Saturday Gardening and Puttering Thread, August 1, 2020 [KT]

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Hello to all our gardeners, putterers and dreamers! First of August and it's hot here in the Central Valley of California. How about where you are? We are starting today with some indoor gardening. The photo above is from Don in Kansas, who has more orchid photos at the link.

RoyalOil sent in photos of an exotic plant for us to identify:

Like to visit local nurseries just to see what's interesting that they have to offer. Found one run by a nice Asian lady. Saw this flower, had to buy it. No idea what it's called. Maybe the horde knows?

The bloom last a couple of days then it dies and a few days later, a new bloom comes out above.

Oh, and she sold me the pot for $25.

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Notsothoreau sent in something fun:

Not sure if folks are familiar with minature African violets.

They are so cute! These are from The Violet Barn. My regular sized one is in the background. Just had these a few months.

"Throw out the radio and take the fiddle down from the wall."
-- Andrew Nelson Lytle, Tennessee, 1930

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They make me want to babble in French baby-talk for some reason. But here's a fiddle tune for Notsothoreau instead:

Show tune. Not a waltz. "Dance all night with a bottle in your hand"

Carnivorous Plants

Our outdoor carnivorous plant expert, Tony Litwin, sent in some fascinating photos a while back. Lots of variety in carnivorous plants! And he has a huge collection! Here are a few:

The Flytrap is self explanatory which also shows a Drosera Filiformis Filiformis as well as a small seedling of Sarracenia Leucophylla Viridscens which is an all green pitcher plant with no red whatsoever on either the plant or the flower.

12-)Venus Flytrap  a seed.jpg

As for the Butterworts, they belong to the species Pinguicula which means little greasy one as the leaves have a greasy feel to them. The largest Butterwort in the US is P. Planifolia (below), while the smallest is P. Pumila ( below that ). The Bladderworts which are the grass like blades in some of the pics (as with the first Butterwort below) belong to the species Utricularia and in this case Utricularia Subulata( the yellow flower).

So, butterworts are related to stinging nettle?

10-)Pinguicula Planifolia  yel.jpg

7-)Pinguicula Pumila.jpg

More to come.

The Edible Garden

40 miles north has a grape report. Remember that he usually protects his grapes from critters:

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KT, My red table grapes are really juicy this year. I picked these a little early, but it was a completely unprotected bunch that I had forgotten about. Somehow.

This was the biggest bunch, and the dark grapes are pretty sweet. Apparently the critters have been eating the berries in the neighbor's yard. Sometimes, you get lucky.

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Harvested this bunch too. They are a big hit with my oldest son.

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Gardens of The Horde

Surprise!

From Mrs. Leggy:

These are my sunflowers. I grew them from seeds and transplanted them as soon as they were big enough. They are at least 7-9 feet tall and are just starting to bloom. This year's bunch seem to have smaller flowers than last year. This is probably a good thing because the ones from last year were so heavy the stems often bent and snapped. Sunflowers love the heat and the frequent downpours we have in Indiana. I'm looking forward to the birds visiting them soon.

Thanks for the garden thread. It's such a happy part of the weekend!

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BIG

We have some wild sunflowers. Nothing like those. Weed control going on in our garden. anything going on in yours?


If you would like to send information and/or photos for the Saturday Gardening Thread, the address is:

ktinthegarden
at that g mail dot com place

Include your nic unless you want to remain a lurker.

Posted by: Open Blogger at 01:15 PM




Comments

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1 Good afternoon Greenthumbs

Posted by: Skip at August 01, 2020 01:19 PM (6f16T)

2 Thank you for the thread. That is a cool orchid.

Posted by: MikeM at August 01, 2020 01:20 PM (nMGVc)

3 grapes, not keto, but tasty.

cheers to the gardeners ...

Posted by: illiniwek at August 01, 2020 01:21 PM (Cus5s)

4 Is that Helliconia?

Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at August 01, 2020 01:21 PM (Dc2NZ)

5 Morning everyone.

Mrs. Squirrel has been tending to her garden here despite the 100 degree temps where we live. So far, we've gotten some good kale, lettuce and now zucchini.

I am waiting for fall to harvest my figs- Olympia variety (green flesh) and I think a brown Turkey fig.

Posted by: Secret Squirrel at August 01, 2020 01:22 PM (xyImL)

6 Tomatoes should be coming in plenty this week, have had some but tossed as many as eaten because some creature nibbled a little out of them the day before I get to pick it. These have been my ground plants as opposed to caged which are higher.
Been getting cucumbers but hot peppers are not showing signs of ripen yet.

Posted by: Skip at August 01, 2020 01:24 PM (6f16T)

7 My Better Boy is finally spitting out red tomatoes, and the tiny pear tomato plant (I forget the type) is going great guns. Alas, my Purple Heart blossoms keep falling off. I'm hoping more temperate weather will help.

I just learned that my hollyhocks will only bloom next year (biennials), so I will have to winterize them this fall.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at August 01, 2020 01:24 PM (Dc2NZ)

8 Fresh figs must be a treat

Posted by: Skip at August 01, 2020 01:24 PM (6f16T)

9 I have determined after much contemplation that I need two things to harvest my garden efficiently: a tomato periscope and a cucumber magnet. The damn things are very sneaky and often aren't the same place you saw them just yesterday.

Posted by: huerfano at August 01, 2020 01:25 PM (9dnxb)

10 8- Skip-

they most certainly are. In Seattle at Pike Place market, a green fig goes for about $1 each. They don't travel well and bruise very easily. But a truly ripe fig is sublime.

When i was in Spain a few years ago, I was able to pick up a flat of fresh brown figs for about 5 euro. There were about 2 dozen figs. It was amazing.

Fig trees are very easy to grow and like hot weather. If you are lucky and in the right environment, you can get two crops a season.

Posted by: Secret Squirrel at August 01, 2020 01:29 PM (xyImL)

11 Insom!? You here? They got grapes.

I recognize Royal Oil's flower but in a red incarnation. Do you think the name will come to me? Not a whisper.

Posted by: creeper at August 01, 2020 01:30 PM (XxJt1)

12 Bromeliad?

I have a patch with red flower.

Posted by: Burnt Toast at August 01, 2020 01:31 PM (1g7ch)

13 Scary plants and flowers today....must be some built in epigenetic fear of hideous prehistoric bees.

Posted by: SarahW at August 01, 2020 01:32 PM (g1vnC)

14 Thought of bagging with a zip lock bag any ground tomatoes to see if that would help .

Posted by: Skip at August 01, 2020 01:33 PM (6f16T)

15 Hey anyone know what's attacking my yellow lantana in the SE? And how to save them? The leaves turn brown. Some tiny bugs on back of leaf.

Posted by: banana Dream at August 01, 2020 01:33 PM (l6b3d)

16 The mystery plant is Tillandsia cyanea

Posted by: Lester Rips at August 01, 2020 01:34 PM (lv264)

17 It's probably the only way I'll ever make the garden thread! I used to grow African violets at work, where I found that getting them closer to a flourescent light in my cube made them grow and bloom. The big African violet in the picture has done nothing for the two years it sat on a window sill. It dawned on me that I could move it under the Ott light on my desk. It has bloomed and doubled in size.

My cousin mentioned that he'd like an African violet so I found the link to The Violet Barn and ordered two for him and two for me. They were the best packaged plants I have ever seen. The little pink one has leaves smaller than the thumbnail on my little finger. They are both impossibly cute. Looking forward to when they bloom.

Posted by: Notsothoreau at August 01, 2020 01:35 PM (YynYJ)

18 Skip

Wife planted a jalapeno pepper. It has green peppers. Do I need to wait until they turn red to pick them?

Posted by: Ronster at August 01, 2020 01:36 PM (90/c2)

19 Royal Oil's plant appears to be a member of the aloe family. There are hundreds of species.

Posted by: creeper at August 01, 2020 01:36 PM (XxJt1)

20 Those are some impressive grapes!

Posted by: Emmie at August 01, 2020 01:38 PM (+ljgK)

21 Bromeliad. Of course. Duh.

Posted by: creeper at August 01, 2020 01:39 PM (XxJt1)

22 We were picking up a tool or something from a Craigslist ad over in NE Portland a year ago. I looked at the large tree next to the garage and it was a fig tree! Might have been twenty feet tall and easily the largest I've seen.

Posted by: Notsothoreau at August 01, 2020 01:39 PM (YynYJ)

23 The mystery plant is Tillandsia cyanea
Posted by: Lester Rips at August 01, 2020 01:34 PM (lv264)


I guess I could look up and see if any survivors are in the tree above my ground patch.

Posted by: Burnt Toast at August 01, 2020 01:40 PM (1g7ch)

24 FIRST!!!!!

Posted by: Sponge - China is Asshoe! at August 01, 2020 01:41 PM (Zz0t1)

25 If I can ever get the money together to fix my fence, I'm planning on putting in a small raised garden and doing some vegetables and spices.

If I have a green thumb, that is.

Posted by: Sponge - China is Asshoe! at August 01, 2020 01:42 PM (Zz0t1)

26 8 Fresh figs must be a treat
Posted by: Skip at August 01, 2020 01:24 PM (6f16T)


They are awesome! I ordered a couple of Chicago Hardy figs from Logee's and they fruited the first year. I was impressed.

They fruited several years for me and then developed some kind of leaf fungus. I suspect that dirty ditch water from overhead sprinklers did them in.

Posted by: Emmie at August 01, 2020 01:43 PM (+ljgK)

27 Wife planted a jalapeno pepper. It has green peppers. Do I need to wait until they turn red to pick them?
Posted by: Ronster at August 01, 2020 01:36 PM (90/c2)


Are they red jalapenos or green ones?

Posted by: Sponge - China is Asshoe! at August 01, 2020 01:43 PM (Zz0t1)

28 Wife planted a jalapeno pepper. It has green peppers. Do I need to wait until they turn red to pick them?
Posted by: Ronster at August 01, 2020 01:36 PM (90/c2)


Reason why most are sold green. They get stripes like 'bark' when they ripen. Unlike other peppers which ripen nicely.

Leave a few and see if you like the texture of ripe jalapeņo.

Posted by: Burnt Toast at August 01, 2020 01:43 PM (1g7ch)

29 RoyalOil story of the mysterious plant reminds me of the beginning of Little Shop of Horrors

Posted by: Bruce at August 01, 2020 01:45 PM (vd8XM)

30 Are they red jalapenos or green ones?

Posted by: Sponge - China is Asshoe!

I dunno.

Posted by: Ronster at August 01, 2020 01:46 PM (90/c2)

31 My lemon and lime trees were yellowing badly. That's a sign of choriosis...lack of iron. Searched everywhere...no chelated iron. Down but not out I grabbed the bottle of iron tabs I occasionally take, dissolved one pill in a pitcher of water and poured half on each plant.

They're going nuts. All the yellow is gone and they're putting out new growth everywhere. The fruit, which set on earlier, is fattening up.


Thank you, Rexall.

Posted by: creeper at August 01, 2020 01:47 PM (XxJt1)

32
I dunno.
Posted by: Ronster at August 01, 2020 01:46 PM (90/c2)


Quick search shows that the difference is time. The peppers start green, but the longer they stay on the vine, the more they ripen and turn red.

Not sure if that changes the heat level, tho.

Posted by: Sponge - China is Asshoe! at August 01, 2020 01:48 PM (Zz0t1)

33 Don in Kansas has some impressive orchids linked. Who knew that was in Kansas?

My prairie has snow in the mountains, woolly veburna, big bluestem, Johnson grass, and some musk thistle. Plus a lot of unidentified green things. Dammit, I'm a chemist, not a botanist!

Ref: Janes all Kansas wild plant biology: https://www.kswildflower.org

Posted by: NaCly Dog at August 01, 2020 01:52 PM (u82oZ)

34 Red jalapenos have the same heat as green ones (which isn't much in the grand scheme of things) but they're sweeter. And prettier.

Posted by: creeper at August 01, 2020 01:54 PM (XxJt1)

35 11 Insom!? You here? They got grapes.

I recognize Royal Oil's flower but in a red incarnation. Do you think the name will come to me? Not a whisper.
Posted by: creeper at August 01, 2020 01:30 PM (XxJt1)

Huh? Wha?

Sorry, I was too busy lolling about...

Posted by: Insomniac - Ex Cineribus Resurgo at August 01, 2020 01:54 PM (ywNoU)

36 Oh, those sunflowers! Someone has really happy birds.

Posted by: creeper at August 01, 2020 01:55 PM (XxJt1)

37 {{{creeper}}}

As soon as the final grade is done and the propane line is connected to the generator, I'll need ground cover. I'm thinking woolly veburna and big bluestem.

What do you use for ground cover on your rocky hilltop?

Posted by: NaCly Dog at August 01, 2020 01:56 PM (u82oZ)

38 Melania Trump has announced her plan to restore the Rose Garden to its former excellence. The following url links to a comprehensive plan to rehab the space, in addition to the history of the Garden, which used to be the site of the White House conservatory.
This document includes soil analysis, electrical lighting information, and blueprints of the garden. Also, a fascinating pictorial narrative. This is a lot of fun reading and a great opportunity to geek out on gardening and White House history:

https://irma.nps.gov/DataStore/DownloadFile/644882

Posted by: kallisto at August 01, 2020 01:56 PM (DJFLF)

39 *peels Insom a grape*

Posted by: creeper at August 01, 2020 01:57 PM (XxJt1)

40 My mom tried to grow grapes once. Just when they started to look edible, they were decimated by raccoons. I can appreciate the little chicken wire cages.

Posted by: Mrs. Leggy at August 01, 2020 01:58 PM (Vf4Y7)

41 39 *peels Insom a grape*
Posted by: creeper at August 01, 2020 01:57 PM (XxJt1)

*nom nom nom*

Posted by: Insomniac - Ex Cineribus Resurgo at August 01, 2020 01:58 PM (ywNoU)

42 Not much in the way of gardening at Che Blake. Plants that are producing get to stay, those that don't, get pulled. (some of my squash plants decided they'd had enough of producing)

Tomatoes are going well, as are the Anaheim peppers.

Still no pavers for the new patio, though, which is irritating. Lowe's keeps putting off delivery.

Posted by: blake - semi lurker in marginal standing
at August 01, 2020 01:59 PM (WEBkv)

43 I don't care for store bought grapes but grapes fresh from the vine? They are really good.

The Butterwort looks like some sort of succulent.

Great pictures and thread, as usual, KT.

Posted by: blake - semi lurker in marginal standing
at August 01, 2020 02:02 PM (WEBkv)

44 Do green peppers grow on limbs?

Posted by: Cosmic Charlie at August 01, 2020 02:03 PM (PUmDY)

45 What do you use for ground cover on your rocky hilltop?
Posted by: NaCly Dog at August 01, 2020 01:56 PM (u82oZ)


Uh...moss, weeds and last year's leaves.


The back yard is grass but I leave the rest completely wild. Critters seem to prefer it that way. Mother Nature seems to do as good a job of stabilizing these hills as I could. And there's no maintenance.

Posted by: creeper at August 01, 2020 02:03 PM (XxJt1)

46 One of my friends had me buy 22LR bullets for her raccoons. She had no luck getting any bullets.

I had no problem getting ammo, and bought her the CCI subsonic variety, since she lives in the barrios of the next town to the West.

She wanted my 22lR Mini-Mags and Stinger ammo. I told her that was a bad idea in town.

Me: "You could be put in jail."

Her: "I'm tired of cooking. They can feed me."

Me: "Uh ... Not my problem. Got it."

Posted by: NaCly Dog at August 01, 2020 02:04 PM (u82oZ)

47
g'afternoon, 'rons

Posted by: AltonJackson at August 01, 2020 02:05 PM (DUIap)

48 Well, still no ripe tomatoes here in North West Oregon, some are starting to change over, its been a slow start this year.

Posted by: BuckIce at August 01, 2020 02:06 PM (XXOPf)

49 Her: "I'm tired of cooking. They can feed me."

Me: "Uh ... Not my problem. Got it."
Posted by: NaCly Dog at August 01, 2020 02:04 PM (u82oZ)
-------------

Heh.

I like her, she's funny.

Posted by: blake - semi lurker in marginal standing
at August 01, 2020 02:07 PM (WEBkv)

50 Fig trees are very easy to grow and like hot weather. If you are lucky and in the right environment, you can get two crops a season.
Posted by: Secret Squirrel at August 01, 2020 01:29 PM (xyImL)
===
How do you keep the birds (and deer?) out of them?

Posted by: Gilded Age II at August 01, 2020 02:08 PM (BRkq2)

51 creeper

Thank you.

My best crop is rocks. Only have a thin coating of soil over it. Most of my property is natural.

I tried to get a picture of endangered butterflies (Regal fritillary) that was all over some woolly veburna this morning. But the pictures were not good enough for the Garden Thread.

Posted by: NaCly Dog at August 01, 2020 02:09 PM (u82oZ)

52 Orchids are the space aliens of the plant world. Amazing colors, Don!

Posted by: 40 miles north at August 01, 2020 02:09 PM (o2vOl)

53 You have interesting friends, Salty.
Did she get rid of the 'coons?

Posted by: creeper at August 01, 2020 02:09 PM (XxJt1)

54 Regarding that Tillandsia: Unless whatever mix it's planted in is exceptionally well drained, it probably won't last very long. While most Tillandsia species are "air plants," cyanea is one of the few that are semi-epiphytic, and can be grown in a loose potting mix. But what it doesn't like is sitting in a constantly soggy mix, which would lead to rot. I grow mine in a clay pot filled with osmunda fiber (which dries out completely between waterings), and it's as happy as a clam.

Posted by: Equirhodont at August 01, 2020 02:10 PM (+2GwM)

55 I have put off harvesting more peppers as Hubby has not been enthusiastic about processing them. I guess he only once to do it once, not twice. Jokes on him though because there are so many they are starting to fall over (and I have them staked and tied like you would not believe) so he's gonna end up with two loads anyway.

Next week we are taking a drive for tomatoes. I only have one plant (grape tomatoes for salads) because blight is a real problem in NYS. There is a farmstand up near Lake Ontario where this family grows huge tomatoes every year, and sells them at a reasonable price. I'd love to know why the blight passes them by!?

Anyhooooo I'll be freezing tomatoes as they are simple to do, and we are completely out. Hubby uses them in soups, stews, and chilis throughout the winter. The no added sodium is a real bonus.


Posted by: Ann at August 01, 2020 02:12 PM (NDO5Q)

56 Does anyone know how to kill mosquitoes in a pond? I want to make a lil park out of it, but I don't want to breed a menace. Do the little donut rings work?

Posted by: Gilded Age II, now with comprehensive surveillance and fake science at August 01, 2020 02:12 PM (BRkq2)

57 Sunflowers are more worrisome

Posted by: Cosmic Charlie at August 01, 2020 02:13 PM (fU1ci)

58 Posted by: kallisto at August 01, 2020 01:56 PM (DJFLF)

Thanks Kallisto. Interesting read.

Perhaps Melania figures she'll have four more years to see it through?

Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at August 01, 2020 02:13 PM (Dc2NZ)

59 I think those miniature African Violets are terrific. I have a hard time keeping the regular ones looking good. I am impressed!

Posted by: KT at August 01, 2020 02:14 PM (BVQ+1)

60 Dragonflies

Posted by: Cosmic Charlie at August 01, 2020 02:15 PM (fU1ci)

61 My mom would always buy fig newtons when I was a kid.
Hated them.
Fast forward to being an adult stationed in Turkey. I had two fig trees next to my apartment. Ignored them. Then I ate this weird and delicious fruit at a reception. Found out it was figs.
Now I really hate fig newtons for screwing up a great fruit.

Posted by: Diogenes at August 01, 2020 02:15 PM (axyOa)

62
>>Like to visit local nurseries just to see what's interesting that they have to offer. Found one run by a nice Asian lady. Saw this flower, had to buy it. No idea what it's called. Maybe the horde knows?

=====

You bought mystery plant from an Asian? Ripped from the headlines!

https://tinyurl.com/y5fwynu6

Posted by: Blonde Morticia at August 01, 2020 02:16 PM (G51Gf)

63 creeper

I'll find out eventually, I expect. We do not get the daily police blotter of the next town over.

She will certainly call some other, closer, friends of hers from jail, rather than me. She thinks I'll say "I told you."

Her vision is not great, as she is considerably older than me and has had melanoma of the eye. But she is determined to rid her property of raccoons.

She is a stubborn woman. She painted TRUMP on her junk car in her driveway, in letters 3 feet tall. I need her to live long enough to vote for him.

Posted by: NaCly Dog at August 01, 2020 02:16 PM (u82oZ)

64 I have yet to get 1st hot pepper to ripen on the plant. I prefer peppers of all kinds ripe but just as you might use a green unripe bell pepper a hot pepper can be used as well. If anything the less ripe the milder they are.
I have dozens of Anaheim, Jalapeno and Cheyenne growing.

Posted by: Skip at August 01, 2020 02:16 PM (6f16T)

65 Fish do a nice job on mosquito larvae.

Posted by: creeper at August 01, 2020 02:17 PM (XxJt1)

66 65 Fish do a nice job on mosquito larvae.
Posted by: creeper at August 01, 2020 02:17 PM (XxJt1)
===
Any of the ornamental ones particularly good?

Posted by: Gilded Age II, now with comprehensive surveillance and fake science at August 01, 2020 02:19 PM (BRkq2)

67 Inre: the plant with the blue flowers and long foliage, it's a Bromeliad which is a plant that can be a epiphyte( grows on trees ), a lithophyte( grows on rocks ), or a terrestrial( grows in the ground. I grow one that is a carnivore( eats bugs and small frogs and lizards ) and comes from South America.

Posted by: Tony Litwin at August 01, 2020 02:19 PM (2U5dr)

68 I let the uneaten sunflower seeds under my bird feeder sprout and grow. Sadly, about a month ago they were attacked by huge beetles the Extension Office entomologist thought were June bugs. Wednesday, the biggest one collapsed from the damage and I am truly ticked. I had to cut it off and dump it into the trash. I let them grow because last year, when I was too sick and depressed to weed, I noticed that goldfinches were swarming the unripe sunflower seed heads. So this year, I deliberately let the sunflowers grow. And earlier this week, the goldfinches came back. Years ago, I had purple cone flowers that the goldfinches loved. Like with the sunflowers, the finches apparently love the unripe, developing seed heads. I haven't seen it this year, but last year the finches got into fights with any Monarch butterfly that tried to investigate the sunflowers.

My butterfly bushes are blooming like mad, and the Painted Lady butterflies are swarming them. Get too close and the bush seems to explode as the Painted Ladies zoom away. The Monarch migration hasn't started yet so there are only a couple of Monarchs stopping by for a snack. There's not as many Yellow Swallowtails as I've seen in previous years, but there are other odds and ends of butterflies in one's and twos.

Out by the street, I have a huge stand of Russian sage. I think every bee for miles in every direction is buzzing around in them.

No pictures because none of the birds and insects are large enough to show. But I enjoy sitting out on the front porch watching them. Looking around, I think I have the most alive yard in the neighborhood. I will miss them all when we finally sell this house and move to an apartment.

Posted by: Captain Josepha Sabin -- current occupation: cat furniture at August 01, 2020 02:20 PM (Q7CsL)

69 Captain Josepha Sabin -- current occupation: cat furniture

Please point out those two plants on my next visit.

And give my best to the XO.

Posted by: NaCly Dog at August 01, 2020 02:22 PM (u82oZ)

70 Salty, that's my kinda girl. But melanoma of the eye? Been around the melanoma merry-go-round with hubby. It's an ugly disease. Hats off to her for overcoming it.

Posted by: creeper at August 01, 2020 02:22 PM (XxJt1)

71 34 Red jalapenos have the same heat as green ones (which isn't much in the grand scheme of things) but they're sweeter. And prettier.
Posted by: creeper at August 01, 2020 01:54 PM (XxJt1)
===
This line has been successfully employed in flirtation. Suppress the first clause. But you already knew that.

Posted by: Gilded Age II, now with comprehensive surveillance and fake science at August 01, 2020 02:23 PM (BRkq2)

72 Any Morons in Northern Califonria who are interested in carnivorous plants should take a trip to California Carnivores, which is now in Sebastopol. To be honest, I haven't been there in years, back when they were around Healdsburg, but it is a fascinating place. They have a _lot_ of plants of many varieties and the owner, Peter, is extremely nice, knowledgeable, and clearly loves the plants. Any time I was in the wine country I enjoyed paying a visit just to look at everything.

Posted by: Where are my ping pong balls? at August 01, 2020 02:24 PM (m3XFr)

73 Gilded Age, I'd just wander down to the lake and net a few of anything that stumbled by. But that's me. Maybe koi?

Posted by: creeper at August 01, 2020 02:26 PM (XxJt1)

74 Thanks, creeper. I think the mosquito-eating koi was make a twofer. This is for wifey.

Posted by: Gilded Age II, now with comprehensive surveillance and fake science at August 01, 2020 02:29 PM (BRkq2)

75 After research...
Big koi do not eat mosquito larvae. Best fish for mosquito control are guppies, goldfish (small koi), bass and bluegills.

Some bluegill species are quite pretty. Probably the best option.

Posted by: creeper at August 01, 2020 02:30 PM (XxJt1)

76 Time to cut sown some musk thistle. It's a noxious weed, but has a very pretty flower that pollinators love.

May chiggers avoid you like you are Kryptonite.

Posted by: NaCly Dog at August 01, 2020 02:31 PM (u82oZ)

77 Good luck with the mosquito wigglers, Gilded Age. Let us know how thefish do.

Posted by: creeper at August 01, 2020 02:33 PM (XxJt1)

78 Thanks for posting the sunflowers, KT! Dear God they are getting tall. Beautiful flowers and TONS of honeybees and bumble bees. I usually cut off the heads when they go to seed and put them by the bird feeder. The critters love them. I often get some smaller flowers sprout along the stem after the main flowers are done. The goldfinches have been landing and looking, but seem more interested in the from my basil plant and the cone flowers in my garden.

Posted by: Mrs. Leggy at August 01, 2020 02:36 PM (Vf4Y7)

79 You guys just reminded me I'm supposed to be harvesting neighbors'garden while they're gone. Good deal. Believe it it not, I'm out of zucchini. BIAB

Posted by: creeper at August 01, 2020 02:36 PM (XxJt1)

80 Is that Helliconia?

On Earthiconica ?

Posted by: JT at August 01, 2020 02:41 PM (arJlL)

81 Those miniature African Violets are fun. I can fit 5 potted ones in my hand. I had them in a sort of open terrarium, looked like a big glass apple. Mine lasted a couple of years until I got called out of state and couldn't keep up the watering. They were fairly easy to maintain and were undemanding as to conditions.

Posted by: JTB at August 01, 2020 02:42 PM (7EjX1)

82 We read about another recall of bagged salad. Every time that happens, I look at our containers of leaf lettuce with greater fondness.

Posted by: JTB at August 01, 2020 02:45 PM (7EjX1)

83 hiya

Posted by: JT at August 01, 2020 02:46 PM (arJlL)

84 Creeper, thanks.

Posted by: Gilded Age II, now with comprehensive surveillance and fake science at August 01, 2020 02:46 PM (BRkq2)

85 Still out of zucchini. How is that possible? But I scored two yellow squash and a cuke. There's a pork loin chop in the refrig. Dinner is on track.

Posted by: creeper at August 01, 2020 02:49 PM (XxJt1)

86 Fig trees are very easy to grow and like hot weather. If you are lucky and in the right environment, you can get two crops a season.
Posted by: Secret Squirrel at August 01, 2020 01:29 PM (xyImL)
===
Do you put nets over them? Mine are gorgeous, then the birds harvest them!

Posted by: Gilded Age II, now with comprehensive surveillance and fake science at August 01, 2020 02:49 PM (BRkq2)

87 JTB, do you recall what bagged salad the lettuce recall covered?

I hate tearing lettuce but that bagged stuff can be poison.

Posted by: creeper at August 01, 2020 02:52 PM (XxJt1)

88 Creeper, it was Fresh Express.

Posted by: Gilded Age II, now with comprehensive surveillance and fake science at August 01, 2020 02:57 PM (BRkq2)

89 Any more news about the suspicious Chy-nah seeds-in-the-mail?

My brother sent me a pic (no, he wasn't the recipient) and these looked like some type of sunflower seed. Smaller and darker, but had the classic stripes.

What better way to spread *something* than by the little birdies/rodents that would eat what these produced and then fly/scurry away, perhaps FAR away?

Posted by: JQ at August 01, 2020 02:57 PM (whOIk)

90 Mrs. Leggy, your 9 foot sunflowers are awesome!

Posted by: 40 miles north at August 01, 2020 02:57 PM (o2vOl)

91 Any news on The Three Stooges Dam ?

Posted by: JT at August 01, 2020 02:58 PM (arJlL)

92 87 ... Creeper,

It was a side story to one about a onion recall (any California grown Thompson International onions).

Fresh Express is the salad company. That story is about a week old. Seems we hear about bagged salad recalls all the time.

Posted by: JTB at August 01, 2020 02:58 PM (7EjX1)

93 Don't fig trees have roots that are problematic for planting near foundations?

Posted by: rhomboid at August 01, 2020 02:58 PM (OTzUX)

94 Mrs. Leggy, your 9 foot sunflowers are awesome!
Posted by: 40 miles north

I planted 7 sunflowers along my driveway; 1 is 7 feet tall and the rest 3-4 ft. tall.

Posted by: JT at August 01, 2020 02:59 PM (arJlL)

95 BTW, The onion recall was for salmonella. It was specifically for their red onions but they were worried about cross contamination so the recall was extended to all kinds from that company.

Posted by: JTB at August 01, 2020 03:01 PM (7EjX1)

96 Gave toothless uncle some fig newtons once. It was funny watching him as the seeds got stuck under his denture plate. After 6 weeks of temps in the 90's ( N. Indiana hot box) We finally got a break today, and much needed rain with the prospect of more to come. Tomatoes are 5 foot high and rising, just now picking ripe Sugar Rush cherry types. So far so good. I have irrigated from the ground no less than ten times in July, which is a record, even for my much patch which holds water very, very well. Between waterings I do 'cheat' and give the tomatoes, peppers and eggplant a little bite to eat via Miracle Grow And Bloom Booster. Last week I planted Okra - soaked the seed in water for a day. They sprouted in THREE DAYS which I have never seen in 30 plus years of gardening. They likey hot hot hot. 20 eggplants will keep wife's Filipina friends supplied, and these plants look really healthy this year. Garden away!

Posted by: Cicero Kaboom! Kid,Looking at the sunny side of life. at August 01, 2020 03:03 PM (Vy7tf)

97 Pets up.

Posted by: socalcon at August 01, 2020 03:05 PM (Roy2Z)

98 CATURDAY NOOD

Posted by: Skip, the guy who says NOOD at August 01, 2020 03:05 PM (6f16T)

99 Tomato growers' question.

I grow tomatoes in 15-gal pots. I'm down to almost exclusively cherry/grape varieties, because they are so prolific, good, and seem less subject to pests and other problems. Sungold, Sweet 100s, Yellow Pear, etc.

I do grow one semi-beefsteak style - San Diego - smallish/medium size.

Every year seems different, presumably due to different seedlings with varying genetics, etc. Weather is almost always very similar (San Diego), conditions/locations are identical. Soil used has kitchen-waste compost. Only addition is some gypsum for the San Diego variety to avoid the black spot on the bottom, and spray them all a few times with copper to prevent fungus.

The one thing I don't get - many years, the plants begin to yellow and "die out", starting in the lower branches and moving up gradually.

Is this normal? Once they've set fruit, is it normal for the plants to start to die away?

Posted by: rhomboid at August 01, 2020 03:06 PM (OTzUX)

100 KT,
A big thanks for another gardening thread. I learn something every time.

Posted by: JTB at August 01, 2020 03:07 PM (7EjX1)

101 JTB at August 01, 2020 03:07 PM
Thanks for coming by.

Posted by: KT at August 01, 2020 03:17 PM (BVQ+1)

102 99 Tomato growers' question

San Diego does no appear to be a very common variety, and I have never seen it offered before in my seed sources (Totally Tomatoes is a good one, Sand Hill has many older varieties) 'Determinate' 'maters grow and mostly set fruit all at once. These would certainly begin to brown and have leaves drop beginning at the lower portions of the plant. Plants that 'stay healthy' and continue to put out new leaves and flowers are most likely 'indeterminate'.

Posted by: Cicero Kaboom! Kid,Looking at the sunny side of life. at August 01, 2020 03:19 PM (Vy7tf)

103 Something chewed on one of my unripe pumpkins, so I picked it and cooked like summer squash. They taste good that way.

My lettuce is all bolted and gone to seed, so I will harvest some of the seed for next spring and then chop it all out.

currently I am eating swiss chard, which is much nicer now that I am an adult. When I was a kid I found it nasty tasting

Corn is now head high, and my melons are putting out flowers and setting fruit.

And some of my tomatoes are going white. They may get color some day.

The only other think is that I tried chipping and boiling green apples to make pectin for canning.

I used some to try to make peach jam so I could make peach tarts.
Not sure if it worked or if cooking the peaches and sugar down made it gel, but peach jam is very tasty.

Posted by: Kindltot at August 01, 2020 03:26 PM (WyVLE)

104 rhomboid at August 01, 2020 03:06 PM
There are various fungi that attack tomato plants. Some of these are the "blights", particularly early and late blight, which are different. Sometimes plants outlive early blight, seldom live through late blight. There are some resistant varieties.

Changing the location of plants from year to year may help. Or if it is hot enough in summer, you can solarize the soil in part of the yard to kill fungi in the soil.

Other things can go wrong, too. If you plant determinate varieties, they will die once they bear fruit.

Posted by: KT at August 01, 2020 03:26 PM (BVQ+1)

105 Captain Josepha Sabin -- current occupation: cat furniture at August 01, 2020 02:20 PM

Nice to hear about your butterfly visitors.

Posted by: KT at August 01, 2020 03:33 PM (BVQ+1)

106 Where did the Lantana question go? What do the bugs on the backs of the leaves look like? Are they aphids? Do any of them have wings? How big are they?

There is a leaf miner that attacks Lantana.

Posted by: KT at August 01, 2020 03:37 PM (BVQ+1)

107 If anyone is still around, need tips for preventing earworms getting into the corn.

Posted by: Miley, the Duchess at August 01, 2020 03:45 PM (rCwaK)

108 Excellent eye caching pics really great to visit this website.

Posted by: Nikhil S. Pawar at August 01, 2020 03:49 PM (KkUOk)

109 From Idaho's Treasure Valley, Boise area: It's the very Height of Summer, over 100 F. (I used to complain about this to a dear friend who lives in Clearlake, CA - where it's usually hotter than here; so I got no sympathy.)

Due to the oven-like heat, I've been getting up earlier this week so I can get garden work done before it hits 80. The shelling pea vines need cutting down; that's on this coming week's list. I also need to start thinning out the flowers in the hummingbird-attracting flower/blueberry bed, because the scarlet sage I really wanted to see, is starting to come up!

Yesterday, I pulled out a lot of carrots - all the yellows (mugged by Romas), most of the oranges (ditto), all the purples (mugged by a mystery vine we're letting grow - butternut squash? cantaloupe?), and a few reds (not yet mugged by mystery vine) - I spent the day cutting up nearly 5 pounds of carrots, then gave some to a friend this morning. I already had 9 pounds frozen - I'd better check "The Deplorable Gourmet" for carrot recipes.

Our two zucchini plants were producing WAY too much for 2 people, so I dug them out this morning - we already have a refrigerator drawer full of zucchini, which we can now eat at a more sedate pace. The watermelon vines can grow over the space in the bed.

Corn has started producing - we may start the blanch-and-freeze process tomorrow.
Green beans need picking pretty much every day. We may have to start processing them too.
I'm still watching the tomatoes.

At one point a few years ago, we brought home some seeds of what we call "roadside sunflower", and put it in along our back paddock fence. They took a year to think about it, then some came up. Now we get a few every year, and they are currently flowering. They're multi-branched, about waist to chest high, or so.

We also have some "birdseed sunflowers", ones that came up after I started putting quail-feeding seed blocks out back each winter. Last year we had one huge plant with multiple branches - this year we have about seven plants! I sure hope the birds like the seeds from the sunflowers, as much as they enjoyed the original seed block! Those things are 6 to 7 feet tall, with lots of branches and very thick bases.

My faithful Johnny Jump-Ups were torched by this heat... only the few closest to the shed still have any green leaves left. Hopefully the seeds will sprout in the fall.

Husband had to do a repair on the irrigation system this morning - it's good we figured out there was a problem *before* the front lawn got torched by this heat. Our northside neighbors are preparing to sell their house, and having our yard look disreputable would not be helpful!

For anyone who read my note last week - the Red Cross is, for a time, doing coronavirus testing on all donated blood, and you can find your test result online - mine did come back Negative. Husband plans a blood test next week to see whether his mystery illness was coronavirus or not.

Hope everyone else is staying safe, staying well, and *staying prepared* for whatever craziness may show up before the November election.

Posted by: Pat* at August 01, 2020 04:30 PM (2pX/F)

110 As millions face their first weekend without extended unemployment benefits, Republican senators are at home and Trump is playing golf.

Posted by: In the real world at August 01, 2020 04:39 PM (5Zt1F)

111 In the real world.

Now do Obama. He golfed a lot more, and was not as earnest pr as hardworking as President as GEOTUS.

Democrat Senators are not in the Senate either, and a good thing, given how they reinforce failure.

-- your nic needs work. Without Projection the Left would be silent. Retrospective analysis is not your friend.

Posted by: NaCly Dog at August 01, 2020 05:03 PM (u82oZ)

112 >>> 106 Where did the Lantana question go? What do the bugs on the backs of the leaves look like? Are they aphids? Do any of them have wings? How big are they? There is a leaf miner that attacks Lantana.
Posted by: KT at August 01, 2020 03:37 PM (BVQ+1)



I don't see bugs currently, unless they're too small to see. Before I saw tiny black/brown things. Currently some of the leaves have a few white oval egg sack looking things under them. Some have web looking stuff wrapped up. The leaves first get brown spots which get bigger then the whole leaf is brown and dead.

They are in a well draining large pot keeping company with a tiny windmill palm.

Posted by: banana Dream at August 01, 2020 05:39 PM (l6b3d)

113 If anyone is still around, need tips for preventing earworms getting into the corn.
Posted by: Miley, the Duchess

Like Black Magic Woman, by Santana ?

Posted by: JT at August 01, 2020 05:41 PM (arJlL)

114 Any Morons in Northern Califonria who are interested in carnivorous plants should take a trip to California Carnivores, which is now in Sebastopol. To be honest, I haven't been there in years, back when they were around Healdsburg, but it is a fascinating place. They have a _lot_ of plants of many varieties and the owner, Peter, is extremely nice, knowledgeable, and clearly loves the plants. Any time I was in the wine country I enjoyed paying a visit just to look at everything.

Point of Order!
Northern California does NOT include the Bay Area or Sacramento.
Contrary to socialist propaganda Northern California is NOT anything north of LA. I
Look at a map.
Look at the voters.
There are many morons out there who just realize they are not alone.
The State of Jefferson will rise out of the ashes of the next election.

Insom will be our first Attorney General if he doesn't object to lower humidity, thousand yard rifle ranges, mountains, and beaches.

Posted by: waepnedmann at August 01, 2020 06:41 PM (YHWoe)

115 Late to the thread as usual, I work Sats, seldom get a post in when it's active.

Tomatoes have started to ripen. At home I've got 4:
2 Romas purchased
1 volunteer from last yrs bed
1 volunteer from work garden
At work I've got 4 volunteers from last yr, like the one I took home.

Turns out the work volunteers turned out to be grape tomatoes. So I've got tons of those, which my wife does not want of course, LOL.

The volunteer plant at home is interesting. After the first major split off in the plant it has 2 different fruits on. One is Roma-like and the other is perfectly round, light green w/ dark green flecks.

Has anyone ever seen this?

Posted by: Farmer at August 01, 2020 07:06 PM (KF21f)

116 banana Dream at August 01, 2020 05:39 PM

If they are very, very tiny and make webs, it could be spider mites. Try blasting with a strong stream of water in the mornings.

Posted by: KT at August 01, 2020 07:10 PM (BVQ+1)

117 banana Dream: "Hey anyone know what's attacking my yellow lantana in the SE? And how to save them? The leaves turn brown. Some tiny bugs on back of leaf."

If there's fine webbing at the most affected parts, it could be spider mites. They're hard to see but for the damage they leave behind.

If there's no webbing but little black residual dots (sorta like molasses ooze) speckled all over, it's lacebugs. They're black with somewhat translucent wings folded over on their backs. That's lacebugs and not lacewings. Lacewings are good guys. You want as many of them as you can get, so don't kill them.

I've treated mine by clipping off the worst branches and disposing (not composting) the trimmings. Lantana is prolific as a grower, so getting new growth isn't a problem. I also give the plants a good feeding of fish emulsion (5-1-1) and then spray molasses occasionally. The emulsion is good food and the molasses stimulates other microbial growth and provides ready carbon. It might also annoy the bugs, but I have no scientific proof it does that.

Posted by: AnonyBotymousDrivel at August 01, 2020 07:13 PM (HhXSr)

118 Miley, to prevent corn earworms,

you can try putting a couple of drops of mineral oil at the tip of the husk, in the silks, after pollination or try spraying with a BT insecticide for caterpillars in the same location.

Posted by: KT at August 01, 2020 07:13 PM (BVQ+1)

119 Mrs. Leggy at August 01, 2020 02:36 PM

Sounds like lots of critter fun in your garden.

Posted by: KT at August 01, 2020 07:14 PM (BVQ+1)

120 AnonyBotymousDrivel at August 01, 2020 07:13 PM

I have never encountered lace bugs before. Thanks.

Posted by: KT at August 01, 2020 07:16 PM (BVQ+1)

121 Hi, Farmer!

"The volunteer plant at home is interesting. After the first major split off in the plant it has 2 different fruits on. One is Roma-like and the other is perfectly round, light green w/ dark green flecks.

Has anyone ever seen this?"

Sounds like you could have a branch mutation. If the fruits are good, you might want to save some seeds to see if they come true next year.

Posted by: KT at August 01, 2020 07:20 PM (BVQ+1)

122 KT: "I have never encountered lace bugs before. Thanks."

The damage they leave behind on lantanas is very similar to spider mites. They just suck the nutrients from the leaves and make them appear spotty, speckled, and wrinkled. The giveaway is the variously-sized oozy residue speckles. The bug may leave, but the trace that they are around remains.

Posted by: AnonyBotymousDrivel at August 01, 2020 07:22 PM (HhXSr)

123 Royal Oil:
Oh, and she sold me the pot for $25.

That's a lt of pot for $25, what a bargain!

Posted by: Farmer at August 01, 2020 07:31 PM (KF21f)

124 Point of Order!
Northern California does NOT include the Bay Area or Sacramento.
Contrary to socialist propaganda Northern California is NOT anything north of LA.
Posted by: waepnedmann at August 01, 2020 06:41 PM (YHWoe)

LOL, I had actually started with "Greater San Francisco Bay area" but changed it because I figured it would get hate from people outside Frisco as being too SF-centric. And I knew it would risk ire from people in the Northern half, but I figured generally people refer to it as NorCal so that's what I went with. Point taken though, in fact I'm from SoCal and sometimes argue with people that the SF area is technically in central California.

Posted by: Where are my ping pong balls? at August 01, 2020 07:44 PM (m3XFr)

125 There is one seed company that will sell you live tomato plants that have two different varieties. It might be Territorial. They also have a "ketchup and fries" plant that produces tomatoes up top, and potatoes down below.

The squash bugs on the zuch could not be overcome, so we pulled it. Zucchini are not difficult to come by. Tomatoes are yielding great numbers, expecially the yellow variety we put in for the daughter-in-law because she doesn't handle the acid well. They add something interesting to the marinara, too.

We use Garden Patch's grow boxes. You add potting mix for the medium. This year I tried a new variety called Pro Mix Moisture. This was an error as the "moisture" formulation prevents the soil wicking up water from the reservoir underneath.

The wife harvested the first four ears of sweet corn to serve to a couple of friends over for lunch. She called me, and asked if I was able to eat corn with my tooth issue. Yep, I said, I'll just slice it off the ear with a knife. I knew what was coming. She wanted to eat the ear reserved for me. I let her have it.

Posted by: Gordon Scott at August 01, 2020 11:04 PM (o6iit)

126 After years of my neighbors spreading pickle powder in my garden and much killing it. I finally ph adjusted the soil to where i now have a booming garden. As the Bible says, an enemy sows tares in your fields. Evil people just love to be asses.

Posted by: ron n. at August 02, 2020 07:23 PM (om5HK)

127 What is pickle powder?

Posted by: Gordon Scott at August 03, 2020 08:26 PM (o6iit)

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