Sunday Morning Book Thread 09-13-2020

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Bibliothèque Nationale de France, Salle Labrouste, Paris

Good morning to all you 'rons, 'ettes, lurkers, and lurkettes, wine moms, frat bros, crétins sans pantalon (who are technically breaking the rules). Welcome once again to the stately, prestigious, internationally acclaimed and high-class Sunday Morning Book Thread, a weekly compendium of reviews, observations, snark, witty repartee, hilarious bon mots, and a continuing conversation on books, reading, spending way too much money on books, writing books, and publishing books by escaped oafs and oafettes who follow words with their fingers and whose lips move as they read. Unlike other AoSHQ comment threads, the Sunday Morning Book Thread is so hoity-toity, pants are required. Even if it's these pants, which, I don't care what anybody else says, are an abomination.



Pic Note:

Look at all of this white privilege:

The National Library of France traces its origin to the royal library founded at the Louvre Palace by Charles V in 1368. Charles had received a collection of manuscripts from his predecessor, John II, and transferred them to the Louvre from the Palais de la Cité...As of 2016, the BnF contained roughly 14 million books at its four Parisian sites (Tolbiac, i.e. Bibliothèque François-Mitterrand, and Richelieu, Arsenal and Opéra) as well as printed documents, manuscripts, prints, photographs, maps and plans, scores, coins, medals, sound documents, video and multimedia documents, scenery elements..." The library retains the use of the Rue de Richelieu complex for some of its collections.



It Pays To Increase Your Word Power®

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(click to enlarge)



New Trump Books

Obsession: Inside the Washington Establishment's Never-Ending War on Trump

"Show me the man and I'll show you the crime" boasted Stalin's henchman Lavrentiy Beria. Which is pretty much how the Democrats have treated Donald Trump. They started shortly after his election and haven't let once let up, according to commentator Byron York in his new book Obsession: Inside the Washington Establishment's Never-Ending War on Trump:

From the moment Donald Trump was elected president—even before he was inaugurated—Democrats called for his impeachment. That call, starting on the margins of the party and the press, steadily grew until it became a deafening media and Democratic obsession. It culminated first in the Mueller report—which failed to find any evidence of criminal wrongdoing on the part of the president—and then in a failed impeachment.

And yet, even now, the Democrats and their media allies insist that President Trump must be guilty of something.

They still accuse him of being a Russian stooge and an obstructer of justice. They claim he was “not exonerated” by the Mueller report.

But the truth...is that Democrats and the media were gripped by an anti-Trump hysteria that blinded them to reality.

The Permanent Coup: How Enemies Foreign and Domestic Targeted the American President by Lee Smith probably covers much of the same ground.

Focusing more on Trump the man himself is Kurt Schlichter's The 21 Biggest Lies about Donald Trump (and you!). That last parenthetical bit is important. As Kurt explains, the progressives are, like:

We want to be in charge, damn it, and that Bad Orange Man is in the way. Oh, and so are all of you who support him.
In their minds President Trump isn't the only problem. You are a problem too. You are in the way, and that's why every obnoxious libel they print about Trump, every vile slander that they utter, every deliberate falsehood that they transmit, is not really aimed at Donald Trump. It's aimed at you.

That's something I noticed sometime in early 2018, maybe a bit before, that the attacks of the shrieking progressive loons and their NeverTrump allies on the French Davidian right broadened in scope from "Trump is evil incarnate" to "...and anyone who supports him is evil, too." I think this started because none of their screaming was having any effect on anything he did. He wasn't apologizing, he wasn't kow-towing the pieties of progressives, in fact, he would often double down and troll them on Twitter -- which would enrage them even further. So now they're coming after us, because we must be horrible people to support such an awful man. This is perhaps not the best marketing move for the NTers who are still calling themselves "conservatives" (as of this date, at least) and who fully expect to be listened to and respected once the Trump is gone. Like we're not going to remember what they did, who they sided with, and who is paying them.

As for the book itself:

Columnist and bestselling author Kurt Schlichter provides a fact-filled—and frequently hilarious—takedown of some of the media’s most pernicious lies about the president. In The 21 Biggest Lies about Donald Trump (and you!), you’ll learn:

--Why liberals cry “racism” at any argument they don’t like—when the real racists of American history have all been the Democrats

--How Trump “the warmonger” has actually given America a more realistic—and safer—foreign policy than any of his immediate predecessors

--Why the media refuses to understand the difference between legal and illegal immigrants (here’s a clue: Trump’s mother was a legal immigrant—and so is his wife)

--Why Trump and his supporters are infinitely more intelligent than a media that have gotten every major story of the Trump presidency wrong

--Trump’s great virtues (that too many Republicans lack): realism, courage, common sense, and an unapologetic determination to win conservative victories



Who Dis:

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(Last week's 'who dis' was actress and ambassador (Ghana and Czechoslovakia) Shirley Temple.



The Most Unrealistic Book Ever

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I'm wondering if this is not some sort of spoof:

1. How can you have a "non-violent burning down of a federal building"?
2. The woman in the cover art is far too attractive: she does not have green hair, blackened teeth, is not immensely overweight or pierced/tatted.
3. Or mentally ill.
4. How good a lover could some limp noodle antifa scum actually be? He's probably so full of soy products that he'd be unable to perform the natural function.
5. I've seen the cover art of enough romance novels to have a good idea as to what kind of men women like. And this guy ain't it.
6. So I conclude that this has to be a parody.

Progressives are working to build a world where these are the only "romance" novels women will be allowed to read.



I Never Knew...

...that Gidget (movie, TV series, whatever) is based on a novel, Gidget, the Little Girl with Big Ideas, a coming-of-age story of a teen-aged girl who discovers surfing (and boys) during one magical summer. She says:

“My English comp teacher Mr. Glicksberg says if you want to be a writer you have to—quote—sit on a window sill and get all pensive and stuff and jot down descriptions. Unquote Glicksberg! I don't know what kind of things he writes but I found my inspiration in Malibu with a radio, my best girlfriends, and absolutely zillions of boys for miles. I absolutely had to write everything down because I heard that when you get older you forget things, and I’d be the most miserable woman in the world if I forgot all about Moondoggie and what happened this summer. I absolutely owe the world my story. (And every word is true. I swear.)”

I thought the backstory of author Frederick Kohner was interesting:

Kohner, a Czechoslovakian Jew, worked in the German film industry as a screenwriter until 1933 when he emigrated to Hollywood after the Nazis started removing Jewish credits from films. Over the coming decades Kohner and his wife Franzie raised their two daughters by the beach while he toiled as a screenwriter for Columbia Pictures. As his children grew into American teenagers he noticed that his daughter Kathy in particular was drawn into a very specific, regional, contemporary slice of American teenage culture – the surf culture.

Surfing was a then-minor youth movement that built its foundation around a sport, love of the beach, and jargon that must have proved a challenge to an Eastern European immigrant. The details fascinated Kohner, who was empathetic with his daughter's feminist intention to participate in a "boys-only" sport. A book was conceived and Kathy became her father's muse as he delved into the surfing world with his daughter as his guide.

1957 was a whole different world. The Kindle edition is $8.99.



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Moron Recommendations

Lurker CringeBiscuit e-mails:

My personal preferred pulp genre leans towards non-fic western America history. Currently wrapping up Ray Thorp's "Crow Killer" the basis for the Pollack/Redford classic "Jeremiah Johnson" which I would recommend. I'm always looking for anything re: the exploits adventurers of settlers of the old U.S. when "west" was Michigan...

So here's the book he's talking about, Crow Killer: The Saga of Liver-Eating Johnson, and now we know why Hollwood changed it to 'Jeremiah Johnson'. I mean, who would want to see a movie about someone named Liver-eating Johnson? Eew. Guy sounds like a total badass, though:

The movie Jeremiah Johnson introduced millions to the legendary mountain man, John Johnson. The real Johnson was a far cry from the Redford version. Standing 6'2" in his stocking feet and weighing nearly 250 pounds, he was a mountain man among mountain men, one of the toughest customers on the western frontier. As the story goes, one morning in 1847 Johnson returned to his Rocky Mountain trapper's cabin to find the remains of his murdered Indian wife and her unborn child. He vowed vengeance against an entire Indian tribe. Crow Killer tells of that one-man, decades-long war to avenge his beloved. Whether seen as a realistic glimpse of a long ago, fierce frontier world, or as a mythic retelling of the many tales spun around and by Johnson, Crow Killer is unforgettable. This new edition, redesigned for the first time, features an introduction by western frontier expert Nathan E. Bender and a glossary of Indian tribes.

On Kindle for $9.99.

___________



Books By Morons

'Ette author artemis has just released the 12th installment of her Doyle & Acton mystery series, Murder in Revelation:

Detective Sergeant Kathleen Doyle was investigating a tip she’d received about doctors who were being assaulted at a London free clinic, but—strangely enough—none of the volunteers was willing to give her a statement. Instead, her only witness offered a fanciful tale about supernatural evildoers—which was nonsense, of course; it was clearly an attempt to shift the blame to the appropriate cultural bogeyman.

Although it did seem as though there were a lot of strange things happening, and all of them at once. A shame, that she had to interrupt the investigation to attend a servant’s funeral at Trestles, but Acton felt they were obligated to go. If only she didn’t feel as though her husband was a little too eager to attend this particular funeral...

The Kindle version is only $4.99.

___________


So that's all for this week. As always, book thread tips, suggestions, bribes, insults, threats, ugly pants pics and moron library submissions may be sent to OregonMuse, Proprietor, AoSHQ Book Thread, at the book thread e-mail address: aoshqbookthread, followed by the 'at' sign, and then 'G' mail, and then dot cee oh emm.

What have you all been reading this week? Hopefully something good, because, as you all know, life is too short to be reading lousy books.



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Posted by: OregonMuse at 09:00 AM




Comments

(Jump to bottom of page)

1 Hello book people.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, Michigangsta at September 13, 2020 09:01 AM (Dc2NZ)

2 Tolled lege

Posted by: Skip at September 13, 2020 09:01 AM (OjZpE)

3 One

Posted by: Palindrome Paduan at September 13, 2020 09:01 AM (AHq56)

4 hiya

Posted by: JT at September 13, 2020 09:01 AM (arJlL)

5 no ...

Posted by: Palindrome Paduan at September 13, 2020 09:01 AM (AHq56)

6 Where/how did you get a picture of my pants?

Posted by: Cybersmythe at September 13, 2020 09:02 AM (qDSku)

7 Good Morning Nerds and Geeks!

Posted by: garrett at September 13, 2020 09:02 AM (d/hHo)

8
Had been doing a reread of the Dies the Fire series by S.M. Stirling. Got to the second book and grew bored with it. So I moved on to a re-read of Mitch Rapp series. Some of my favorite authors have new books out which I will get evntually, but right now they are still above my cut-off limit for e-books.

Posted by: Vic at September 13, 2020 09:02 AM (mpXpK)

9 Booken morgen horden!!!!

Posted by: vmom 2020 - The Translations of Marcus Aurelius at September 13, 2020 09:03 AM (nUhF0)

10 I have to shut the auto cucumber off somehow.
Anyway should finish Amity Shlaes's The Forgotten Man today or tomorrow. Learned a lot though not new people as hear of the them often through life.

Posted by: Skip at September 13, 2020 09:04 AM (OjZpE)

11
g'mornin', book-ish 'rons

Posted by: AltonJackson (Click here for the MiMoMe!!!) at September 13, 2020 09:04 AM (L83do)

12 The Who Dis is a bit easy, isn't it. He's reading his own damn book.

Posted by: Sir Ian Botham at September 13, 2020 09:05 AM (0EkGe)

13 They started shortly after his election and haven't let once let up, according to commentator Byron York in his new book Obsession: Inside the Washington Establishment's Never-Ending War on Trump:


Actually they started right after the election campaign started for the primaries.

Posted by: Vic at September 13, 2020 09:05 AM (mpXpK)

14 I did a book related thing yesterday!
I wrote up a quick, shallow comparison of 4 translations of the Meditations of Marcus Aurelius.

I was hoping it would be helpful to the interested.
Link is in nic

Posted by: vmom 2020 - The Translations of Marcus Aurelius at September 13, 2020 09:06 AM (nUhF0)

15 I like the movie Jeremiah Johnson and know some of the real story. That book would be a good read I think.

Posted by: Skip at September 13, 2020 09:07 AM (OjZpE)

16 Vic, I like Island in the Sea of Time a lot but I think I lost my copy

Posted by: vmom 2020 - The Translations of Marcus Aurelius at September 13, 2020 09:07 AM (nUhF0)

17 Hello bookistas!

Posted by: Huck Follywood at September 13, 2020 09:07 AM (gtNWf)

18 So I read the 90 page story on Owl Gored and the time machine. It went way out of the to make fun of George Bush. It also went way out the the way to make people believe the Owl just wanted to save the world. Glad it was only 80 pages or so!

Posted by: rhennigantx at September 13, 2020 09:07 AM (JFO2v)

19 This week I read The Fires of Heaven in the WOT series. I also read Noir by Christopher Moore which was recommended here a couple of months ago. Great characters, great dialog, it kept me smiling while reading it.

Posted by: Zoltan at September 13, 2020 09:08 AM (AAqtz)

20 The Who Dis is a bit easy, isn't it. He's reading his own damn book.
Posted by: Sir Ian Botham at September 13, 2020 09:05 AM (0EkGe)


Some kind of hybrid Rommelpatton?

Posted by: hogmartin at September 13, 2020 09:08 AM (t+qrx)

21 1957 was a whole different world.

It was near the last of golden age at the end of WWII andB4 the American commies started the anti-war movement.

Posted by: Vic at September 13, 2020 09:09 AM (mpXpK)

22 Nice Lieberry!

Those pants, so many pockets, so little to put in them.

The Who Dis is Dr.Fauci having sexy time and trying to show that trollop his big idea.

Posted by: Hairyback Guy at September 13, 2020 09:09 AM (Z+IKu)

23 Last week I responded to a comment about all the grimdark stories by recommending a couple of authors that write lighter and humorous fare, but that was kind of late in thread so I'm repeating it here. If you're looking for fun and funny books you should try A. Lee Martinez and the John Moore who's written books like A Fate Worse Than Dragons and The Unhandsome Prince and Heroics for Beginners.

Posted by: Cybersmythe at September 13, 2020 09:10 AM (qDSku)

24 Those pants are fine, hater.

Posted by: guy with no knees at September 13, 2020 09:10 AM (hE1hd)

25 Good morning all - and I love the looks of that library!
Been working all this week on the next book, and I am looking for suggestions for a title! Oddly enough, I usually am not stuck for a book title, but this time ... OK, it's a novel, told partly in letters between two cousins during WWII. One is the wife of an English planter in Malaya, who is waiting out the war in Australia, hoping that her husband survives as a POW. The other is a US Army nurse, serving in North Africa and Italy ...and they exchange letters every couple of months. Suggestions?
Just about everything that I read these days is research for background on this, including the very funny memoir "Care of Postmaster" by Thomas R. St. George, which was a best-seller during the war.

Posted by: Sgt. Mom at September 13, 2020 09:10 AM (xnmPy)

26 The Antifa Lover blurb is hilarious

Posted by: vmom 2020 - The Translations of Marcus Aurelius at September 13, 2020 09:11 AM (nUhF0)

27 Thanks to the person who recommended Dean Koontz's "The Silent Corner". I blazed through it and now I'm on the second book of the Jane Hawk series.

It's a classic Koontz tale of an evil cabal of vile elites who want to remake the world more to their liking, nudging it along their chosen path by eliminating troublesome folks.

The perils of science without moral constraints is a constant theme in his novels.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, Michigangsta at September 13, 2020 09:11 AM (Dc2NZ)

28 Obnoxious comments on last page, eh? Today is supposed to be a day of rest but OK slave driver......

Posted by: Muad'dib at September 13, 2020 09:11 AM (fZqIv)

29 At the moment, I'm reading 'The Citizen Kane Book', published in 1971. It consists of a 120-page essay by Pauline Kael about the making of the movie, followed by the script itself. It's not bad. I'm 61, so Pauline Kael was a big name in my youth. I was shocked to read this and discover that she actually remembered seeing silent movies when she was young. I know the story about her saying that she didn't know how Nixon got elected because she didn't know anyone who voted for him has been debunked, but she really was a snob.

The book is full of name-dropping of a very elite New York sort. Who now cares about the Algonquin Round Table, George Kaufman, Dorothy Parker, or the rest of the 1930s smart set? The book is a little awkward because Orson Welles was still alive when it was written, so her dire pronouncements on the failure of his career sound a bit presumptuous. No, he didn't become America's Emperor-Director, as some people expected he would, but the work he left behind still is watched and talked about, which is more than can be said for many others who were more successful in the 40s and yet are quite forgotten today.

I get the impression Kael sort of relished putting out a contrarian, independent persona, so she insists Citizen Kane is really quite superficial, and kind of owes its uniqueness to... a German expressionist style? I wonder how well the rest of the many reviews she did in her heyday would hold up, considering how odd her take on this movie was.

Posted by: Dr. Mabuse at September 13, 2020 09:12 AM (Y8Re1)

30 Big big fan of the Acton and Doyle series by our own artemis. Highly recommend.

Posted by: grammie winger at September 13, 2020 09:12 AM (4EyHE)

31 Morning, all!

Posted by: Trimegistus at September 13, 2020 09:12 AM (R1+YM)

32 Eris, it's such a dark series.

Posted by: vmom 2020 - The Translations of Marcus Aurelius at September 13, 2020 09:12 AM (nUhF0)

33 Kathy Koehner

Posted by: Skip at September 13, 2020 09:12 AM (OjZpE)

34 16
Vic, I like Island in the Sea of Time a lot but I think I lost my copy

Posted by: vmom 2020 - The Translations of Marcus Aurelius at September 13, 2020 09:07 AM (nUhF0)

The Kindle version is available from Amazon for $4.

Posted by: Vic at September 13, 2020 09:13 AM (mpXpK)

35 Acton and Doyle is great. Gotta get caught up!

Posted by: vmom 2020 - The Translations of Marcus Aurelius at September 13, 2020 09:13 AM (nUhF0)

36 The book is a little awkward because Orson Welles was still alive when
it was written, so her dire pronouncements on the failure of his career
sound a bit presumptuous.


I'm just glad they didn't burn down his house during the Kenosha riots.

Posted by: grammie winger at September 13, 2020 09:14 AM (4EyHE)

37 Leftism is an ersatz religion. Religions need a devil. The devil needs minions. We be the minions.

Posted by: Ignoramus at September 13, 2020 09:14 AM (9TdxA)

38 I just began Edward Achorn's new book "Every Last Drop Of Blood: The Momentous Second Inaugural Of Abraham Lincoln" . Having listened to an interview of the author, in which he noted parallels between the struggles Lincoln faced and Trump faces every day, I was hooked. I even bought the hard cover edition, so I have high expectations!

https://tinyurl.com/yy2r76aj

Posted by: Huck Follywood at September 13, 2020 09:14 AM (gtNWf)

39 8
Had been doing a reread of the Dies the Fire series by S.M. Stirling. Got to the second book and grew bored with it. So I moved on to a re-read of Mitch Rapp series. Some of my favorite authors have new books out which I will get evntually, but right now they are still above my cut-off limit for e-books.

Posted by: Vic at September 13, 2020 09:02 AM (mpXpK)
---

I loved the first two books of the Stirling series, when Moderns suddenly had to cope with no technology, but by the third book society was basically a Medieval drama.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, Michigangsta at September 13, 2020 09:14 AM (Dc2NZ)

40 Mornin', all! I'm not that shocked when people tell me they don't like reading, because so many books are crap that are assigned in many schools, and teachers ruin the good ones. Read The Story-Killers, a book written to fight Common Core for details on that. The book is way more than just what's wrong with the Common Core.

I was thoroughly shocked when I found out there are people who read and don't "see" the story happen in their mind's eye while reading it. I either taught myself to read or an older sibling did, and I know from the first book that I could "hear" and "see" everything that was going on. My husband can't and never could, so although he likes certain books, like the LOTR series, he doesn't devour even great books the way I do.

Posted by: Catherine at September 13, 2020 09:15 AM (McBCG)

41 Orson Welles's last role was the voice of an evil planet in a cartoon. I think it's safe to say his career arc trended generally downward.

Posted by: Trimegistus at September 13, 2020 09:15 AM (R1+YM)

42 The real Gidget

Posted by: CN at September 13, 2020 09:15 AM (ONvIw)

43 1957 was a whole different world.

The last year before full sized Chevrolets became land whales.

Posted by: Captain Hate at September 13, 2020 09:15 AM (y7DUB)

44 I loved the first two books of the Stirling series,

--

My fave part has to be what happened to the hippy dippy lady

Posted by: vmom 2020 - The Translations of Marcus Aurelius at September 13, 2020 09:16 AM (nUhF0)

45 "Even if it's these pants, which, I don't care what anybody else says, are an abomination."
---

You and Jack Posobiec.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, Michigangsta at September 13, 2020 09:16 AM (Dc2NZ)

46 Good morning, Horde. Long time, no (or little) see.

We've almost finished the move, and I believe all books are here. Alas, we do have too many for the house. Partly because it turns out we have more duplicates than we thought (I'm the real guilty party there.) E.g., at least 3 of Leave it to Psmith and Officers and Gentlemen. And God knows how many of Screwtapes and Mere Chrisianity.

Anyone know the best way to sell books?

As it is, MOST remain in boxes, and those that were unpacked are somewhat chaotic. On the last, though, it's kind of fun to look at a pile that includes Rex Stout, Lewis, some battleship stuff, and Bill James, and Milton and Aquinas, and many more. My wife decided we should see if we can fill one case with GKC and CSL. Probably will include associated writers, like Belloc and Tolkein.

Posted by: Eeyore at September 13, 2020 09:16 AM (7X3UV)

47 The "Obsession" with Trump hate does blind people, but it is like the virus, intentionally spread around. The permanent coup happens on several fronts ... it also is very deliberate.


imo, it has to be recognized that these PsyOps are being run by powerful men, that own TheMedia, and drive the narrative (FakeNews) with intent of creating and spreading the Hate. Hate and Fear are used constantly (historically, but now with instant access via "social" media and the Google Archipelago) ... Fear/Lies used to motivate/control the masses.


Some of those masses are the leftists right inside the beltway and news agencies ... but really, those talking heads pumping out the hate, KNOW they are professional propagandists, their product is Agitprop.

Paycheck Cuckservatives certainly know they are serving Democrats, as they supported Clinton and Biden, serving the DC Crime Cartels. It is War, Hate/Fear is one of their more powerful weapons. They have created a national hysteria for the weakened minds ... minds poisoned for decades.

Posted by: illiniwek at September 13, 2020 09:17 AM (Cus5s)

48 39 I loved the first two books of the Stirling series,
when Moderns suddenly had to cope with no technology, but by the third
book society was basically a Medieval drama.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, Michigangsta at September 13, 2020 09:14 AM (Dc2NZ)

Yeah, I thought the Island In the Sea of Time started petering down after the first two books. However I stuck it out until about the 7th or 8th book when I first read the,m in the dead tree version. I now have the first 3 in Kindle.

Posted by: Vic at September 13, 2020 09:17 AM (mpXpK)

49 33: she married a Yiddish professor not moondoggie

Posted by: CN at September 13, 2020 09:18 AM (ONvIw)

50 Funniest moment of the ATV winch install yesterday with Winch Wench: I asked her to please grab the cutting dikes for me so I could trim up some wires. Some times passes and nothing. I can hear her rustling around in the tool chest. So I get myself out of Downward Dog under the ATV to grab the dikes. Her comment was "oh, I thought you were looking for a sarcastic lesbian".

Posted by: Muad'dib at September 13, 2020 09:18 AM (fZqIv)

51 My fave part has to be what happened to the hippy dippy lady
Posted by: vmom 2020 - The Translations of Marcus Aurelius at September 13, 2020 09:16 AM (nUhF0)


What happened to her?

Posted by: hogmartin at September 13, 2020 09:19 AM (t+qrx)

52 I just started reading The Choirboys, by Joseph Wambaugh.

I'd read it way back when.

Wambaugh writes well and knows how to tell a story.

I'm at the part where Officer "Roscoe" Rules and his partner Officer "Whaddyamean" Dean are sent to settle and calm a dispute between neighbors and Roscoe tells the hispanic guy "If that was my wife, I'd kick her in the c*nt" , setting off a near riot.

Posted by: JT at September 13, 2020 09:20 AM (arJlL)

53 One thing I've just read was a long missing Abstract by Bill James, 1988. In it, he has an article "Revolution" in which he argues that we should return to the pre-1930s minor league system, where the minors were independent. That means not required to give their players to the majors.

He's got a point. The biggest reason minor league baseball lost fans is that they aren't really trying to win. If the MLB team's star player gets a hangnail, the minor league team's best player gets whisked up, and to hell with their pennant race. As he points out, the lower talent level argument is countered by the fact that college basketball and football thrive. It is loyalty to a team that matters, and that's hard to build when the team isn't really working for itself.

Now, the question hit me, could this happen now, when the pros have gone to s**t? (And the woke colleges for that matter.) It does seem an opportunity.

Posted by: Eeyore at September 13, 2020 09:21 AM (7X3UV)

54 That Antifa book has to be satire. It sounds more like something one of the Horde wrote than a serious pro-Antifa thing. But then, that's why the website "Not The Bee" now exists: stories you think are the Bee that are true.

Posted by: Ian S. at September 13, 2020 09:22 AM (6XLoz)

55 I recently re-read a bio of Sir George Hubert Wilkins, the Australian explorer who pioneered flying in the Arctic and tried to take a submarine to the North Pole. Sound idea . . . except that he was doing it in a beat-up WWI-surplus USN O-class sub. Didn't make it very far before he had to turn back, but the data he gathered helped the Nautilus do the job thirty years later. When he died the USS Skate carried his ashes to the North Pole.

Posted by: Trimegistus at September 13, 2020 09:22 AM (R1+YM)

56 I'm taking a break between sections of The Badtable Children to read Roverandom to the grandsons. With the arrival of their puppy, Zorro, came a preoccupation with dog stories

Posted by: CN at September 13, 2020 09:22 AM (ONvIw)

57 51
My fave part has to be what happened to the hippy dippy lady

Posted by: vmom 2020 - The Translations of Marcus Aurelius at September 13, 2020 09:16 AM (nUhF0)



What happened to her?

Posted by: hogmartin at September 13, 2020 09:19 AM (t+qrx)

Actually we are talking about two different series by Stirling. My original coment was about the Dies the Fire series. Those followup comments were about Island in the Sea of Time.

Posted by: Vic at September 13, 2020 09:22 AM (mpXpK)

58 George C Scott and Dean Martin

Posted by: jsg at September 13, 2020 09:22 AM (IC+Cn)

59 After finishing Hoff's The True Believer, I read a version of Aesop's Fables for something a little lighter. My copy is undated (a prior owner apparently got in 193 and the introduction was dated 1848. It has been many decades since I've read the fables and I had not realized how many of our expressions stem from Aesop's fables. It was a little sad to see how much common wisdom has been discarded by the post-modern nihilists. I had purchased it for my grandsons but this particular version has rather archaic language that they would find to be a bit of a hard slog.

I also read The 26 Letters by Oscar Ogg. This is the revised edition published by Crewell in 1971 (Ogg explains that they had to reset the type-face and make new lithographs for this edition because the plates were worn-out from repeated printings). The book goes into the evolution of our alphabet and the shape of the characters. He also devotes an extensive chapter on printing. I found it informative but rather simply written. Rating = 4.1/5.0

Posted by: Retired Buckeye Cop is now an engineer at September 13, 2020 09:22 AM (pJWtt)

60 We can't fully appreciate Citizen Kane from the perspective of today. Firstly, Kane is clearly William Randolph Hearst, a larger than life character of his time. Before Trump became POTUS, there is no one on our stage today who compares. And it wasn't a flattering portrayal. So Welles pissed off the most powerful media figure of his time.

And then there are so many technical things about Kane that were novel in film at the time. Arguably the best script of all time.

Posted by: Ignoramus at September 13, 2020 09:23 AM (9TdxA)

61 Lay off my cargo shorts brah or else I'll break out the kilt again.

Posted by: GGE of the Moron Horde, NC Chapter at September 13, 2020 09:23 AM (CcOog)

62 BTW, I seem to have misread that girl who lectured us on getting rid of books. I thought she said "30 stacks of boxes of books." We haven't cut that far, yet. And maybe never will.

Another thing. Those boxes packed by the movers were extremely badly done. Some damage, and I'm missing two of my complete Samuel Johnson. Hope they turn up. Haven't counted the Pepys yet.

Posted by: Eeyore at September 13, 2020 09:23 AM (7X3UV)

63 Frederick Kohner figured out the preferences of book buyers pretty quickly: put girl in bikini on book cover; Sell story to TV producers the next day. Retire!

Posted by: Huck Follywood at September 13, 2020 09:24 AM (gtNWf)

64 @59: oops, typo on the publishing house -- should read "Crowell"

Posted by: Retired Buckeye Cop is now an engineer at September 13, 2020 09:24 AM (pJWtt)

65 Morning, 'rons and 'ronettes. Sinuses are killing me.

I will have to see if I can find a place showing the Kitty Genovese movie. I knew the Times story was shit, not just because it's the Times and the story was pimped by (as the late, lamented Spy magazine dubbed him) Abe "I'm writing as bad as I can" Rosenthal, but because I'd also read Kevin Cook's Kitty Genovese.

I'm not surprised that Winston Moseley didn't want to talk to Kitty's brother. The bastard's been playing the race card since the day he was arrested. He probably thinks BurnLootMurder is well-deserved retribution.

And now, wanting to link the book, I see Witness is available on Amazon Prime.

https://tinyurl.com/y24xypzm

Posted by: Mary Poppins' Practically Perfect Piercing at September 13, 2020 09:25 AM (2JVJo)

66 I finished Twilight of the Gods, the final book in Ian Toll's magnificent Pacific War trilogy. I got it on Monday and finished all 792 pages on Friday. It's that good a read. If you're interested in that theater at all, this is now required reading.
I knew the broad strokes of the war, but now understand the decisions, persons, and places far better than I did. That said, I'm still unsure of whether MacArthur was a complete jackass, a brilliant dramatist and strategist, or more likely, a mixture of both. Spruance was a weird dude, but obviously the right guy at the right time. Whatever else he did, he was good reserving his attention for the big decisions, and delegating the rest to his subordinates. I've disagreed with others about Halsey before, but was unaware that he would almost certainly have been removed from command if not for his PR value to the American people ("kill Japs, kill Japs, kill more Japs" played well).

I don't mean to suggest that the book is all about the big names. There are plenty of interesting anecdotes and stories about the lives of the grunts, both American and Japanese.

In short, I expect I'll reread the entire trilogy more than once.

Posted by: pep at September 13, 2020 09:25 AM (v16oJ)

67 Is it the third book in Stirling's Nantucket series which includes a blow-by-blow retelling of the MOVIE version of Rorke's Drift, teleported in space and time?

Posted by: Trimegistus at September 13, 2020 09:26 AM (R1+YM)

68 including the very funny memoir "Care of Postmaster" by Thomas R. St. George, which was a best-seller during the war.
Posted by: Sgt. Mom at September 13, 2020 09:10 AM (xnmPy)


I have that book.

Posted by: Mary Poppins' Practically Perfect Piercing at September 13, 2020 09:26 AM (2JVJo)

69 Not to be a debbie downer...but they'll be burning libraries and museums down before this is over. Just too much concentrated whiteness.

Posted by: Cuthbert the Witless at September 13, 2020 09:26 AM (9dzlp)

70 We can't fully appreciate Citizen Kane from the perspective of today. Firstly, Kane is clearly William Randolph Hearst, a larger than life character of his time. Before Trump became POTUS, there is no one on our stage today who compares. And it wasn't a flattering portrayal. So Welles pissed off the most powerful media figure of his time.
And then there are so many technical things about Kane that were novel in film at the time. Arguably the best script of all time.
Posted by: Ignoramus at September 13, 2020 09:23 AM (9TdxA)

Yup....they had William Randolph and we had Patty.

How things change.

Posted by: Hairyback Guy at September 13, 2020 09:27 AM (Z+IKu)

71 12 The Who Dis is a bit easy, isn't it. He's reading his own damn book.


Looks like both their pictures on the cover.

Posted by: Mr. Peebles at September 13, 2020 09:27 AM (oVJmc)

72 Those boxes packed by the movers were extremely badly done. Some damage, and I'm missing two of my complete Samuel Johnson. Hope they turn up....
Posted by: Eeyore at September 13, 2020 09:23 AM (7X3UV)


My sympathies. I packed all my books for our recent move. Fortunately, the two houses are only about 20 miles distance from each other and I was able to move books in stages. I had to move about 6000 books myself and the last ones are on the shelves! (Still have to do some re-organizing, however).

Posted by: Retired Buckeye Cop is now an engineer at September 13, 2020 09:28 AM (pJWtt)

73 40 Mornin', all! I'm not that shocked when people tell me they don't like reading, because so many books are crap that are assigned in many schools, and teachers ruin the good ones. Read The Story-Killers, a book written to fight Common Core for details on that. The book is way more than just what's wrong with the Common Core.

I was thoroughly shocked when I found out there are people who read and don't "see" the story happen in their mind's eye while reading it. I either taught myself to read or an older sibling did, and I know from the first book that I could "hear" and "see" everything that was going on. My husband can't and never could, so although he likes certain books, like the LOTR series, he doesn't devour even great books the way I do.
Posted by: Catherine at September 13, 2020 09:15 AM (McBCG)

--------------------------------------

I always thought English classes killed the love of reading for a lot of people. Partly because you had to read books for their importance, not because they were particularly good stories, and partly because you couldn't just enjoy the story. You had to analyze the crap out of it to divine the author's true meaning, or to explain why it's really an allegory about this or that historical event. I read for pleasure, not for a lecture.

And I'm also one who visualizes stories as I read them. In fact, if I start to notice the words on the page, I know it's time for me to put the book down for a bit.

Posted by: No One of Consequence at September 13, 2020 09:28 AM (CAJOC)

74 Orson Welles's last role was the voice of an evil planet in a cartoon. I think it's safe to say his career arc trended generally downward.
Posted by: Trimegistus

On one Tonite Show, Orson was the first guest, then Robert Blake came out, looked at Orson and said "Mr. Wells......you make Wimpy look skimpy"

Wells replied "Well, I'm fat and you're ugly, but I can diet"

Posted by: JT at September 13, 2020 09:28 AM (arJlL)

75 The book group started Another Country by James Baldwin, an obvious choice by one of the homos with a black fetish (even the other queens roll their eyes about him). I'd read a short story by Baldwin once before, Sonny's Blues, which was a well written story about a musician with issues. This is more of the same only a lot longer and the main character, Rufus, a drummer commits suicide by jumping off the GW bridge at the end of the first chapter. The first chapter was reasonably engaging about a self destructive person but I have a feeling the rest of the book won't be as good, albeit reasonably well written.

Posted by: Captain Hate at September 13, 2020 09:28 AM (y7DUB)

76 Excellent as usual book thread, OM. I have a few pair of cargo shorts, which, in honor of this thread, I am NOT wearing.

So it goes. I am rereading Slaughterhouse Five by that Vonnegut Jr. fella, a book in which the US Supreme Court had to get involved over it's banningations.

So it goes.

I can't blame the man for hating war -- He experienced it in a far more up close and personal level than I ever hope to.

And if there is a "beyond war level" crime, it is that Dresden GER, after being leveled more thoroughly than Hiroshima, fell under the Soviet rule afterwards.

Their pile of bad karma must have been immense. Or just a whole bunch of bad luck. So it goes.

Posted by: GnuBreed at September 13, 2020 09:29 AM (Z4rgH)

77 Not to be a debbie downer...but they'll be burning libraries and museums down before this is over. Just too much concentrated whiteness.
Posted by: Cuthbert the Witless at September 13, 2020 09:26 AM (9dzlp)


I expect it.

And the librarians and museum curators will be the first to light the fires.

Posted by: Mary Poppins' Practically Perfect Piercing at September 13, 2020 09:31 AM (2JVJo)

78
Good morning, all. No one knows who dis?

Posted by: Blonde Morticia at September 13, 2020 09:31 AM (SFAhl)

79 Her comment was "oh, I thought you were looking for a sarcastic lesbian".

Posted by: Muad'dib


You married well. I think the times when our spouses make us dissolve in laughter are priceless.

Posted by: pep at September 13, 2020 09:31 AM (v16oJ)

80 Good morning, all. No one knows who dis?
Posted by: Blonde Morticia

Gidget and Inspector Gadget

Posted by: JT at September 13, 2020 09:32 AM (arJlL)

81 46 ...

Anyone know the best way to sell books?

...

Posted by: Eeyore at September 13, 2020 09:16 AM (7X3UV)

-----------------------------

We just take ours to Half-Price Books. They look over what you bring, and give you a quote. You can either take it or leave it.

If you're not averse to just giving away some books, you can also see if there are any Little Libraries in your area, or even set one up yourself, assuming you moved to an area with neighbors nearby.

Posted by: No One of Consequence at September 13, 2020 09:32 AM (CAJOC)

82 I've often said that high-school English teachers do more to drive people away from reading than anything else. They create the idea that some books are Literature, and Literature is full of obscure secret stuff that YOU can't understand.

Thing is, all the English-teacher stuff in books -- symbolism, foreshadowing, allegory, theme, etc. -- those are all tools in the author's toolbox. The goal is always the same: storytelling.

There's a great piece by CS Lewis about reading Hamlet; can't recall the title. He points out that if you read a bunch of critical essays about Hamlet it's hard to tell they're even about the same play. But people keep reading and watching Hamlet -- because it's an entertaining and interesting story.

Posted by: Trimegistus at September 13, 2020 09:32 AM (R1+YM)

83 *** a commercial break ***

Ozark MoMe on Sunday, Oct. 11th, at the Lake of the Ozarks (MO). That's Columbus Day weekend (until they re-name it Hispaniola Day).

Contact info at left margin, if you're interested in attending.

Wilkommen! Bienvenue! Welcome! I am your host!

Posted by: mnw at September 13, 2020 09:33 AM (Cssks)

84 Not really book related except that I read the newspaper there on Saturday mornings, but I think I've just lost my favorite breakfast place. The cook died suddenly a couple of days ago, and since his sister (who co-owns the place and is a server) doesn't cook, I think it's going to shut down.

Nuts.

Posted by: Mary Poppins' Practically Perfect Piercing at September 13, 2020 09:33 AM (2JVJo)

85 "sit on a window sill and get all pensive and stuff and jot down descriptions"
________

Reminds me of a line in Michael Gilbert's Body of a Girl. An older cop tells a younger "In every street in London, there was an old woman sitting at her window, who saw everything. The secret of police work is finding her."

That's a motif he uses in a few other stories as well.

He's a writer I recommend very highly. End Game (The Final Throw) is perhaps the most fun, Smallbone Deceased the best as a mystery, and Death Has Deep Roots the most typical.

The first involves catching a criminal tycoon* both from the top and the bottom. Smallbone is a murder in a solicitors' office. Deep Roots is a murder in a London hotel, reaching back to WWII France, with trial scenes.

*Gilbert is capable of making self made men either the hero or the villain. All around, he is the most even handed writer I can think of. ANYONE can be good or bad, except terrorists.

Posted by: Eeyore at September 13, 2020 09:33 AM (7X3UV)

86 Good morning Horde, I often just lurk on this thread with pen in hand scribbling down lists of your book recommendations. I swear when I die my kids are going to find these lists scattered all over the house. I am anxiously awaiting the opening of our new library in town and I am so grateful for all of these suggestions.

Posted by: Debby Doberman Schultz at September 13, 2020 09:34 AM (a4EWo)

87 Posted by: GnuBreed at September 13, 2020 09:29 AM (Z4rgH)

Valerie Perrine as Montana Wildhack...*sigh*...we were young once.

Posted by: BignJames at September 13, 2020 09:34 AM (X/Pw5)

88
Bought Hitler: Downfall: 1939-1945 by Volker Ullrich at B&N yesterday.

I find I can read print books comfortably only in a chair but e-books are best read lying down. Anyone else have this problem?

Posted by: Hadrian the Seventh at September 13, 2020 09:34 AM (mht8P)

89 My opinion is that if there are a lot of books written about you, good or bad, you are making an impact. Compare the number of books written about TFG at the end of his first term vs. the number of books written about Trump.

TDS is real. Sometime in the next half dozen years there will be a drug for it. Maybe something like Prozac.

Posted by: Martini Farmer at September 13, 2020 09:34 AM (3H9h1)

90 I've been reading The British Are Coming by Rick Atkinson, the first book of a proposed trilogy about the Revolutionary War by the author of the Liberation Trilogy about the American participation in WWII in Europe and North Africa. So far, it is quite good and filled with telling detail. For example, we find this in his description of Tower arsenal in London as the troops depart for Massachusetts Bay:

Obsolete weapons decorated Tower walls in fantastic sculptures, like the seven-headed hydra constructed from old pistols. Stacked bayonets and ancient firelocks formed a corkscrew pillar twenty-two feet high. The place was a tabernacle of firepower.

I wish I could see it.

Posted by: Anonosaurus Wrecks, Tyrannosaur Wrangler at September 13, 2020 09:34 AM (+y/Ru)

91 I read Crow Killer about 15 years ago. I have no idea how much of the book is true and how much is myth, legend, or downright b.s., but it was a fun read. Skip the stupid Robert Redford movie and read a tale of the brutal Wild West instead.

Posted by: PabloD, make commies fly again! at September 13, 2020 09:35 AM (KFnWd)

92 Yup....they had William Randolph and we had Patty.


Story time!

I got on the student newspaper in grad school because I had read Hunter Thompson's "Generation of Swine" and I wanted to use that as an angle to get to interview him.

I would go on to review the book with references to acid flashbacks, which none of my fellow NYU MBA students related to.

This is pre-internet. I'm reading around and calling around and I find that he is represented by the San Francisco Chronicle. I pester them enough that I get a call back from a guy who says his name is Bill Hurst and no Hunter won't talk to me go away.

And it was only later that the penny dropped and I realized I'd been told to fuck off by William Hearst.

Posted by: Bandersnatch at September 13, 2020 09:35 AM (q2K0j)

93 82
I've often said that high-school English teachers do more to drive
people away from reading than anything else. They create the idea that
some books are Literature, and Literature is full of obscure secret
stuff that YOU can't understand.


This was definitely true of me. It drove me batty having to listen to an English teacher drone on about symbolism. For many of them, it seemed like their main function was to justify their own jobs.

Posted by: pep at September 13, 2020 09:36 AM (v16oJ)

94 I'd wear those pants.

Posted by: Mr. Peebles at September 13, 2020 09:36 AM (oVJmc)

95 @46
I know that the dreaded Amazon is an outlet to sell used books, I buy them and often they have a library's stamp, so I think the libraries make a little money that way.
There's also abe.com, and thriftbooks.com (but I think Amazon bought abe)

Posted by: artemis at September 13, 2020 09:36 AM (AwPyG)

96
I've often said that high-school English teachers do more to drive people away from reading than anything else. They create the idea that some books are Literature, and Literature is full of obscure secret stuff that YOU can't understand.

----------

The best way to destroy the love of literature and poetry in children is English classes. The very names Catcher in the Rye and Siddhartha fill me with horror.

Posted by: Hadrian the Seventh at September 13, 2020 09:37 AM (mht8P)

97 Bought Hitler: Downfall: 1939-1945 by Volker Ullrich at B&N yesterday.

I'm still reading it. Stalingrad has fallen.

Posted by: Mary Poppins' Practically Perfect Piercing at September 13, 2020 09:37 AM (2JVJo)

98
Reading The Van Rijn Method by Poul Anderson on Horde recommendation.

Planning to read the entire Technic Civilization series.

Posted by: deplorable unperson - refuse to accept the Mask of the Beast at September 13, 2020 09:37 AM (+MpRO)

99 I became active in my local library precisely because I want to be able to thwart (or at least oppose and publicize) any Woke bullshit the assorted Karens who run the place come up with.

Posted by: Trimegistus at September 13, 2020 09:37 AM (R1+YM)

100 I find I can read print books comfortably only in a chair but e-books are best read lying down. Anyone else have this problem?
Posted by: Hadrian the Seventh

Wait a minute........what kinda e-books are you reading ?

Posted by: JT at September 13, 2020 09:37 AM (arJlL)

101 Good Sunday morning, horde!

Debby Doberman, I do the same. Little notebooks, little scraps of paper all rubber banded together, in my wallet, inside my kindle cover, used as bookmarks for other books, not to mention the lists on amazon and my library app.

Posted by: April, Freedom Now! at September 13, 2020 09:37 AM (OX9vb)

102 90
I've been reading The British Are Coming by Rick Atkinson, the first
book of a proposed trilogy about the Revolutionary War by the author of
the Liberation Trilogy about the American participation in WWII in
Europe and North Africa.


That's high on my list. His WW2 trilogy was excellent.

Posted by: pep at September 13, 2020 09:38 AM (v16oJ)

103
TDS is real. Sometime in the next half dozen years there will be a drug for it. Maybe something like Prozac.

Posted by: Martini Farmer at September 13, 2020 09:34 AM


IIRC, fish tank cleaner cures TDS

Posted by: AltonJackson (Click here for the MiMoMe!!!) at September 13, 2020 09:38 AM (L83do)

104 We just take ours to Half-Price Books. They look over what you bring, and give you a quote. You can either take it or leave it.

If you're not averse to just giving away some books, you can also see if there are any Little Libraries in your area, or even set one up yourself, assuming you moved to an area with neighbors nearby.
Posted by: No One of Consequence at September 13, 2020 09:32 AM (CAJOC)
_______

Nothing like that around here. Lack of bookstores is the worst part of the town. I will be donating some.

Posted by: Eeyore at September 13, 2020 09:38 AM (7X3UV)

105
Wait a minute........what kinda e-books are you reading ?
Posted by: JT at September 13, 2020 09:37 AM (arJlL)

----------

Taking your question seriously (a mistake, I know), at the moment The Wages of Destruction by Adam Tooze.

Posted by: Hadrian the Seventh at September 13, 2020 09:38 AM (mht8P)

106 I'm still reading it. Stalingrad has fallen.

Don't give away the ending!

Posted by: pep at September 13, 2020 09:39 AM (v16oJ)

107 @82
Going back at least 20 years, high schools have felt the need to be diverse in their reading requirements. My kids read a lot of obscure stuff, and missed out on a lot of the classics.

Posted by: artemis at September 13, 2020 09:39 AM (AwPyG)

108 I read David Copperfield in 8th Grade. A quiz after every chapter or two!

That'll do it.

Posted by: mnw at September 13, 2020 09:39 AM (Cssks)

109 Mornin', all,

So if that's Kohner, I suspect the girl might be his grown daughter, but that's hardly a fair Who Dis. Unless she's famous herself. She looks a little like Audrey Hepburn, thanks to the short hair, but that's not AH.

According to IMDb, his daughter and the inspiration for Gidget was Kathy Kohner.

Posted by: Wolfus Aurelius at September 13, 2020 09:39 AM (rpbg1)

110 There's a great piece by CS Lewis about reading Hamlet; can't recall the title. He points out that if you read a bunch of critical essays about Hamlet it's hard to tell they're even about the same play. But people keep reading and watching Hamlet -- because it's an entertaining and interesting story.
Posted by: Trimegistus at September 13, 2020 09:32 AM (R1+YM)
________

I think it's "Hamlet, the Prince or the Play."

Posted by: Eeyore at September 13, 2020 09:39 AM (7X3UV)

111 "Anyone know the best way to sell books?"

When we were moving, we took the thinnings of our book collection to the local Half Price Books. They gave us a few bucks for them - which we promptly spent on books, of course. HPB also takes magazines. It helps if you have a complete run of a magazine - say, a full year of The New Criterion.

As a unsponsored book note: The Library of America is having a sale - 20% off everything, plus free shipping.

Our read-aloud this week was a classic: The Healing Hand: Man and Wound in the Ancient World, by Guido Majno, MD. Dr Majno was (he passed away a few years ago) a pathologist who wrote a wonderful book about medicine in ancient times and cultures: a book that is both learned and lucid. Rather than all of medicine, he concentrates on the treatment of wounds. If you're at all interested in the history of medicine or science - or in ancient warfare, and how their "medics" cared for the wounded - this is a must-read. Be prepared to learn not only about medicine, but the intricacies of cunieform, hieroglyphics, and Chinese ideograms! It is out of print, but you can find used copies on alibris.com starting at around $4. Highly recommended.

Posted by: Brown Line at September 13, 2020 09:40 AM (S6ArX)

112 No unfrozen bagels.

Someone is fired.

Posted by: jsg at September 13, 2020 09:40 AM (IC+Cn)

113 And it was only later that the penny dropped and I realized I'd been told to fuck off by William Hearst.
Posted by: Bandersnatch at September 13, 2020 09:35 AM (q2K0j)


That's like the old joke about the farm boy who goes to town to see Andrew Jackson and, when he returns, proudly tells everyone that the General talked to him.

"What did he say?"

"He told me to get the hell out of the way!"


And, while Marion Davies' nickname for Hearst was "Old Droopy Drawers," I've never been able to confirm beyond self-referencing books on Welles and Kane that he really called Davies' clitoris "Rosebud" (though I myself did use the term when I wrote a silent screen sex story as an exercise).

Posted by: Mary Poppins' Practically Perfect Piercing at September 13, 2020 09:41 AM (2JVJo)

114 William Randolph Hearst was a big deal back in 1941, but who but us morons knows about him today? Yet you can still watch Citizen Kane and enjoy it, even if you don't have a clue about which elements in the story reflect his life and which were completely made up. And maybe it's not fair to judge Welles by the last bit of work he did before he died; not many of us go out on an all-time high note, if we live long enough. I'd just say that his BEST work will ensure that he's remembered for generations, even if he did produce it right at the beginning of his life, and contemporaries who had more success at the time won't be remembered at all.

Posted by: Dr. Mabuse at September 13, 2020 09:41 AM (Y8Re1)

115 107 Artemis

Yes. Bigtime.

Posted by: mnw at September 13, 2020 09:41 AM (Cssks)

116 "Western badmen" by Dorothy Johnson 1970. Done read it about 20 times.

Posted by: klaftern at September 13, 2020 09:42 AM (RuIsu)

117 Taking your question seriously (a mistake, I know), at the moment The Wages of Destruction by Adam Tooze.
Posted by: Hadrian the Seventh

Well, ok; but keep your pants on in case Adam meets a buxom dame.

Posted by: JT at September 13, 2020 09:42 AM (arJlL)

118 Yeah, Antifa Lover is almost certainly a satire. I just read the "Look Inside" section on Amazon. The Senator just passed or introduced some anti-male pro-marriage legislation (women can get divorced easily, men must pay a million dollars). She also echoes, was it Kamala Harris? when she says "and that powerful yet insecure woman was me".

The editing looks atrocious, making at least one important line unknowable, but with such a short sample that may be part of the joke. I did something similar with The Dream of Poor Bazin, although in my case it was making the beginning sound like a nineteenth century French adventure story rather than like it was written by a college graduate who never learned to write.

I hope.

Posted by: Stephen Price Blair at September 13, 2020 09:43 AM (2lndx)

119 It is worthwhile to compare and contrast these three things:

1. William Randolph Hearst's later years and death;
2. Orson Welles's later years and death;
3. The ending of T.F. Kane in the movie.

Which two are most similar? I say 2 and 3.

Posted by: Trimegistus at September 13, 2020 09:43 AM (R1+YM)

120 One tell about Antifa Lover is the hottie on the cover. If a congresswoman were that good looking, she'd be a Republican.

Posted by: Eeyore at September 13, 2020 09:44 AM (7X3UV)

121 97 Stalingrad has fallen
Dam Mary4XP, you ruined the book

Posted by: Skip at September 13, 2020 09:45 AM (OjZpE)

122 Reading The Van Rijn Method by Poul Anderson on Horde recommendation.

Planning to read the entire Technic Civilization series.
Posted by: deplorable unperson - refuse to accept the Mask of the Beast at September 13, 2020


*
*

I just re-read the novelettes "Day of Burning," which is a David Falkayn story (Van Rijn's protege), and the story "The Queen of Air and Darkness," totally unconnected to the other universe. Both dynamite tales. I've ordered a copy of his novel The Star Fox, which I read many years ago and have forgotten except that it's an SF take on Francis Marion, the Swamp Fox of our history.

Posted by: Wolfus Aurelius at September 13, 2020 09:45 AM (rpbg1)

123
My Antifa Lover.



Xer lit a Molotov cocktail in my heart and that blazed out of control. Our love rioted for weeks without end as we two indeterminate things fully expressed our communist commitment to each other.

Posted by: TheQuietMan at September 13, 2020 09:45 AM (EMCcL)

124 "Lord Nelson spoke to me once at dinner."

"What did he say?"

"He said, 'Kindly pass the salt down.' "

Posted by: mnw at September 13, 2020 09:46 AM (Cssks)

125 The "Print is Dead" cartoon...

I still subscribe to real newspapers for the simple reason that there are no pops, slide-ins, roll-overs and countless other distractions to my reading.

Thank God.

Posted by: FloridaMan at September 13, 2020 09:46 AM (y5Sya)

126 121 97 Stalingrad has fallen
Dam Mary4XP, you ruined the book
Posted by: Skip at September 13, 2020 09:45 AM (OjZpE)


No no no, Stalingrad is just fine. Better than fine. Really.

Posted by: Stalingrad Bob at September 13, 2020 09:47 AM (PiwSw)

127 And if there is a "beyond war level" crime, it is that Dresden GER, after being leveled more thoroughly than Hiroshima, fell under the Soviet rule afterwards.

-
I read The Fire and the Darkness by Sinclair McKay about the Valentine's Day bombing a while ago. I've forgotten the details but one haunting story was about an ordinary German woman sentenced to death because she made a casual comment to the effect that she doubted that Germany could win the war.

Posted by: Anonosaurus Wrecks, Tyrannosaur Wrangler at September 13, 2020 09:47 AM (+y/Ru)

128 Francis Marion, the Swamp Fox of our history.

Leslie Nielsen was the Swamp Fox on the tv show.

Posted by: JT at September 13, 2020 09:47 AM (arJlL)

129 Actually as a mostly military history reader my whole life I can pick up any military narrative and start anywhere in it, I know how they got there and how it ended.

Posted by: Skip at September 13, 2020 09:48 AM (OjZpE)

130 This was definitely true of me. It drove me batty having to listen to an English teacher drone on about symbolism. For many of them, it seemed like their main function was to justify their own jobs.

Posted by: pep at September 13, 2020 09:36 AM


I read an article once, I can't remember where, that says that is exactly the way it is. I only dimly remember, but I seem to recall it's what happens when you get a bunch of frustrated writers trying to teach about literature.

Posted by: Cybersmythe at September 13, 2020 09:48 AM (qDSku)

131 "Stalingrad has fallen"

"Roger De Bris presents history. Of course, I think we should add a little music. That whole third act has got to go. They're losing the war. It's too depressing. We'll have to put something in there.
(gripped by his vision)
Aaahghhh! I see it! A line of beautiful girls, dressed as Storm Troopers, black patent leather boots, all marching together... Two-three-kick-turn! Turn-turn- kick-turn!"

Posted by: Ignoramus at September 13, 2020 09:48 AM (9TdxA)

132 "...and the story was pimped by (as the late, lamented Spy magazine dubbed him) Abe "I'm writing as bad as I can" Rosenthal..."
---

WHo was "bosomy dirty book writer"? Shirley Lord?

Posted by: All Hail Eris, Michigangsta at September 13, 2020 09:48 AM (Dc2NZ)

133 Welles always said that Kane was a composite character, based on several people. He mentioned Samuel Insull; Joseph Pulitzer AND Hearst."

Posted by: mnw at September 13, 2020 09:49 AM (Cssks)

134 citizen kane relies strongly on citizen hearst by w.a. swanberg, the gabriel sherman or michael woolf of that era, one might say he was the murdoch of that era, with the populism that was considered off puttng, unlike say the new york times schutzbergers (sic) who would soft pedal the holocaust, and stalin,

Posted by: bolivar de gris at September 13, 2020 09:49 AM (hMlTh)

135 This turned into a bit of a TL/DR. Sorry.

I just finished The News from Waterloo by Brian Cathcart.

An entertaining study of how the news of Wellington's victory at Waterloo reached London in the days when news was transported only as quick as the fastest horse.
And also the....and hang on to your hats because you'll be shocked by this....the deceit, manipulation, cheating, backbiting and plain old fashioned skulduggery perpetrated by the partisan free press in order to be the first to have the news of any battle whether it was true or not.
Two of my favourite anecdotes were,

The man who arrived in London with news of a narrow victory for Wellington after he heard it from soldiers arriving in Ostend in Belgium about 80 miles from Waterloo just an hour before he boarded a cross channel ferry.
And on arriving in London hot footed it to his favourite newspaper to tell them (at a handsome price, of course) and then found himself arrested and slung in jail.
The reason for this was that year before a similar travel weary and bedraggled stranger arrived in town to proclaim Napoleon's death by Russian Cossacks.
He delivered this exciting news to the stock exchange - which should have been a red flag.
When pressed by the excitable brokers to tell more, he told them "No, no I have letters of import for the Prince Regent about the matter, I must away to him at once!" or something of that nature.
It was, as you know, complete bollocks and rather than h hurrying to the Prince Regent, the stranger disappeared into the English countryside.
But it did send share prices rocketing for a day or so until the truth emerged.
And certain wealthy business men made a killing selling previously worthless shares while the market rocketed to a previously unknown high.
When the scandal emerged it took down quite a few well known political names including several 'radical' politicians.
The left were as bent as corkscrews even then.
And, though the arrested man was not trying to be deceitful, he was still wrong.
The battle he heard about was the Battle of Quatre Bras in which Wellington, caught by surprise by Napoleon's quick advance from France, managed to beat back the French advance and buy time for the allies to organise their forces for the deciding clash at nearby Waterloo a few days later.
In fact the main battle was actually taking place as the unlucky traveller arrived in London with his honest, hopefully lucrative but still completely wrong news.

The second story is of the old Duke of Wellington himself.
Decades after the battle he was attending a soirée in Paris thrown by a rich socialite.
On entering the ballroom several old French soldiers who fought at the battle, made a show of turning their backs to him in the type of pansified ruffling fluster that the French excel at.
The socialite, mortified at this snub to her guest of honour, was tearfully apologising to the Duke for her compatriot's bad manners when the Duke touched her arm and reassuringly said,
"Don't worry, Madame. I've seen those backs before."

Posted by: Sir Ian Botham at September 13, 2020 09:49 AM (0EkGe)

136 One reason I was enthusiastic about homeschooling my kids for part of their education was the chance to make sure they read important, good stuff rather than this week's diversity checkbox items. They read Shakespeare and Browning and Keats and Coleridge and Poe and Doyle and Conrad and Maugham and Waugh and Thurber and Wodehouse and Mencken and Borges and Verne and Jane Austen and Wilkie Collins and Dickens and Saki and . . .

At times I feel like part of the underground movement in Fahrenheit 451.

Posted by: Trimegistus at September 13, 2020 09:49 AM (R1+YM)

137 #29: "I don't know how Nixon won. Everyone I know voted for McGovern!"

Posted by: Catch Thirty-Thr33 at September 13, 2020 09:49 AM (SSJSf)

138 78
Good morning, all. No one knows who dis?
Posted by: Blonde Morticia at September 13, 2020 09:31 AM (SFAhl)


The book jacket is a giveaway.

'Mornin' Horde!

Posted by: Emmie at September 13, 2020 09:50 AM (4JM5Y)

139 Francis Marion, the Swamp Fox of our history.

Leslie Nielsen was the Swamp Fox on the tv show.
Posted by: JT at September 13, 2020


*
*

I was tempted to throw that out as a trivia question, but you answered it as if I had. Good work!

Posted by: Wolfus Aurelius at September 13, 2020 09:50 AM (rpbg1)

140 129 Actually as a mostly military history reader my whole life I can pick up any military narrative and start anywhere in it, I know how they got there and how it ended.
Posted by: Skip at September 13, 2020 09:48 AM (OjZpE)

- "Hey, I just picked up this book about Hiroshima!"

- "Hmm. So much carnage and destruction. And yet--"

- "Buhbuhbuhbuh.... don't ruin it for me, I'm only a few pages in!"

- *facepalm*

Posted by: Warai-otoko at September 13, 2020 09:50 AM (6FeV1)

141 Yesterday should have been Professor Neil Peart's 68th birthday. In addition to being a poet and author, he was also a percussionist.

Posted by: Catch Thirty-Thr33 at September 13, 2020 09:50 AM (SSJSf)

142 We can't fully appreciate Citizen Kane from the perspective of today. Firstly, Kane is clearly William Randolph Hearst, a larger than life character of his time. Before Trump became POTUS, there is no one on our stage today who compares. And it wasn't a flattering portrayal. So Welles pissed off the most powerful media figure of his time.

In the movie "Mr. Jones" Gareth Jones needed somebody to run with the evidence that Walter Duranty was covering up the Holomodor. All of Hearst's gatekeepers told him to fuck off until he connived a way to get in front of the magnate, who relished a chance to skewer the Slimes

Posted by: Captain Hate at September 13, 2020 09:51 AM (y7DUB)

143 Bought more books from Edward Hamilton. My only complaint with them is that their catalog descriptions sometimes make a book sound more appealing than it really is.

King Arthurby Nicholas Higham, which argues that Arthur never existed and was a myth who evolved from Celtic and mediaeval legends. Very didactic and not as entertaining as I thought it would be. I put it down and probably won't pick it up again.

The Pope Who Would Be King, about Pius IX and his transition from inspiration to the revolutionaries of 1848 to a repressive reactionary. I dipped a toe into this and will probably read it when I've finished the new Hitler bio.

The Fall of the Dynasties, from 1963, about the collapse of the word after 1914. Probably won't get into that one until the cold, dark days of winter.

Posted by: Mary Poppins' Practically Perfect Piercing at September 13, 2020 09:51 AM (2JVJo)

144 Sadly until I figure out why ebooks are not downloading my reading is going to be curtailed.

Posted by: Skip at September 13, 2020 09:52 AM (OjZpE)

145 119 - I think you're right, and one of the interesting things about Kael's essay is that she focused a lot on how the writer, Herman Mankiewicz, really did put a fair bit of Welles himself into the character. It was Welles who was the orphaned prodigy, not Hearst (although he didn't have a poor upbringing like the fictional Kane).

Posted by: Dr. Mabuse at September 13, 2020 09:52 AM (Y8Re1)

146 Gidget and Fred Kohner?

Posted by: JAS at September 13, 2020 09:52 AM (2BZBZ)

147 77: Yes. Libraries are largely a gathering spot in my area..and very noisy. Librarians largely push an agenda with their programming. I go as little as possible

Posted by: CN at September 13, 2020 09:52 AM (ONvIw)

148 Video on Utoob, "The Truth About the Brown Recluse". Turns out, it's about spiders.

Posted by: klaftern at September 13, 2020 09:52 AM (RuIsu)

149 127 Anon

The Nazi govt beheaded Erich Maria Remarque's sister for that... although mostly because they couldn't get at Remarque himself.

Posted by: mnw at September 13, 2020 09:53 AM (Cssks)

150 136: Because you are.

Posted by: CN at September 13, 2020 09:53 AM (ONvIw)

151 I read "Our Lady of Fatima" by William Thomas Welch. I just got one word to recommend to you. "Penances."

Posted by: JAS at September 13, 2020 09:53 AM (2BZBZ)

152 127 And if there is a "beyond war level" crime, it is that Dresden GER, after being leveled more thoroughly than Hiroshima, fell under the Soviet rule afterwards.

-
I read The Fire and the Darkness by Sinclair McKay about the Valentine's Day bombing a while ago. I've forgotten the details but one haunting story was about an ordinary German woman sentenced to death because she made a casual comment to the effect that she doubted that Germany could win the war.
Posted by: Anonosaurus Wrecks, Tyrannosaur Wrangler at September 13, 2020 09:47 AM (+y/Ru)

This would make Klemperer's diaries even more fascinating to read.

Posted by: Catch Thirty-Thr33 at September 13, 2020 09:53 AM (SSJSf)

153

My Antifa Lover might be a humor book based on some of the reviews



59 pages of an Antifa soldier watching his girlfriend with other men from inside a hidden wall in her bedroom. Compelling and true to life.




I was interested in a good romance novel but this quickly turned into something weird. I'm not sure what "pegging" means, but when the male antifa love kept asking for it i knew something was off.

Posted by: TheQuietMan at September 13, 2020 09:53 AM (EMCcL)

154 144 Sadly until I figure out why ebooks are not downloading my reading is going to be curtailed.
Posted by: Skip at September 13, 2020 09:52 AM (OjZpE)


Airplane mode?

Posted by: I am the Shadout Mapes, the Housekeeper at September 13, 2020 09:54 AM (PiwSw)

155 I'm currently enjoying a non-fiction book and one that's very appropriate for our times: The Great Influenza: The Story of the Deadliest Pandemic in History, by one John M. Barry. It begins a little slowly, recounting the sad state of American medicine in the 1870s, and contains a mini-lecture on the nature of viruses in general and the influenza virus in particular. Still fascinating.

This pandemic was a real one. In comparison, the nonsense we're continually being sold today looks like a firecracker; the 1918-1919 pandemic was an atomic bomb.

Posted by: Wolfus Aurelius at September 13, 2020 09:54 AM (rpbg1)

156 Delving further into Thomas Perry books with The Informant, a continuation of the story of The Butcher Boy, who tries to stay out of his old life as a contract killer for the mob, but the mob has other ideas. Kind of a retread of previous plot points, but Perry is a good enough writer to make it work.

Started Last of the Breed by Louis L'Amour- not a western, but set in Russia and features a downed US pilot trying to survive in the wilderness after a prison escape.

Posted by: Charlotte at September 13, 2020 09:54 AM (kDUUX)

157 I'd just say that his BEST work will ensure that he's remembered for generations, even if he did produce it right at the beginning of his life, and contemporaries who had more success at the time won't be remembered at all.
Posted by: Dr. Mabuse at September 13, 2020 09:41 AM (Y8Re1)


Exactly. Who remembers John Houseman except as the cranky professor in The Paper Chase, if anybody remembers the movie at all? And yet for years, Houseman was credited as the real genius of the Mercury Theater of the Air and of Kane.

I would have loved to have met Welles, though, having read My Lunches With Orson, he'd have either batted me away with a cutting remark or been snide behind my back.

Posted by: Mary Poppins' Practically Perfect Piercing at September 13, 2020 09:54 AM (2JVJo)

158 RE: Crow Killer, if you're not above a little historical fiction, Mountain Man by Vardis Fisher is a charming read and one of the works that Jerimiah Johnson was based upon. It's one I re-read every couple or three years or so.

Posted by: H at September 13, 2020 09:54 AM (bA43l)

159 there are too many particular details to kane, to be a pastiche, much like plainview was clearly doheny, in sinclairs imagination, there was an era when murdoch was considered such an eminence gris that he inspired the villiian in tomorrow never dies, even though he had elements of robert maxwell, and the protagonist in something called the paper man, where he orchestrates a coup in the uk,

Posted by: bolivar de gris at September 13, 2020 09:55 AM (hMlTh)

160 155 We have better medical care now.

Posted by: CN at September 13, 2020 09:55 AM (ONvIw)

161 I've forgotten the details but one haunting story was about an ordinary German woman sentenced to death because she made a casual comment to the effect that she doubted that Germany could win the war.

I've come across that in Downfall - sometime in 1944 Hitler ordered that "defeatism" be made a capital crime.

Good thing he couldn't read Goebbels' diary, since the minister was himself a bit of a defeatist around then.

Posted by: Mary Poppins' Practically Perfect Piercing at September 13, 2020 09:57 AM (2JVJo)

162 And maybe it's not fair to judge Welles by the last
bit of work he did before he died; not many of us go out on an all-time
high note, if we live long enough. I'd just say that his BEST work
will ensure that he's remembered for generations, even if he did produce
it right at the beginning of his life, and contemporaries who had more
success at the time won't be remembered at all.

Posted by: Dr. Mabuse


Yeah, Welles coasted on someone else's outstanding zither work.

Posted by: pep at September 13, 2020 09:57 AM (v16oJ)

163 144 Sadly until I figure out why ebooks are not downloading my reading is going to be curtailed.
Posted by: Skip at September 13, 2020 09:52 AM (OjZpE)
---

I held down the on/off button for 40 seconds until my e-reader (a basic Kindle) reset itself. That solved the problem.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, Michigangsta at September 13, 2020 09:57 AM (Dc2NZ)

164 Leslie Nielsen was the Swamp Fox on the tv show.

Surely you're joking.

Posted by: Mary Poppins' Practically Perfect Piercing at September 13, 2020 09:57 AM (2JVJo)

165 If you go to London, try to visit Apsley House, which was gifted to the Duke of Wellington.
Basically, he saved the world, and so the place is heaped with priceless gifts from every grateful country.
He held a dinner every year on the anniversary of Waterloo until there weren't any surviving officers to attend.

Posted by: artemis at September 13, 2020 09:57 AM (AwPyG)

166 "there are too many particular details to kane"

Yep, and that's how Hearst saw it.
"You'll never work in this town again."

Posted by: Ignoramus at September 13, 2020 09:58 AM (9TdxA)

167 "I love to read. My education is self-inflicted."

- Groucho Marx, autodidact (which replaced the horsedidact)

Posted by: BackwardsBoy - Joe Biden killed my career at September 13, 2020 09:58 AM (HaL55)

168 I'm rereading "The Book of Laughter and Forgetting" by Milan Kundera. I wanted to reread
"The Joke" as it has been coming up a lot lately in various interweb discussions but I've been looking for it for months and can't seem to find a copy.

Posted by: Who knew at September 13, 2020 09:58 AM (SfO/T)

169 WHo was "bosomy dirty book writer"? Shirley Lord?
Posted by: All Hail Eris, Michigangsta at September 13, 2020 09:48 AM (Dc2NZ)


Yes.

Posted by: Mary Poppins' Practically Perfect Piercing at September 13, 2020 09:58 AM (2JVJo)

170 Lord of Chaos is good. I often run the climatic scene through my head when bored.

Posted by: Jamaica NYC at September 13, 2020 09:59 AM (4vNgL)

171 @163
The kids call that a "hard reset". When in doubt, turn it off without shutting down.

Posted by: artemis at September 13, 2020 09:59 AM (AwPyG)

172 Obviously not airplane mode, just tried again, search book, not there, shows startdownloading and the needle so to speak never moves. Deleted it numerous times and same thing.
Downloaded Prager's book ( over 500 pgs) then Sharpe's Trafalgar which is stuck, Lloyd's book went fine, tried Jack Cashill and it failed.

Posted by: Skip at September 13, 2020 10:00 AM (OjZpE)

173 135 I believe Georgette Heyer's "a Civil Contract" used the market manipulation/crash as a plot point. The hero makes a killing in the market, not because he is venal, but because as an experienced soldier he knows that Wellington has to be winning. Very interesting.

Posted by: Dr Alice at September 13, 2020 10:00 AM (sPgUt)

174 8 Vic

I had high hopes for Dies the Fire by SM Stirling since the first book set things up so well and established the new reality. Made it thru the second book and a bit into the third book (Corvallis), then quit. No interest in reading further and might gave not started the third book if I had not been able to check it out free from library.

Posted by: Charlotte at September 13, 2020 10:00 AM (kDUUX)

175 there was an era when murdoch was considered such an eminence gris that he inspired the villiian in tomorrow never dies, even though he had elements of robert maxwell

So many of these attempts to shoehorn present-day villains and issues into any kind of art, but especially movies, just backfires. At best, the whole thing is forgotten, and at worst, the supposedly urgent message being delivered is garbled and incomprehensible. George Lucas's Star Wars sequel movies were supposedly a dark allegory about Bush and Iraq War. Does anybody remember that? Thankfully not; the movies are bad enough as it is, but that topical reference, considered so daring and visionary at the time, has almost evaporated.

Posted by: Dr. Mabuse at September 13, 2020 10:00 AM (Y8Re1)

176 This evening's re-read will be "Spy: The Funny Years".

Okay, off to seize the day.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, Michigangsta at September 13, 2020 10:01 AM (Dc2NZ)

177 Exactly. Who remembers John Houseman except as the cranky professor in The Paper Chase, if anybody remembers the movie at all? And yet for years, Houseman was credited as the real genius of the Mercury Theater of the Air and of Kane.
. . .
Posted by: Mary Poppins' Practically Perfect Piercing at September 13, 2020


*
*

Houseman is mentioned on Seinfeld. A character named Berg is in the episode, and Jerry does a Houseman drawl in saying his name: "Mist-ah Berrrg."

But you're right, not many people would remember him, or know him, now.

Posted by: Wolfus Aurelius at September 13, 2020 10:02 AM (rpbg1)

178 Strzrok is on with Chuck Todd this morning, presumably to promote his new book where he denies any Trump animus, and confesses that he did things so much by the book that it cost Hillary POTUS, his greatest regret.

Will Chuck ask Strzok him how and why his official phone got atomized?

Posted by: Ignoramus at September 13, 2020 10:02 AM (9TdxA)

179 At times I feel like part of the underground movement in Fahrenheit 451.


==


Indeed.

Posted by: runner at September 13, 2020 10:03 AM (zr5Kq)

180 George Lucas's Star Wars sequel movies were supposedly a dark allegory
about Bush and Iraq War. Does anybody remember that? Thankfully not;
the movies are bad enough as it is


Don't sell them short. They weren't just bad enough, they were spectacularly bad.

Posted by: pep at September 13, 2020 10:04 AM (v16oJ)

181 Another I've been reading is Beacon Lights of Literature, an old 9th grade textbook. Includes Midsummer Night's Dream and Ivanhoe, complete, along with a big chunk of the Odessey (prose). Plus a mass of short stories and poetry.

A lot more demanding than when I was in school, and obviously not what they're getting now. It has its flaws, mainly a heavy bias toward Romanticism. There are literally no poems between the ballads and the Ancient Mariner. Still, interesting stuff. I'd almost forgotten how much I liked "The Twa Corbies". The most recent well known story was "The Most Dangerous Game."

And, FWIW, I actually had a good teacher for 9th grade English. One of two in the 7th - 12th grade run. In NY schools of the time, 1/3 wasn't too bad.

Posted by: Eeyore at September 13, 2020 10:05 AM (7X3UV)

182 @173
One of my favorite books. That one, and The Toll Gate.

Posted by: artemis at September 13, 2020 10:05 AM (AwPyG)

183 155 We have better medical care now.
Posted by: CN at September 13, 2020


*
*

We certainly do. Antibiotics to treat pneumonia, for one thing. But part of Barry's story is how a certain number of American medical scientists dragged America's doctors, kicking and screaming, to parity with those in Germany. Without their research and discoveries prior to 1918, the influenza would have been worse still.

Posted by: Wolfus Aurelius at September 13, 2020 10:06 AM (rpbg1)

184 I'm rereading "The Book of Laughter and Forgetting" by Milan Kundera. I wanted to reread


Oh what a great idea. I just had a flashback to the 80s. A girl gave me that one and then I read the rest of Kundera.

There was a series called Writers from the Other Europe. I think Phillip Roth edited it.

Posted by: Bandersnatch at September 13, 2020 10:06 AM (q2K0j)

185 128 Francis Marion, the Swamp Fox of our history.

Leslie Nielsen was the Swamp Fox on the tv show.
Posted by: JT at September 13, 2020 09:47 AM (arJlL)
________

Really, that's whom Mel Gibson is playing in The Patriot. Based on it, at least. Like Aubrey and Cochrane. (Or Hornblower and Cochrane.)

Posted by: Eeyore at September 13, 2020 10:06 AM (7X3UV)

186 Surf Existentialism: Waiting For Gidgetot

Posted by: Anonosaurus Wrecks, Tyrannosaur Wrangler at September 13, 2020 10:07 AM (+y/Ru)

187 read "Wages of Destruction" a month or so back, was impressed by the details of the economic analysis of the 3rd Reich.
A friend (who i was describing it to) kept asking why Hitler didn't just quit while he was ahead and i couldn't remember enough details (if they were even there) to answer. in retrospect, i thought about Tuchman's book, "The March of Folly" (probably still on my list of best books) and why govt's do what isn't in there best interests. Not sure her examples are all good ones, though.

Posted by: yara at September 13, 2020 10:07 AM (rde8g)

188 Started Last of the Breed by Louis L'Amour- not a western, but set in Russia and features a downed US pilot trying to survive in the wilderness after a prison escape.
Posted by: Charlotte

THAT is my fave L'Amour book !

Posted by: JT at September 13, 2020 10:08 AM (arJlL)

189 Time Magazine's Man of the Year dropped a deuce in Nancy Pelosi's driveway.

Posted by: Boss Moss at September 13, 2020 10:08 AM (NpeXC)

190 They don't make a 9.7" kindle anymore, so once mine died I haven't read like I should.

Posted by: jsg at September 13, 2020 10:08 AM (IC+Cn)

191 Imagine being an English teacher today.If you had your druthers what would you assign? I'd assign adventure stories to middle schoolers. Captains Courageous, Treasure Island, anything by Edgar Rice Burroughs. Maybe the mountain man stories you are mention.
Stories of derring-do

Posted by: artemis at September 13, 2020 10:08 AM (AwPyG)

192 And, FWIW, I actually had a good teacher for 9th grade English. One of two in the 7th - 12th grade run. In NY schools of the time, 1/3 wasn't too bad.
Posted by: Eeyore at September 13, 2020 10:05 AM (7X3UV)

My ninth grade English teacher wasn't that great. And the only thing I remember about my ninth grade teacher in summer school was that she was so bloody hot.

Posted by: Catch Thirty-Thr33 at September 13, 2020 10:09 AM (SSJSf)

193 Who remembers John Houseman except as the cranky professor in The Paper Chase, if anybody remembers the movie at all?
________

I always remember a scene in one of the Naked Gun movies, where he's a driving instructor.

And yes, I remember Nielsen as Swamp Fox. Watched it as a kid.

Posted by: Eeyore at September 13, 2020 10:09 AM (7X3UV)

194 I'd like to let the horde know how much we appreciate your support of the book sale. Amazon says we moved 1557 Kindle Free E-books and 1351 Kindle Paid E-Books from right-thinking authors. A lot of that can be attributed to the horde. Sunday was (as usual) the biggest day for the sale. We'll do it again over the Thanksgiving Day weekend.

Posted by: Hans G. Schantz at September 13, 2020 10:09 AM (FXjhj)

195 Read a few of Nabokov's short stories he wrote at the end of WW2. Not surprisingly they're written from a Russian perspective as he was still getting used to his new country. Edmund Wilson helped him out quite a bit although he was an odd character in a lot of ways, including taking an odd offense to Vlad's sarcasm and refusing to fully accept what the native Rooski told him about the nature of Russian poetry. And beating the fuck out of his then wife, Mary McCarthy. I've just started reading Bend Sinister, his first full length fiction written in the US. It starts out strangely experimental in a way I had difficulty dealing with, although maybe that was from the uncomfortably weather which is now relieved by a cold front.

Posted by: Captain Hate at September 13, 2020 10:10 AM (y7DUB)

196 On one Tonite Show, Orson was the first guest, then Robert Blake came out, looked at Orson and said "Mr. Wells......you make Wimpy look skimpy"

Wells replied "Well, I'm fat and you're ugly, but I can diet"
Posted by: JT at September 13, 2020 09:28 AM (arJlL)


I watched that live when it happened! It was hilarious.

And Robert Blake has more than one screw loose.

Posted by: OregonMuse, AoSHQ Thought Leader, Pants Monitor & Charismatic MAGAfauna Exemplar at September 13, 2020 10:10 AM (qrPgC)

197 I've started and stopped several books this week, mostly on audio (I like to listen while I work).

I listened to The Cove by Ron Rash, and that was a good one. I've read his short stories, and this is a good novel. WWI era, Appalachian romance. Not the bodice-ripping kind, just the heart wrenching kind.

I finished The 37th Parallel by Ben Mezrich--an exploration of paranormal and UFO activity in the US. I can't help myself with this stuff.

Audio books that I started, and quickly returned because of too much Acting! Yes! Thank You!!!! were: Killers of the Flower Moon, by David Grann; Above the Waterfall, by Ron Rash.

I'll read those in tree version myself.

Posted by: April, Freedom Now! at September 13, 2020 10:10 AM (OX9vb)

198 @186
Ha!
I've always loved surf genre music.

And "gidget" = "girl midget." She was very short

Posted by: artemis at September 13, 2020 10:10 AM (AwPyG)

199 We're past 100 comments, so rather than willow myself:

Noone uses Lower Alabama.

Anyone who knows enough to know what Lower Alabama is, knows it would be better to say "The Holy City of Dothan" instead.

Posted by: Thing From Snowy Mountain, Cryptid Anarchist at September 13, 2020 10:11 AM (MCtOo)

200 192 And, FWIW, I actually had a good teacher for 9th grade English. One of two in the 7th - 12th grade run. In NY schools of the time, 1/3 wasn't too bad.
Posted by: Eeyore at September 13, 2020 10:05 AM (7X3UV)

My ninth grade English teacher wasn't that great. And the only thing I remember about my ninth grade teacher in summer school was that she was so bloody hot.
Posted by: Catch Thirty-Thr33 at September 13, 2020 10:09 AM (SSJSf)
_________

We had zero hot teachers in my day. But one of the good English teachers was cute - when she taught my mother. My brother (much younger) says that later they got a Hollywood level babe. But not in my day.

Posted by: Eeyore at September 13, 2020 10:12 AM (7X3UV)

201 191 Imagine being an English teacher today.If you had your druthers what would you assign? I'd assign adventure stories to middle schoolers. Captains Courageous, Treasure Island, anything by Edgar Rice Burroughs. Maybe the mountain man stories you are mention.
Stories of derring-do
Posted by: artemis at September 13, 2020 10:08 AM (AwPyG)


I'd have different reading lists boys and girls. Boys don't care whether a plucky heroine falls in love with some mysterious but handsome dude who may be harboring a dark secret.

Posted by: OregonMuse, AoSHQ Thought Leader, Pants Monitor & Charismatic MAGAfauna Exemplar at September 13, 2020 10:13 AM (qrPgC)

202 Oh, also, I visited the little used bookstore next to work that is run by the hospital TWIGs. Since my last visit, someone donated a handful of Rex Stout books, so I bought all six of them.

Currently reading The Doorbell Rang, which I've watched about 75 times, because the series is Mr. April's favorite thing to watch when he's bored with other tv.

Posted by: April, Freedom Now! at September 13, 2020 10:13 AM (OX9vb)

203 There was a series called Writers from the Other Europe. I think Phillip Roth edited it.
Posted by: Bandersnatch at September 13, 2020 10:06 AM (q2K0j)


Correct. Roth was a prick in a lot of ways but he and Penguin did a great job of exposing samizdat writers to a western audience.

Posted by: Captain Hate at September 13, 2020 10:13 AM (y7DUB)

204 Who remembers John Houseman except as the cranky professor in The Paper Chase, if anybody remembers the movie at all?

Robin Williams studied with John Houseman, and did a hilarious parody of him on SCTV. "An Evening With John Houseman and his acclaimed reading of the Melonville & Tri-Cities Area Telephone Book, 1982"

Posted by: Dr. Mabuse at September 13, 2020 10:14 AM (Y8Re1)

205 And, FWIW, I actually had a good teacher for 9th grade English. One of two in the 7th - 12th grade run. In NY schools of the time, 1/3 wasn't too bad.
Posted by: Eeyore at September 13, 2020


*
*

I managed to dodge horrors like Catcher in high school. Our 11th grade class read The Haunting of Hill House,, which has the advantage of being creepily entertaining as well as being literary.

In college, though, they hit me with Dubliners, Hemingway's short stories, Catch-22, The Horse's Mouth, and other things that bored me silly. I like a *story*, dammit. If they'd handed me Steinbeck, I might have come to appreciate him a lot earlier than I did.

Posted by: Wolfus Aurelius at September 13, 2020 10:14 AM (rpbg1)

206 Ha!
I've always loved surf genre music.

And "gidget" = "girl midget." She was very short
Posted by: artemis at September 13, 2020 10:10 AM (AwPyG)


I always thought it was; girl widget = gidget = universally useful

Posted by: PUE 206 at September 13, 2020 10:14 AM (D/SYi)

207 183 john barry's book "The Great Influenza" in his early chapter's also describes how the head army doctor was determined that THIS time fewer soldiers would die of non-battle causes so he gathered as many of the more recently graduated doctors (of whom my g'father was one) to serve.
one result being that, in the general population, there were fewer "good" doctors to handle the flu. otoh, given that he traces the cause to some soldiers in the midwest maybe it wouldn't have made much difference

Posted by: yara at September 13, 2020 10:15 AM (rde8g)

208 "141 Yesterday should have been Professor Neil Peart's 68th birthday. In addition to being a poet and author, he was also a percussionist."
*********
I like shooting black powder revolvers, too!

Posted by: Cosda at September 13, 2020 10:16 AM (n1Fig)

209 Isn't "My Antifa Lover" (parody or not) basically the same plot as "V for Vendetta"?

Mask-wearing enigmatic revolutionary entices woman with the mystique of his revolutionary fervor and then firebombs a government building, triggering the downfall of oppression and they all lived nihilistically never after.

Posted by: Muldoon at September 13, 2020 10:16 AM (Fc5rx)

210 Since my last visit, someone donated a handful of Rex Stout books, so I bought all six of them.

Currently reading The Doorbell Rang, which I've watched about 75 times, because the series is Mr. April's favorite thing to watch when he's bored with other tv.
Posted by: April, Freedom Now! at September 13, 2020


*
*

That one really cemented the adversarial relationship Stout had with Hoover. Stout had been an outspoken critic of the FBI for years, and Hoover had an extensive dossier on him. Stout was never a commie that I know of; he was more like us here, critical of government excesses.

What are the other 5 Wolfe books?

Posted by: Wolfus Aurelius at September 13, 2020 10:16 AM (rpbg1)

211 Houseman is mentioned on Seinfeld. A character named Berg is in the episode, and Jerry does a Houseman drawl in saying his name: "Mist-ah Berrrg."

But you're right, not many people would remember him, or know him, now.
Posted by: Wolfus Aurelius at September 13, 2020 10:02 AM (rpbg1)


"Smith Barney. They make money the old fashioned-way."

(beat)

"They EARN it."

Posted by: OregonMuse, AoSHQ Thought Leader, Pants Monitor & Charismatic MAGAfauna Exemplar at September 13, 2020 10:17 AM (qrPgC)

212 Just got done reading- Japan 1941 by Eri Hotta. Interesting insights of the lead in to war.

Posted by: PUE 206 at September 13, 2020 10:17 AM (D/SYi)

213 Oh, I also bought the complete In Search Of. . . with Leonard Nimoy. Having a blast watching that, especially "In Search Of. . .The Coming Ice Age."

Posted by: Mary Poppins' Practically Perfect Piercing at September 13, 2020 10:17 AM (2JVJo)

214 Dubliners. I hear you. Who thought that was a good book?

Posted by: artemis at September 13, 2020 10:18 AM (AwPyG)

215 Having a blast watching that, especially "In Search Of. . .The Coming Ice Age."
Posted by: Mary Poppins' Practically Perfect Piercing

They should have made it an episodic offering. We are still searching.

Posted by: Tonypete at September 13, 2020 10:19 AM (Rvt88)

216 My ninth grade English teacher wasn't that great. And the only thing I remember about my ninth grade teacher in summer school was that she was so bloody hot.
Posted by: Catch Thirty-Thr33 at September 13, 2020 10:09 AM (SSJSf)

In 9th and 11th grade I had the same young woman for Algebra and Algebra II.

She always wore mini-skirts and had wonderful legs and a most splendiferous behind. She had long reddish blond hair and a beautiful face.

if I had had a gnarled pld man for those classes, I'd be a nuclear physicist today.

Posted by: JT at September 13, 2020 10:19 AM (arJlL)

217 I kinda like the later Orson Welles. He seemed comfortable in his life, got paid enough to do what he liked, sat around telling stories and didn't really seem to care about unfinished work. He's like us.

Posted by: lowandslow at September 13, 2020 10:19 AM (4thlk)

218 The mention of Crow Killer is timely for me. I've read the book several times and it's gripping.
I just finished a book, X Biedler, Vigilante.
He recounts an encounter with Johnson where he ate the liver of a Sioux Indian in Montana. Crow Killer gives a different account but the two men knew and respected each other.
The editors, as it's a collection of Biedler's own writings as well as newspaper and other accounts of his contemporaries are, Helen Fitzgerald Sanders and William H Bertsche Jr.
Foreward by A B Guthrie Jr.Copyright is 1957 published bu the Univ of OK Press. A good read discovered in a small town used bookstore in Montana recently.

Posted by: Winston, dreg of society at September 13, 2020 10:19 AM (d9Irc)

219 Dubliners. I hear you. Who thought that was a good book?

Posted by: artemis at September 13, 2020 10:18 AM (AwPyG)

Good? sure. Great? Absolutely not.

Posted by: CharlieBrown'sDildo at September 13, 2020 10:19 AM (xT2tT)

220 Regarding Orson Welles: Fred Allen's memoir of his days in radio (titled "Treadmill to Oblivion") has a very funny chapter in which Welles came on his show and they did an adaptation of "Les Miserables." Welles was Jean Valjean and Allen was Inspector Javert.

On the show Welles told Allen they would costar, but the skit was written so that he copped all the lines and Allen said nothing at all. Absolutely hilarious.

Posted by: Dr Alice at September 13, 2020 10:20 AM (sPgUt)

221 john barry's book "The Great Influenza" in his early chapter's also describes how the head army doctor was determined that THIS time fewer soldiers would die of non-battle causes so he gathered as many of the more recently graduated doctors (of whom my g'father was one) to serve. one result being that, in the general population, there were fewer "good" doctors to handle the flu. . . . .
Posted by: yara at September 13, 2020


*
*

Right. American medical schools and training in the late 19th century and the very early 20th were very poor. The older doctors, the ones who would not have been drafted or joined up, would have been those "trained" in the earlier style: never did a dissection, never saw a patient, probably did not have a college degree at all let alone one in a science.

Posted by: Wolfus Aurelius at September 13, 2020 10:20 AM (rpbg1)

222 Oh, there's an ice age coming, all right, if you wait long enough.
It's like the press conference where the Cal Tech expert answered a reporter's question that the latest faultline would indeed impact Los Angeles.
In about a million years or so.

Posted by: artemis at September 13, 2020 10:20 AM (AwPyG)

223 And it was only later that the penny dropped and I realized I'd been told to fuck off by William Hearst.
Posted by: Bandersnatch at September 13, 2020 09:35 AM (q2K0j)

Very Nice!

I met Patty at a fund raiser in New Yawk City at the Chelsea Piers back before the burning times.

Kinda of an older dumpy blonde then but she was nice enough. I would have made a move on her but I think her old man was nearby so I just ordered another drink.


Posted by: Hairyback Guy at September 13, 2020 10:21 AM (Z+IKu)

224
Sounds like that Liver-Eating Johnson took things just a little too far.


Posted by: Hangnail-Eating naturalfake at September 13, 2020 10:21 AM (dWwl8)

225 And Robert Blake has more than one screw loose.

Posted by: OregonMuse, AoSHQ Thought Leader, Pants Monitor & Charismatic MAGAfauna Exemplar

We could ask Mrs. Blake..... oh.

Posted by: JT at September 13, 2020 10:22 AM (arJlL)

226 Dubliners. I hear you. Who thought that was a good book?

Back when he was still somewhat sane (this was like 2003), Jonah Goldberg had a good line that went something like "The postmodern Left is angry at science because they keep making things that work, while to date the Duke faculty hasn't been able to light a football stadium with the adverbs from Dubliners".

Posted by: Ian S. at September 13, 2020 10:22 AM (6XLoz)

227 Yep, and that's how Hearst saw it.

"You'll never work in this town again."
Posted by: Ignoramus at September 13, 2020 09:58 AM (9TdxA)


And he almost made that threat stick. For many years, Welles had trouble financing the movies he wanted to make. Hearst must've pulled a lot of strings.

Posted by: OregonMuse, AoSHQ Thought Leader, Pants Monitor & Charismatic MAGAfauna Exemplar at September 13, 2020 10:22 AM (qrPgC)

228
C'mon, man!

Posted by: Booger-Eating Joe Biden at September 13, 2020 10:22 AM (dWwl8)

229 Book nerds!

Posted by: Ogre at September 13, 2020 10:22 AM (KnJdm)

230 All right, I've got to go down to the drugstore and then perhaps work on the book.

Hope you all have a lovely day.

Posted by: Mary Poppins' Practically Perfect Piercing at September 13, 2020 10:22 AM (2JVJo)

231 Dubliners. I hear you. Who thought that was a good book?
Posted by: artemis at September 13, 2020


*
*

I need to try it again now that I have more "literary" taste. But Joyce annoyed me with that Euro style of using dashes to introduce a line of dialog instead of a quote mark, and no mark at all at the end:

-- You must be joking.
-- Not at all.

It makes me feel claustrophobic to see that.

Posted by: Wolfus Aurelius at September 13, 2020 10:23 AM (rpbg1)

232 I listened to The Cove by Ron Rash, and that was a good one. I've read his short stories, and this is a good novel. WWI era, Appalachian romance. Not the bodice-ripping kind, just the heart wrenching kind.
....

Audio books that I started, and quickly returned because of too much Acting! Yes! Thank You!!!! were: Killers of the Flower Moon, by David Grann; Above the Waterfall, by Ron Rash.


The Cove is one of the only books by Rash I haven't read. Above the Waterfall was typically well written and engaging but it was a small clip below his best work imo.

Posted by: Captain Hate at September 13, 2020 10:23 AM (y7DUB)

233 216 My ninth grade English teacher wasn't that great. And the only thing I remember about my ninth grade teacher in summer school was that she was so bloody hot.
Posted by: Catch Thirty-Thr33 at September 13, 2020 10:09 AM (SSJSf)

In 9th and 11th grade I had the same young woman for Algebra and Algebra II.

She always wore mini-skirts and had wonderful legs and a most splendiferous behind. She had long reddish blond hair and a beautiful face.

if I had had a gnarled pld man for those classes, I'd be a nuclear physicist today.
Posted by: JT at September 13, 2020 10:19 AM (arJlL)



Had a similar experience with my biology teacher, mine turned out to be having an inappropriate relationship with one of the hippie dope smoking kids I used to hang out with.

Posted by: PUE 206 at September 13, 2020 10:24 AM (D/SYi)

234 medical understanding of how diseases transfer is surprisingly recent--things we take for granted.
Florence Nightingale was sent to the Crimean war to install basic hygiene in the hospitals, and it made a huge difference. I think her story is "Faithful Friend" which is another good book.

Posted by: artemis at September 13, 2020 10:25 AM (AwPyG)

235 Greetings:

Western Book recommendation: "Bad Hand" by a guy named Robinson. It's a biography of Ranald Slidell McKenzie, one of our Civil War (1.0) generals who rarely rates a mention. But he went on to out Indian the Indians (apologies to Col. Hackworth) during his post war service on the frontiers. Some his history and accomplishments show up in the John Ford and John Wayne cavalry movie "Rio Grande". Sad ending, though.

Posted by: 11B40 at September 13, 2020 10:25 AM (evgyj)

236 214 Dubliners. I hear you. Who thought that was a good book?
Posted by: artemis at September 13, 2020 10:18 AM (AwPyG)
_________

George Orwell loved it. And Joyce in general.

To me, he's meh.

Posted by: Eeyore at September 13, 2020 10:25 AM (7X3UV)

237 The party of love, peace, and understanding is up to it again.

LA County Sheriffs
@LASDHQ
Replying to @LASDHQ
To the protesters blocking the entrance and exit of the HOSPITAL EMERGENCY ROOM yelling "We hope they die" referring to 2 LA Sheriff's ambushed today in #Compton: DO NOT BLOCK EMERGENCY ENTRIES AND EXITS TO THE HOSPITAL. People's lives are at stake when ambulances can't get through.
1:02 AM · Sep 13, 2020

Posted by: Anonosaurus Wrecks, Tyrannosaur Wrangler at September 13, 2020 10:25 AM (+y/Ru)

238 Dean Koontz. His Frankenstein series. Can't get enough of the guy. Ok, later. Gotta read.

Posted by: Cannibal Bob at September 13, 2020 10:26 AM (pmcmT)

239 214 Dubliners. I hear you. Who thought that was a good book?

Posted by: artemis at September 13, 2020 10:18 AM (AwPyG)


There was one story in it I will never forget, about a schlub who works as a copyist in a law firm (no xerox machines in those days!) who sneaks out of work early because he wants to get drunk. He can't get as drunk as he wants because he doesn't have enough money even after pawning his watch, so he goes home to beat his wife only she's not there, so he beats one of his kids instead.

It was absolutely heartbreaking. And I identified strongly with the main character, a little man beat down by life and his own poor choices.

Posted by: OregonMuse, AoSHQ Thought Leader, Pants Monitor & Charismatic MAGAfauna Exemplar at September 13, 2020 10:27 AM (qrPgC)

240 235 Bad Hand shows up in the westerns of Robert Vaughn (not Napoleon Solo).

Posted by: yara at September 13, 2020 10:28 AM (rde8g)

241 In 9th and 11th grade I had the same young woman for Algebra and Algebra II.

She always wore mini-skirts and had wonderful legs and a most splendiferous behind. She had long reddish blond hair and a beautiful face.

if I had had a gnarled pld man for those classes, I'd be a nuclear physicist today.
Posted by: JT at September 13, 2020


*
*

Tenth-grade English: My teacher was a honey-blonde lady who reportedly was a karate enthusiast. She was certainly in great shape. She was also smart, had a good sense of humor, and didn't hit us over the head with "literary" works. In 10th grade we were still focusing on grammar and diagramming sentences, so the question about "literary" fiction didn't come up much.

Posted by: Wolfus Aurelius at September 13, 2020 10:28 AM (rpbg1)

242 Goofy punctuation pulls you out of the story. I love Georgette Heyer, but she uses too many exclamation marks. !!!

Posted by: artemis at September 13, 2020 10:29 AM (AwPyG)

243 Bad Hand shows up in the westerns of Robert Vaughn (not Napoleon Solo).
Posted by: yara at September 13, 2020


*
*

There's an author named Robert Vaughn? Fiction or non-?

Posted by: Wolfus Aurelius at September 13, 2020 10:29 AM (rpbg1)

244 237 The party of love, peace, and understanding is up to it again.

LA County Sheriffs
@LASDHQ
Replying to @LASDHQ
To the protesters blocking the entrance and exit of the HOSPITAL EMERGENCY ROOM yelling "We hope they die" referring to 2 LA Sheriff's ambushed today in #Compton: DO NOT BLOCK EMERGENCY ENTRIES AND EXITS TO THE HOSPITAL. People's lives are at stake when ambulances can't get through.
1:02 AM Sep 13, 2020
Posted by: Anonosaurus Wrecks, Tyrannosaur Wrangler at September 13, 2020 10:25 AM (+y/Ru)

----------------------------

Do they not realize that those blocking the entrances and exits simply don't care?

Posted by: No One of Consequence at September 13, 2020 10:30 AM (CAJOC)

245 There was one story in it I will never forget, about a schlub who works as a copyist in a law firm (no xerox machines in those days!) who sneaks out of work early because he wants to get drunk. He can't get as drunk as he wants because he doesn't have enough money even after pawning his watch, so he goes home to beat his wife only she's not there, so he beats one of his kids instead.

It was absolutely heartbreaking. And I identified strongly with the main character, a little man beat down by life and his own poor choices.
Posted by: OregonMuse, AoSHQ Thought Leader, Pants Monitor & Charismatic MAGAfauna Exemplar at September 13, 2020


*
*

I would not have appreciated that at 19. I might find it very affecting now.

Posted by: Wolfus Aurelius at September 13, 2020 10:30 AM (rpbg1)

246 @239
You must have loved Angela's Ashes. .

Posted by: artemis at September 13, 2020 10:30 AM (AwPyG)

247 Dubliners. I hear you. Who thought that was a good book?

Posted by: artemis at September 13, 2020 10:18 AM (AwPyG)

Good? sure. Great? Absolutely not.

Posted by: CharlieBrown'sDildo at September 13, 2020 10:19 AM (xT2tT)


The last story, The Dead, was the only one that was truly memorable; the other ones were just ok with some being trite.

Posted by: Captain Hate at September 13, 2020 10:30 AM (y7DUB)

248 Dean Koontz. His Frankenstein series. Can't get enough of the guy. Ok, later. Gotta read.
Posted by: Cannibal Bob

ISWYDT

See ya Cannibal; regards to Heidi.

Posted by: JT at September 13, 2020 10:30 AM (arJlL)

249 Started Last of the Breed by Louis L'Amour- not a western, but set in Russia and features a downed US pilot trying to survive in the wilderness after a prison escape.
Posted by: Charlotte


The second to last of his novels. I was and am partial to his Sackett series of novels, but I'm an old softy for his Western genre novels.

This, I blame on my dad.

Posted by: GnuBreed at September 13, 2020 10:31 AM (Z4rgH)

250 On the show Welles told Allen they would costar, but the skit was written so that he copped all the lines and Allen said nothing at all. Absolutely hilarious.
Posted by: Dr Alice at September 13, 2020 10:20 AM (sPgUt)
_________

There's a variation of that scenario in Saki's The Peace Offering.

Posted by: Eeyore at September 13, 2020 10:31 AM (7X3UV)

251 What happened to her?

Posted by: hogmartin at September 13, 2020 09:19 AM (t+qrx)

Actually we are talking about two different series by Stirling. My original coment was about the Dies the Fire series. Those followup comments were about Island in the Sea of Time.
Posted by: Vic at September 13, 2020 09:22 AM (mpXpK)

yes,sorry, my bad

iirc, hogmartin, hippy dippy lady is horrified that the tume travellers are going to disrupt the culture of the noble natives and tries to aid them against the moderns, and ends up almost starring in a temple sacrifice, eventually meets native spear.

Posted by: vmom 2020 - The Translations of Marcus Aurelius at September 13, 2020 10:32 AM (nUhF0)

252 Pants? P-A-N-T-S ? ! ! !

Who cares about the pants?

Bastid is wearing those fru-fru socks that don't even cover his NASTY ankles.

He probable doesn't even have the modesty to wear a mask.

Posted by: Marooned at September 13, 2020 10:32 AM (yYptV)

253 you know what would work better than tweeting about not blocking the emergency entries to the hospital? Arrest everyone that is blocking the entries, Every Damn One of them.


How hard is that? Arrest criminals that are endangering lives ... but no, an impassioned tweet, begging for mercy from the terrorists ... showing compassion to the oppressed Antifa/BLM terrorists (who are funded by the same shadow men that fund the mayors that put cops on stand down).

Posted by: illiniwek at September 13, 2020 10:32 AM (Cus5s)

254 The party of love, peace, and understanding is up to it again.

LA County Sheriffs
@LASDHQ
Replying to @LASDHQ
To the protesters blocking the entrance and exit of the HOSPITAL EMERGENCY ROOM yelling "We hope they die" referring to 2 LA Sheriff's ambushed today in #Compton: DO NOT BLOCK EMERGENCY ENTRIES AND EXITS TO THE HOSPITAL. People's lives are at stake when ambulances can't get through.
1:02 AM Sep 13, 2020
Posted by: Anonosaurus Wrecks, Tyrannosaur Wrangler at September 13, 2020 10:25 AM (+y/Ru)

----------------------------

Do they not realize that those blocking the entrances and exits simply don't care?
Posted by: No One of Consequence

They should have tweeted, Gov Newsome please tell your foot soldiers to leave the hospital

Posted by: Jean at September 13, 2020 10:32 AM (Xih1H)

255 Do they not realize that those blocking the entrances and exits simply don't care?


Not care? They're doing it deliberately to force the cops to remove them.

Posted by: Mr. Peebles at September 13, 2020 10:33 AM (oVJmc)

256 As I said, I never had a hot teacher. But on a related point, it is true that every time I was in a class with a girl I had a crush on, my grades soared. I always fell for smart girls, and wanted to impress them. The last two years of HS, when I had a steady girlfriend, were a triumphant progress. (And my mother, who disliked her, never saw that she was the main reason.)

Posted by: Eeyore at September 13, 2020 10:34 AM (7X3UV)

257 238 Dean Koontz. His Frankenstein series. Can't get enough of the guy. Ok, later. Gotta read.
Posted by: Cannibal Bob at September 13, 2020 10:26 AM (pmcmT)

---------------------------------

I started reading Koontz after I got caught up on Stephen King's books back in the day. I think the first of his I read was Phantoms. I liked his take on the Frankenstein story, as well as the original Odd Thomas (I haven't read the others in that series)

Posted by: No One of Consequence at September 13, 2020 10:34 AM (CAJOC)

258 This is just disturbing. I went to Hot Air (yeah, yeah) and it's full of ads for Hottest Female Golfers. I know that the young lady with the weird name and big 'uns has featured prominently here, but I haven't clicked on anything or done any searches.

Posted by: pep at September 13, 2020 10:34 AM (v16oJ)

259 Oh well, the smart girl I married is starting to make "time to unpack more books" noises.

Posted by: Eeyore at September 13, 2020 10:35 AM (7X3UV)

260 I imagine the reason for the Sheriff's tweet is not to shame the bad guys but to alert the public to what is going on.
the sheriff has been a bright spot. The mayor of LA tried to cancel Halloween and the sheriff said there'd be no enforcement, and so the mayor had to back off.

Posted by: artemis at September 13, 2020 10:36 AM (AwPyG)

261
It's not just the cargo shorts.... it's the short socks that really set off the ensemble!

Milady (with a touch of help from me) has spent the last two days taking to huge boxes of children's books that were hastily packed and breaking them down to reasonable-size book boxes, picking out throwaways, giveaways, keepers, and ones to send the grandkids.

Some real flashbacks to our kids' yout', and reading some of those over and over and over....

Posted by: mindful webworker
We had the best of intentions...
at September 13, 2020 10:37 AM (vZ0KM)

262 243 non. lots on KU. and, correction: Robert Vaughan.

Posted by: yara at September 13, 2020 10:37 AM (rde8g)

263 Boys must pay a lot more attention to what their teachers look like. All I remember are certain personalities but names, faces....no.

Posted by: Sharon(willow's apprentice) at September 13, 2020 10:37 AM (sd8p8)

264 259 Oh well, the smart girl I married is starting to make "time to unpack more books" noises.
Posted by: Eeyore at September 13, 2020 10:35 AM (7X3UV)

--------------------------------

You've got time, then. When she starts throwing books at you, well...

Posted by: No One of Consequence at September 13, 2020 10:38 AM (CAJOC)

265 The second to last of his novels. I was and am partial to his Sackett series of novels, but I'm an old softy for his Western genre novels.

This, I blame on my dad.
Posted by: GnuBreed

As a young adult I was visiting my Dad and we noticed we had not seen the next door widower for a few days. Quite unusual. We ended up letting ourselves into his place and found him deceased, lying in bed with, if memory serves, 'The Cherokee Trail' open resting on his chest.

Not a bad way to head out.

Posted by: Tonypete at September 13, 2020 10:39 AM (Rvt88)

266 . I went to Hot Air (yeah, yeah) and it's full of ads for Hottest Female Golfers.

Don't tell midwesternprude or whatever.. she may faint.

Posted by: Jewells45 at September 13, 2020 10:39 AM (dUJdY)

267 What are the other 5 Wolfe books?
Posted by: Wolfus Aurelius at September 13, 2020 10:16 AM (rpbg1)

Three Aces, which is a collection of Too Many Clients, Might As Well Be Dead, and The Final Deduction.

Black Orchids

The Rubber Band and The Red Box, both bound in one volume.

Bad For Business, which is not a Nero Wolfe.

And, Nero Wolfe of West Thirty-Fifth Street, by William S. Baring-Gould. This is not a Nero Wolfe mystery; my husband read this one first, and says it's kind of a guide to Nero Wolfe mysteries. Timelines, relationships, that kind of thing. He loved it.

Posted by: April, Freedom Now! at September 13, 2020 10:39 AM (OX9vb)

268 This is just disturbing. I went to Hot Air (yeah, yeah) and it's full of ads for Hottest Female Golfers.
Posted by: pep at September 13, 2020 10:34 AM (v16oJ)


Ugh. It's like when you buy a vacuum cleaner or a convection oven from somewhere, and for the next month, all the emails from them are "Hey, you bought a convection oven! Here are lots more, just in case you wanted to replace it right away" or "Just some more vacuum cleaners for your collection - you can never have too many!". How may hot female golfers can any household possibly need at one time?

Posted by: hogmartin at September 13, 2020 10:39 AM (t+qrx)

269 Still thoroughly enjoying how VDH fleshes out the action in explaining why things happened to Thucydides; most recently talking about the multiple Spartan attacks on the agricultural lands in Attica. Despite the first invasion being a massive show of force in sheer numbers, the wheat fields were so fucking huge and the number of olive trees were very large *and* it was nearly impossible to totally trash any of such a resilient plant, that it was failure theater to the max. Not to be outdone in stupidity, the Athenians did the same fucking thing to the inhabitants of Megara with the same dumbfuck results.

Posted by: Captain Hate at September 13, 2020 10:40 AM (y7DUB)

270 @261
Memories of reading the same book again and again, even if it wasn't your favorite. Hopefully I'll never have to open "Put me in the Zoo" ever again.

Posted by: artemis at September 13, 2020 10:40 AM (AwPyG)

271 This may not end well. Actually, it could get ugly. Hubbymayhem and I are both going to quit smoking........AT THE SAME TIME!I Pray for us, people.

Posted by: Madamemayhem (uppity wench) at September 13, 2020 10:40 AM (Vxu+H)

272 I'm sorry to hear about ibguy. He was a good one! RIP, my friend.

Posted by: Prothonotary Warbler at September 13, 2020 10:41 AM (H3MF8)

273 This may not end well. Actually, it could get ugly. Hubbymayhem and I are both going to quit smoking........AT THE SAME TIME!I Pray for us, people.
Posted by: Madamemayhem (uppity wench)

Prayers up! For heaven's sake, DO NOT try to paper a bathroom together during this time.

Posted by: Tonypete at September 13, 2020 10:41 AM (Rvt88)

274 How may hot female golfers can any household possibly need at one time?
Posted by: hogmartin at September 13, 2020 10:39 AM (t+qrx)

----------------------------------

I suppose that depends on whether Cannibal Bob is hosting a party or dining alone.

Posted by: No One of Consequence at September 13, 2020 10:42 AM (CAJOC)

275 Hubbymayhem and I are both going to quit smoking........AT THE SAME TIME!


I call dibs on Madamemayhem's stuff.

Posted by: Bandersnatch at September 13, 2020 10:42 AM (q2K0j)

276 >>I've come across that in Downfall - sometime in 1944 Hitler ordered that "defeatism" be made a capital crime.

Seems a bit over the top.

Posted by: JackStraw at September 13, 2020 10:43 AM (ZLI7S)

277 Delving further into Thomas Perry books with The
Informant, a continuation of the story of The Butcher Boy, who tries to
stay out of his old life as a contract killer for the mob, but the mob
has other ideas. Kind of a retread of previous plot points, but Perry
is a good enough writer to make it work.





Posted by: Charlotte at September 13, 2020 09:54 AM (kDUUX)

"The Old Man" is good, too. It's about an old special ops guy whose former bosses and old enemies come looking for him.

Posted by: Wethal at September 13, 2020 10:43 AM (ZzVCK)

278 William S. Baring-Gould also wrote _Sherlock Holmes of Baker Street_, a biography of the great detective which attempts to explain all the inconsistencies which crept in over the years (like why John H. Watson's wife called him "James" at one point, and why Professor James Moriarty has a brother named James Moriarty).

I believe Baring-Gould is the one who came up with the theory that Nero Wolfe is the illegitimate son of Sherlock and Irene Adler, after an affair during his "presumed dead" period. Nero certainly resembles Sherlock's brother in physique and habits. Apparently Rex Stout even threw in some "clues" to support the theory in later Wolfe books.

Posted by: Trimegistus at September 13, 2020 10:44 AM (R1+YM)

279 This may not end well. Actually, it could get ugly. Hubbymayhem and I
are both going to quit smoking........AT THE SAME TIME!I Pray for us,
people.

Posted by: Madamemayhem (uppity wench)


You are definitely going to need some happy pills.




Posted by: Javems at September 13, 2020 10:44 AM (xNAv5)

280 263 Boys must pay a lot more attention to what their teachers look like. All I remember are certain personalities but names, faces....no.
Posted by: Sharon(willow's apprentice) at September 13, 2020 10:37 AM (sd8p


Guessing none of them were the dashing sort then?

Posted by: PUE 206 at September 13, 2020 10:44 AM (D/SYi)

281
I finally read "The Natural", the "1952 novel about baseball by Bernard Malamud, and is his debut novel". Now I know why the movie's story is unsatisfying, because the novel's plot is equally unsatisfying. All the same characters are in the book as the movie, but their contexts are different, particularly Roy Hobbs, the "hero", and the two women, Memo Paris (Kim Basinger in the movie) and Iris Gaines (Glenn Close).

Roy Hobbs is not the godlike goody two shoes that Redford plays. He is a bum, morally and in his actual life. Vain and shallow, he is the perfect rube to pursue Memo, who is surprisingly even more shallow. Roy is Bonneville Salt Flats; Memo is the Aral Sea. She has exactly nothing about her that makes her alluring yet Roy is obsessed with getting her into bed. Go figure.

Iris plays her redeemer role here, but if there was a long ago contact between her and Roy, it is only vaguely implied. She has a grown daughter and is a (young) grandmother. During her encounter with Roy, a child (said to be a son, by her) is conceived.

All these storms over shallow seas converge and whip up a perfectly droning and trite ending. Remember, Roy is a bum, so it is not heroic. But it is his deserved and earned ending.

Posted by: Krebs v Carnot: Epic Battle of the Cycling Stars (TM) at September 13, 2020 10:44 AM (pNxlR)

282 Dean Koontz. His Frankenstein series. Can't get enough of the guy. Ok, later. Gotta read.

Dean is the man. Guilty pleasure. I think I read everything he wrote through Odd Thomas. Still waiting on the third of the Christopher Snow and Moonlight Bay trilogy 8 years later.

Posted by: deplorable unperson - refuse to accept the Mask of the Beast at September 13, 2020 10:45 AM (+MpRO)

283 I call dibs on Madamemayhem's stuff.
Posted by: Bandersnatch at September 13, 2020 10:42 AM (q2K0j)

For the record... Hubbymayhem is much nicer than I am. No you can't have his stuff either.

Posted by: Madamemayhem (uppity wench) at September 13, 2020 10:45 AM (Vxu+H)

284 To April, Freedom Now: You've got to read Serena by Ron Rash. Wonderful book set in the Appalachians during the 30s, made into a disaster of a movie by an untalented director.

I love reading this thread for the book ideas. Currently I'm reading one I found on the Book thread long ago - Between Silk and Cyanide: A Codemaker's War 1941-1945 by Leo Marks. It's his story of his days as a cryptographer. I'm only 40 pages in, so I can't say much except that the first sentence will grab you: "In January 1942 I was escorted to the war by my parents in case I couldn't find it or met with an accident on the way."

Posted by: CarolinaGirl at September 13, 2020 10:45 AM (Kh9rg)

285 Three Aces, which is a collection of Too Many Clients, Might As Well Be Dead, and The Final Deduction.

Black Orchids

The Rubber Band and The Red Box, both bound in one volume.

Bad For Business, which is not a Nero Wolfe.

And, Nero Wolfe of West Thirty-Fifth Street, by William S. Baring-Gould. This is not a Nero Wolfe mystery; my husband read this one first, and says it's kind of a guide to Nero Wolfe mysteries. Timelines, relationships, that kind of thing. He loved it.
Posted by: April, Freedom Now! at September 13, 2020


*
*

April, in my opinion Might As Well Be Dead is among the very best of his work. And Rubber Band is one of his best mystery plots. Be aware that Stout wrote these books over 40 years, and both Wolfe and Archie evolved a bit: Wolfe talks less and grunts more in the post-WWII novels, Archie's speaking grammar is worse in the pre-war ones (he says things like "It don't matter"). They are all readable and re-readable -- I dip back into the stories every year, even when I remember who the murderer is. But the ones from 1947 to 1974 are more assured and even more skillful.

The Baring-Gould book is fascinating -- it's a kind of "biography" of Wolfe, Archie, and the house and their household.

Posted by: Wolfus Aurelius at September 13, 2020 10:46 AM (rpbg1)

286 The Mayhem family is taking the mayhem up a notch.

Posted by: lowandslow at September 13, 2020 10:47 AM (4thlk)

287 Speaking of Holmes spin-offs, Laurie King writes a series about a young American woman who meets the retired Holmes in Sussex Downs where he is beekeeping, and becomes his protogee. The first is called "The Beekeeper's Apprentice."

Posted by: artemis at September 13, 2020 10:48 AM (AwPyG)

288 "Bartleby The Scrivener" ia about a human xerox machine. What a lousy job.

I liked "The Dublimers" because I could understand it, ...unlike Joyce's really famous books.

Posted by: mnw at September 13, 2020 10:48 AM (Cssks)

289 278 William S. Baring-Gould also wrote _Sherlock Holmes of Baker Street_, a biography of the great detective which attempts to explain all the inconsistencies which crept in over the years (like why John H. Watson's wife called him "James" at one point, and why Professor James Moriarty has a brother named James Moriarty).

...

Posted by: Trimegistus at September 13, 2020 10:44 AM (R1+YM)

-------------------------------

That's an easy one - lazy parents.

When I was working at a public school, I came across two kids in the student database system. One named John, one named Jonathan. Same last name, same birthdate. At first I thought they were duplicates, but no. Completely different SSNs.

Posted by: No One of Consequence at September 13, 2020 10:48 AM (CAJOC)

290 The Mayhem family is taking the mayhem up a notch.
Posted by: lowandslow at September 13, 2020 10:47 AM (4thlk)

MAXIMUM MAYHEM!!

Posted by: Madamemayhem (uppity wench) at September 13, 2020 10:50 AM (Vxu+H)

291 Started Jacques Barzun's "From Dawn to Decadence: 1500 to the Present 500 Years of Western Cultural Life." What strikes me is how much praise the book received when it was published in 2001 - not just by conservatives like Roger Kimball but by publications which now stand against Western Civ and all it stands for.

I've just read Barzun's championing of the use of the word "man" to refer to humanity as a whole and his defense of Columbus. Barzun notes that there were plenty of people in Spain - especially clergymen - who recognized the humanity of the Indians and denounced brutal treatment of them right from the start. It was NOT official policy of either Spain or Columbus to slaughter the Indian population. The problem was that official authorities in Spain had very little control over what individuals bent on becoming very wealthy did in the New World. The sort of personality types willing to sail off into the unknown and risk tremendous hardships were the same sort of men who ventured alone into the American West centuries later - very tough hombres and not infrequently that toughness crossed the line into ruthlessness. But, as Barzun also points out, the Indians themselves were hardly peaceful innocents - the Caribs encountered by Columbus had exterminated an earlier tribe. Barzun could say such things in 2001 and still get praised by critics at the NY Times and Atlantic. If he were still alive today (he died in 2012, close to his 105th birthday), he'd certainly have antifa brats picketing his house.

One of Barzun's main themes is that the same drives and impulses that made Western Civilization great and spectacularly successful over the past 500 years are now leading to the West's destruction from within.

Since the Wuhan flu crap started, I've been drawn to reading books like Boorstin's "The Discoverers" and Hackett Fischer's books about the Founders, because I want to read books that celebrate our history and civilization rather than denigrate it. And also because I fear that in the near future authors like Boorstin and Hackett-Fischer and Barzun might very well be banned for being "white supremacist."

Posted by: Donna&&&&&&&&V at September 13, 2020 10:50 AM (HabA/)

292 why Professor James Moriarty has a brother named James Moriarty).

-
In Kim Newman's The Hound of the D'Urbervilles, a dark parody of Professor Moriarty and Holmes, he has three Moriarty brothers, all named James.

Posted by: Anonosaurus Wrecks, Tyrannosaur Wrangler at September 13, 2020 10:50 AM (+y/Ru)

293 Madamemayhem, I am seriously commencing prayer for you both. I thnk God it was not hard for me, many years ago, but Mr. April has tried to quit snuff about 40 times in the 15 years I've known him. What a terrible addiction. Best wishes to you both.

Posted by: April, Freedom Now! at September 13, 2020 10:50 AM (OX9vb)

294 Didn't George Foreman name all his boys George Foreman?

Posted by: lowandslow at September 13, 2020 10:51 AM (4thlk)

295 My theory is that the Moriarty family were staunch Jacobites and named all their sons James in honor of the King Over the Water.

Posted by: Trimegistus at September 13, 2020 10:51 AM (R1+YM)

296 I believe Baring-Gould is the one who came up with the theory that Nero Wolfe is the illegitimate son of Sherlock and Irene Adler, after an affair during his "presumed dead" period. Nero certainly resembles Sherlock's brother in physique and habits. Apparently Rex Stout even threw in some "clues" to support the theory in later Wolfe books.
Posted by: Trimegistus at September 13, 2020


*
*

Ellery Queen the author came up with an idea about this, which he called "The Great E-O Theory." I don't recall it too well, but I think it is based on the notion that, since "Sherlock" has an "e" followed by an "o," as does "Nero," and since "Holmes" has an "o" then an "e," as does "Wolfe," that Stout was planting a clue as to the connection between the two characters.

Knowing EQ, I suspect he had other examples of this with other literary characters.

Posted by: Wolfus Aurelius at September 13, 2020 10:52 AM (rpbg1)

297 MAXIMUM MAYHEM!!
Posted by: Madamemayhem (uppity wench) at September 13, 2020 10:50 AM (Vxu+H)


*enormous Dickensian waif eyes*

Will... will Truckasaurus be there, mum?

Posted by: hogmartin at September 13, 2020 10:53 AM (t+qrx)

298 269 Hate

VDH also wrote an interesting book about Epimonandas, the Theban leader who destroyed Sparta shortly after the Peloponnesian War ended.

Posted by: mnw at September 13, 2020 10:53 AM (Cssks)

299 Thanks April! I'm going full time vape, Hubbymayhem is going nic patches and hope. Who knows how this will work.

Posted by: Madamemayhem (uppity wench) at September 13, 2020 10:53 AM (Vxu+H)

300 In Kim Newman's The Hound of the D'Urbervilles, a dark parody of
Professor Moriarty and Holmes, he has three Moriarty brothers, all named
James.


Was Darrell unavailable?

Posted by: pep at September 13, 2020 10:54 AM (v16oJ)

301 287 Speaking of Holmes spin-offs, Laurie King writes a series about a young American woman who meets the retired Holmes in Sussex Downs where he is beekeeping, and becomes his protogee. The first is called "The Beekeeper's Apprentice."
Posted by: artemis at September 13, 2020 10:48 AM (AwPyG)

---------------------------------

There's a movie called Mr. Holmes, starring Ian McKellan, that is about Holmes in his later years, and beekeeping is a major part of it. I wonder if that idea came from these books, as I don't recall it from any of the Doyle stories.

There's a new movie coming out called Enola Holmes, who is Sherlock's younger sister, played by Millie Bobbie Brown (Eleven from Stranger Things). It looks somewhat interesting, but the trailer is odd, mostly because I've never seen Brown in anything else before, and never heard her talk so much (or in her native accent).

Posted by: No One of Consequence at September 13, 2020 10:54 AM (CAJOC)

302 I never found Nabokov experimental, some are fun and others not so. Pnin and Invitation are two best from the middle years. Read Pale Fire last, if at all possible.

Posted by: Jamaica NYC at September 13, 2020 10:54 AM (4vNgL)

303 >>Thanks April! I'm going full time vape, Hubbymayhem is going nic patches and hope. Who knows how this will work.

I do. With 10 extra pounds.

Posted by: JackStraw at September 13, 2020 10:55 AM (ZLI7S)

304 294 Didn't George Foreman name all his boys George Foreman?
Posted by: lowandslow at September 13, 2020 10:51 AM (4thlk)

----------------------------

And one of his daughters Georgetta

Posted by: No One of Consequence at September 13, 2020 10:56 AM (CAJOC)

305 Didn't George Foreman name all his boys George Foreman?


All five of them.

"Did I ever tell you that Mrs. McCave
Had twenty-three sons, and she named them all Dave?

Well, she did. And that wasn't a smart thing to do.
You see, when she wants one, and calls out "Yoo-Hoo!
Come into the house, Dave!" she doesn't get one.
All twenty-three Daves of hers come on the run!

This makes things quite difficult at the McCaves'
As you can imagine, with so many Daves.
And often she wishes that, when they were born,
She had named one of them Bodkin Van Horn.
And one of them Hoos-Foos. And one of them Snimm.
And one of them Hot-Shot. And one Sunny Jim.
Another one Putt-Putt. Another one Moon Face.
Another one Marvin O'Gravel Balloon Face.
And one of them Zanzibar Buck-Buck McFate...

But she didn't do it. And now it's too late."



We used to have a commenter named ZB McFate. I loved his nic.

Posted by: Bandersnatch at September 13, 2020 10:57 AM (q2K0j)

306 Speaking of Holmes spin-offs, Laurie King writes a series about a young American woman who meets the retired Holmes in Sussex Downs where he is beekeeping, and becomes his protogee. The first is called "The Beekeeper's Apprentice."
Posted by: artemis at September 13, 2020


*
*

In his 1967 The Rainbow Affair, Book no. 13 in the Man From U.N.C.L.E. original novels from Ace Books, David McDaniel has Solo and Illya travel to England. They meet a slew of the famous British literary detectives and criminals like Father Brown, Miss Marple, the Saint, and Dr. Fu Manchu. Names are never given; you figure it out based on the characters' actions and dialogue. The heroes consult a retired "crime expert" who lives in Sussex with his bees, named William Escott (a name Holmes used, I think, in one of his adventures). Worth reading if you can find it.

McDaniel was also the one who suggested that Thrush arose from the late Prof. Moriarty's criminal organization after his sudden death.

Posted by: Wolfus Aurelius at September 13, 2020 10:58 AM (rpbg1)

307 I'd be worried that the Enola Holmes idea is all about the girl power. It will disclose that she was the brains, and Holmes himself was only a front, because society was so misogynistic.

Posted by: artemis at September 13, 2020 10:58 AM (AwPyG)

308 Didn't George Foreman name all his boys George Foreman?

Posted by: lowandslow at September 13, 2020 10:51 AM (4thlk)

I think so, II, III, IV, etc.

Posted by: BignJames at September 13, 2020 10:58 AM (X/Pw5)

309 The whole beekeeping thing comes from one tossed-off line in a later story about Holmes planning to retire to Sussex and keep bees in his old age.

Philip Jose Farmer used that in his Holmes-Tarzan crossover parody -- at one point Sherlock commands a swarm of African killer bees by doing the waggle dance.

Posted by: Trimegistus at September 13, 2020 10:59 AM (R1+YM)

310 Was Darrell unavailable?
Posted by: pep at September 13, 2020 10:54 AM (v16oJ)

Fun fact...
The late, great pappymayhem was actually named Larry. I kept hoping that one day, one glorious day, I would hear him introduce himself and my two brothers by saying, "Hi! I'm Larry, this is my son Darryl and my other son Darrell.".
I am disappoint.

Posted by: Madamemayhem (uppity wench) at September 13, 2020 10:59 AM (Vxu+H)

311 I think Orson Welles best work (although not the most well known) may have "The Chimes at Midnight". Welles was forenamed with the character Falstaff, and he combined all of the pieces of the various Shakespeare plays in which Falstaff made an appearance. Many think he did a better job with the character than even Shakespeare did, worth the watch if you've never seen it.

Posted by: Tom Servo at September 13, 2020 10:59 AM (V2Yro)

312 @306
That sounds good, I'll have to find it. I love that sort of thing.

Posted by: artemis at September 13, 2020 10:59 AM (AwPyG)

313 There's a movie called Mr. Holmes, starring Ian McKellan, that is about Holmes in his later years, and beekeeping is a major part of it. I wonder if that idea came from these books, as I don't recall it from any of the Doyle stories.

. . .
Posted by: No One of Consequence at September 13, 2020


*
*

Holmes, I think, was fond of telling Watson that when he retired, it would be to Sussex to keep bees. The trope has been used so often that I'm sure it is in the original. Perhaps in the short story "The Sussex Vampire."

Posted by: Wolfus Aurelius at September 13, 2020 11:00 AM (rpbg1)

314 33, 109 -- https://tinyurl.com/Kathy-Kohner

Posted by: Marooned at September 13, 2020 11:00 AM (yYptV)

315 VDH also wrote an interesting book about Epimonandas, the Theban leader who destroyed Sparta shortly after the Peloponnesian War ended.
Posted by: mnw at September 13, 2020 10:53 AM (Cssks)


It's funny that he wrote the intro to the Landmark version of Thucydides and I don't remember it being particular good, maybe because just writing in support of the edition kept him from really drilling down on what happened in A War Like No Other.

Posted by: Captain Hate at September 13, 2020 11:01 AM (y7DUB)

316 Well, as always, this has been fun. I love you people.

But it's time to make the dog food. The next four hours are spoken for.

Posted by: April, Freedom Now! at September 13, 2020 11:01 AM (OX9vb)

317 I didn't know that Millie Bobbi Brown was a real person. I had heard that name before but I thought it was a cartoon character. Never heard of Stranger Things.

Posted by: megthered at September 13, 2020 11:01 AM (PsvDC)

318 It was absolutely heartbreaking. And I identified strongly with the main character, a little man beat down by life and his own poor choices.
Posted by: OregonMuse, AoSHQ Thought Leader, Pants Monitor & Charismatic MAGAfauna Exemplar at September 13, 2020 10:27 AM (qrPgC)

Sounds like he needed the beatdown. A good ending would be the wife's father cracking the childbeater's head open with a bat.

Posted by: CN at September 13, 2020 11:01 AM (ONvIw)

319 Good morning!

Let's smile and be happy & strike fear in the hearts of killjoy leftists everywhere.

Posted by: NaCly Dog at September 13, 2020 11:02 AM (hyuyC)

320 Ahoy, bookfagz!

Posted by: Insomniac - Ex Cineribus Resurgo at September 13, 2020 11:02 AM (NWiLs)

321
...[i[The Horse's Mouth, and other things that bored me silly. I like a *story*, dammit...

Wholley Kau!

Not only does "The Horse's Mouth" have story out the wazoo.

I consider it oner of the greatest novels of the 20th Century.

But, wait! There's more. It's hilarious.

Artist, scumbag, and scoundrel Guilley Jimson's narrative of his quest to fulfill his artist vision no matter what is a pure joy to read.

Joyce Cary*, the writer of "THM" can really write great characters, incidents, and plot.

BONUS! while you can read "THM" as a light comedy there's actually quite a bit of profundity at play here as well should you care to look for it.

In short, if you've never read "THM", give it a whirl.

It's excellent. Highest recommendation.




*Joyce Cary also wrote "Mr Johnson" another great book inspired by Cary's time in Africa.

Posted by: naturalfake at September 13, 2020 11:03 AM (dWwl8)

322
In the story "His Last Bow", we read that Holmes has discontinued his consulting detective work and has taken up bee keeping.


https://www.thescienceofdeduction.org/post/grow-your-blog-community

Posted by: Krebs v Carnot: Epic Battle of the Cycling Stars (TM) at September 13, 2020 11:04 AM (pNxlR)

323 The Witch tells you should fear Trump becoming a dictator.

https://bit.ly/2RjiYmi

Posted by: Anonosaurus Wrecks, Tyrannosaur Wrangler at September 13, 2020 11:05 AM (+y/Ru)

324 I didn't know that Millie Bobbi Brown was a real person. I had heard that name before but I thought it was a cartoon character. Never heard of Stranger Things.
Posted by: megthered at September 13, 2020


*
*

Linda brought the first two seasons on DVD from the library. It's sort of a Stephen King-ish series about otherworldly goings-on, and secret government labs, in a small town in Indiana (?) in the early Eighties. Millie plays a girl who has been raised in a lab to train her in the use of her psi powers. The show also features Winona Ryder, who is still great-looking and effective.

I wonder why they chose to set it in 1983.

Posted by: Wolfus Aurelius at September 13, 2020 11:05 AM (rpbg1)

325 Madamemayhem seriously best of luck to both of you. Hopefully 2 at the same time can be a motivating factor. You will feel a lot better if you can.

Posted by: Skip at September 13, 2020 11:05 AM (OjZpE)

326 Sounds like that Liver-Eating Johnson took things just a little too far.


Posted by: Hangnail-Eating naturalfake at September 13, 2020 10:21 AM (dWwl

"Johnson-Eating Oliver" was right out there, too.

Posted by: Alberta Oil Peon at September 13, 2020 11:05 AM (MhTAc)

327 Joyce Cary*, the writer of "THM" can really write great characters, incidents, and plot.

BONUS! while you can read "THM" as a light comedy there's actually quite a bit of profundity at play here as well should you care to look for it.

In short, if you've never read "THM", give it a whirl.

It's excellent. Highest recommendation.

*Joyce Cary also wrote "Mr Johnson" another great book inspired by Cary's time in Africa.
Posted by: naturalfake at September 13, 2020


*
*

I might try it -- I might be able to appreciate it now.

Posted by: Wolfus Aurelius at September 13, 2020 11:06 AM (rpbg1)

328 There are a lot of hard core Sherlock Holmes people, who have canons and who meet, and who write anthologies.
I think he's regarded as the most recognized character in literature.

Posted by: artemis at September 13, 2020 11:06 AM (AwPyG)

329 There's a new movie coming out called Enola Holmes, who is Sherlock's younger sister, played by Millie Bobbie Brown (Eleven from Stranger Things). It looks somewhat interesting, but the trailer is odd, mostly because I've never seen Brown in anything else before, and never heard her talk so much (or in her native accent).
Posted by: No One of Consequence

Enola Holmes is a children's book series - I read them.a while ago and they were fun.
But the author iirc is woke now, so I dunno how the movie will be.

Posted by: vmom 2020 - The Translations of Marcus Aurelius at September 13, 2020 11:07 AM (nUhF0)

330 320 Ahoy, bookfagz!
Posted by: Insomniac - Ex Cineribus Resurgo at September 13, 2020 11:02 AM (NWiLs)


Ahoy! Welcome to the Cuckservative Bulwark Book Crew.

Posted by: PUE 206 at September 13, 2020 11:07 AM (D/SYi)

331 Hope I'm not too late to the party to make a recommendation to Cringebiscuit:

The "Winning of America" series by Allen W. Eckert. Traces the frontier and frontiersmen from the first cross-Appalachian explorers of the French and Indian Wars to the truly "Old West" of the upper midwest. Highly readable and novelistic ( iin both the good and bad sense - not sure how rigorous the history is.) Great fun.

Posted by: Taro Tsujimoto at September 13, 2020 11:07 AM (j4zcI)

332 Thanks everyone for the encouragement! I'm hoping this goes well enough that a divorce attorney, an estate attorney, or a shovel will not get involved.

Posted by: Madamemayhem (uppity wench) at September 13, 2020 11:08 AM (Vxu+H)

333 324 I didn't know that Millie Bobbi Brown was a real person. I had heard that name before but I thought it was a cartoon character. Never heard of Stranger Things.
Posted by: megthered at September 13, 2020


*
*

Linda brought the first two seasons on DVD from the library. It's sort of a Stephen King-ish series about otherworldly goings-on, and secret government labs, in a small town in Indiana (?) in the early Eighties. Millie plays a girl who has been raised in a lab to train her in the use of her psi powers. The show also features Winona Ryder, who is still great-looking and effective.

I wonder why they chose to set it in 1983.
Posted by: Wolfus Aurelius at September 13, 2020 11:05 AM (rpbg1)

-----------------------------------

Couldn't say why '83 specifically, but I seem to recall that the creators had a thing for '80s nostalgia. The attention to detail is amazing.

Posted by: No One of Consequence at September 13, 2020 11:08 AM (CAJOC)

334 I too take notes, but am so lazy, I use my phone to take pictures of the recommendations! I always have them with me that way! Love the book thread.

Posted by: Loveulong at September 13, 2020 11:08 AM (mdg8n)

335 I never found Nabokov experimental, some are fun and others not so. Pnin and Invitation are two best from the middle years. Read Pale Fire last, if at all possible.
Posted by: Jamaica NYC at September 13, 2020 10:54 AM (4vNgL)


Maybe that's a better way to describe them although maybe dystopian versus other types is a good way to categorize them. I'm reading thing chronologically as I go through his biography; Lolita and Pale Fire (which I thoroughly enjoyed) will be rereads.

Posted by: Captain Hate at September 13, 2020 11:09 AM (y7DUB)

336 DO NOT BLOCK EMERGENCY ENTRIES AND EXITS TO THE HOSPITAL. People's lives are at stake when ambulances can't get through.
1:02 AM Sep 13, 2020
Posted by: Anonosaurus Wrecks, Tyrannosaur Wrangler at September 13, 2020 10:25 AM (+y/Ru)

Just give the ambulance drivers a green light to ram. At speed.

Posted by: Alberta Oil Peon at September 13, 2020 11:09 AM (MhTAc)

337
329 There's a new movie coming out called Enola Holmes, who is Sherlock's younger sister, played by Millie Bobbie Brown (Eleven from Stranger Things).


Wokesters everywhere wonder, "Is Enola gay?"

Posted by: Krebs v Carnot: Epic Battle of the Cycling Stars (TM) at September 13, 2020 11:09 AM (pNxlR)

338 Thing is, all the English-teacher stuff in books -- symbolism, foreshadowing, allegory, theme, etc. -- those are all tools in the author's toolbox. The goal is always the same: storytelling.
**

I'm off to set up my joy-killing lessons in an hour.

Seriously, though, my students are middle schoolers, and they're coming from elementary with little understanding of figurative language. My colleague and I are working on it, as well as grammar, which they also don't "get." (Transfers from other districts know adverbs and conjunctions; why don't ours?)

I've met college students who don't know how to look up definitions of new words - let alone puzzle out figurative language - and fully-functional adults who become outraged if someone uses vocabulary or idioms they don't know. (No "monkeyshines" is not a slur, ma'am.) I don't think it was lefty teachers who did this to them, although post-modern and "critical" reading took its toll.

Some teachers take the path of least resistance and teach, at most, two novels a year with a pre-made lessons, like the New York Engage curriculum. To give you an idea, it says that students should read a novel with the idea of answering "How do time, culture, and place contribute to the development of each character's identity?" It makes it easier for students to gather evidence from the text so they can write an essay, but it also detracts from the fun of reading.

I do mini-lessons on figurative language and pop out a concept at a time; e.g. what's "culture" and how do the characters' culture differ from your own? It's necessary that they start thinking about it and articulating it - and, since I'm conservative, I want them to be able to identify and defend aspects of their own culture instead of thinking every culture is equal. This is a necessary evil, just like forcing kids to edit and revise their writing, instead of just accepting the pure, unadulterated beauty of their ideas; e.g. "deer hunting is awsom and do it w/my dad."

Posted by: NaughtyPine at September 13, 2020 11:10 AM (/+bwe)

339 There are a lot of hard core Sherlock Holmes people, who have canons and who meet, and who write anthologies.
I think he's regarded as the most recognized character in literature.
Posted by: artemis at September 13, 2020


*
*

He and Tarzan.

Harold Ross of the New Yorker fame was of the opinion that there were three names that *everyone* would recognize: Holmes, Tarzan, and Harry Houdini. Everybody else, he told his writers, would require more or less introduction.

(No doubt it was stuff like this that led one of his writers -- not Dorothy Parker or Bob Benchley -- when he received such a comment from Ross on a story, to write back, "You keep out of this, Ross.")

Posted by: Wolfus Aurelius at September 13, 2020 11:10 AM (rpbg1)

340 why Professor James Moriarty has a brother named James Moriarty).


George Foreman Syndrome?

Posted by: Mr. Peebles at September 13, 2020 11:11 AM (oVJmc)

341 Just give the ambulance drivers a green light to ram. At speed.
Posted by: Alberta Oil Peon at September 13, 2020 11:09 AM (MhTAc)

RAMMING SPEED!

The fuckub left is 100% responsible for these shootings. I hope PDT hangs in their necks and drives it home . Scumbags and cunts all of them

Posted by: Nevergiveup at September 13, 2020 11:11 AM (85Gof)

342 I read something fun this week.
I knew that JRR Tolkien died in 1973 but I didn't realise:

1 ring to rule them all.
9 rings for the race of men.
7 rings for the race of dwarfs.
3 rings for the elves.

Posted by: Sir Ian Botham at September 13, 2020 11:11 AM (0EkGe)

343 Strzrok was on with Chuck Todd this morning, to promote his new book. Strzok got a platform to say that Trump was and continues to be compromised by the Russians. Says its financial dealings, including that Trump was angling for a Trump hotel in Moscow, a project that never even reached a term sheet before it got dropped. Strzok says all the investigations into Trump were justified because there's a lower standard to bring counter-intelligence investigations and Trump was an obvious risk. He denied any Trump animus in his e-mails, and regrets that they were weaponized to besmirch his great colleagues at the FBI.

That was it. Chuckie took him at his word.

For openers, I'd have asked Strzok how and why his official phone got atomized.

Posted by: Ignoramus at September 13, 2020 11:11 AM (9TdxA)

344 336 DO NOT BLOCK EMERGENCY ENTRIES AND EXITS TO THE HOSPITAL. People's lives are at stake when ambulances can't get through.
1:02 AM Sep 13, 2020
Posted by: Anonosaurus Wrecks, Tyrannosaur Wrangler at September 13, 2020 10:25 AM (+y/Ru)

Wasn't this the impetus for Bridgegate in NJ? Now it's OK to impede ambulances? Fuck BLM

Posted by: CN at September 13, 2020 11:11 AM (ONvIw)

345 Sounds like that Liver-Eating Johnson took things just a little too far.





Posted by: Hangnail-Eating naturalfake at September 13, 2020 10:21 AM (dWwl



"Johnson-Eating Oliver" was right out there, too.

Posted by: Alberta Oil Peon at September 13, 2020 11:05 AM (MhTAc)

============
My kind of reading!

Posted by: Zombie Shep Smith, live from New Orleans! at September 13, 2020 11:11 AM (gtNWf)

346 thanks wolf. I looked her up, still wouldn't know her if she bit me. Not much of a tv watcher so I'm not as knowledgeable as the smart kids.

Posted by: megthered at September 13, 2020 11:12 AM (PsvDC)

347 I do mini-lessons on figurative language and pop out
a concept at a time; e.g. what's "culture" and how do the characters'
culture differ from your own? It's necessary that they start thinking
about it and articulating it - and, since I'm conservative, I want them
to be able to identify and defend aspects of their own culture instead
of thinking every culture is equal. This is a necessary evil, just like
forcing kids to edit and revise their writing, instead of just accepting
the pure, unadulterated beauty of their ideas; e.g. "deer hunting is
awsom and do it w/my dad."





Posted by: NaughtyPine


You sound like an excellent teacher.

Posted by: pep at September 13, 2020 11:12 AM (v16oJ)

348 Good luck, madamemayhem!

You can do it!
But take the firearms out of the house.

Posted by: Nurse ratched at September 13, 2020 11:13 AM (U2p+3)

349 I wonder why they chose to set it in 1983.
Posted by: Wolfus Aurelius at September 13, 2020 11:05 AM (rpbg1)

-----------------------------------

Couldn't say why '83 specifically, but I seem to recall that the creators had a thing for '80s nostalgia. The attention to detail is amazing.
Posted by: No One of Consequence at September 13, 2020


*
*

There are story advantages: no Internet to make it easy for the characters to look things up, no cell phones to make it easy for them to communicate. I would think, too, that the creators had an idea that the series would end up in our time, 30 years later -- that the '80s part was the prologue, somehow.

Posted by: Wolfus Aurelius at September 13, 2020 11:13 AM (rpbg1)

350 Good luck Madamemayhem, it is something that I promised my doctor I will do this year. I keep blaming the smoking on the stress of my daily life, but I know it is up to me to change. Cough, cough.

Posted by: Debby Doberman Schultz at September 13, 2020 11:13 AM (a4EWo)

351 247 Dubliners. I hear you. Who thought that was a good book?

Posted by: artemis at September 13, 2020 10:18 AM (AwPyG)

I do. A masterpiece, each story. I'm not that well-read, but I rank it with Salinger's Nine Stories as best collection I've come across.

Posted by: Ordinary American at September 13, 2020 11:14 AM (H8QX8)

352 I think he's regarded as the most recognized character in literature.

Posted by: artemis at September 13, 2020

================

Other than Alice, you mean.

Posted by: Professor Lou Carroll at September 13, 2020 11:14 AM (gtNWf)

353
Posted by: Sir Ian Botham at September 13, 2020 11:11 AM (0EkGe)


We look forward to your opus, "The Numerology of Middle Earth".

Posted by: Krebs v Carnot: Epic Battle of the Cycling Stars (TM) at September 13, 2020 11:15 AM (pNxlR)

354 There are story advantages: no Internet to make it easy for the characters to look things up, no cell phones to make it easy for them to communicate. I would think, too, that the creators had an idea that the series would end up in our time, 30 years later -- that the '80s part was the prologue, somehow.
Posted by: Wolfus Aurelius at September 13, 2020 11:13 AM (rpbg1)

-------------------------------

I think if they did that, comparisons to "It" would fly fast and furious.

Posted by: No One of Consequence at September 13, 2020 11:16 AM (CAJOC)

355 Strzok. Ditch. Some assembly required.

Posted by: Mr. Peebles at September 13, 2020 11:16 AM (oVJmc)

356 Frankly I suspect Sherlock is ahead of Alice nowadays. But Dracula has 'em both beat by a mile.

Posted by: Trimegistus at September 13, 2020 11:16 AM (R1+YM)

357 Maybe that's a better way to describe them although
maybe dystopian versus other types is a good way to categorize them.
I'm reading thing chronologically as I go through his biography; Lolita
and Pale Fire (which I thoroughly enjoyed) will be rereads.

Posted by: Captain Hate at September 13, 2020 11:09 AM (y7DUB)

===================
I hope you also enjoyed Pnin. I did, and that reminds me to reread.

Posted by: Huck Follywood at September 13, 2020 11:17 AM (gtNWf)

358 353
Posted by: Sir Ian Botham at September 13, 2020 11:11 AM (0EkGe)

We look forward to your opus, "The Numerology of Middle Earth".
Posted by: Krebs v Carnot: Epic Battle of the Cycling Stars (TM) at September 13, 2020 11:15 AM (pNxlR)

****************
Hmm......no! Stop giving me ideas!

Posted by: Sir Ian Botham at September 13, 2020 11:17 AM (0EkGe)

359 New Jersey drivers should expect to reach for a little extra pocket change when taking the states major highways starting Sunday.

Beginning Sept. 13, tolls hikes will take effect on three of New Jerseys major highways, including the New Jersey Turnpike, Garden State Parkway and Atlantic City Expressway.

FUCK YOU ASSHOE

Posted by: Nevergiveup at September 13, 2020 11:20 AM (85Gof)

360 355 Strzok. Ditch. Some assembly required.
Posted by: Mr. Peebles at September 13, 2020 11:16 AM (oVJmc)


Disassembly + trash bag?

Posted by: PUE 206 at September 13, 2020 11:21 AM (D/SYi)

361 356 Frankly I suspect Sherlock is ahead of Alice nowadays. But Dracula has 'em both beat by a mile.
Posted by: Trimegistus at September 13, 2020 11:16 AM (R1+YM)

------------------------------

I heard a comment the other day that roughly said that reading Dracula in modern times is a very different experience that it was when the book was first written, precisely because the character is universally known. They specifically mentioned a line where Dracula says "I don't drink wine". Back then, readers would be left to wonder why he doesn't drink wine, until the reveal that he is a vampire. Nowadays, because he is so well-known, everyone's like, yeah, he doesn't drink wine because he drinks blood.

Posted by: No One of Consequence at September 13, 2020 11:21 AM (CAJOC)

362 359: I'm sure this is only the beginning. We gotta keep those state workers happy at home

Posted by: CN at September 13, 2020 11:21 AM (ONvIw)

363 A lot of Necer-Trumpers have nuciform heads.

Posted by: Guy Smiley at September 13, 2020 11:21 AM (jbF6h)

364 Strzok says all the investigations into Trump were justified because there's a lower standard to bring counter-intelligence investigations and Trump was an obvious risk. He denied any Trump animus in his e-mails, and regrets that they were weaponized to besmirch his great colleagues at the FBI.






"We'll stop him." Yeah, how could anyone think that Stroker has any animus against the president.

Posted by: TheQuietMan at September 13, 2020 11:21 AM (5tWEb)

365 A fellow I know has published a catalogue of all the known translations of Alice and maintains it is the most often translated book in the world, with a larger cultural impact as measured in more languages, more printings and more volumes sold than any other. Since his own book rests on this being true I have no reason to doubt him, but I've no idea how one would go about verifying.

Posted by: Huck Follywood at September 13, 2020 11:22 AM (gtNWf)

366 I hope you also enjoyed Pnin. I did, and that reminds me to reread.
Posted by: Huck Follywood at September 13, 2020 11:17 AM (gtNWf)


That's still eight or nine years in his future from where I am now.

Posted by: Captain Hate at September 13, 2020 11:22 AM (y7DUB)

367 The only redeeming factor involving Chuck Todd is that no one watches Chuck Todd anymore except the True Believers on the left. And not even that many of them.

Posted by: Tom Servo at September 13, 2020 11:22 AM (V2Yro)

368
Also from "Jessica Strange": Not My President but My Lover: Who Could Possibly #Resist?

The synopsis. A beautiful young businesswoman finds herself overworked and undersexed but a chance encounter brings her to a hunky man who can satisfy her every need, none other than 45th United States President Donald Trump.

Through a series of wet and wild encounters Trump helps her experience an awakening of her body and soul. Sexually.


It sounds like epic trolling.

Posted by: Krebs v Carnot: Epic Battle of the Cycling Stars (TM) at September 13, 2020 11:23 AM (pNxlR)

369 277 Wethall

The Old Man by Thomas Perry is actually the first book I read by Perry and made me think I needed to read more by him. One of the best of its genre of "don't mess with old men who might have more skills than you think".

Posted by: Charlotte at September 13, 2020 11:24 AM (kDUUX)

370 ooohhh

Susanna Clarke (Jonathan Strange & Mr Norrel) ha a new book coming soon

I am hopeful!

Posted by: vmom 2020 - The Translations of Marcus Aurelius at September 13, 2020 11:25 AM (nUhF0)

371 351 247 Dubliners. I hear you. Who thought that was a good book?

Posted by: artemis at September 13, 2020 10:18 AM (AwPyG)

I do. A masterpiece, each story. I'm not that well-read, but I rank it with Salinger's Nine Stories as best collection I've come across.
Posted by: Ordinary American at September 13, 2020 11:14 AM (H8QX

I also liked Dubliners. The last few paragraphs of "The Dead" are among the most beautiful and haunting in the English language.

I also liked the first part of "Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man." The Christmas dinner fight the family gets into over Charles Parnell Stewart rings perfectly true to anybody who has ever gotten into a political battle with relatives at a holiday dinner.

Joyce becomes less rewarding as he becomes more experimental and interested in word play and abstractions.

Posted by: Donna&&&&&&&&V at September 13, 2020 11:26 AM (HabA/)

372 Finished reading Debbie Does Dallas for the 1,431st time.

I've started to come to the conclusion that Debbie is a slut.

Posted by: Justsayin' at September 13, 2020 11:26 AM (Fs5vw)

373 Has Christopher Taylor been here today. IIRC he's near Salem where those fires are raging.

Posted by: CN at September 13, 2020 11:26 AM (ONvIw)

374 Just woke up. Is Biden still running for presdident like he has bench warrants out?

Posted by: Menack at September 13, 2020 11:27 AM (buTO7)

375 Any of the news shows paying attention to the attempted assasination of the Sheriffs deputies?

Posted by: Nevergiveup at September 13, 2020 11:29 AM (85Gof)

376 I started watching the Polish detective show "Signs". It got too dark, too fast...and I decided to drop Netflix so I didn't continue.

Posted by: CN at September 13, 2020 11:29 AM (ONvIw)

377 I watch Chuck Todd and some Psycho Joe because it's an early read on where Media is going.

Posted by: Ignoramus at September 13, 2020 11:29 AM (9TdxA)

378 I've started to come to the conclusion that Debbie is a slut.

Posted by: Justsayin' at September 13, 2020 11:26 AM (Fs5vw)

====================

Not that there is anything wrong with that.

Posted by: Congresswoman Katie Hill at September 13, 2020 11:29 AM (gtNWf)

379 Finished reading Debbie Does Dallas for the 1,431st time.

I've been alternating between rereads of Old Yeller and Charlotte's Web. Keeps me in sobbing shape.

Posted by: Kirk Herbstreit at September 13, 2020 11:30 AM (EgshT)

380 Maria Bartolomeo (sp?) has an amazing segment where it is disclosed that Hunter got $$ when he went over to China with Biden to buy a Michigan company that makes military stuff, with the object of selling it to the Chinese outright.
He was the straw man to sell military secrets to the communists.

Posted by: artemis at September 13, 2020 11:30 AM (AwPyG)

381 Maria says "Isn't that treason?"

Posted by: artemis at September 13, 2020 11:31 AM (AwPyG)

382 358 353
Posted by: Sir Ian Botham at September 13, 2020 11:11 AM (0EkGe)

We look forward to your opus, "The Numerology of Middle Earth".
Posted by: Krebs v Carnot: Epic Battle of the Cycling Stars (TM) at September 13, 2020 11:15 AM (pNxlR)

****************
Hmm......no! Stop giving me ideas!
Posted by: Sir Ian Botham at September 13, 2020 11:17 AM (0EkGe)

****************
****************

Google 'the ring of Silvianus' if you want the fascinating true story of a lost cursed ring found after being lost for thousands of years.
One of the people involved was an up and coming linguist and academic called JRR Tolkien.

Posted by: Sir Ian Botham at September 13, 2020 11:32 AM (0EkGe)

383 376 I started watching the Polish detective show "Signs". It got too dark, too fast...and I decided to drop Netflix so I didn't continue.
Posted by: CN at September 13, 2020 11:29 AM (ONvIw)

----------------------------

Did you decide to drop Netflix, and so were unable to continue watching? Or did you drop Netflix so that you would be unable to continue watching?

Posted by: No One of Consequence at September 13, 2020 11:32 AM (CAJOC)

384 Any of the news shows paying attention to the attempted assasination of the Sheriffs deputies?
Posted by: Nevergiveup at September 13, 2020 11:29 AM (85Gof)

Yes, it was on both OANN and Fox this morning.

Posted by: Jen the original at September 13, 2020 11:32 AM (+5aTf)

385 380 Maria Bartolomeo (sp?) has an amazing segment where it is disclosed that Hunter got $$ when he went over to China with Biden to buy a Michigan company that makes military stuff, with the object of selling it to the Chinese outright.
He was the straw man to sell military secrets to the communists.
Posted by: artemis at September 13, 2020 11:30 AM (AwPyG)

I don't see a damn thing worth indicting! Maybe another 3 year expensive investigation, though!

Posted by: Billy plays Bagpipes at September 13, 2020 11:32 AM (ONvIw)

386 >>Maria Bartolomeo (sp?) has an amazing segment where it is disclosed that Hunter got $$ when he went over to China with Biden to buy a Michigan company that makes military stuff, with the object of selling it to the Chinese outright.
He was the straw man to sell military secrets to the communists.

You don't say.

Posted by: JackStraw at September 13, 2020 11:32 AM (ZLI7S)

387
The reviews on Amazon are fun for Jessica Stranger's Antifa lover tripe. This is one of them -- "This is a perfect book to wipe your butt with."

Posted by: Krebs v Carnot: Epic Battle of the Cycling Stars (TM) at September 13, 2020 11:33 AM (pNxlR)

388
The synopsis. A beautiful young businesswoman finds herself overworked and undersexed but a chance encounter brings her to a hunky man who can satisfy her every need, none other than 45th United States President Donald Trump.

Through a series of wet and wild encounters Trump helps her experience an awakening of her body and soul. Sexually."

and that little girl was me!!!

Posted by: E. Jean Carroll at September 13, 2020 11:33 AM (V2Yro)

389 I've never enjoyed reading Joyce because I think his storytelling is obscured by his over-contrived writing style. I've started "Portrait Of The Artist" several times, because so many tell me it is the most accessible of his modernist books, and put it down just as many.

Posted by: Huck Follywood at September 13, 2020 11:33 AM (gtNWf)

390 And yes, 'the ring of Sylvie's anus' would maybe be a more satisfying watch.

Posted by: Sir Ian Botham at September 13, 2020 11:33 AM (0EkGe)

391
Did you decide to drop Netflix, and so were unable to continue watching? Or did you drop Netflix so that you would be unable to continue watching?
Posted by: No One of Consequence at September 13, 2020 11:32 AM (CAJOC)

I dropped Netflix for unrelated reasons. But signs was unrelentingly dark. A town with no redeeming characters.

Posted by: CN at September 13, 2020 11:34 AM (ONvIw)

392 Our B&N opened the other day, with restrictions, the missus and I made our first visit in over 6 months last night.

Unintentionally eavesdropping of a young couple (couldn't have been 20) I overheard the male say (to the effect): I used to not like reading. But lately I enjoy it more. It really turns on my imagination and takes me places I want to go to in real life!

My first thought? I must tell the horde.

Posted by: socalcon at September 13, 2020 11:34 AM (Roy2Z)

393 Bloomberg is going to spend $100 million on media buys to convince Floridians that Biden is more anti-communist than Trump, more pro-Israel than Trump, and more pro-gun than Trump.

Heh.

So Mini Mike, how do you become a billionaire?
Easy. First you start with $60 billion ....

Posted by: Ignoramus at September 13, 2020 11:35 AM (9TdxA)

394 > Through a series of wet and wild encounters Trump helps her experience an awakening of her body and soul. Sexually.

It sounds like epic trolling.
Posted by: Krebs v Carnot: Epic Battle of the Cycling Stars (TM) at September 13, 2020 11:23 AM (pNxlR)


Related (and probably NSFW/cartoon):

https://stoatnet.org/chynah.jpg

Posted by: hogmartin at September 13, 2020 11:35 AM (t+qrx)

395 I finished "Grant" by Mr. Chernow.
This was an excellent book, revelatory on many items not covered in previous books on U.S. Grant I had read.
On Audiobook it takes 50 hours to complete (normal speed).
I am kind of new to the audiobook concept, but I've decided I like it. I can enjoy consumption of the book while puttering or cooking.
But isn't cheap.

Posted by: navybrat the not so irritable at September 13, 2020 11:35 AM (w7KSn)

396 387
The reviews on Amazon are fun for Jessica Stranger's Antifa lover tripe. This is one of them -- "This is a perfect book to wipe your butt with."
Posted by: Krebs v Carnot: Epic Battle of the Cycling Stars (TM) at September 13, 2020 11:33 AM (pNxlR)

------------------------

How is this not a thing? Get some books in the public domain, and print them on toilet paper.

Posted by: No One of Consequence at September 13, 2020 11:35 AM (CAJOC)

397
How is this not a thing? Get some books in the public domain, and print them on toilet paper.
Posted by: No One of Consequence at September 13, 2020 11:35 AM (CAJOC)

Nobody wants an inky ass! That's why

Posted by: CN at September 13, 2020 11:36 AM (ONvIw)

398 Hello!

https://nypost.com/2020/09/13/trans- satanist-anarchist-wins-gop-nomination-for-sherrif/

Posted by: Based Department at September 13, 2020 11:37 AM (WKxJi)

399 I also listened to the podcast interview of Byron York on the topic of his new book, hosted by Derek Hunter.
Worth a listen.

Posted by: navybrat the not so irritable at September 13, 2020 11:37 AM (w7KSn)

400 263 Boys must pay a lot more attention to what their teachers look like. All I remember are certain personalities but names, faces....no.
Posted by: Sharon(willow's apprentice) at September 13, 2020 10:37 AM (sd8p

There's something to that, I suspect.

As repeatedly mentioned here and elsewhere, going through a teacher's certification program, it awakens a lot of memories that I need to fall back on. My fourth grade teacher was simply amazing and someone to emulate. But there was one other thing. And everyone who sees the class picture that I have from fourth grade comments on it: she was very young. And she was very pretty.

Indeed, I was in another fourth grade class when the new teacher came along and before I knew she was to be my new teacher and that she visited the classroom I was in to gather her new students the first thought I had was "how pretty!" To this day I can point out peculiarities. For instance, any time she wore a skirt to school, 1) it was NEVER higher than the mid-point of her knees, and 2) she ALWAYS wore knee socks with them. And she almost never wore high heels, and if she did, they MAY have had one to one and a half inch heels. They were never terribly high.

Amazing how I can hold on to that after decades, no?

Posted by: Catch Thirty-Thr33 at September 13, 2020 11:37 AM (SSJSf)

401
How is this not a thing? Get some books in the public domain, and print them on toilet paper.
Posted by: No One of Consequence at September 13, 2020 11:35 AM (CAJOC)


"The Communist Manifesto" would be perfect.

Posted by: Krebs v Carnot: Epic Battle of the Cycling Stars (TM) at September 13, 2020 11:37 AM (pNxlR)

402 The Jesuits had us read Joyce's Portrait as HS freshmen, presumably so we'd never find it on our own and take it to heart.

I read Dubliners in college and mostly liked it

Posted by: Ignoramus at September 13, 2020 11:37 AM (9TdxA)

403 Also from "Jessica Strange": Not My President but My Lover: Who Could Possibly #Resist?



The synopsis. A beautiful young businesswoman finds herself
overworked and undersexed but a chance encounter brings her to a hunky
man who can satisfy her every need, none other than 45th United States
President Donald Trump.



Through a series of wet and wild encounters Trump helps her experience an awakening of her body and soul. Sexually.



It sounds like epic trolling.

Posted by: Krebs v Carnot: Epic Battle of the Cycling Stars (TM) at September 13, 2020 11:23 AM (pNxlR)



From the few preview pages on Amazon it looks like a poorly written letter to Penthouse Forum.

Posted by: TheQuietMan at September 13, 2020 11:38 AM (5tWEb)

404 397
How is this not a thing? Get some books in the public domain, and print them on toilet paper.
Posted by: No One of Consequence at September 13, 2020 11:35 AM (CAJOC)

Nobody wants an inky ass! That's why
Posted by: CN at September 13, 2020 11:36 AM (ONvIw)

----------------------------

I thought of that, but then realized you can buy all manner of printed toilet paper.

Posted by: No One of Consequence at September 13, 2020 11:38 AM (CAJOC)

405 Any of the news shows paying attention to the attempted assasination of the Sheriffs deputies?
Posted by: Nevergiveup at September 13, 2020 11:29 AM (85Gof)

Yes, it was on both OANN and Fox this morning.
Posted by: Jen the original at September 13, 2020 11:32 AM (+5aTf)

I meant the msm

Posted by: Nevergiveup at September 13, 2020 11:38 AM (85Gof)

406 I am kind of new to the audiobook concept, but I've decided I like it. I can enjoy consumption of the book while puttering or cooking.
Posted by: navybrat the not so irritable at September 13, 2020 11:35 AM (w7KSn)


I've been using them (with a 45 minute sleep timer) for falling asleep, too.

Someone did a study that found that while you can drive and listen to music without distraction (as music stimulates a different part of the brain than the visual/spatial driving parts), listening to audiobooks is distracting because the same parts of the brain that imagine a scene have to share time with processing what you're seeing and doing on the road.

Posted by: hogmartin at September 13, 2020 11:38 AM (t+qrx)

407 Anybody got some names on that Hunter Biden China connection? I'd like to look it up so I can talk about it with others.

Posted by: Trimegistus at September 13, 2020 11:39 AM (R1+YM)

408 338: Is there much hand-wringing even now as how to get boys to read?

Posted by: Catch Thirty-Thr33 at September 13, 2020 11:39 AM (SSJSf)

409 I dropped Netflix for unrelated reasons. But signs was unrelentingly dark. A town with no redeeming characters.
Posted by: CN at September 13, 2020 11:34 AM (ONvIw)

I dislike that about almost all European productions. The BBC, which I used to enjoy, has also gotten unrelentingly dark. It's like they sense that their culture and their continent is dying, and that pervades all of their works.

Posted by: Tom Servo at September 13, 2020 11:40 AM (V2Yro)

410 I meant the msm
Posted by: Nevergiveup

it was on some British news thing on tv this morning (Sky?)

Posted by: vmom 2020 - The Translations of Marcus Aurelius at September 13, 2020 11:40 AM (nUhF0)

411 And for the record, Kirk Herbstreit is never going to live it down. Even the Hodge Twins are ragging on him.
(Sportscaster who wept about all that racial injustice in football)

Posted by: artemis at September 13, 2020 11:40 AM (AwPyG)

412 Das Kapital des Toilet?

Posted by: Anna Puma at September 13, 2020 11:41 AM (2TxKA)

413 I dislike that about almost all European productions. The BBC, which I used to enjoy, has also gotten unrelentingly dark. It's like they sense that their culture and their continent is dying, and that pervades all of their works.


true.

but then there's After Life.

Posted by: BlackOrchid_j9HX3 at September 13, 2020 11:41 AM (j9HX3)

414 I haven't tried the audio books while driving.
Since I go almost no where anymore...

Posted by: navybrat the not so irritable at September 13, 2020 11:41 AM (w7KSn)

415 400 263 Boys must pay a lot more attention to what their teachers look like. All I remember are certain personalities but names, faces....no.
Posted by: Sharon(willow's apprentice) at September 13, 2020 10:37 AM (sd8p

There's something to that, I suspect.

As repeatedly mentioned here and elsewhere, going through a teacher's certification program, it awakens a lot of memories that I need to fall back on. My fourth grade teacher was simply amazing and someone to emulate. But there was one other thing. And everyone who sees the class picture that I have from fourth grade comments on it: she was very young. And she was very pretty.

Indeed, I was in another fourth grade class when the new teacher came along and before I knew she was to be my new teacher and that she visited the classroom I was in to gather her new students the first thought I had was "how pretty!" To this day I can point out peculiarities. For instance, any time she wore a skirt to school, 1) it was NEVER higher than the mid-point of her knees, and 2) she ALWAYS wore knee socks with them. And she almost never wore high heels, and if she did, they MAY have had one to one and a half inch heels. They were never terribly high.

Amazing how I can hold on to that after decades, no?
Posted by: Catch Thirty-Thr33 at September 13, 2020 11:37 AM (SSJSf)

---------------------------------

I had a crush on my 4th grade teacher. She, too, was very young and very pretty.

Posted by: No One of Consequence at September 13, 2020 11:41 AM (CAJOC)

416 The Antifa Lover thing might be real. There is a whole genre of "romance" books on Amazon dealing with women being overcome and ravaged by repellent things. Like dinosaur rape, being a cannibal tribe love slave, etc.. And I'm pretty sure it's not men buying these books.

Posted by: banana Dream at September 13, 2020 11:43 AM (l6b3d)

417 376 I started watching the Polish detective show "Signs". It got too dark, too fast...and I decided to drop Netflix so I didn't continue.
Posted by: CN at September 13, 2020 11:29 AM (ONvIw)


yeah, I quit too - not because it was too dark for me (I can be very grimdark) but got too teen-angsty

Posted by: vmom 2020 - The Translations of Marcus Aurelius at September 13, 2020 11:43 AM (nUhF0)

418 I just walked through the house and turned off 6 lights in empty rooms. So I guess I'm old.

Posted by: Mrs. Peel at September 13, 2020 11:44 AM (rWZ8Y)

419 Report on Oliver Cromwell.

Finished Cromwell by Antonia Fraser, and was struck by many parallels to today. It is a large book, but engaging.

First, the large book is exhaustive in chronicling his life, with a close focus on his life and actions.

He had a big change in his life as a middling member of the local gentry, and became a strong Puritan believer. He was all for the little men of his part of England, and started making speaches in Parliament. He did not like the policy of Charles I.

The country was riven by the Monarchists and Parliamentarians, but it was also a deeply felt religious conflict. The bad boys were the Baptists, Puritans, and the Millennials, certain Earth was doomed and looking for proof in Revelations.

The book shows his growth into the best Parliamentarian General, becoming the Lord General. This was most unlikely, since we was a father of five, a devoted family man, and a hawking and hunting country landowner. He used the OT book Isaiah as his guide in life,

It shows the maneuvering in Parliament to kill King Charles I, how Parliament took over the Executive's function, and the rise of Cromwell to become the Lord Protector.

His military campaigns are sketched in, with not a lot of detail this smart military blog would want. But enough is said to get the gist of the fighting. Fighting in Ireland is put in context, being about 10 months out of his life.

It shows his growth as a leader, and as a tolerant ruler, using the same techniques as a King, and having a wider vision of what England needed. He became more tolerant. He got the Jews reinstated in England, for example.

Parallels to today in next post.

Posted by: NaCly Dog at September 13, 2020 11:44 AM (hyuyC)

420 I'm reading a goofy young adult dystopia type trilogy thing?

bubble gum reading

BUT! it's actually completely pertinent to our entire current situation, in various creepy and prescient ways.

it's the Delirium/Pandemonium/Requiem series, where a tyrannical USA has clamped down HARD in order to eradicate a "terrible virus" - and the virus is called "Deliria"... and it's essentially human love.

Posted by: BlackOrchid_j9HX3 at September 13, 2020 11:44 AM (j9HX3)

421 How to get boys to read: wait until they're past 30. Til then, find them lots of things to do outside all day and let them have lots of sex at night.

Posted by: Tom Servo at September 13, 2020 11:44 AM (V2Yro)

422
1.) Read the Gidget book, or

2.) Swallow a rusty old decking nail and hope for the best.

What would YOU do?

Posted by: Yudhishthira's Dice at September 13, 2020 11:44 AM (x73LH)

423 I dislike that about almost all European productions. The BBC, which I used to enjoy, has also gotten unrelentingly dark. It's like they sense that their culture and their continent is dying, and that pervades all of their works.
Posted by: Tom Servo at September 13, 2020 11:40 AM (V2Yro)

Certainly a lot. I thought this Signs show would sort of be like Shetland except with a Polish "hero". I gave it a fairs shot, but I couldn't go on. It just kept dragging more characters into the mud and soon it was no longer watchable.

I noted with Endeavour the tendency toward depressingly dark characterizations. Nobody can be allowed to be somewhat wholesome. They all have to be tragically flawed.

Posted by: CN at September 13, 2020 11:44 AM (ONvIw)

424 >>Anybody got some names on that Hunter Biden China connection? I'd like to look it up so I can talk about it with others.

Henniges Automotive.

Posted by: JackStraw at September 13, 2020 11:44 AM (ZLI7S)

425 Next I will get "Killing Crazy Horse" by Bill O'Reilly.
I have all the other "Killing..." books.

Posted by: navybrat the not so irritable at September 13, 2020 11:44 AM (w7KSn)

426 418 I just walked through the house and turned off 6 lights in empty rooms. So I guess I'm old.
Posted by: Mrs. Peel at September 13, 2020 11:44 AM (rWZ8Y)

-----------------------------

Did you do it by clapping? 'Cause that there's the tell.

Posted by: No One of Consequence at September 13, 2020 11:45 AM (CAJOC)

427
yeah, I quit too - not because it was too dark for me (I can be very grimdark) but got too teen-angsty
Posted by: vmom 2020 - The Translations of Marcus Aurelius at September 13, 2020 11:43 AM (nUhF0)

Even the non-teens were teen angsty.

Posted by: CN at September 13, 2020 11:45 AM (ONvIw)

428 I watch Chuck Todd and some Psycho Joe because it's an early read on where Media is going.
Posted by: Ignoramus at September 13, 2020 11:29 AM (9TdxA)


F Chuck's facial hair and beady eyes make him look like a really dense rodent who has no chance of making it through even an elementary maze.

Posted by: Captain Hate at September 13, 2020 11:45 AM (y7DUB)

429 From what I heard this morning, there haven't been any new evacuations. Air quality is really really bad though. Always possible there's a problem with his internet.

Posted by: Notsothoreau at September 13, 2020 11:46 AM (YynYJ)

430 Dinosaur sex?

That would explain James Carville,

Posted by: Anna Puma at September 13, 2020 11:47 AM (2TxKA)

431 T.S. Eliot said Joyce's story "The Dead," (the last story "The Dubliners") was the best short story ever written, IIRC.

Posted by: mnw at September 13, 2020 11:47 AM (Cssks)

432 I saw the hunter clip @karluskap on twitter.
Remember you can search "@karluskap" and her twitter will come up, you don't have to sign up for anything.

Posted by: artemis at September 13, 2020 11:47 AM (AwPyG)

433
The only redeeming factor involving Chuck Todd is that no one watches Chuck Todd anymore except the True Believers on the left. And not even that many of them.


Side effects of Chuck Todd include indigestion, bloating, excess gas, constipation, runny nose, diarrhea, and piles. Do not take Chuck Todd if you are allergic to Chuck Todd. Near fatal bouts of nausea have been reported with Chuck Todd use. If scratching oneself after taking Chuck Todd persists for four hours or more, seek medical attention immediately. Do not take Chuck Todd after ingesting shellfish to avoid attacks of catatonia.

Ask your doctor if Chuck Todd is right for you today!

Posted by: Krebs v Carnot: Epic Battle of the Cycling Stars (TM) at September 13, 2020 11:47 AM (pNxlR)

434 (Transfers from other districts know adverbs and conjunctions; why don't ours?)


I'm on a jihad about this. I teach a foreign language to middle schoolers and they arrive with no understanding of English grammar.

To make a point of this I dragged my principal to a cafeteria table and made one poor girl who was not one of my students stand up (I may have traumatized her). I asked what two things does a sentence need?

She said, as they all do, a capital letter and a period.

At back to school night a parent who is also a teacher pulled me aside and said oh you should know that the whole subject verb agreement thing went out of fashion and they don't teach it anymore.

It's not my kids' fault that they don't know anything.

Posted by: Bandersnatch at September 13, 2020 11:48 AM (q2K0j)

435 This Clara Kraebber used to be kinda cute. I cant decide if she is a statement about class, antifa or gingers. All three, maybe?

Posted by: PUE 206 at September 13, 2020 11:48 AM (D/SYi)

436 That would explain James Carville,
Posted by: Anna Puma at September 13, 2020 11:47 AM (2TxKA)


Click "random" on the character generator screen enough times, and you get James Carville.

Posted by: hogmartin at September 13, 2020 11:48 AM (t+qrx)

437 373 Has Christopher Taylor been here today. IIRC he's near Salem where those fires are raging.
Posted by: CN

checked his twitter - he last posted yesterday evening

Posted by: vmom 2020 - The Translations of Marcus Aurelius at September 13, 2020 11:48 AM (nUhF0)

438 431 T.S. Eliot said Joyce's story "The Dead," (the last story "The Dubliners") was the best short story ever written, IIRC.
that's entirely reasonable - wonderful story

nice film of it also by John Huston with Angelica as leading actress

Posted by: BlackOrchid_j9HX3 at September 13, 2020 11:48 AM (j9HX3)

439 wait - 22 hours ago

Posted by: vmom 2020 - The Translations of Marcus Aurelius at September 13, 2020 11:49 AM (nUhF0)

440 Das Kapital des Toilet?
Posted by: Anna Puma at September 13, 2020 11:41 AM (2TxKA)

Das Krapital?

Posted by: Alberta Oil Peon at September 13, 2020 11:50 AM (MhTAc)

441 TDS is real. Sometime in the next half dozen years there will be a drug for it. Maybe something like Prozac.

====
I'm thinking more along the line of cyanide.

Posted by: Vlad the Impaler, whittling away like mad at September 13, 2020 11:51 AM (d6mdH)

442 Why Strozk was so wrong in what he said about counterintelligence (and which we all know, but just to recap)

He claimed counter-intelligence didn't require as high a bar to investigate; BUT the only "evidence" he had was a hit-piece written by the Hillary campaign and laundered through John Brennan's English pals. Everything else was faked to pretend that there was more - they knew from the very beginning that Carter Page was working for the CIA in all his visits for Russia, which made the claims against him all monstrous, intentional, lies.

AND when Trump slightly suggested that Joe Biden's illegal money laundering in the Ukraine should be looked into (counter-intelligence investigation?) all of Strozk's political allies demanded IMPEACH! IMPEACH!!!! Those two points negate every single thing Strozk published in his book.

Posted by: Tom Servo at September 13, 2020 11:51 AM (V2Yro)

443 I'm on a jihad about this. I teach a foreign language to middle schoolers and they arrive with no understanding of English grammar.
Posted by: Bandersnatch at September 13, 2020 11:48 AM (q2K0j)


In fairness, I knew the parts of speech from elementary school, well enough to be dangerous, but I really couldn't say I understood how English grammar worked until I started learning foreign languages. No way am I alone on this.

Posted by: hogmartin at September 13, 2020 11:51 AM (t+qrx)

444 Anything produced by the BBC must contain gay scenes for virtue signaling purposes. They even felt the need to have a gay alien reptile person in Doctor Who!

Posted by: Menack at September 13, 2020 11:52 AM (buTO7)

445
Reliable sources tell of a well-used copy of "I Was A Cannibal Tribe Love Slave" on Preznint Boyfriend's night stand.

Posted by: Krebs v Carnot: Epic Battle of the Cycling Stars (TM) at September 13, 2020 11:52 AM (pNxlR)

446 430 Dinosaur sex?

That would explain James Carville,
Posted by: Anna Puma at September 13, 2020 11:47 AM (2TxKA)

Reptilian lifeforms of some kind, anyway.

Posted by: Insomniac - Ex Cineribus Resurgo at September 13, 2020 11:52 AM (NWiLs)

447 checked his twitter - he last posted yesterday evening
Posted by: vmom 2020 - The Translations of Marcus Aurelius at September 13, 2020 11:48 AM (nUhF0)

Good. Scary mess

Posted by: CN at September 13, 2020 11:52 AM (ONvIw)

448 I dislike that about almost all European productions. The BBC, which I used to enjoy, has also gotten unrelentingly dark. It's like they sense that their culture and their continent is dying, and that pervades all of their works.
=======================
This is really true. My wife and I got sucked into watching "Hinterland," about a Welsh* police force. The episodes weave together, and it had excellent writing and acting. By the time we got to the end, however, the total carnage and dark sub-plot made me re-examine my affinity for the show.
*The entire series was shot in Welsh and British English. That's right, they filmed each episode twice.

Posted by: Brave Sir Robin at September 13, 2020 11:53 AM (7Fj9P)

449 Most of you probably know this, but Saddam wrote a romance novel - "Zabibah and the King."

Posted by: Yudhishthira's Dice at September 13, 2020 11:53 AM (x73LH)

450 440 Das Kapital des Toilet?
Posted by: Anna Puma at September 13, 2020 11:41 AM (2TxKA)

Das Krapital?
Posted by: Alberta Oil Peon at September 13, 2020 11:50 AM (MhTAc)


Also know as The Movement.

Posted by: PUE 206 at September 13, 2020 11:54 AM (D/SYi)

451 Gidget photo above:

The young woman looks like Leslie Gore ("It's My Party & I'll Cry If I Want To"), but... she never played Gidget.

Sandra Dee was the original Gidget.

Trivia: Most mismatched husband & wife EVER? That would be... Sandra Dee & Bobby Darin, imo.

Posted by: mnw at September 13, 2020 11:54 AM (Cssks)

452 Anything produced by the BBC must contain gay scenes for virtue signaling purposes. They even felt the need to have a gay alien reptile person in Doctor Who!
Posted by: Menack at September 13, 2020 11:52 AM (buTO7)

The BBC is full of nothing but preverts.

Posted by: Zombie Jimmy Savile at September 13, 2020 11:55 AM (Z+IKu)

453 Every now and then I post the books I have recently obtained on my blog. For anyone interested, here is my latest list:
http://agentintellect.blogspot.com/2020/08/some-recent-acquisitions.html

Posted by: Jim S. at September 13, 2020 11:55 AM (ynUnH)

454
What Kind of Name is That? - a limerick

I just met a young girl named Gidget
(That's a cross between a girl and a midget)
She's a pleasant surfer girl
Who likes to catch a curl
But I have to say, Moondoggie is an idjit!

Posted by: Muldoon at September 13, 2020 11:55 AM (Fc5rx)

455
Trivia: Most mismatched husband & wife EVER? That would be... Sandra Dee & Bobby Darin, imo.

Posted by: mnw at September 13, 2020 11:54 AM (Cssks)

Nah, Liz Taylor and Senator Warner

Posted by: CN at September 13, 2020 11:56 AM (ONvIw)

456 *The entire series was shot in Welsh and British English. That's right, they filmed each episode twice.
Posted by: Brave Sir Robin at September 13, 2020 11:53 AM (7Fj9P)

So the English series is a half-hour show, and the Welsh runs a full hour?

Posted by: Alberta Oil Peon at September 13, 2020 11:56 AM (MhTAc)

457 Parallels to today in next post.
Posted by: NaCly Dog at September 13, 2020 11:44 AM (hyuyC)

yes, yes ??

Posted by: runner at September 13, 2020 11:56 AM (zr5Kq)

458 Something to consider, in light of our upcoming election:
In Britain, they had a historic landslide last fall. I mean, nothing like it--the lefties were wiped out, and the equivalent of our right now has something like a 60 seat advantage.
But nothing has really changed; people are still forced to pay for the BBC to feed them propaganda.

Posted by: artemis at September 13, 2020 11:57 AM (AwPyG)

459 In Cromwell's England we had the established order under Charles I. Cromwell and others had religious fervor that disagreed with the King. Kinda like the Left today.

Many hated the King, and the intensity of hatred for Trump is even greater. The Establishment is rotten and corrupt in both England of the time and today. Funding government was a focus on many in power then, which is unlike today. Fiat currency has changes the need for balance in government funding.

A hopeful issue was when the King and his government was swept aside, the winners could not transform into a replacement for the King. Lots of infighting and disparate agendas.

Cromwell has a weak successor in his son, picking one son over perhaps a better choice. So the revolution had no legs. As who can lead the Left as rulers? The Left has manipulators, but not leaders.

The country as a whole, devastated by two phases of Civil War, was starting to heal when Cromwell died. He was Lord Protector for only 6 years or so.

The subjects returned to their accustomed form of Government. So all that fervor for revolution was ended, and Monarchy returned.

So even if we lose in November, keep pushing for the return of America. We as citizens are the last-resort feedback mechanism for a good country. There is no way the Left can bind up wounds. They want to be in absolute power, which will be their undoing.

Posted by: NaCly Dog at September 13, 2020 11:57 AM (hyuyC)

460 >>> 449 Most of you probably know this, but Saddam wrote a romance novel - "Zabibah and the King."
Posted by: Yudhishthira's Dice at September 13, 2020 11:53 AM (x73LH)


Ah man! That makes me yearn for a feel good buddy cop movie between a down on her luck belly dancer and an Elvis impersonator.


Make It HAPPEN Hollywood!

Posted by: banana Dream at September 13, 2020 11:57 AM (l6b3d)

461 I finished Desert Wife by Hilda Faunce, a memoir from 1914 on, of her experience when her husband ken, who had grown up in Colorado and had been an Indian trader with the Navajo, had gone broke in a business deal after moving to the Southern Oregon coast, and they traveled first to Colorado, and then to Arizona take over a vacant trading post on the Navajo reservation trading in Navajo blankets wool, handicrafts, jewelry and hides for canned goods, flour, ammunition tools and household goods. Hilda also did a side work sewing up coats and shirts on her treadle Singer. The goal was to earn enough money to buy and pay off a ranch so they could work for themselves, not the owner of the trading post.

First they traveled out on the old Southern pioneer trail to Salt Lake city, then on to the Four Corners area to find a trading post to take over, with all their possessions in a two horse wagon. On the way they travel across Utah, and Hilda talks about her surprise in dealing with the Mormon settlers, and how the locals took them for Mormons as well. She discusses problems and risks of the trail, including rabid coyotes, and a team of horses that are terrified of automobiles and street cars when they try to hurry through a very modern Salt Lake City.
In assuming the trading post, she talks about the problems of trading with the Navajo and living in the region in what is a barn-built two room shack, taking jewelry in pawn for credit, buying cattle, hides that might be from stolen cattle, and dealing with Navajo taboos on death and storms. The Navajo were very poor, despised anyone they considered ungenerous, and had a habit of claiming a relationship to get a better deal, which requires diplomacy from a store owner who is trying to make a living.

This period covers the lead up to and the period of WWI and also discusses how the restrictions on flour, materials, and the smallpox and Spanish flu epidemics that swept through affected the Navajo, as well as a near Indian uprising when it was rumored that the newly established Draft would include the Navajo.

Hilda adored many of the Navajo and was clearly in awe of their artistic abilities, though she found many to be difficult and some to be avoided if at all possible. She does refer to them as The Heathens, but admits that is not very accurate. She and her husband were devastated by the Smallpox and Spanish flu deaths.
In the end they paid enough on their note to move to their new ranch, which ends the book.

I do love memoirs because they tell more than just facts, they tell a lot about intentions and attitudes as well. Hilda's experience traveling is of hardship and silence, such incredible silence on the pioneer trail, that is echoed in her husband Ken, who speaks very little and appears to not be bothered by it. Her experience with the Navajo is about being an outsider who is an incident away from being despised and hated by a society that has murdered outsiders, who she finds frustrating and scary from time to time, but she had deep respect and affection for, and was clearly liked in return.

Anyhow, a well written book, apparently from collected letters to a friend, who got them back to her and they worked them up into a book together.

Posted by: Kindltot at September 13, 2020 11:58 AM (WyVLE)

462 These people have lost their minds. They really think they occupy some mythical moral high ground.

@BrentHBaker

On #MTP,
@ChuckTodd
frets how Trump has thwarted the media: "When we lose our ability to shame a politician, we lose a lot of our power. That's for sure."

Posted by: JackStraw at September 13, 2020 11:58 AM (ZLI7S)

463 Greetings book readers!
I am still inching my way through El Principe de la Niebla in my quixotic quest for Spanish (reading) fluency. 50% of the way through and the three teenage protagonists have gotten together to try to figure out the scary doings around their small seaside village. They've done a reconnaissance of the ship-wreck, the younger sister has fallen down the stairs, and Max has told his friend and his sister about the scary statues in the abandoned garden.

Also in the middle of Horde-recommmended (author? -- I forget) The Passion of Job (Laura Baxter), flipping back and forth to the KJV's Job. Highly, highly readable and recommended.

I finished a juicy Victorian romance by Sherry Thomas: The Luckiest Lady.

And I started a re-read of Iliad, combined with Spencer Klavan's commentary on his YouTube channel, also some Brit's (Nicolson) Why Homer Matters. Not so sure about the last, and I am only in Book 2 of Iliad (catalog of the Greek leaders), but so far good.

I find I read too fast for Homer and poetry in general. I have to force myself to stop, go back, and read again more slowly. I am better fitted (trained) for pulp pleasure.

Posted by: sinmi at September 13, 2020 11:58 AM (A5IVt)

464 Strzok. Ditch. Some assembly required.
Posted by: Mr. Peebles at September 13, 2020 11:16 AM (oVJmc)


Ric Grennell asked him on Twitter what it was like having another man turn his Pages. Strzok blocked him.

Posted by: Ian S. at September 13, 2020 11:58 AM (6XLoz)

465 Trivia: Most mismatched husband & wife EVER? That would be... Sandra Dee & Bobby Darin, imo.
======================
Marilyn Monroe and Joe DiMaggio?

Posted by: Brave Sir Robin at September 13, 2020 11:59 AM (7Fj9P)

466
Ric Grennell asked him on Twitter what it was like having another man turn his Pages. Strzok blocked him.
Posted by: Ian S. at September 13, 2020 11:58 AM (6XLoz)

Grennell is amazing

Posted by: CN at September 13, 2020 11:59 AM (ONvIw)

467 Ric Grennell asked him on Twitter what it was like having another man turn his Pages. Strzok blocked him.
Posted by: Ian S

I imagine the Page is badly dog-eared.

Posted by: Tonypete at September 13, 2020 11:59 AM (Rvt88)

468 Trump will have 2 years after November to get a lot of things righted, this time we can't let McConnell and McCarthy subvert the will of the people.

Posted by: Heart of Darkness at September 13, 2020 12:00 PM (nFRLh)

469 I asked what two things does a sentence need?

*********

A parole board and a scheduled release date.

Posted by: Muldoon at September 13, 2020 12:00 PM (Fc5rx)

470 On #MTP,

@ChuckTodd

frets how Trump has thwarted the media: "When we lose our ability
to shame a politician, we lose a lot of our power. That's for sure."



Posted by: JackStraw at September 13, 2020 11:58 AM (ZLI7S)


Awww...poor widdle Chuckie.

Posted by: TheQuietMan at September 13, 2020 12:00 PM (3bFb9)

471 NaCly Dog

Richard Cromwell (the Lord Protector's son) inspired the phrase, "as queer as Dick's hatband."

Posted by: mnw at September 13, 2020 12:00 PM (Cssks)

472 "Fighting in Ireland is put in context, being about 10 months out of his life."

But what a ten months they were, from the Irish perspective.

So Cromwell was mostly peaceful.

Roger Howell, the first American to teach British History at Oxford IIRC, and Cromwell fanboi, wrote his bio, and got the Ireland thing down to half a page.

Posted by: Ignoramus at September 13, 2020 12:01 PM (9TdxA)

473 NOOD.

Commies gonna commie.

Posted by: Sponge - China is Asshoe! at September 13, 2020 12:01 PM (Zz0t1)

474 @463
I went to listen to Sherry Thomas once, and was amazed to find that she is a Chinese immigrant. Very intelligent woman, but with a very thick Chinese accent.
(She writes very popular romances, and you'd never guess this)

Posted by: artemis at September 13, 2020 12:02 PM (AwPyG)

475 Cromwell grew to be a Great Man, with issues. Antonia Fraser grew to like him, even though she was a firm believer in Catholicism.

I like a biographer to have a an interesting life, with lots of experience in what works and does not work.

Antonia Fraser had that life, with enough exposure to power politics to be insightful, enough family life to be knowing, and even some real scandal to inform her. She did a good job in her biography of Cromwell.

Posted by: NaCly Dog at September 13, 2020 12:04 PM (hyuyC)

476 Now, the question hit me, could this happen now, when the pros have gone to s**t? (And the woke colleges for that matter.) It does seem an opportunity.
Posted by: Eeyore at September 13, 2020 09:21 AM (7X3UV)


The James Historical Abstract is great writing. Actually, both version are. Some of the same material used in the second version, but altogether, if you want a comprehensive history of baseball, James is your guy. And some people just think of him as the "stat" guy, which is incredibly wrong.

As for the minors, I hope that's what happens, that they become divorced from the majors, and leagues are able to form and hold contracts with players, who are free to move up, if they want to.

But imagine a league in a relatively smaller city, with players who aren't really major league talent, all competing for the right to be champions. It would be great, and it would be much better than what exists now.

Posted by: BurtTC at September 13, 2020 12:05 PM (hku12)

477 LMAO at a tweet I saw on Hans TL:


@hradzka
Level 1:
*1990*
SCIENTIST. "I can send men 30 years into the future! But--"
GENERAL. *hits button*
*zot*
CHRONONAUT. "Amidst pandemic & unending natural disasters, President Donald Trump, creator of Space Force, brings Middle East peace--"
S. *gunshot*
S. "see? they always come back insane"

Posted by: vmom 2020 - The Translations of Marcus Aurelius at September 13, 2020 12:06 PM (nUhF0)

478 13 They started shortly after his election and haven't let once let up, according to commentator Byron York in his new book Obsession: Inside the Washington Establishment's Never-Ending War on Trump:

Actually they started right after the election campaign started for the primaries.
Posted by: Vic at September 13, 2020 09:05 AM (mpXpK)
===

Good catch!

Clearly York's attempt to make you forget that the entire Republican establishment, the COC, the entire big donor class, every elected official, the fake azz "conservative" media, Fox News, etc. opposed Trump from Day 1.

Last I heard, the GOP is retiring 20 or so incumbents in the Senate. That is the same strategy they used to throw the House.

Posted by: Gilded Age II at September 13, 2020 12:07 PM (BRkq2)

479 In fairness, I knew the parts of speech from elementary school, well enough to be dangerous, but I really couldn't say I understood how English grammar worked until I started learning foreign languages. No way am I alone on this.


That is utterly fair. I was raised to speak proper English but I never understood the rules until I learned German.

Posted by: Bandersnatch at September 13, 2020 12:08 PM (q2K0j)

480 I finally read "The Natural", the "1952 novel about baseball by Bernard Malamud, and is his debut novel". Now I know why the movie's story is unsatisfying, because the novel's plot is equally unsatisfying. All the same characters are in the book as the movie, but their contexts are different, particularly Roy Hobbs, the "hero", and the two women, Memo Paris (Kim Basinger in the movie) and Iris Gaines (Glenn Close).
................

All these storms over shallow seas converge and whip up a perfectly droning and trite ending. Remember, Roy is a bum, so it is not heroic. But it is his deserved and earned ending.
Posted by: Krebs v Carnot: Epic Battle of the Cycling Stars (TM) at September 13, 2020 10:44 AM (pNxlR)


I love the book, and hate the movie. It's not really a baseball book. It's a book about character (or lack thereof). Malamud knows how to write, and he knows people. Hobbs is an idiot who hasn't earned any of the good things that happen to him, and totally earns all the bad things that do.

It's a wonderful morality story, one that rings true, with humor and wit.

Unlike the movie, which is just a trite hero story about a guy who can hit a baseball far.

Posted by: BurtTC at September 13, 2020 12:09 PM (hku12)

481 I know he's a big ol' Lefty and we hates him,
but Stephen King's "On Writing" is actually a good book on not just how to write, but how to read books.

Posted by: Sal at September 13, 2020 12:09 PM (KTdeA)

482 I love reading this thread for the book ideas. Currently I'm reading one I found on the Book thread long ago - Between Silk and Cyanide: A Codemaker's War 1941-1945 by Leo Marks. It's his story of his days as a cryptographer. I'm only 40 pages in, so I can't say much except that the first sentence will grab you: "In January 1942 I was escorted to the war by my parents in case I couldn't find it or met with an accident on the way."

I don't remember if it was my recommendation or not, but I do like that book a great deal, and want to take the opportunity to re-recommend it.

Also, my late Dad, who was in Army Intelligence, liked it a great deal.

Posted by: Thing From Snowy Mountain, Cryptid Anarchist at September 13, 2020 12:10 PM (5ck7c)

483 I had a crush on my 4th grade teacher. She, too, was very young and very pretty.
Posted by: No One of Consequence at September 13, 2020 11:41 AM (CAJOC)

That element definitely existed in my case, but I think I learned a great life lesson here: it was super-easy for my teacher to be a complete bitch. My schooling is filled with examples of such. But in this case, I had a teacher who saw I had quite a bit of intellectual curiosity, and rather than crush it, or do things to snuff it out, she decided it would be better to encourage it. It's to the point where, when I was telling my middle sis about all this, she said "I think I know who was responsible for you studying history."
She was pretty but it wasn't as important as the other things she did on my behalf, like seeing to it that I got into the talented and gifted program at my school, among other things.

Posted by: Catch Thirty-Thr33 at September 13, 2020 12:10 PM (SSJSf)

484 It's always been a wonder that Cromwell's family were allowed to live out prosperous and long lives. Especially given the accepted standards of retribution at that time.
Richard Cromwell lived until he was 85.
Other than any of the surviving regicides who signed Charles I's death warrant - and the corpses of those already deceased, Charles II left nearly everyone else on the Parliamentary side unmolested and free to live out their lives.
A virtual miracle for that age.

Posted by: Sir Ian Botham at September 13, 2020 12:10 PM (0EkGe)

485 mnw

Yes. It was a hit job. He was not the leader his father was, although not a flaming homo by any means.

Ignoramus

Yes, Cromwell lost control of his troops in a couple of battles in Ireland. Which, without going through the 30 Years War, was unused to being mistreated.

The broader feelings of English leaders for the Irish rabble was the real cause of discontent. They wanted the Irish to be slaves on the worst land, while the English kept the good land.

The policy English financiers wanted was certain to make them hated. Fortunately, the policies failed, as they were unworkable. The Irish were tough and smart in how they coped with idiots.

Posted by: NaCly Dog at September 13, 2020 12:10 PM (hyuyC)

486 Hmm. The gal sitting aside Kohner's lap looks like a young Kathleen Quinlan...

Posted by: Additional Blond Agent, STEM guy at September 13, 2020 12:11 PM (ZSK0i)

487 474 @463
I went to listen to Sherry Thomas once, and was amazed to find that she is a Chinese immigrant. Very intelligent woman, but with a very thick Chinese accent.
(She writes very popular romances, and you'd never guess this)
Posted by: artemis at September 13, 2020 12:02 PM (AwPyG)

I was raised by a German and no one could ever tell by hearing her talk. But her first language was in fact German.

Posted by: Catch Thirty-Thr33 at September 13, 2020 12:11 PM (SSJSf)

488 Sir Ian Botham

Yes. The book explains all that.

It was a wise decision, made better because the real talent of the Roundheads died with Cromwell. And he had strove mightily to be a kind ruler, so he gained some goodwill along the way.

Posted by: NaCly Dog at September 13, 2020 12:13 PM (hyuyC)

489 Hmm. The gal sitting aside Kohner's lap looks like a young Kathleen Quinlan...
Posted by: Additional Blond Agent, STEM guy at September 13, 2020 12:11 PM (ZSK0i)


She is apparently the real life "Gidget," and she has a look about her that has been said about the actress who plays Aria Stark in the Game of Thrones show: She looks like a young grandmother.

Posted by: BurtTC at September 13, 2020 12:14 PM (hku12)

490 Right. Now this thread is dead.

Posted by: BurtTC at September 13, 2020 12:15 PM (hku12)

491 Thing From Snowy Mountain, Cryptid Anarchist

I recommended it.

The fate of the women SOE agents is heartrending. What is left unsaid is how SOE fit into deception plannings. But it shows the strengths and weaknesses of a new Intel agency.

Posted by: NaCly Dog at September 13, 2020 12:16 PM (hyuyC)

492 (She writes very popular romances, and you'd never guess this)
Posted by: artemis at September 13, 2020 12:02 PM (AwPyG)

I had no idea Herry Thomas is Chinese!

and Burt:

like Cobra Kai
Sunday Book Thread
Never dies!

Posted by: vmom 2020 - The Translations of Marcus Aurelius at September 13, 2020 12:19 PM (nUhF0)

493 I've been reading "The World in a Crucible, 1914-19" (from the old Harper & Row Rise of Modern Europe 20-book series) and rereading "The Iliad."

Posted by: Gilded Age II at September 13, 2020 12:27 PM (BRkq2)

494 Have Morons been writing the Amazon reviews for My Antifa Lover? They are gut bustingly funny!

Posted by: SuperMayorSuperRonNirenberg at September 13, 2020 12:28 PM (/Hc9U)

495 Love that library! Thanks for the pic.

Posted by: Gilded Age II at September 13, 2020 12:28 PM (BRkq2)

496 @495
Yes, I like my libraries high-ceilinged and weighty. That's a beauty

Posted by: artemis at September 13, 2020 12:33 PM (AwPyG)

497 forgot to mention in my MA post

Be very careful when buying classics like Marcus Aurelius ton Amazon - they have a terrible way of mashing all different versions and translations together. You'll be looking at one translation on hardcover, then you switch to the paperback or Kindle tab it's a completely different translation! Double check the ISBN and the "look inside" feature to make sure you are buying the one you want.

Posted by: vmom 2020 - The Translations of Marcus Aurelius at September 13, 2020 12:36 PM (nUhF0)

498 Amazon rigs searches. It's a form of censorship.

1. I searched for The World in the Crucible 1914-1919.

Amazon gave me instead: "Rigging the Game: How Inequality is Reproduced in Everyday Life." [no words in common with the search]

The book I used the exact title for shows up NOWHERE in Amazon's search.

So I tried without success the following:
2. "The World in the Crucible" [quotation marks]
3. "The World in the Crucible 1914-1919 [including subtitle]
4. "The World in the Crucible 1914-1919" [including subtitle with quotation marks]
5. The World in the Crucible 1914-1919 The Rise of Modern Europe [adding name of the the series]
6. Schmitt Vedeler [the two authors' last names]
7. Schmitt Harold C Vedeler [full name of primary author] The World in the Crucible 1914-1919 The Rise of Modern Europe [full name of the primary author]

Finally when I added the first name of the first listed author, it showed up:
8. Bernadotte Schmitt The world in the crucible
9. I then found out by experiment that the search would work if author last names only were used but only if the author was listed after the title. But all

But all nine ways work for the book about the [bowel] movement that Amazon is promoting under auspices of its search engine.

I have 100 examples.

Posted by: Gilded Age II at September 13, 2020 12:51 PM (BRkq2)

499 Trivia: Most mismatched husband & wife EVER? That would be... Sandra Dee & Bobby Darin, imo.
======================
Marilyn Monroe and Joe DiMaggio?
Posted by: Brave Sir Robin

Frank Sinatra and Mia Farrow ?

Posted by: JT at September 13, 2020 01:06 PM (arJlL)

500 The BBC, which I used to enjoy, has also gotten unrelentingly dark. It's like they sense that their culture and their continent is dying, and that pervades all of their works

====
It doesn't require any deep insight to detect this since they're helping to (if not the primary driver behind) killing it.

Posted by: Vlad the Impaler, whittling away like mad at September 13, 2020 01:15 PM (d6mdH)

501 458 Something to consider, in light of our upcoming election:
In Britain, they had a historic landslide last fall. I mean, nothing like it--the lefties were wiped out, and the equivalent of our right now has something like a 60 seat advantage.
But nothing has really changed; people are still forced to pay for the BBC to feed them propaganda.
Posted by: artemis at September 13, 2020 11:57 AM (AwPyG)

Here's the difference: Boris Johnson is basically an establishment Tory. He was against Brexit before he was for it. Many people voted for him because they were rightly scared to death of Corbyn.

Real change would happen if someone like Nigel Farage was elected PM. Imagine how much "change" would have happened if we had elected Romney in 2016 and you'll get why nothing much is going on in the UK.

They don't have a Trump. They have an elitist guy who pretended to be like Trump to win over the Brexit voters but sadly Johnson appears to be very comfortable with PC and globalism.

Posted by: Donna&&&&&&&&V at September 13, 2020 01:19 PM (HabA/)

502 Posted by: Gilded Age II at September 13, 2020 12:51 PM (BRkq2)

isbn search

Posted by: vmom 2020 - The Translations of Marcus Aurelius at September 13, 2020 01:30 PM (nUhF0)

503 Yes, Cromwell lost control of his troops in a couple of battles in Ireland. Which, without going through the 30 Years War, was unused to being mistreated.
_________

I don't buy that. The distinctive thing about Cromwell is that he was one of the rare commanders who could keep his troops under his control, even when they'd routed the enemy. He showed that several times. That's a rare characteristic. (Alexander, of course had it.) It strains credulity that he "lost" it against the Irish, especially given that his own comments go both ways. Sometimes he made excuses; sometimes exulted.

Fraser, though an RC, is also a lib. British libs have ahrd time not supporting the Roundheads.

Posted by: Eeyore at September 13, 2020 01:55 PM (7X3UV)

504 262 243 arrrgh fiction. what was i thinking.

Posted by: yara at September 13, 2020 02:00 PM (rde8g)

505 I like stories that have dogs in them. I found a series by Alex Kava with variations on the main characters last name of Creed. Ryder Creed is an ex-Marine dog handler who was self-destructive until Hannah refocused him and they formed a company, CrimeScents that trains rescued and abandoned dogs for SAR, cadaver and other scent work. A previous series character appears, Maggie O'Dell, an FBI serial killer profiler. Both series are fast paced and enjoyable. I've read four Creed books and in the first of the O'Dell series and have not been disappointed by any of them. $9.99 each on Kindle and well worth it.

Posted by: Aelishdad at September 13, 2020 02:10 PM (P8upX)

506 I don't buy that. The distinctive thing about
Cromwell is that he was one of the rare commanders who could keep his
troops under his control, even when they'd routed the enemy. He showed
that several times. That's a rare characteristic. (Alexander, of course
had it.) It strains credulity that he "lost" it against the Irish,
especially given that his own comments go both ways. Sometimes he made
excuses; sometimes exulted.



Fraser, though an RC, is also a lib. British libs have ahrd time not supporting the Roundheads.
Posted by: Eeyore at September 13, 2020 01:55 PM (7X3UV)


The Irish hate. And they always look for external reasons for failure. Cromwell may have been a horrible person who was was an abusive tyrant who set the path for Ireland's subjugation.

He also DIED before the Salem Witch Trials STARTED in Massachusetts, which was more than 400 years ago.

The Irish traditionally can name the rape victims of Cromwell's Cavalry, but they can't remember who loaned them a pound last week. At some point you have to ponder on that.

Posted by: Kindltot at September 13, 2020 02:12 PM (WyVLE)

507 The New Dark Ages: leftist grifters writing books and no one to read them.

Posted by: Eve at September 13, 2020 03:41 PM (L5yo0)

508 IIUC Jeremiah Johnson is based on Vardis Fisher's "Mountain Man". Same guy/character. Worth getting the movie in Blu-Ray for the scenery

Posted by: Fsmokey at September 13, 2020 05:19 PM (0CLXv)

509 Just finished Kurt Schlichter's "21 Lies" last night. As always, a sprightly read with a lot of sass. Agreed with just about everything although he didn't go into too much depth on any one of the lies.
Where he missed the boat was his discussion of the MSM. He didn't get past the personal attitudes of the "journalists" and didn't discuss who hired these guys and gals and who hired and directed their editors.
Somehow the owners (except of Fox) have made some very bad business decisions and the only explanation lies in the deeper strategies of the owning multinational corporations.
This deserves a much deeper exploration.

Posted by: Whitehall at September 14, 2020 01:00 AM (TPgXP)

510 I've been reading Don Trump, Jr's latest (Liberal Privilege).

MUCH better than I expected. I'd never read one of his books, so really didn't expect much. It's straightforward and plainly written. Funny - and intentionally so.

A little too many snarky comments (although the subjects do deserve the snark), but still good. Worth buying, or at least spending time with the KU version.

Posted by: Linda S Fox at September 14, 2020 05:17 AM (HZfQV)

511
g'evenin', 'rons

Posted by: AltonJackson at September 14, 2020 10:03 PM (DUIap)

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