PM (2QZjP)

348 Back to my Robert Service book. I always enjoyed his Yukon work, the war related poems can be very graphic and sad. I know he wrote some fiction, but I have yet to read any of it. The descriptions don't sound appealing
Posted by: CN
-------

I have a nice book of Robert Service poems. I refer to it now and again. I had, at one time, committed 'The Shooting of Dan McGrew' to memory. Under the influence of a couple of beers, a recitation was always entertaining for my beer-sodden friends.

Posted by: Mike Hammer, etc., etc. at July 24, 2022 12:09 PM (aex1q)

349 348. That and The Cremation of Sam McGee were popular choices for mandatory HS recitations as I recall. Fun and the storyline makes them memorable.

Posted by: CN at July 24, 2022 12:12 PM (ONvIw)

350 Greetings:

A perhaps somewhat dated proofreading technique was to read the text from right to left.

Spell-check might have killed it altogether.

Posted by: 11B40 at July 24, 2022 12:14 PM (uuklp)

351 [Regarding the Dragonrider of Pern]

Was the fall in technology accompanied by a rise in magic? Or do the events in the "fantasy" realm have naturalistic explanations?
Posted by: Alberta Oil Peon at July 24, 2022 12:08 PM (2QZjP)

There is no 'magic' in Pern, per se. Just dragons with unexplainable--yet clearly defined--abilities. (The books came from an age when telepathy and psionic powers were tropes of science fiction.) So, basically, the books are 'fantasy' because of dragons and the medeval-esque setting.

Posted by: Castle Guy at July 24, 2022 12:17 PM (Lhaco)

352 Greetings:

The cartography in today's books is usually sub-par which is depressing in view of all digital equipment and techniques available.

Posted by: 11B40 at July 24, 2022 12:17 PM (uuklp)

353 "261 Taro Tsujimoto, have you finished "Children of Time?"

Cause that ending, man, it sits wrong even though it's right"

‐----------

I loved it. It was disconcerting, which is perfect. It's viscerally uncomfortable to contemplate humanity in that humbling position.

Posted by: Taro Tsujimoto at July 24, 2022 12:45 PM (5YmYl)

354 Good for you! The adult oriented ones around here are pretentious, virtue signaling, far left garbage and include "hopes for the planet" and other bullshit messages.
Posted by: CN at July 24, 2022 11:02 AM (ONvIw)

Here's what to do: take photocopies of extremely funny or exciting passages from books by decidedly based authors, write the cite on the back, along with a note that says,"Tired of all this woke shit? Here's a new beginning for you." Slip copies of this into all the woke shitbooks you can find.

Might work in bookstores, too. Would get the Karens vibrating.

Posted by: Alberta Oil Peon at July 24, 2022 12:47 PM (y9OKG)

355 >>> 351 [Regarding the Dragonrider of Pern]

Was the fall in technology accompanied by a rise in magic? Or do the events in the "fantasy" realm have naturalistic explanations?
Posted by: Alberta Oil Peon at July 24, 2022 12:08 PM (2QZjP)

There is no 'magic' in Pern, per se. Just dragons with unexplainable--yet clearly defined--abilities. (The books came from an age when telepathy and psionic powers were tropes of science fiction.) So, basically, the books are 'fantasy' because of dragons and the medeval-esque setting.
Posted by: Castle Guy at July 24, 2022 12:17 PM (Lhaco)

Well there's also that whole teleportation-which-includes-time-traveling the dragons do. iirc it was Ben Bova who had a friendly argument with Anne McCaffrrey on how SF those abilities were or weren't.

Posted by: Helena Handbasket at July 24, 2022 12:55 PM (llON8)

356 There is no 'magic' in Pern, per se. Just dragons with unexplainable--yet clearly defined--abilities. (The books came from an age when telepathy and psionic powers were tropes of science fiction.) So, basically, the books are 'fantasy' because of dragons and the medeval-esque setting.
Posted by: Castle Guy at July 24, 2022 12:17 PM (Lhaco)

Thanks. That is a very sufficient answer.

Posted by: Alberta Oil Peon at July 24, 2022 01:00 PM (jt3rE)

357 Krebs, the book is the mystery of the stuttering parrot. Alfred Hitchcock and the three 8nv3stigators.

Posted by: Thomas Paine at July 24, 2022 01:17 PM (dsTxA)

358 "I know a pretty good amount about US history during the revolutionary war so it's highly illuminating to hear that history told from a British perspective."

An interesting fictional excursion along these lines are two novels by Robert Graves: "Sergeant Lamb's America," and "Proceed, Sergeant Lamb," detailing the adventures of young Redcoat in North America during the revolution. Graves' contempt for Americans is as apparent as his contempt for the Romans in his Claudius novels. Contempt for his subjects is a consistent feature in Graves' fiction. Check out his skewering of John Milton in "Wife to Mr. Milton."

Posted by: Brett at July 24, 2022 01:19 PM (bkFEe)

359 Investigators, jeez.

Posted by: Thomas Paine at July 24, 2022 01:24 PM (dsTxA)

360 Just here to tip my hat to Dave in Texas. RIP.

Posted by: Catch Thirty-Thr33 at July 24, 2022 02:02 PM (CdZ4i)

361 I get paid more than $85 every hour for working on the web. I found out about this activity 3 months prior and subsequent to joining this I have earned effectively $15k from this without having internet working abilities.
Simply give it a shot on the accompanying site... www.Salarycash1.com

Posted by: Sarah at July 24, 2022 04:33 PM (nzKxt)

362 11B40

I used to read from the bottom up when I did academic editing. Breaks up the flow so you see the mistakes.

Posted by: Ultra pj at July 24, 2022 04:45 PM (G1dq6)

363 "Brown's better known for his SF, but he wrote several crime/noir novels."

Fred Brown wrote more than a dozen mystery/thriller novels-the Ed and Am Hunter series alone has 7 in it, including the great, and Edger-award winning, "The Fabulous Clipjoint." Many, like most of his SF and the Ed & Am Hunter series, were comedic mysteries. Some, like "The Screaming Mimi" and "Knock Three, One, Two" are thrillers, and some are a bit surreahis shorts follow the same general pattern.

Brown began, like many pulp writers (Frank Gruber for instance) writing anything that would bring in a buck, but he soon graduated to the mystery pulps, and wrote dozens and dozens of mystery stories. Every few years someone starts a project to republish his "lost" works; recently it's been Haffner Press that is reprinting all his pulp stories-they have 2 vols out now, with more to come including a complete collection of the Ed and Am Hunter books.

Posted by: Pope John 20th at July 24, 2022 06:51 PM (xi3bI)

364 As for the complaint about Rickenbacker; in WW 1 aircraft had very limited ammo and fuel, so extended dogfights were a very bad idea. Even if you won a long dogfight, it left you vulnerable to the next opponent you met on the way home. Also, generally altitude, not maneuvering, is the winning tactic in aerial warfare. So the best tactic would be to get above your enemy, dive and shoot, and then climb again if you had fuel and ammo enough for a second round. BTW, most of the aircraft shot down by the high-scoring aces like von Richthofen were observation aircraft, bombers or greatly inferior fighter aircraft. Successful aces mostly didn't look for fair fights; the sobriquet Knights of the Air was mostly crap (and I also doubt real knights were great believers in fair fights).

Posted by: Pope John 20th at July 24, 2022 07:14 PM (xi3bI)

365 If you're diving into Fredric Brown's mysteries, don't miss THE FAR CRY.

I think an outfit called Bruin Books has been doing some of Brown's work in trade paperbacks, 2 novels per volume, with intros/afterwords by Barry Malzberg.

And bests to all.

Posted by: Just Some Guy at July 24, 2022 07:53 PM (JzDjf)

366 Great self published read is "Monkeys On The Road". Thirty thousand miles driving from the USA to South America with a 6-year-old kid in a camper van. Not overly dramatized in spite of passing thru civil disturbances, just a real tale of camper life abroad. Great pics too.

https://www.monkeysontheroad.com/

Posted by: Jacques Endabocks at July 24, 2022 08:51 PM (JcnFx)

367 Reading has been heavy duty - thanks to the heat of summer.

A Beautiful Mind. John Nash was a super genius but a pretty despicable man. Much like Alan Turing in that respect - but moreso. Then read the public domain book The Great God Pan (1894). Kind of a weird tale and mad scientist cycle. Pretty good. Then leafed through another public domain book 'A Handbook of Greek and Roman Mythology' which had a short section on Pan and other forest spirits. Real life crossover- the Red Army was trapped on Raate Road by Finnish ski forces. Many of the RA troops were from the east steppes. They got very spooked by the claustrophobic monochrome dense forest. A Rus officer recorded the troops saying-feeling oppressed by evil spirits - he knew about Pan and Pan's effect upon men. Panic.

Posted by: 13times at July 24, 2022 09:24 PM (GIDLr)

368 Read a short pamphlet posted at archive.org "Russian Strategic Culture" by Martti Kari. Read a Dan Simmons book "The Abominable". If you like mountain climber fiction then you'll probably like it. I don't like reading about mountain climbing or treks across Antarctica or the Arctic. Feats of Will over extreme environments just don't inspire me. I get it - it's hard to breath at Camp V through VII on the North Slope of Everest. Every foot-fall like a ton of lead. The cold air scalds your lungs. People die. Ropes snap like dental floss! So. Hard. To. Breath.

Posted by: 13times at July 24, 2022 09:39 PM (GIDLr)

369 Went through my ebooks 'The Red Decade' and 'Assignment in Utopia' and cleaned up my Clippings and Notes. For people using digital e-readers and into reading about the communist era 1900-1959ish. Both of the above books associate American and British communists-socialists with Comintern front groups they joined and belonged to. I was listing American reporters/journalists active in China 1920-1945 and found a number of them belonged to Fronts. Not surprising - but good luck finding those front group lists on contemporary websites. Reading about China leads to quotes from Agnes Smedley, and it's pretty obvious she's a bourgeois-commie idiot. But discovering her affiliations and recording them on a website is fulfilling.

Posted by: 13times at July 24, 2022 10:00 PM (GIDLr)

370 Probably the best book about World War I is Alistair Horne's THE PRICE OF GLORY, which is mostly about the Battle of Verdun but does an excellent job of showing how the French and Germans trapped each other in that hideous slaughterhouse, from the beginnings of the war in 1871 where France bungled the Franco-Prussian War to the horrible debacle of the Nivelle Offensive after Verdun. It's the middle book of a three-volume trilogy on the Franco-German wars, and most excellent.

As for Stross' THE FULLER MEMORANDUM, I think it is the best of his Laundry novels, which makes it his best novel, period.

Posted by: Wombat-socho at July 24, 2022 10:12 PM (CDNPI)

371 And very far upthread - yeah. William Shirer was a hardcore leftist. He wrote for us plebs because royalties from an art house book wouldn't feed the family. He wanted very much to be a part of the Euro-arts Bohemian crowd. The ironic part is the Brit Oxford-Cambridge historian clique hated TRAFOTTR. How dare a Yankee write such a thing. And unlettered! (tripos public school boys need only apply) accordingly.

Read his anthology "Twentieth Century Journey." He's a prickly little pear. Bruised easily. McCormick just doesn't appreciate his genius. Hubris, spite and contempt feature bigly. I'm not exaggerating. He really is a jerk-leftist.

Posted by: 13times at July 24, 2022 10:21 PM (GIDLr)

372 247: I remember when that book was called The Politics of Glory, which was really a better name.

Posted by: Wombat-socho at July 24, 2022 10:36 PM (CDNPI)

373
In the Alicia Silverstone article, the opening sentence is a perfect double entendre --

"Clueless star Alicia Silverstone revealed she shares her bed with her 11-year-old son, claiming that she is 'following nature.'"

There was no need to drag the movie into this; plain old "Clueless" works just fine.

Posted by: Krebs v Carnot: Epic Battle of the Cycling Stars at July 24, 2022 11:21 PM (ZvxPV)

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