Sunday Morning Book Thread 10-18-2015: The Beat Goes On [OregonMuse]


beatniks-550.jpg
"Look, I'll Explain It Again: This 'Free Speech' Thing We're Always On About, It's Only For Our Side, Get It?"

Alternate caption: "Well Guys, This Society Has Given Us Success, Respect, Admiration, and Comfortable Lives. Let's Destroy It!"

(thanks to goatexchange)

Good morning to all of you morons and moronettes and bartenders everywhere and all the ships at sea. Welcome to AoSHQ's stately, prestigious, internationally acclaimed and high-class Sunday Morning Book Thread. The Sunday Morning Book Thread is the only AoSHQ thread that is so hoity-toity, pants are required. Or kilts. Also, assless chaps don't count. Serious you guys. Kilts are OK, though. But not tutus. Unless you're a girl.

For those of you morons who are interested in the identities of those pictured in the rogues' gallery above (stolen from http://www.mrporter.com/journal/the-tribute/that-beatnik-look/295), we have Michael McClure on the far left side, and standing next to him is Bob Dylan, then Allen Ginsberg, and the dude in the ersatz hoodie is Lawrence Ferlinghetti. I have no idea who that disgruntled-looking young man is in the background. This photo from 1965 was taken in the alley behind the City Lights Bookstore in San Francisco.


Howling Mad

Hey, remember when the left used to howl with outrage about censorship and oppression and mindless conformity? Yes, those were the good old days, the days when great gouts of flaming anguish and despair would burst forth like coronal mass ejections from the overfed, over-sexed, and over-stuffed hearts of beatniks and hippies, because nothing, and I mean absolutely NOTHING, was worse than having to live in the most prosperous, free, and secure country in the history of the human race, which was America in the 1950s.

Not any more, though. No longer does the left see the best minds of their generation destroyed by madness, starving hysterical naked, dragging themselves through the negro streets at dawn looking for an angry fix. Nope, none of that. And no more angelheaded hipsters burning for the ancient heavenly connection to the starry dynamo in the machinery of night, not even for any of those who poverty and tatters and hollow-eyed and high sat up smoking in the supernatural darkness of cold-water flats floating across the tops of cities contemplating jazz. No, that's all gone.

Nowadays, they're busy shouting down conservative speakers on campus, organizing high-tech lynchings of Supreme Court nominees, bakery store owners and pizza shops, and getting the fire chief of Atlanta fired because he wrote a book they didn't like:

Fire Chief Kelvin Cochran — the subject of recent controversy over remarks made in a self-published religious book — has been terminated from the Atlanta Fire Rescue Department, Mayor Kasim Reed announced today.

Oh, do tell:

Among what city leaders said were troubling remarks in the fire chief’s book was a description of homosexuality as a “perversion” akin to bestiality and pederasty. Reed said in November that such writings were inconsistent with the city’s employment policies and opened an investigation into potential discrimination within the fire department. The findings of that investigation have not yet been released.

Because a discouraging word should never be heard (FORBIDDEN BY LAW!). Maybe Cochran could've saved his job by claiming the book was meant to be 'ironic'. I almost wish he had.

OK, so the book Cochran, a serious Christian, wrote is Who Told You That You Were Naked?, which is an exposition on what the Bible teaches about guilt, shame, forgiveness, and redemption:

This profound question, "Who told you that you were naked?, meant much more than, "Who told you that you do not have on clothes?" From God's perspective nakedness meant so much more. It meant condemnation and deprivation to his most precious creation-mankind. Though He reconciled Adam's condition by clothing him in coats of lambs' skin, Adam never got over what he had done. Condemnation has dominated ever since. Now we have a more permanent solution. We have been clothed with Christ!

It's not exactly a study of Plotinus Poe St. John of the Cross telepathy and bop kabbalah because the cosmos instinctively vibrated at their feet in Kansas, and also, Cochran isn't plowing any new ground here. That God dealt with the effects of sin by killing an animal so that Adam could be 'covered' and how that is a foreshadow of Christ is well known theological territory. The book isn't really about homosexuality as such. But it does not look favorably upon it, so Cochran must be expelled from the academies for crazy & publishing obscene odes on the windows of the skull, vanishing into nowhere Zen New Jersey leaving a trail of ambiguous picture postcards of Atlantic City Hall.

So, all the dull greyness, the oppression, all the mindless conformity that Allen Ginsberg used to howl about, is now not only being enthusiastically embraced, but also rigidly enforced, by the left.

My question is, will the architects and enablers of the new oppression ever be called to account for their cultural tyranny by a new Angry Young Poet? I would like to think so. Even though things are falling apart, and the center isn't holding, I'm rather optimistic about this. It may be that this new AYP has already been born, and is just waiting in the wings until the time is right for his emergence onto the stage to confront the progressive Spiritus Mundi. And the left, which has been marinating in mindless conformity for years, will never see it coming.

Groovy, man.

Ye Olde Horreur

Interesting article about the origins of the "horror story" genre:

However, the true “flowering” of stories of horror (picture the emergence of creeping, pustulant vines rather than flowers) began in the late 18th century. Horace Walpole’s Castle of Otranto (1764) invented out of whole cloth the genre that became known as the Gothic horror or Gothic romance. Walpole sought to combine medieval ideas about the supernatural with the realism of the modern novel. Above all, he sought to create an atmosphere of terror, a world in which anything could happen and often did: A giant helmet falls from the heavens, crushing Conrad on his wedding day; immense limbs appear within the castle itself; mysterious blood flows; and a hodgepodge of other bogeymen wander in and out of the tale.

The Castle of Otranto is available for free on Kindle, and most likely elsewhere as well.

The Gothic romantic phenomenon was not limited to English-speaking countries. The French roman noir ( “black novels” ) and the German Schauerroman ( literally, “shudder-novels” ) were equally popular.

And don't forget the Americans. Washington Irving got into the act with his now-classic The Legend of Sleepy Hollow and Rip Van Winkle. And Nathaniel Hawthorne was also fascinated by strange stories, with tales such as Dr. Heidegger's Experiment, and Septimius Felton, or The Elixir of Life, which was published posthumously.

The Vampyre; a Tale, by John William Polidori, was the first popular novel dealing with the vampire phenomenon. It was published in 1819 and was quite successful, being translated into French, German, Spanish and Swedish and also adapted into not one, but several stage plays.

Also check out the delightfully purple prose of Varney the Vampyre by James Malcolm Rymer:

“Her bosom heaves, and her limbs tremble, yet she cannot withdraw her eyes from that marble-looking face...With a plunge he seizes her neck in his fang-like teeth—a gush of blood, and a hideous sucking noise follows. The girl has swooned, and the vampire is at his hideous repast!”

Now that's some good, flatulent stuff right there.

Read the whole thing to see more suggestions for early horror stories.


Moron Recommendations

Moron lurker 'Locomotive Breath' heartily recommends The Great Christ Comet by Colin Nicholl (PhD, University of Cambridge) which forcefully and eloquently argues that the Star of Bethlehem was actually a great comet. LB says:

Some very heavy hitters in astronomy and theology are heaping praise upon this scholarly, yet very entertaining read that makes a "compelling case that the Star of Bethlehem could only have been a great comet. Taking a fresh look at the biblical text and drawing on the latest astronomical research, this beautifully illustrated volume will introduce readers for the first time to the Bethlehem Star in all of its glory."

Although the Kindle edition price-tag of $27.99 means that I won't be getting to this one for awhile.

___________

Now that ace has renewed the AoSHQ book club with 'Hound of the Baskervilles', I received an email from a lurking moron who says:

For those hobos / moron(ette)s who can't be bothered to actually read words on (e)paper, there are several free, public domain audiobooks of 'Hound of the Baskervilles' on LibriVox. Here's a list that has a bit more info than their default search:

http://aplt1.com/results?sort=title&solo=on&dramatic=on&q=baskervilles&language=EnglishThis email paid for by a FREE app that makes the great stuff from LibriVox easier to navigate and listen to:

https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/aplt1-free-audiobook-player/id1025263484

No Android app yet, but the aplt1.com website works fine there.


Books by Morons

As has been mentioned in the book thread comments last week, the latest (third) installment of the 'Amy Lynn' series by moron commenter 'Oldsailors Poet' has been published. OSP e-mailed earlier to tell me about it:

I think it's the best so far. It's a Spy Thriller/Romance. Manly Romance, not girlie. However, I still don't allow porn in my books...The good guys are still good. The Bad guys are really bad and per usual, a heaping helping of, AMERICA, F*CK YEAH!!! ... This is a more classically written book. I think the cover is spectacular.

But wait, there's more:

Also, to celebrate #3, the foundation book, Amy Lynn, will be free on Kindle Oct 17th and 18th. Those 'rons who have yet to give her a shot may do so for free.

The new on is Amy Lynn, The Lady Of Castle Dunn (Volume 3), and here is the Amazon blurb:

She made a deal with the CIA… They gain access to her extraordinary talents and she gets the chance to protect children…and avenge them. But in the world of high stakes covert operations, things are never so simple. In an Oklahoma mansion… A dying businessman makes a deal with the devil and opens a door to unimaginable evil.

Unfortunately, it's not yet available on Kindle. The Kindle release should have already happened, but it has been unaccountably delayed. Hopefully, soon. In the meantime, here is a link to the first book in the series, Amy Lynn, available today for FREE.

___________


Moron commenter 'Long Running Fool' has finished his non-fiction book, Surviving the Home Inspection: The Essential Seller's Guide, which

gives every home-seller the tools to reduce the stress involved with selling a home, save money, and sail through the inspection. Written...by a veteran inspector...[t]his book moves beyond the "lipstick-on-a-pig" advice and gives you the knowledge to select the improvements most likely to aid you-and the ones to avoid as they'll cost you more than they make for you.

So, if you're looking to sell your house, this is a book you might want to take a look at.

LRF is also the author of the running-themed novels Finishing Kick, Trail of Second Chances, and also a novel a service dog that changed two lives, A Walk with Rose.

___________


Moron author 'V the K' had his website redesigned, and I think it looks pretty good. You can take a look at it here. And while you're there, you might want to check out the 11th installment of his 'Worlds Apart' series:

It has been nearly 5 years since the Pathfinder Ship Pegasus left the Eventide system; more than a century since it entered the Orion Quadrant on its quest to find Earth. The worlds it has called upon have been, in turn, abandoned, primitive, and desolate.

At Eventide, the crew of Pegasus detected a signal and decided to follow it. They hope it will lead to an opportunity to reconnect with their homeworlds.

In fact, the signal is calling the ship to its end.

Worlds Apart Book 11: Charlemagne is available on .ePub, .pdf, and .mobi for $3.99. Also Kindle.


___________

So that's all for this week. As always, book thread tips, suggestions, bribes, rumors, threats, and insults may be sent to OregonMuse, Proprietor, AoSHQ Book Thread, at the book thread e-mail address: aoshqbookthread, followed by the 'at' sign, and then 'G' mail, and then dot cee oh emm.

What have you all been reading this week? Hopefully something good, because, as you all know, life is too short to be reading lousy books.

Posted by: Open Blogger at 09:03 AM




Comments

(Jump to bottom of page)

1 Re-reading the Mitch Rapp series. I had taken a break to do a history book I got on sale from Amazon, but moved back when I finished it.

Posted by: Vic-we have no party at October 18, 2015 09:01 AM (t2KH5)

2 Mayor Mohammed Kasim Reed

Posted by: Just Throwing That Out There at October 18, 2015 09:05 AM (LYCUN)

3 Picked up from Gutenberg.org a massive History of Frederick II (the great) by Thomas Carlyle. It's 22 volumes but started at 4. You can do that with history books.

Posted by: Skip at October 18, 2015 09:06 AM (uvPCb)

4 Jack BV Tannous, Syria between Byzantium and Islam

It's a PhD thesis, which means - unedited. So there are some stylistic quirks, like that lame "canon fodder" pun we've all only seen a thousand times by now.

On the plus side you can read the whole PDF for free :
http://tinyurl.com/pbpdq5w

Besides that, um... wow. This essay (finally) makes the case for a "late antiquity" that wasn't a dark age - at least SOMEWHERE. That somewhere was the Christian (and Jewish) Near East. That Near East spoke Edessene Aramaic, a.k.a. Syriac. It's especially the Christian Syrians who kept the old Greek philosophers and (most of all) doctors copied and current over those centuries that were so dark in the West.

Certain of the Muslims end up looking good, too. They didn't add much to this effort themselves, being at first too busy with the raping and looting; but later - under the Mutalizite 'Abbasids like Harun al-Rashid - they *sponsored* the translation-efforts, and sponsored new scientific knowledge as well.

A feature of this time was that "Christianity" was then fluid. It did have priests like Jacob of Edessa who really really wanted a canon-law of their own, that wasn't Byzantine or Nestorian. Others, not least the seventh-century Byzantines themselves, *did* want a unified Christianity and got pissed off when Monophysites insisted on niggling little details; (correctly) seeing that as a cover for selfish partisanship. Most Christians on the ground didn't care about these details either; all they wanted was for a village priest to show up who wasn't a parasite or a moron.

The Syriac Christian milieu did have problems - mainly at the fringes, where there weren't enough priests to go 'round. There the locals were "too busy with the goats", as they put it. (No, not in THAT way.) Because they had no time for school, they would forget certain elements of Christianity and would revert to paganism or else read the Bible wrong. Orthodoxy required effort. And ambitious charlatans could use village ignorance to fuel their own careers.

Everything Tannous said about Christianity at this time went for Jews too, although he doesn't mention them much. Tannous does note that it all goes double for Islam, which was then still working out the implications of their own faith. The Mutazila was exactly a movement for Muslims to do that with the benefits of science.

The Mutazila lost official support with Caliph al-Mutawakkil, who closed the schools and beat everyone over the head with the Koran. Here the thesis seems to agree with "The Closing of the Muslim Mind".

I recommend this mostly to readers of Emmet Scott's "Mohammed and Charlemagne Revisited" as a corrective, at least for the Near East inland off the Mediterranean coast.

Posted by: boulder terlit hobo at October 18, 2015 09:07 AM (aLXXe)

5 East Jerusalem, Bubbling Over With Despair...

Drudge link to NYT which has gone full nazi.

Posted by: Bruce With a Wang! at October 18, 2015 09:07 AM (iQIUe)

6 L Neil Smith, Tom Paine Maru

This is a book in the Libertarian-Preachy genre. I found out about Smith's general work by way of the "Quantum Vibe" webcomic, which relies heavily upon it. Smith wrote other books in this universe before this one, but he's attempted to make this one a standalone.

The protagonist, or at least the reader's avatar, has the character of the Savage from "Brave New World". Only, instead of interacting with maternal Socialism, he is interacting with Anarcho-Capitalism. If that sounds weird to you too, well... that's why L Neil Smith uses this device - to explain to us "Kilroys" how things like public-order, sex, defence, and education work in a society like this. Hint: there's lots and lots of technomagic.

The book starts out in two unlibertarian planets: the Savage comes from a militaristic society and the first planet he visits after that is a feudal barony. But above them all also exists a vast anarchist empire, the Confederacy - as in, Articles Of Confederation. The Confederates find the barony, wherein the Savage is being held prisoner; and they (literally) uplift him (and his superior officer, whose name is - I shit you not - "Enson Sermander") and let them both tag along as the Confederates go and screw with other unlibertarian societies. That's the plot: a wire hanger on which Smith can teach us about how to run a society, and how not to.

Sure, there's a reason why this perfect society exists alongside these other primitive planets - it involves parallel universes, failures in a probability engine, and George Washington getting hanged for not being libertarian enough. But does it matter?

PS. Some of that backstory is inadvertently hilarious. Read L Neil Smith's list of Presidents here. Go ahead, scroll down and read it.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/North_American_Confederacy

Posted by: boulder terlit hobo at October 18, 2015 09:08 AM (aLXXe)

7 I'm re-reading "How To Stop Worrying and Start Living" by Dale Carnegie (Carnegie was a Christian)
which is a great and helpful book.

Posted by: FenelonSpoke at October 18, 2015 09:09 AM (GERXL)

8 YAY BOOK THREAD! V the K, that's a nicely ominous summary.

Colonial American week for my World Lit class: John Smith, William Bradford, and Mary Rowlandson. May throw in a plug for Rush Revere while I'm at it.

Posted by: Elisabeth G. Wolfe at October 18, 2015 09:10 AM (iuQS7)

9 All I've read lately was Walk in the Woods. I was very, very disappointed, especially since it was so highly recommended. Started out OK but went downhill and stayed there. Waste of my time.

I am poring over an interesting Illustrated Shakespeare that I picked up for 50 cents at a used book sale. It's about 8 inches thick and weighs ten pounds. It's a 1970s facsimile of a mid-19th century edition. It's kind of fascinating because the original book was being assembled just as Collier's forgeries were being exposed. So, Collier is given huge amounts of ink, which is then all nullified by footnotes regarding the exposition of his forgeries. Must have been too late to go back to press, so they had to use footnotes.

Posted by: WhatWhatWhat? at October 18, 2015 09:11 AM (HMt16)

10 Good morning to the Horde and many thanks to Oregon Muse.

I've gone ahead and knocked down the prices on my two novels for the weekend, too. All three books are in Unlimited. You don't need to be a runner to enjoy the novels. Finishing Kick is a sweet coming-of-age read, and Trail is a fast action/adventure in the Bitterroot Mountains of Montana. Both feature strong-willed ladies. What can I say, I like the type - and raised three of them.
For those of you who do check out the moron authors, all of us could use reviews once you finished the story. Think about heading to Amazon or wherever you got the book from and leaving an honest review.
As for what I'm reading, Unbowed by Mangari Maathai - more prep for a two month trip to Kenya next January.

Posted by: Long Running Fool at October 18, 2015 09:13 AM (L0bUn)

11 That's how the left rolls, scream they're view is not being treated equal when the minority and then when they become the majority shut down dissent with jails then ultimately gulags. I can only laugh every time I hear a lefty want jail time for any dissent like global climate, not baking cakes, not condoning gay events etc.

Posted by: Skip at October 18, 2015 09:13 AM (uvPCb)

12 The mystery man came over and he said "I'm outta sight!"
He said for a nominal service charge I might reach Nirvana tonight.
If I was ready, willing and able to pay him his usual fee
He would drop all the rest of his pressing affairs and devote his attention to me.

Frank wrote it. Dylan knew it.

Posted by: Dave, exiled in RI at October 18, 2015 09:14 AM (aIf4d)

13 Yay, book thread!
I've been busy at my own stuff to do with the Tiny Publishing Bidness, and with finalizing two books of my own, which will be released officially in November. The historical novel, Sunset and Steel Rails is all done, but Chronicles of Luna City still requires polishing ... that's a collection of short stories and essays (rather like blog posts) about a little south Texas town, set in the present day. My daughter and I are writing it as a joint effort, and I am also creating a website specifically for it: lunacitytexas.com . We're drawing on all kinds of interesting characters and institutions that we know of from having done so much traveling for my own books. I did get started on Elisabeth Wolfe's "Look Behind You" which is a magical fantasy WWII adventure.

Posted by: Sgt. Mom at October 18, 2015 09:16 AM (95iDF)

14 Via the LA Public Library, there are several copies available of Hound of the Baskervilles in various formats, including audio. It's a safe bet that it's the same for most other public libraries.

Posted by: baldilocks at October 18, 2015 09:17 AM (ys2UW)

15 Michael McClure on the far left side, and standing next to him is Bob Dylan, then Allen Ginsberg






Aren't they all on the far left?

Posted by: TheQuietMan at October 18, 2015 09:17 AM (DiZBp)

16 The Kindle edition of HoB is also free.

Posted by: baldilocks at October 18, 2015 09:18 AM (ys2UW)

17 Hound of the Baskervilles also available free on Gutenberg.


http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/2852

Posted by: Vic-we have no party at October 18, 2015 09:20 AM (t2KH5)

18 #4 boulder terlit hobo

Interesting looking. Most folks don't consider the fluidity of a religion as it develops its orthodoxy. Thanks.

Posted by: Long Running Fool at October 18, 2015 09:21 AM (L0bUn)

19 I would laugh if the "new" utes of today suddenly rebelled against sloth, ill manners, uncleanliness, stupidity and following the "in" crowd. Would serve the fascists on the left right. (no pun intended)

Good Halloween read, "The Croquet Player" by that old nasty HG Wells. Scary stuff and all to real.

Posted by: Hairyback Guy at October 18, 2015 09:21 AM (ej1L0)

20
Review: Bombs Away: The Hot War by Harry Turtledove

Alt history - As US forces are routed in Korea, MacArthur talks Truman into dropping the Bomb in Manchuria, triggering a prolonged incremental WWIII.

Suffers the usual problems with Turtledove's books. OK premise, but he has to stretch everything out into a 6 book series to pay for re-roofing the garage. So the books are painfully slow.

Especially in this case, since the idea that the US plays nuclear back and forth with the Soviets for months once major Western, especially major US cites get nuked is ridiculous. Nuke San Francisco and you know Russia gets reduced to glass in an afternoon. End of story. But you know, that garage.....

Book also has the problem of Turtledove's aversion to showing the interesting bits of politics and technology to focus on peasants eating beets and such. Once again, you'll be flipping pages waiting for something interesting to happen.

Posted by: Laurie David's Cervix at October 18, 2015 09:21 AM (kdS6q)

21 I just finished "No Country for Old Men" and other than a character study of Sheriff Bell, there was nothing there. A ghost runs around killing people to get back some stolen money and/or drugs: yawn. I did like the sheriff and his wife a lot so the book was OK. I'll try at least one more Cormac McCarthy.

And I started "A Beginner's Guide to Singing Gregorian Chant Notation, Rhythm and Solfeggio." And I bet you didn't, so there.

Oh, and there was a short little book called "A Rescue in Progress" about a man and his foster pup who he kept. That was very sweet as you might imagine. The Kindle version (don't know if there's another) had links to some videos of the adorable goggie, and of course there's a Facebook page which I have now liked because, adorable goggie.

Posted by: Tonestaple at October 18, 2015 09:22 AM (dCTrv)

22 Good morning, Gentle Readers. This has been a week of interruptions so many things were started but few finished. Alas! But it's been a good week for future cold weather reading.

"The Art of the Lord of the Rings" came out Tuesday. This is a compilation of illustrations, sketches and maps Tolkien made while writing LOTR. I've seen, and been envious, of Tolkien's illustrations and general artistic talents and this new volume just adds to that feeling. When the hell did he have time to do these things between writing LOTR, his academic work, and raising a family?

Anyway, I am enjoying it but I'm a bit of a Tolkien nut and don't mind getting down in the weeds of his creative processes. If you aren't like that, check the book at the library first as it isn't cheap, even at Amazon prices. Looking at the sketches and maps made me want to reach for pen and ink to try my own drawing. Now if I only had the talent.

Posted by: JTB at October 18, 2015 09:22 AM (FvdPb)

23 Dale Carnegie has a lot of powerful stories in his book from real people-some with their names disguised. He also says this about prayer:

Even if you are not a religious person by nature or training-even if you are an out and out skeptic-pyare can help you so much more than you believe because it is a practical thing. What do I mean by "practical"? I mean prayer fulfills those three basic psychological needs which all people share whether they believe in God or not;

1. Prayer helps us put into words exactly what is troubling us. It is almost impossible to deal with a problem which is vague and nebulous......if we ask help from God..we must put it into words.

2. Prayers gives us a sense of sharing our burdens...Sometime sour worries are of so ultimate a nature that we cannot discuss them even with our closest friends and relatives...when we can't tell anyone else we can always tell God.

3. Prayer puts into force and active principle of "doing". It's a first step towards action. I doubt if someone can pray for some fulfillment day after day without benefitting from it, in other words for helping something come to pass. Dr Alexis Carrell, a scientist said, "Prayer is the most powerful force of energy one can generate.""

Posted by: FenelonSpoke at October 18, 2015 09:24 AM (GERXL)

24 You joking me? Allen Ginsturd was a notorious homo. He'd love the idea that biblical truths about homosexuality would be vigorously suppressed.

Posted by: Bruce Boehnerr at October 18, 2015 09:26 AM (Fv3UZ)

25 #CruxoftheBiscuit

Posted by: BackwardsBoy at October 18, 2015 09:27 AM (LUgeY)

26
Review: The End of All Things by John Scalzi

Another book in the Old Man's War series and it's ok. Straightforward set of four novelettes tack-welded together and posing as a novel.

Very much a 60s Poul Anderson or 80s David Brin feel. Aliens and ultra-competent humans chatting amicably about interstellar politics over tea between space-battles.

Readable and inoffensive.

Posted by: Laurie David's Cervix at October 18, 2015 09:29 AM (kdS6q)

27 LDC,

Is the New Turtledove Book a continuation of the 2nd Great War or a new series?

Posted by: The Ducks at October 18, 2015 09:29 AM (kLrYQ)

28 "Dr. Heidegger's Experiment" by *Nathaniel Hawthorne*? WTF? Was Hawthorne such an idiot that he didn't realize that Heidegger would't be born until 1889? What an idiot.

Posted by: Bruce Boehnerr at October 18, 2015 09:30 AM (Fv3UZ)

29 Kasim Reed just illustrates what I've been saying for some years now, that the Civil Rights movement was the original SJW entryism.

People like Reed and, for that matter, MLK never had any interest in real civil rights - none. They wanted "bottom rung up". MLK, as a socialist, effectively wanted the return of slavery.

Posted by: boulder terlit hobo at October 18, 2015 09:31 AM (aLXXe)

30 And I started "A Beginner's Guide to Singing Gregorian Chant Notation, Rhythm and Solfeggio." And I bet you didn't, so there.

Jealous! Just went over chant with my Humanities 101 class a couple of weeks ago and recorded myself singing "Of the Father's Love Begotten" as an example of chant that's still in use (and thus avoided any potential copyright stickiness).

Posted by: Elisabeth G. Wolfe at October 18, 2015 09:31 AM (iuQS7)

31
Is the New Turtledove Book a continuation of the 2nd Great War or a new series?
Posted by: The Ducks




New series with a new alt point, which is Truman's decision to use nnkes.

Posted by: Laurie David's Cervix at October 18, 2015 09:31 AM (kdS6q)

32 Pretty good spoof of Beat writing in the Howling Mad paragraph above.

Except you forgot to use the word 'languid'. They loved that one.

Posted by: ghost of hallelujah at October 18, 2015 09:32 AM (7RXcs)

33 23 ... Nice summation of the benefit of prayer. And it works even for the not formally religious types, like me. The power of words (think Genesis) should never be ignored.

Posted by: JTB at October 18, 2015 09:33 AM (FvdPb)

34 "New series with a new alt point, which is Truman's decision to use nnkes."

Think I'll pass then. Too many Turtledove Books in the I'll never read again pile, now.

Posted by: The Ducks at October 18, 2015 09:34 AM (kLrYQ)

35 My wife tells me when I'm about to stroll out of the house naked. I have so much on my mind I sometimes forget.

Posted by: Joe Biden at October 18, 2015 09:34 AM (Fv3UZ)

36 "I have so much on my mind I sometimes forget."

Next time Joe, put your meds in the Paste.

Posted by: The Ducks at October 18, 2015 09:35 AM (kLrYQ)

37 No book notes (still flitting through several in my usual ADD style), but just got off the phone with Mom and she dropped this bit of surrealistic imagery:

She and Dad attended the opening of 2001: A Space Odyssey in Detroit and saw Salvador Dali in the lobby.

She said neither of them approached him. My dad, the artist, must have been beside himself.

I don't know if he had his pet lobster on a leash, but I like to think his mustachios were waxed to perfection.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, self-aware douchebag at October 18, 2015 09:35 AM (jR7Wy)

38 A woman I once knew years ago has written a fascinating novel about a touching aspect of life in Israel and here's the video trailer her publisher issued describing the book.

Please support her and give the book a read!


http://bit.ly/1OC7OmQ


I never knew publishers release video "Book Trailers" now, emulating Hollywood I suppose. Makes commercial sense, I guess, seeing how visual the new generation has become but it still seems at odds with the idea of reading the printed word.

Posted by: MTF at October 18, 2015 09:35 AM (TxJGV)

39 *waves to Sgt. Mom* Looking forward to Luna City shenanigans! And I hope you enjoy Look Behind You.

Posted by: Elisabeth G. Wolfe at October 18, 2015 09:36 AM (iuQS7)

40 Re: horror. Don't forget Ann Radcliffe. Ccastle Otranto sounds oddly like Mysteries of Udolpho. Maybe ewok will opt for one of these instead of Hound.

Posted by: Bruce Boehner at October 18, 2015 09:36 AM (Fv3UZ)

41 Quack! Quack!!*

*/off Sock

Posted by: Tim in Illinois. Old and unimproved. at October 18, 2015 09:37 AM (kLrYQ)

42 @20 "Review: Bombs Away: The Hot War by Harry Turtledove"

Agree completely. Borrowed it from the library and I'm glad that I didn't contribute to the roof.

I love alternate history, but Turtledove is like double the Hamburger Helper with half the hamburger. It is a shame because he does come up with some interesting premises.

I did love the "Worldwar" series with the alien lizards and ginger, despite the excessive padding.

***

Finishing Ace Atkins' "Dark End of the Street." Very interesting characters, but a distinctly odd book. I'm going to check out more of his stuff.

I really loved his "Devil's Garden," which dealt with the early life of Dashiell Hammett.

Posted by: doug at October 18, 2015 09:37 AM (+XemL)

43 *waves back at Elisabeth*
I am enjoying it, now that I see that it's a magical fantasy ...
And for Luna City - we already worked up the story that you and your mom told us about the elderly gentleman with the huge automobile that he could barely see over the steering wheel of ...

Posted by: Sgt. Mom at October 18, 2015 09:41 AM (95iDF)

44 Hi, Digger. Who's Earl? Please tell me because a manual can't.

Posted by: Bruce Boehner at October 18, 2015 09:41 AM (Fv3UZ)

45 I'll have to check out the Gregorian chant book. The little bit of it I did on college was fun but learned entirely by ear. Fortunately, our rehearsal area had great echoes. It was neat for the basses to make the room almost vibrate with our voices. Powerful stuff.

Posted by: JTB at October 18, 2015 09:42 AM (FvdPb)

46 has been terminated from the Atlanta Fire Rescue Department, Mayor Kasim Reed announced today.
***
The fire chief should now sue the mayor for religious discrimination...This being Georgia I suppose their is a chance that he wouldn't get a left-tard judge.

Speaking of which, if conservative officials and judges don't start responding like this, the government will be putting conservatives in jail soon, which mind you is the whole end point of the "gay rights" movement.

Posted by: 18-1 at October 18, 2015 09:43 AM (5LOno)

47 It was a dork and stormy night...

Posted by: Sir Norris Tadpole at October 18, 2015 09:44 AM (Fv3UZ)

48 I have a feeling that Bob Dylan would be in support of free speech. if he's still a Christian I don't think he'd support people being drummed out of business or receiving death threats because they opposed the progressive agenda, even if Dylan supported gay marriage.

Posted by: FenelonSpoke at October 18, 2015 09:46 AM (GERXL)

49 I read Guns of the South by Turtledove and it was OK except it bogged down toward the end. I gave another one a chance and it bogged down in the beginning and never recovered.


If you want alt History read the first three books in the 1632 series. But after the first three they bog down too. Also you have to overlook the liberal union slant of the author.

Posted by: Vic-we have no party at October 18, 2015 09:48 AM (t2KH5)

50 Wasn't Allen Ginsburg a chickenhawk?

Posted by: Betty the Chicken at October 18, 2015 09:48 AM (Fv3UZ)

51 I have not been reading much lately. Need to get back to it. I guess I'll do the book club read...

Posted by: Lea at October 18, 2015 09:48 AM (vmMMi)

52 For those who will read Hound of the Baskervilles for the book selection, check out Michael Dirda's "On Conan Doyle". It is his usual delightful series of chapters on various aspects of the man and his writing. Hound was the young Dirda's introduction to Sherlock Holmes and his description of the event is so close to my experience, several years later, it is eerie. But cool.

Posted by: JTB at October 18, 2015 09:49 AM (FvdPb)

53 Good morning, all. This is where I note that I can't read or hear mention of The Hound of the Baskervilles without this guy (and his tragic life) immediately springing to mind:


http://tinyurl.com/ydbun4w

Posted by: Country Singer at October 18, 2015 09:50 AM (nL0sw)

54


Guns of the South was excellent. IMHO. The Great War Series was very good. The Center Cannot Hold was crappy and the 2nd Great War Series was downright awful.

In at the Death, the last book of the Series could have been written on a Bar napkin and gotten the same effect.

FREEDOM!!! From ever reading another crappy Turtledove Book.















Posted by: Tim in Illinois. Old and unimproved. at October 18, 2015 09:53 AM (kLrYQ)

55
Congrats, Oldsailors Poet. Warms the heart to see you doing so well, and cranking out the writing at warp speed. Your legacy is stamped in gold.

Posted by: Dem'th sense at October 18, 2015 09:53 AM (qCMvj)

56 I have been re-reading "The Hound of the Baskervilles" in preparation for the book club. I like the "meaning moor" bit. Doyle and Rev., Sabine Baring-Gould were romantics about Dartmoor.

Posted by: FenelonSpoke at October 18, 2015 09:54 AM (GERXL)

57 Somewhat OT, somewhat OnT:

Hey, remember when the left used to howl with outrage about censorship and oppression and mindless conformity?

Not in the same way, but I think we're about to get a big, ole, fat, heapin' helping of Leftist outrage about censorship and oppression presented with mindless conformity-

in the service of Hillary!

When I went to see, "Crimson Peak"- there was a huge display in the lobby with Meryl Streep, Helena Bonham Carter, and Carey Mulligan(?)-

all glaring sternly with their best resting bitch face-

and written underneath in huge letters-

"Suffragette".

So, yeah, unless this is a musical about Bowie's song "Suffragette City"-

it looks like the whole of the cultural left is about to release one year long howl about the horrors of being a woman in this, the most evil and repressive society evah, past, present, and future.

I'm sure there will be plenty of novels and poetry and popular songs in her service as well.

So, instead of the relatively benign 50's style- You're all squaresville, Daddio- revolt

we'll be getting a 24/7 high tech 2016 howl of

You're all rapey, Xtian, white, male oppressors what rape and oppress with your white, male, Xian penis and should kill yourself!

Another cultural highpoint brought to you by the left.

Posted by: naturalfake at October 18, 2015 09:54 AM (KUa85)

58 #56

That should be "menacing" moor, not meaning.

Posted by: FenelonSpoke at October 18, 2015 09:56 AM (GERXL)

59 You're all rapey, Xtian, white, male oppressors what rape and oppress with your white, male, Xian penis and should kill yourself!
***
Hmm, I suddenly have some insight into Bill and Hill...Hillary being one woman that Bill never tried to rape...

Posted by: 18-1 at October 18, 2015 09:57 AM (5LOno)

60 I never knew publishers release video "Book Trailers" now, emulating Hollywood I suppose. Makes commercial sense, I guess, seeing how visual the new generation has become but it still seems at odds with the idea of reading the printed word.

Posted by: MTF at October 18, 2015 09:35 AM (TxJGV)


Some European publishers do that, there are trailers for Harry Harrison's West of Eden (in Hungarian for a Hungarian publisher)

Eric Cline was compelled to do one for his book on the end of the bronze age, 1177 BC: The Year Civilization Collapsed. He complained about it at the beginning of a lecture that I saw on line

His Book Trailer is here:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q4EsR8dGJiI

Posted by: Kindltot at October 18, 2015 09:58 AM (3pRHP)

61 There is a teensy problem with the interpretation of the Star of Bethlehem as a comet: In the ancient world, comets were almost universally regarded as evil omens. They were more likely to foretell the death of kings, not their birth. Not to mention wars, plagues, famines, earthquakes, and you name it.

There is another book, first published around 2000, "The Star of Bethlehem: The Legacy of the Magi" by Michael R. Molnar, who is a Ph.D. in astronomy. I've been linking it around Christmastime for the last few years.

https://tinyurl.com/ozzzedw

Despite being an astronomer, he offers an astrological interpretation for the Star. Before about 1600, astronomy and astrology were one and the same. The ancients studied the heavens for signs and portents, and Molnar discovered that on April 17, 6 B.C. conditions would have been ripe for a prediction of a great king born in Judea.

Molar's theory takes into account what people at the time would have considered important, rather than a physical object that would appeal to modern eyes. Note the blurbs from professional astronomers lavishing praise on his astrological interpretation. You don't see that every day.

Posted by: rickl at October 18, 2015 10:00 AM (sdi6R)

62 26
Review: The End of All Things by John Scalzi

Another book in the Old Man's War series and it's ok. Straightforward set of four novelettes tack-welded together and posing as a novel.

Posted by: Laurie David's Cervix at October 18, 2015 09:29 AM (kdS6q)

***********

Although my opinion of Scalzi the man has lowered considerably over the past several years, I have always been drawn to the universe he created in his Old Man's War series.

I had hoped that this newest installment would build on the developments of The Human Division in a creative and at least entertaining way, but I was disappointed. The characters didn't seem true to form and the whole work really did seem "tacked" together. There was also a lot less of the humor/sarcasm that he usually puts in his novels.

The first of the four "novelettes" was the only one I felt he put any effort into.

Makes me wonder if his new multi-novel contract with Tor will negatively affect the quality of his writing.

Posted by: Elinor, Who Usually Looks Lurkily at October 18, 2015 10:00 AM (NqQAS)

63 At first glance I thought that was Yasser Arafat with a gun in that picture. I see now it's just some dumbass with a umbrella.

Posted by: freaked at October 18, 2015 10:01 AM (BO/km)

64 This week I read Citadel, the second volume of John Ringo's Troy Rising series. After surviving an attack by the Rangoa Empire, Earth goes on the offensive. There is more action than in volume one, Live Free or Die, but still a lot of science and dollops of humor. Can't wait to read The Hot Gate, the next in the series.

Posted by: Zoltan at October 18, 2015 10:01 AM (THsLo)

65
The Vampyre; a Tale, by John William Polidori, was the first popular novel dealing with the vampire phenomenon.







Fittingly, vampires were common in poetry before this. Reading Paglia got me to check out Coleridge's poem Christabel, and I've always enjoyed it.

18th Century Lesbian Vampires. What's not to love?

Posted by: IllTemperedCur at October 18, 2015 10:02 AM (o98Jz)

66 i haven't had much reading time lately (been writin' and working')

but I loves me some "Hound of the Baskervilles", one of the earliest novels young naturalfake read.

Maybe I can squeeze it in as it's not very long.

Posted by: naturalfake at October 18, 2015 10:03 AM (KUa85)

67 Question: If I have recommendations for the book thread, should I post them in the comments, or is there an email address to sent them to?

Posted by: Breaker Morant's Least Favorite Prisoner at October 18, 2015 10:04 AM (sUegk)

68 >>>You're all rapey, Xtian, white, male oppressors what rape and oppress with your white, male, Xian penis and should kill yourself!


These people are so fanatically stupid. Suicide is not necessary. We can appease them by agreeing to voluntarily removing our penis and testicles and having them replaced with a vagina. Then we can be BFFs and go shopping for clothes and shoes together. It'll be awesome!

Posted by: Caitlyn Jenner at October 18, 2015 10:04 AM (Fv3UZ)

69 >>>but I loves me some "Hound of the Baskervilles"


I loves me some Horse of the Baskervilles.

Posted by: Andrew Mendoza at October 18, 2015 10:07 AM (Fv3UZ)

70 67 Question: If I have recommendations for the book thread, should I post them in the comments, or is there an email address to sent them to?

Posted by: Breaker Morant's Least Favorite Prisoner at October 18, 2015 10:04 AM (sUegk)


Either is fine. The book thread e-mail address is listed in the last paragraph of the post:

As always, book thread tips, suggestions, bribes, rumors, threats, and insults may be sent to OregonMuse, Proprietor, AoSHQ Book Thread, at the book thread e-mail address: aoshqbookthread, followed by the 'at' sign, and then 'G' mail, and then dot cee oh emm.

Posted by: OregonMuse at October 18, 2015 10:11 AM (q3+zJ)

71 I don't think an Angry Young Poet is going to set things aright. I'm thinking it'll be a combination of SMOD, economic collapse, "immigration", disease, and starvation. Angry Young Riflemen tend to trump poets of any sort.

Posted by: PabloD at October 18, 2015 10:13 AM (BcOEh)

72 I thank you, on behalf of both myself, and my brilliant powers of observation...

Posted by: Breaker Morant's Least Favorite Prisoner at October 18, 2015 10:14 AM (sUegk)

73 I just Kindle'd the Hounds. Can't believe it's not in my hardbook short stories collections. I didn't see it for free, but am in a hurry, and don't care. $0.75. It's now on my Kindle.

Stuff to do outside! Frost this morning, ugh.

Posted by: artisanal 'ette at October 18, 2015 10:14 AM (qCMvj)

74 If Dylan were really a Christian, he wouldn't advocate that people should get stoned. That's an OT/Muzzie thing.

Posted by: Bruce Boehner at October 18, 2015 10:14 AM (Fv3UZ)

75
Question: If I have recommendations for the book thread, should I post them in the comments, or is there an email address to sent them to?

Posted by: Breaker Morant's Least Favorite Prisoner at October 18, 2015 10:04 AM (sUegk)









If you're going to recommend "Big 'Uns" magazine for inclusion in the Book Thread, some of us long-time crusty Morons have been doing that for YEARS to no avail.

It must be that OregonMuse hates us. *snif*

Posted by: IllTemperedCur at October 18, 2015 10:15 AM (o98Jz)

76 The Syriac Christian milieu did have problems - mainly at the fringes, where there weren't enough priests to go 'round.

This seems to be a common problem in 'Christianized' areas. I know it was an issue in the U.S. and Canada which led to circuit-rider pastors to try to create continuity in teaching and help support orthodoxy. My understanding is that lack of priests/pastors in Scotland meant only seeing one a couple times a year if you were lucky, and possibly never if you lived far from a city, which is why marriage by the blacksmith was legal there. Although that may be only fiction as I haven looked into it. It would make sense though as humans have a psychological need to solemnize certain occasions.

Posted by: Polliwog the 'Ette at October 18, 2015 10:15 AM (GDulk)

77 *waves to Elisabeth and Sgt. Mom*

All Hail Eris, Dali must have really loved when Bowman went through TMA-2 and ended up in the hotel room.

Got some writing done, not as much as planned. Tried to read again A Rising Thunder but skipped through the book.

Sorry to hear Lady of Castle Dunn Kindle version is held up. Are Createspace's Hamsters on strike?

Posted by: Anna Puma at October 18, 2015 10:15 AM (IjmeC)

78
The first of the four "novelettes" was the only one I felt he put any effort into.
Posted by: Elinor



The first novelette, the story of a merchant ship pilot being shanghaied into becoming a brain in a box guiding a Q-ship on a mission of destruction, is really the only "good" story. The plot, while very A to B, at least is memorable. Very much a Ben Bova era Analog story that a dozen authors from that time could have written. Call it -- workmanlike.

The other three -- If I concentrate, I can plot out two, but the third is going all Perry on me. The stories are ok, but they're time passers.

Posted by: Laurie David's Cervix at October 18, 2015 10:15 AM (kdS6q)

79 LOL because I thought I was one of the few people in the world to have read Castle of Otranto. What a hoot! The first few chapters has so much crammed into it the rest of the book is somewhat of a letdown, but a really fast and very amusing read.

I was pushing for Frankenstein as the group read because I thought there were so many contemporary tie-ins (body parts for sale or trade!), but the Hound will be fun.

Otherwise, my reading for the past month has been in 10-min increments, mostly online, because a 15 month old toddler grandson running around the house is not conducive to any coherent thought except survival (his or mine, I'm not sure).

Posted by: mustbequantum at October 18, 2015 10:17 AM (MIKMs)

80 Well done Oregon Muse. Very well done indeed.

Posted by: Deety at October 18, 2015 10:17 AM (EmfUD)

81
I don't think an Angry Young Poet is going to set things aright. I'm thinking it'll be a combination of SMOD, economic collapse, "immigration", disease, and starvation. Angry Young Riflemen tend to trump poets of any sort.

Posted by: PabloD at October 18, 2015 10:13 AM (BcOEh)






Y'know, there's a pretty good AYR>AYP bumper sticker, internet meme or T-shirt slogan lurking in there somewhere. You should develop that.

Posted by: IllTemperedCur at October 18, 2015 10:19 AM (o98Jz)

82 >>>Now that's some good, flatulent stuff right there.


That would make a great comedy skit: a flatulent vampire who awakened his potential victims before he got to the bed. Count Flatula.

Posted by: Bruce Boehner at October 18, 2015 10:20 AM (Fv3UZ)

83 Brain in a box on a suicide mission?

Demon 4 by David Mace
http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0441142575

Posted by: Anna Puma at October 18, 2015 10:20 AM (IjmeC)

84 73
I just Kindle'd the Hounds. Can't believe it's not in my hardbook short
stories collections. I didn't see it for free, but am in a hurry, and
don't care. $0.75. It's now on my Kindle.



Stuff to do outside! Frost this morning, ugh.

Posted by: artisanal 'ette at October 18, 2015 10:14 AM (qCMvj)

LOL, I posted a link up thread where you could download it for free.

Posted by: Vic-we have no party at October 18, 2015 10:22 AM (t2KH5)

85 I thought the guy on the left in the photo above was Johnny Cash, but what would he be doing with that crew? Except for Dylan who was his friend.

Posted by: JoeF. at October 18, 2015 10:22 AM (Nao8N)

86 I just checked and our local lib does not have a copy of Chief Cochran' s book. I am going to fill out a request to buy form.

Posted by: @votermom at October 18, 2015 10:26 AM (cbfNE)

87 *pauses*

How The State knows better is Anne McCaffrey's "Brain-Brawn" ships stories are.

Posted by: Anna Puma at October 18, 2015 10:30 AM (IjmeC)

88 78

If I concentrate, I can plot out two, but the third is going all Perry on me.

Posted by: Laurie David's Cervix at October 18, 2015 10:15 AM (kdS6q)

********

LOL!

Posted by: Elinor, Who Usually Looks Lurkily at October 18, 2015 10:31 AM (NqQAS)

89 The hard core Beatniks and, later, Hippies never appealed to me. They always seemed like spoiled, usually urban, types (hello, Ginsberg) denigrating the culture that gave them leisure to howl. Too much emphasis on ugly (think even something as mild as Rod Mckuen singing "Amsterdam") and sneering at anything positive or even just pleasant. I was too young to know the term 'nihilism' but not too young to sense the trend. That these creatures should be regarded as cultural icons is disturbing and disgusting. Their offspring are the Occupy Wall Street and SJW scum.

OK. Rant off. For now.

Posted by: JTB at October 18, 2015 10:32 AM (FvdPb)

90 Listening to Hero of Ages the last of Sanderson's Mistborn trilogy. Not really sure how I feel about it so far.

Posted by: Polliwog the 'Ette at October 18, 2015 10:33 AM (GDulk)

91 Was Hawthorne such an idiot that he didn't realize that Heidegger would't be born until 1889?

****


The prescience is settled.

Posted by: Seamus Muldoon at October 18, 2015 10:34 AM (mvenn)

92 IllTemperedCur: I have to confess that I designed and ordered some "SMOD 2016" stickers the other day (I hope Ace and/or AtC doesn't own a copyright - I don't want a box of emus to show up on my porch). I figure I'll slap one on my car's rear window, and maybe my range bag. Maybe it'll get noticed and I'll finally meet another member of the Horde in person one day.

I also like the nic "Retard Strength Trumps Smart Power" - makes me chuckle every time I see it.

Posted by: PabloD at October 18, 2015 10:35 AM (BcOEh)

93 Okay, before I get off of someone's lawn, who are the guys in the photo? I don't recognize any of them.

Posted by: Polliwog the 'Ette at October 18, 2015 10:36 AM (GDulk)

94 I re-read Lois Bujold's Captain Vorpatril's Alliance.
Ivan Vorpatril, cousin to Miles Vorkosigan, is living out his dream, to quietly live his life as the staff aide in the Barryaran military administration of the Barryar empire.
Then he is asked to pick up a young lady and keep an eye on her by an old acquaintance. The young lady turns out to be on the run from kidnappers sent by the people who were hunting down her whole family - and who eventually leak her information to immigration control so they can locate her and deport her so they can capture her. To protect her he offers to marry her, and does so while the local security is trying to beat down his door.

Then the newlyweds, as all newlyweds do, spend time discovering who they are and why they have married (your cousin is the Emperor? Your father is a Baron and the head of one of the major houses of an entire planet? Your half-sister is BLUE?) amid kidnapping attempts, explosions, digging for lost treasure, dinner parties and legal hearings.

Bujold is worth re-reading. I forget how pleasant a writer Lois Bujold is, and how full her writing is without being overstuffed with extra padding.
I also find her prose to be incredibly readable. I don't know if she is the best prose writer of this generation, she has some really stiff competition in SF, but she is way up there.

Posted by: Kindltot at October 18, 2015 10:37 AM (3pRHP)

95 should be "and who they have married" not why they married, but it also fits.

Posted by: Kindltot at October 18, 2015 10:38 AM (3pRHP)

96 Wasn't Ginsberg a raging homo? Or did he just write that shit to be edgy and transgressive?

Posted by: Insomniac at October 18, 2015 10:39 AM (kpqmD)

97 Ivan to Emperor Gregor, "Well Sir, I think Simon was bored."

At least that is how I remember that scene. But yeah it is a very fun mystery/treasure/adventure romp.

Another memorable phrase - "It was buggered to fit."

Posted by: Anna Puma at October 18, 2015 10:40 AM (IjmeC)

98 I just finished "No Country for Old Men"

-
I read that because I hoped to find some strength on how to deal with the constant swimming upstream in the sewer as law enforcement does. What I learned from it was give up. (Things are actually worse now in that I ways knew we were the good guys. Now in the age Sir Barks-a-Lot and Lynch-Holder I am no longer sure.)

Posted by: The Great White Snark at October 18, 2015 10:40 AM (Nwg0u)

99 Angry Young Poets don't seem to be much good at building things.

Posted by: Seamus Muldoon at October 18, 2015 10:40 AM (mvenn)

100 I tried to read Mysteries of Udolpho once, but I got bored after a few chapters.

FS, I will try the Dale Carnegie book.

Posted by: @votermom at October 18, 2015 10:41 AM (cbfNE)

101 OregonMuse let me know about a compilation of decades of Chess Life and Chess Review magazines on CD offered by the US Chess Federation. They arrived late yesterday so I just started to look at the early ones from 1933. Fascinating stuff. Aside from the chess material, which is well presented, the writing is superb. I suspect most of the writers were born and educated in the late Victorian period or soon after and it shows in the clarity of word usage and proper sentences. So far it is a delight to read.

Thanks, OM

Posted by: JTB at October 18, 2015 10:41 AM (FvdPb)

102 Thanks for the plug, Oregon Muse. I don't wanna brag, but if things keep going, I'll make more from eBook sales than Charles Johnson made with his GoFundMe. So there's that.

Posted by: V the K at October 18, 2015 10:41 AM (c/Ipt)

103 93 Okay, before I get off of someone's lawn, who are the guys in the photo? I don't recognize any of them.

Posted by: Polliwog the 'Ette at October 18, 2015 10:36 AM (GDulk)


Hate to sound like a dick, but I explained who they are in the 2nd paragraph below the photo.

Posted by: OregonMuse at October 18, 2015 10:42 AM (q3+zJ)

104 I should add that the chess compilation was a bargain. There is years worth of reading and instructions on the four disks.

Posted by: JTB at October 18, 2015 10:43 AM (FvdPb)

105 Angry Young Poets don't seem to be much good at building things.

No, but they're real good at tearing them down.

Posted by: OregonMuse at October 18, 2015 10:43 AM (q3+zJ)

106 Oh, and thanks for another great book thread, OM!

Posted by: @votermom at October 18, 2015 10:44 AM (cbfNE)

107 Other Moron books for purchase
Lauren's
http://astore.amazon.com/aoshq-20/detail/B00PRBME38

Christopher Taylor's
http://astore.amazon.com/aoshq-20/detail/B014TKK4RU

And of course my little story. ;
http://astore.amazon.com/aoshq-20/detail/B014BTSEYO

Posted by: Anna Puma at October 18, 2015 10:45 AM (IjmeC)

108 They will only be stopped when Christians come to realize that Jesus was not a pacifist and that belief in Him is not a suicide pact.

Then and only then will Christians stand up (as they did just a few centuries ago, this pacifism is relatively new as a general belief. Martyrs subscribed to it so as to make their martyrdom more obvious.)

We've aroused ourselves a number of times before to stand up and beat back the Islamic threat. I blame the communists. They are most likely the ones responsible for the idea that has spread through Christianity that somehow Christ was a pacifist and that to stand up to your enemies was sinful.

Don't ever let a liberal tell you what your religion means or how it's practiced. That's a road to confusion right there.

Posted by: Bitter Clinger and All That at October 18, 2015 10:48 AM (Xo1Rt)

109 So, question, I have a couple of ideas kicking around in my head for the next writing project. Thought I would run them by the horde and see which you all liked better.

1. The protagonist (don't have a name yet) is an anti-social hockey player with a short temper and a penchant for beating up people. He is on the verge of getting kicked out of college for beating up a transgender (he didn't know it was a transgender.) But after the global economic and social collapse, the same charateristics that made him an outcast suit him ideally as a leader in The Burning Times that follow. Also, he has an imaginary bear for a friend.

2. A scifi space adventure where the bad guys are the protagonists. The crew of the space battle cruiser Vladimir Putin have been tasked with a critical mission by the Scorpion Empire; locate the secret base where the rebel freedom fighters (who recently sabotaged and destroyed the empire's mega-weapon) are hiding and destroy them by any means necessary.

What do you think, are either of these promising?

Posted by: V the K at October 18, 2015 10:48 AM (c/Ipt)

110 96 Wasn't Ginsberg a raging homo? Or did he just write that shit to be edgy and transgressive?

Posted by: Insomniac at October 18, 2015 10:39 AM (kpqmD)


Yes to both questions.

A bit of trivia I heard on the 'Jeopardy' TV show last week asserted that a critic of 'Howl' said that it was just Ginsberg being upset and angry at all those who didn't share his sexual orientation. I was unable to find either the critic's name or the complete quote, but it did provide me with enough material for a book thread. Thanks, Al!

Posted by: OregonMuse at October 18, 2015 10:49 AM (q3+zJ)

111 Posted by: OregonMuse at October 18, 2015 10:42 AM (q3+zJ)

D'oh! I even read the post but seem to have missed that paragraph (which is particularly impressive given all the red in it).

Posted by: Polliwog the 'Ette at October 18, 2015 10:50 AM (GDulk)

112 #106 My pleasure, @votermom.

Posted by: OregonMuse at October 18, 2015 10:51 AM (q3+zJ)

113 109 So, question, I have a couple of ideas kicking around in my head for the next writing project. Thought I would run them by the horde and see which you all liked better...

What do you think, are either of these promising?
Posted by: V the K at October 18, 2015 10:48 AM (c/Ipt)


I like #1. #2 sounds more like a video game. Sorry, but it does.

Posted by: OregonMuse at October 18, 2015 10:55 AM (q3+zJ)

114 After The Hound of the Baskervilles you may wish to read Sherlock Holmes Was Wrong by Bayard. He takes the same evidence Holmes had and comes up with an entirely different solution. I thought that this was a lot of fun. According to this book, which adds no new facts or evidence to the original The Hound of the Baskervilles, that stupid limey bastard got the wrong murderer, the wrong murder, the wrong Hound of the Baskervilles, and even unknowingly contributed to the real murder and the escape of the real murderer. It was written in French by a Frenchman and some of the translation of the original into French and then back into God's language weakens some of the argument but not substantially so. Being written by a Frenchman, of course, the book is haughty and pretentious but even that fits right into this in-depth analysis of those shocking events, so clouded as they are by fog and mystery. There is even a good deal of psychological, parapsychological,and even metaphysical examination of the reality of literary characters. We're through the looking glass here, people.

Posted by: The Great White Snark at October 18, 2015 10:58 AM (Nwg0u)

115 I thought it especially ironic that Mikes, who spent his entire career surrounded by the exotica of the Galaxy, married Barrayan Vor, while Ivan, who spent his career surrounded by the flower of Vor beauty, married a Galactic exotic.

Posted by: Fox2! at October 18, 2015 10:58 AM (brIR5)

116 #1. His imaginary bear friend is his therapy bear who offers advice.

#2 reminds me too much of Star Wars.

Posted by: Anna Puma at October 18, 2015 10:58 AM (IjmeC)

117 Don't ever let a liberal tell you what your religion means or how it's practiced. That's a road to confusion right there.

Funny how they don't do that with islam.

IMO, Christianity is all about seeing things as they are, discerning good from evil, right from wrong and striving as one can to make a positive difference so that we may have Heaven on Earth and live in peace.

Posted by: BackwardsBoy at October 18, 2015 10:59 AM (LUgeY)

118 Not to mention Miles' own Mini-Me, Mark.

Posted by: Fox2! at October 18, 2015 10:59 AM (brIR5)

119 People reading Hound of the Baskervilles for Ace's book selection should be wary. You might find yourself going through the Holmes short stories. Then some of Doyle's non-Holmes writings. Before you know it you will fritter away hours with delightful entertainment. Be aware and beware!

Posted by: JTB at October 18, 2015 11:00 AM (FvdPb)

120 Reading School of Darkness by Bella Dodd and am about 60 percent done. It shows how *organized* the statist push to subjugate the U.S. has been for over a century which gives me very little hope of our being able to undo the damage without a miracle. Conversely, it show that the internal secretiveness and paranoia of the leadership can also cause I high level of disarray so the situation isn't actually hopeless, only dire.

Posted by: Polliwog the 'Ette at October 18, 2015 11:01 AM (GDulk)

121 Or maybe Maxi-Me, since Mark's goal was for a one-eyed sniper to be able to distinguish him from Miles. In the dark.

Posted by: Fox2! at October 18, 2015 11:01 AM (brIR5)

122 Posted by: V the K at October 18, 2015 10:48 AM (c/Ipt)

*****

You had me at "anti-social hockey player with a short temper and a penchant for beating up people."

Posted by: Elinor, Who Usually Looks Lurkily at October 18, 2015 11:04 AM (NqQAS)

123 I'm already up to the third chapter of HoB. This should be fun.

Posted by: BackwardsBoy at October 18, 2015 11:05 AM (LUgeY)

124 30. Elisabeth, don't be too jealous. I gave the book two stars at amazon because I'm a third of the way through and I've learned almost everything I've read so far in quickie introductions at choir practice. Further, this book is printed in an uncial font and for that alone the author needs to be punished harshly.

Next payday (this was expensive), depending on what I get out of this book, I will try a different book on the subject.

Posted by: Tonestaple at October 18, 2015 11:05 AM (dCTrv)

125 I have no idea who that disgruntled-looking young man is in the background.

Probably a FiBIe, mad that his cover was being blown.

Posted by: Fox2! at October 18, 2015 11:07 AM (brIR5)

126 From Drudge: Amazon suing fake reviewers.

Posted by: The Great White Snark at October 18, 2015 11:07 AM (Nwg0u)

127
And speaking of WWIII alt history -- not a lot of it.

Certainly were a significant amount of WWIII present day and future fiction, but not much "for want of a nail" stuff.

Two books I can think of are Brendan DuBois' Resurrection Day, which had an America devastated in a Cuban Missile Crisis gone wrong, and the anthology Cold War Hot: Alternate Decisions in the East-West Struggle ed. Peter G. Tsouras.

For the interested, probably have to hunt in the invaluable Uchronia alt history site's timeline beginning in the late 40s.:

www.uchronia.net/bib.cgi/diverge.html?o=1750

Posted by: Laurie David's Cervix at October 18, 2015 11:08 AM (kdS6q)

128 I read "Fifty-One Years of Victorian Life" by Margaret, Countess of Jersey, then the autobiography of Lady Randolph Churchill (Winston's mother). Now I am getting through Manchester's multi-volume biography of Winston Churchill, "The Last Lion." All good reads and fascinating for their discussions of life in the Victorian, Edwardian, and early 20th century periods. However, I would like to read an autobiography with more of a bourgeois perspective. The above-mentioned books offer insights into the lives of the elite and powerful but I would like to read about lives of the middle to upper middle classes during the Victorian and Edwardian eras. Does anyone know of some titles/authors that would fit the bill?

Posted by: Brunnhilde at October 18, 2015 11:09 AM (epLS9)

129 Tom Paine Maru was the first L. Neil Smith book that I ever read, and I found it very effective.
I didn't think of the Brave New World tie in. Probably because of my biases, I saw it as the different ways that the main character and his commanding officer chose to act and adapt in response to having their old world taken away, having it shown as a lie, and being offered a new one with more scary freedom and self responsibility. The choices made were to adapt or to try to re-create the old world.

I also loved the Confederacy universe because it offers the idea of what an adult society might look like.
Some of the later scenes in Tom Paine Maru were a little heavy handed and a bit Deus ex machina, but it is a book that was written to present a specific philosophy, and to build a bridge between the readers' experience and world view and that of a hypothetical libertarian society, and present some outcomes.
It is also more readable than Atlas Shrugged.

Posted by: Kindltot at October 18, 2015 11:09 AM (3pRHP)

130 Ah, Book Thread! *hands out cinnamon roll biscuits*

I read Castle Otranto, and a bunch of other Gothik Romances. I swear those people had sources of drugs unknown to modern times. Also their characters had great lung capacity, judging by the length of the average sentence of dialog.

Recently reading: Fire with Fire. Well written Marty Stu, and a bit more heavy-handed character herding than I enjoy. Eh, it numbed the bus commute.

Also read Cherryh's Foreigner Amazing writing, but as far as action goes one book is the equivalent of one chapter elsewhere, as we spend most of our time trapped in the whiny, uncertain brain of Bren the Interpreter. I even skipped to book 10 (of *16* in the series) and yep, he's still thinking in frantic circles and we get to be there for ALL of it. Not enough explosions or alienness.

Want to thank one of the Morons who pointed out Baen's book bundles, an amazing cheap way to get lots of decent books. I read very fast and I need brain candy for the bus, and it is hard to find affordable good stuff searching Amazon. Takes too much time. So the book bundles are an excellent way to go.

Back to writing now...

Posted by: Sabrina Chase at October 18, 2015 11:10 AM (GG9V6)

131 Allen Ginsberg was a raging homo who did have a flair for language. There are passages of "Howl" that are indeed evocative. If he and Kerouac had applied themselves better and laid of the drugs and alcohol ,they could have been really good writers.
Ginsberg was from my hometown of Paterson, NJ and my father hated his guts. Ginsberg's father , Louis, was my father's high school English teacher, and my father described him as a "gentleman, but a Commie."

Posted by: JoeF. at October 18, 2015 11:10 AM (Nao8N)

132 Top Photo caption: "Well guys, this society has given us success, respect, admiration, and comfortable lives. Let's destroy it!"

Posted by: goatexchange at October 18, 2015 11:10 AM (+IrMF)

133 I've read The Castle of Otranto. Wouldn't recommend it. The prose style is so florid and overwrought that it's nearly unreadable. Fortunately it's pretty short.

Posted by: Lawrence Person at October 18, 2015 11:12 AM (Jm+BD)

134 Another excellent book thread, OM!

Hmm, I suddenly have some insight into Bill and Hill...Hillary being one woman that Bill never tried to rape...

Ack, just the thought! Think it's safe to say that Hillary is his "mom" stand-in, forever keeping him in line, punishing his excesses.

But yes, there is definitely a resurgence of 70's style feminism, women pretending that all that has happened since then has fallen short. Ugh.

Posted by: Lizzy at October 18, 2015 11:12 AM (NOIQH)

135 VtK: did Joseph Stalin play hockey in college? Violent, anti-social, and delusional sounds a lot like Uncle Joe.

Posted by: PabloD at October 18, 2015 11:13 AM (BcOEh)

136 g'late mornin', 'rons

Posted by: AltonJackson at October 18, 2015 11:14 AM (KCxzN)

137 The guy on the right in the photo above looks like Hamid Karzai, the crook we propped up in Afghanistan.

Posted by: JoeF. at October 18, 2015 11:14 AM (Nao8N)

138 When I was in grade school in the late 1950s there was an elementary school book club or service. The teacher would pass out lists of books students could order for, at most, a quarter and they would be delivered to the school in a few weeks. I bring this up because that is how I got my first copy of Hound of the Baskervilles. It also provided a first exposure to Shirley Jackson and many others now forgotten. The day those books arrived was exciting and a Big Deal.

Anyone else have that experience?

Posted by: JTB at October 18, 2015 11:14 AM (FvdPb)

139 You really think there's some mass of yoots out there, waiting to rebel against the oppressive left?

Really??

Not me. I see mass killings in our near future. Follows by whatever oopsie comes after that. One for which we will not be around.

Much will be lost, in the way of wisdom. Killed by a deliberate hand, and what follows will need to be reinvented. If it can.

I suppose it doesn't hurt to be hopeful. Why not. Maybe things will get better. We'll see. Or we won't.

Posted by: BurtTC at October 18, 2015 11:14 AM (Dj0WE)

140 117 Don't ever let a liberal tell you what your religion means or how it's practiced. That's a road to confusion right there.

Funny how they don't do that with islam.


That's because liberalism is external to Islam. By contrast, it is my view that what we now know as 'liberalism' or 'progressivism' originated within Christianity, i.e it's pretty much an unacknowledged Christian heresy, or at least, borrowed heavily from the Christian worldview.

Posted by: OregonMuse at October 18, 2015 11:15 AM (q3+zJ)

141 135--yes. Stalin also studied for the priesthood and was a poet. He was also a gangster and a black marketeer. To this day, there are some who believe he was a paid informer in the employ of the Czar's secret police.

Posted by: JoeF. at October 18, 2015 11:16 AM (Nao8N)

142 >>What do you think, are either of these promising?


#1 sounds good. Might be fun to make him a hockey thug who has a firm moral code, sort of like the Bud White character in LA Confidential. That morality would be a plus in a post-apocalyptic world.

Posted by: Daryl Dixon at October 18, 2015 11:17 AM (NOIQH)

143 132 Top Photo caption: "Well guys, this society has given us success, respect, admiration, and comfortable lives. Let's destroy it!"

Posted by: goatexchange at October 18, 2015 11:10 AM (+IrMF)


Thank you for your contribution to the book thread. I'm stealing it.

Posted by: OregonMuse at October 18, 2015 11:17 AM (q3+zJ)

144 @131 Kerouac & alcohol

I liked "The Dharma Bums" quite a bit.

Was Gary Snyder one of the few Beat authors who didn't have substance abuse problems?

Posted by: doug at October 18, 2015 11:18 AM (+XemL)

145 When I was in grade school in the late 1950s there was an elementary school book club or service. The teacher would pass out lists of books students could order for, at most, a quarter and they would be delivered to the school in a few weeks. I bring this up because that is how I got my first copy of Hound of the Baskervilles. It also provided a first exposure to Shirley Jackson and many others now forgotten. The day those books arrived was exciting and a Big Deal.

Anyone else have that experience?
Posted by: JTB at October 18, 2015 11:14 AM (FvdPb)


Yeah, our school did that, but not for a quarter. They were more than that. I don't know how much more, but more than my parents could afford.


We had a shedload of books at home though, so it wasn't that there was nothing to read, but it sure felt like I was missing out when the delivery of those shiny new books arrived at school.

Posted by: BurtTC at October 18, 2015 11:19 AM (Dj0WE)

146 JTB - definitely that school-sponsored book distribution system was in place in the 60's, and yes, it was a big deal when the ordered books arrived. I even remember excitedly telling and hearing about the books my friends and I had ordered.

Posted by: goatexchange at October 18, 2015 11:19 AM (+IrMF)

147 Drudge has weird headlines. I'm a Giants fan so I like Eli Manning, and I respect his brother Peyton. But who cares if they are supporting Jeb!! Will the vote of one NFL fan change because of that?

Posted by: JoeF. at October 18, 2015 11:21 AM (Nao8N)

148 I saw the Angry Young Poets open for the Fine Young Cannibals at the Hammersmith in '86.

Posted by: oblig. at October 18, 2015 11:22 AM (g0y7D)

149 Fortunately, our rehearsal area had great echoes. It was neat for the basses to make the room almost vibrate with our voices. Powerful stuff.

That is the designed "instrument" for Gregorian chant,
monastics filling the abbey church with praise for God.

Not that the cloistered women didn't make a joyful noise unto the Lord, but I suspect that was a pleasant side effect.

Posted by: Fox2! at October 18, 2015 11:22 AM (brIR5)

150 Anyone else have that experience?

-
Not Hounds but I well remember the service and read lots of books.

Posted by: The Great White Snark at October 18, 2015 11:23 AM (Nwg0u)

151 >>Also, he has an imaginary bear for a friend.



Who you calling imaginary?

Posted by: Teddy Ruxpin at October 18, 2015 11:24 AM (EJ1r7)

152
LAT headline is Obama Gives Up on Wars He Inherited.

Lefties never effing stop....

Posted by: Bruce With a Wang! at October 18, 2015 11:26 AM (iQIUe)

153 Anyone else have that experience?

Posted by: JTB at October 18, 2015 11:14 AM (FvdPb)


That would be the Scholastic Book Service, if I remember rightly. My (Catholic) grade school used it extensively. I think that even may have been a book thread topic of a year or two ago.

I would suggest Googling "Scholastic Book Service".

Posted by: OregonMuse at October 18, 2015 11:27 AM (q3+zJ)

154 Anyone else have that experience?

Posted by: JTB at October 18, 2015 11:14 AM (FvdPb)

*****

Yes, in the 1960s! It was so much fun getting your own books. We would sometimes each order different titles and swap them around so we have more variety.

When my kids were in school, Scholastic sponsored what they called "Book Fairs". The books were over-priced, heavy on Harry Potter themes, and included lots of games, toys, stuffed animals, pens and pencils, and puzzles rather than just the books.

Parents quickly learned not to let their kids take cash to school for the "Book Fair" because the kids would always come home with a pile of garbage and no books.

Posted by: Elinor, Who Usually Looks Lurkily at October 18, 2015 11:28 AM (NqQAS)

155 Since Polidori has been mentioned with vampires.

From Christopher Frayling's book Vampyres: Lord Byron to Count Dracula.

"Clearly, the vampire theme lends itself very well to an exploration of relationships - political and social, as well as psychological. Hegel's master-slave dialectic could, as we have seen, be rewritten as a vampire relationship which is equally degrading for both parties." pg80-81.

Posted by: Anna Puma at October 18, 2015 11:29 AM (IjmeC)

156 LAT headline is Obama Gives Up on Wars He Inherited.

Lefties never effing stop....
Posted by: Bruce With a Wang! at October 18, 2015 11:26 AM (iQIUe)


Funny, I was walking past a tv earlier this week, one of the networks was saying how Obama was going to now leave troops in Afghanistan well past 2016, and sent X number of troops BACK to Iraq...


What is the truth? Does anyone really know what this Administration is up to, when it comes to these battle fronts?

Posted by: BurtTC at October 18, 2015 11:30 AM (Dj0WE)

157 Read 'REAMDE' by Neil Stephenson this week.

Also re-read 'the Slow Regard of Silent Rhings' bynPatrick Rothfuss. And most of 'Hound...'.

Posted by: Garrett at October 18, 2015 11:30 AM (EJ1r7)

158 Hillary! would make a good vampire.

Posted by: The Great White Snark at October 18, 2015 11:31 AM (Nwg0u)

159 My favorite part of HoB is the old manuscript narrative about Sir Hugo.

Just as a stand alone supernatural spook story it is great.

Posted by: the guy that moves pianos for a living... at October 18, 2015 11:31 AM (tEDMc)

160 >>From Drudge: Amazon suing fake reviewers.

The article didn't make clear what kind of "fake" reviewers they were targeting - are these people who work in the industry who write glowing reviews to boost a book's sales, or the ideological ones who, like trolls, give poor reviews to books written by people who espouse the wrong ideas?

On a side note, you had mentioned Chelsea Clinton's book in a thread a few weeks ago, and despite poor reviews, it is an Amazon bestseller. Have to wonder if Hillary is making donors purchase it, or worse, it's being purchased by all the public schools. Is anything not a scam with these grifters?

Posted by: Daryl Dixon at October 18, 2015 11:32 AM (NOIQH)

161 45, JTB, sometimes our choir director has the basses just sing the chant on one very low note (I think it's just one). Gives the whole thing an organ feel which is nothing short of delicious.

Posted by: Tonestaple at October 18, 2015 11:33 AM (dCTrv)

162 BurtTC, this particular yoot IS rebelling against the oppressive left. Not sure about everybody else, but I can't stand it when people tell me how to think.

On a similar note, I re-read The Comprachicos by Ayn Rand last week, which is about the problems of 'progressive' education. Weird how her stuff is depressing and hopeful at the same time. I always come away with the feeling that I can do anything, simply because I have a brain and I'm willing to use it. But that essay is still really depressing; I was the ostracized loner in school who didn't understand the 'mob mentality' that infects little children. I just wanted to be left alone to read books and build towns of blocks, not do group projects. So I completely get what the author was trying to say.

Posted by: right wing whippersnapper-quietly rebellious at October 18, 2015 11:34 AM (26lkV)

163 OM, when I hear the name Polidori, I think of Tim Powers' novel The Stress of Her Regard, which pulls together the Romantic poets, the myth of the Lamia, vampire stories and Byron's summer in Switzerland with Percy Shelley, Mary Shelley, and Polidori.
When I read it I thought it might be a must read for any English major. Now, I am not so sure.

Powers' earlier books were looser and more flamboyant. His later books become a bit... overly plotted, in that he takes a variety of historical and factual elements and seems to turn them into a supernatural conspiracy theory.

The problem of conspiracy theories is that the DON'T LEAD ANYWHERE.

Posted by: Kindltot at October 18, 2015 11:35 AM (3pRHP)

164 Something about the arrival of fall puts me in a re-reading mood. Lately I've been re-reading Rex Stout's Nero Wolfe books; this last week, I skipped a straight chronological approach in favor of re-reading two favorites: Before Midnight and And Be A Villain. It may not be a coincidence that each contains a character that I suspect Stout had a lot of fun portraying: Gertrude Frazzee, an anti-cosmetics campaigner in the former ("What is your opinion of women who stink themselves up with decayed tumors?") and Nancylee Shepherd, teenage radio fan, in the latter ("Oh yes! She's simply utterly!").

Also reread Richard Kadrey's Sandman Slim series. These books can seem sort of lightweight on first read, but they reward re-reading much more than I would have expected. If, of course, you are not offended by the warped theological universe presented in the books.

Posted by: Splunge at October 18, 2015 11:39 AM (iMxBJ)

165 . . .It also provided a first exposure to Shirley Jackson and many others now forgotten. The day those books arrived was exciting and a Big Deal. . . .

Shirley Jackson must be one of the most underrated 20th century writers. Oddly, her 'Life Among the Savages' is my absolute favorite. Her prose is so carefully crafted it is poetry.

I grew up across the street from our Public Library. The elderly ladies in charge at the time would wait for me at the door to let me in. Mom said she had bags under her eyes to even somewhat keep up with what I was reading -- the ladies would call if they were worried that I was reading something too 'advanced' -- but Mom always said that she would not censor.

Why won't the so-called 'Progressives' treat The Lottery and The Giver as cautionary -- like 1984 and Brave New World? SMH

Posted by: mustbequantum at October 18, 2015 11:39 AM (MIKMs)

166 That would make a great comedy skit: a flatulent vampire who awakened his potential victims before he got to the bed. Count Flatula.
He could team up with Franks&bean's monster.

Posted by: andycanuck at October 18, 2015 11:40 AM (m1pMI)

167 57, Naturalfake, the word "suffragette" invariably reminds me of this: http://tinyurl.com/q4stb52

Posted by: Tonestaple at October 18, 2015 11:41 AM (dCTrv)

168 I've been reading a lot of ancient history lately, a very well written book is "The Roman Army, a History 753 BC - AD 476" by Patricia Southern. Massive and detailed but accessible and readable.

Finally ordered a set of the HBO production of "Rome". The first 5 minutes is awesome. The Centurion Lucius Vorenus leads his men in battle against the Gauls. An accurate depiction of the Roman Army in battle, far removed from Hollywood's typical wild melee nosh pits. Legionnaire Titus Pullo must be one of the biggest badasses on film, but he acts without thinking which causes no end of trouble. Roman politics was very dangerous, choose your side wisely Highly recommended video series if you're interested in the era.

Posted by: JHW at October 18, 2015 11:43 AM (w+zdY)

169 Suffragette always makes me think of this, actually

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zLnPd7lzT4g

Posted by: Kindltot at October 18, 2015 11:43 AM (3pRHP)

170 Why won't the so-called 'Progressives' treat The Lottery and The Giver as cautionary -- like 1984 and Brave New World? SMH



Posted by: mustbequantum at October 18, 2015 11:39 AM (MIKMs)
Because they see themselves in the driver's seat, making everyone else jump to their commands. Sane people, on the other hand, realize that, for every 'driver', there must be a dozen 'drivees', and that each of us is more likely to become the oppressed, not the oppressor. Odd how most of these people went to schools where they were taught about 'do unto others', sharing, fairness, etc, yet they live their lives exactly the opposite.

Posted by: right wing whippersnapper-quietly rebellious at October 18, 2015 11:43 AM (26lkV)

171 The problem of conspiracy theories is that the DON'T LEAD ANYWHERE.


Posted by: Kindltot


*****

That's exactly what THEY want you to conclude!



**casts furtive glance over shoulder**

Posted by: Seamus Muldoon at October 18, 2015 11:44 AM (mvenn)

172 162 BurtTC, this particular yoot IS rebelling against the oppressive left. Not sure about everybody else, but I can't stand it when people tell me how to think.

Posted by: right wing whippersnapper-quietly rebellious at October 18, 2015 11:34 AM (26lkV)


Glad to hear it. And I cannot recommend "The Comprachicos" highly enough. It is one of her most important nonfiction essays.

Posted by: rickl at October 18, 2015 11:44 AM (sdi6R)

173 Powers' earlier books were looser and more flamboyant. His later books become a bit... overly plotted, in that he takes a variety of historical and factual elements and seems to turn them into a supernatural conspiracy theory.
Posted by: Kindltot at October 18, 2015 11:35 AM (3pRHP)


Yes, finding the missing supernatural story inside historical events is pretty much his technique, or so he's said in interviews. Your thought about degree of plotting is interesting, but I'm having trouble aligning it with the books. Declare matches your description, but is IMO one of his very best. Expiration Date, on the other hand, struck me as somewhat under-plotted, and therefore a bit directionless.

Posted by: Splunge at October 18, 2015 11:44 AM (iMxBJ)

174 Count Flatula's curse is to give his victims undying farts?

Posted by: Anna Puma at October 18, 2015 11:46 AM (IjmeC)

175 #1. His imaginary bear friend is his therapy bear who offers advice.
And he's from the Delaware Valley. (Him; not the imaginary bear. It's from the "desert".)

Posted by: andycanuck at October 18, 2015 11:46 AM (m1pMI)

176 The article didn't make clear what kind of "fake" reviewers they were targeting - are these people who work in the industry who write glowing reviews to boost a book's sales, or the ideological ones who, like trolls, give poor reviews to books written by people who espouse the wrong ideas?
Posted by: Daryl Dixon at October 18, 2015 11:32 AM (NOIQH)


At some point, I saw an article that made the sequence of events clear:
(1) British newspaper gets a ghost-written book to the top of some Amazon best-seller list by hiring some organization that posts fake reviews
(2) Amazon announces that they're going after fake reviewers.
So "putting reviewers-for-hire out of business" seems to be the focus.

Posted by: Splunge at October 18, 2015 11:48 AM (iMxBJ)

177 That would make a great comedy skit: a flatulent vampire who awakened his potential victims before he got to the bed. Count Flatula.
He could team up with Franks&bean's monster.
Posted by: andycanuck at October 18, 2015 11:40 AM (m1pMI)


Back in the day, when SNL was actually funny, they did a skit with Dracula asking people the risk questions to determine their possible HIV status.


I want to say Walken was the Count, but maybe that's just me merging memories of stuff from their heyday.

Posted by: BurtTC at October 18, 2015 11:49 AM (Dj0WE)

178 WIKI:
While Ferlinghetti has expressed that he is "an anarchist at heart," he concedes that the world would need to be populated by "saints" in order for pure anarchism to be lived practically. Hence he espouses what can be achieved by Scandinavian-style democratic socialism.


So, he'd PREFER no gummint at all, but figures the best he can get is some good old socialism.All the counter-culture douchebags are really just commies at heart.

Posted by: Pappy O'Daniel at October 18, 2015 11:51 AM (oVJmc)

179 BurtTC: I think James Woods played Dracula in that skit.

Posted by: PabloD at October 18, 2015 11:51 AM (BcOEh)

180 I found this when I searched SBS -

http://tinyurl.com/q8a5q3r

Hopping in the Wayback Machine...

Posted by: BackwardsBoy at October 18, 2015 11:51 AM (LUgeY)

181 I want to say Walken was the Count, but maybe that's just me merging memories of stuff from their heyday.

Posted by: BurtTC at October 18, 2015 11:49 AM (Dj0WE)

*****

James Woods, maybe?

Posted by: Elinor, Who Usually Looks Lurkily at October 18, 2015 11:51 AM (NqQAS)

182 Among what city leaders said were troubling remarks in the fire chief's
book was a description of homosexuality as a "perversion" akin to
bestiality and pederasty.




Orwell was right: In a time of universal deceit, telling the truth is a revolutionary act.

Posted by: Jay Guevara at October 18, 2015 11:52 AM (oKE6c)

183 Count Spatula cannot make heads or tails of your gassy premise, and finds the gravitational pull between humor and horror leads to an unwieldy flip-flop. But, he supposes, you must break a few literary eggs to make an omelet. Or a pancake. Or French Toast. With a side of sausage.

Posted by: Count Spatula at October 18, 2015 11:52 AM (qjyQp)

184 Posted by: rickl at October 18, 2015 11:44 AM (sdi6R)

A lady that I work with has a toddler, and I recommended The Comprachicos to her, after she asked me- the childless twenty something- for advice on teaching her daughter how to think rationally. It was a weird conversation- she's a knee-jerk liberal, so she actually said to me, "Whippersnapper, I hate talking with you! You make me think about things that I've always thought were true!"

I proceeded to explain to her that she shouldn't live in a bubble because how would she teach her kid to think about the world if SHE doesn't bother to think? And this is an otherwise intelligent person in her early forties. So I told her to read The Comprachicos, but I have the feeling she'll try it and give up. Grr.

Posted by: right wing whippersnapper-quietly rebellious at October 18, 2015 11:54 AM (26lkV)

185 153 ... Scholastic Book Service must be it. I don't recall anything offered besides books. Apparently, they have expanded their offerings a lot. Funny, I can't remember it being offered after third grade. But it was the start of a book accumulating addiction that has only gotten worse over the decades.

Posted by: JTB at October 18, 2015 11:55 AM (FvdPb)

186 I want to say Walken was the Count, but maybe that's just me merging memories of stuff from their heyday.

Posted by: BurtTC at October 18, 2015 11:49 AM (Dj0WE)

*****

James Woods, maybe?
Posted by: Elinor, Who Usually Looks Lurkily at October 18, 2015 11:51 AM (NqQAS)


Yes! Even better...


https://vimeo.com/43187299

Posted by: BurtTC at October 18, 2015 11:56 AM (Dj0WE)

187 Posted by: BackwardsBoy at October 18, 2015 11:51 AM (LUgeY)

***

Thank you for that! Brought back lots of memories!

Posted by: Elinor, Who Usually Looks Lurkily at October 18, 2015 11:56 AM (NqQAS)

188 >>>Drudge has weird headlines. I'm a Giants fan so I
like Eli Manning, and I respect his brother Peyton. But who cares if
they are supporting Jeb!! Will the vote of one NFL fan change because
of that?

Posted by: JoeF. at October 18, 2015 11:21 AM (Nao8N)<<<

You'd think in that massive melon of mine there'd be a brain for things other than memorizing a playbook.


And Eli... well, everyone knows he's retarded.



Posted by: Peyton Manning at October 18, 2015 11:59 AM (lqmAz)

189 Count Blastula - A Vampire Ghost / Revenge story about a Vampire who was aborted and parted out by Planned Parenthood?

Posted by: Garrett at October 18, 2015 12:01 PM (EJ1r7)

190 161 ... I recall the basses sometimes provided a 'drone' effect. I can still do a decent impression of a tuba and string bass and, on a good day, a double bassoon. Not exactly a talent in high demand. I suspect my range tops out at middle C these days.

Posted by: JTB at October 18, 2015 12:01 PM (FvdPb)

191 Posted by: Count Spatula at October 18, 2015 11:52 AM (qjyQp)

****

I can see why the critics all panned your book.

Posted by: Seamus Muldoon at October 18, 2015 12:02 PM (mvenn)

192 https://vimeo.com/43187299

Posted by: BurtTC at October 18, 2015 11:56 AM (Dj0WE)


Hilarious! Thank you for the link.

Posted by: OregonMuse at October 18, 2015 12:03 PM (q3+zJ)

193 Count Uvula- in human form he yodels in full throat, striking fear in the hearts of men and women. At night he hangs suspended upside-down from the back of your throat.

Posted by: Seamus Muldoon at October 18, 2015 12:05 PM (mvenn)

194 The terrifying tale of a plasterer who embeds blood-draining spirits in tiny holes in his victims' walls.

Posted by: Count Spacula at October 18, 2015 12:11 PM (JfN61)

195 Count Bakula -- A vampire scientist jumps through time, inhabiting the body of another person until he sets something right... all the while fighting his insatiable thirst for blood.

Posted by: definitely not the guy who starred in Quantum Leap at October 18, 2015 12:12 PM (lqmAz)

196 A monster who rises from his coffin, puts on a fabulous dress, and parties all night.

Posted by: Count Dragula at October 18, 2015 12:13 PM (AOCjz)

197 180 ... Some of those covers look about right. I recall there were a number of sports books for boys. And I believe that is where I got my copy of "101 Elephant Jokes", so it wasn't all high falutin'. I probably drove my parents nuts telling them about that new level of sophisticated humor. The sad part is I remember a few of the jokes.

Posted by: JTB at October 18, 2015 12:13 PM (FvdPb)

198 "Screwtape Letters" by C.S. Lewis.

"...will the architects and enablers of the new oppression ever be called to
account for their cultural tyranny by a new Angry Young Poet?"

That's one I've been wondering about, too. It's not like there's no hypocritical Leftists or victims of their ideology to write a song or poem about. When does the screw turn the other way?

Posted by: saltlick at October 18, 2015 12:15 PM (sanAo)

199 Since it's October, I re-read some Neil Gaiman short stories this week. Dude can write, that's for sure. Plus while I'm sure he's a foolish Lefty in politics, he does have a refreshing British-style impatience for the PC police. He titled his most recent collection (not the one I was reading) _Trigger Warnings_, which is the best subtle literary raised middle finger I've seen in a while.

Posted by: Trimegistus at October 18, 2015 12:16 PM (AOCjz)

200 Can someone please help me with a book search?
The author I recall was a Palestinian ..
The book was How to Stab a Jooo.
I asked the local Librarian yesterday for a search and nothing turned up..

Posted by: ACE Trackingking cookies co at October 18, 2015 12:17 PM (S1WrL)

201 Back when SNL was funny -- How about the Frank Zappa/Don Pardo duet of "I Am The Slime" (from your video)? One of my favorites. http://bit.ly/XxBwS4

I saw Zappa and the Mothers in concert round about 1968. Quite an experience.

Posted by: doug at October 18, 2015 12:18 PM (+XemL)

202 As per a fetish of mine, I'd like to see Count Mucula. He visits sleeping women with colds and ... you know. Or count Sonny Side Eggula, with yelliw egg yolk dribbling off his fangs and down his chin, instead of blood.

Posted by: Bruce Boehner at October 18, 2015 12:18 PM (Fv3UZ)

203 Splunge, his Fisher King series bothered me, but it goes back to my view on conspiracy theories and eccentric behavior and that strain of OCD that I have.

First, I don't like struggling to placate powerful uninterested forces that I have no control over and can't escape. I realize this a major element in a lot of fiction, especially horror and dark fantasy, but it gets old. The element of Declare was to prevent the bad guys from getting access to such forces, and that was interesting, but the whole McGuffin of the book pissed me off.

Also If you talk to eccentric people, like the sort that think potatoes are the miracle food and live on nothing but potatoes and research them and ignore everything else because it isn't potatoes and have a fairly successful career because they have found a niche that allows them to work with potatoes, you come to realize fairly quickly that there is more to life than potatoes.

To my eye, the Fisher King books did this and became a medium to string together historical facts, (like some OCD James Burke) without a goal or an outside purpose, not even a reflection on what it means about where we are, or where we are going. The plot defaults to the struggle becomes everything, without end, and without any reward other than a little more existence.

I felt that there should be more than this.

I am not saying that I don't like his work. I really even liked Epitaph in Rust (Laser Books!) and loved Dinner at Deviants Palace, and I liked the Fisher King stuff too, in spite of that series' tone of "chips on the flood" fatalism. There is some really clever stuff there.
But at a point I had enough, and it irritates me because if it weren't for that I would want to read more.

Posted by: Kindltot at October 18, 2015 12:20 PM (3pRHP)

204 >>That's one I've been wondering about, too. It's not like there's no hypocritical Leftists or victims of their ideology to write a song or poem about. When does the screw turn the other way?


Probably not going to be in the form of poetry - more likely video, such as South Park.

Posted by: Lizzy at October 18, 2015 12:20 PM (NOIQH)

205 Bought the home inspection book. I don't own a home, but that strikes me as just the sort of esoteric information that might come in handy someday.

Posted by: Oschisms at October 18, 2015 12:21 PM (ZsN9X)

206 Can we haz some elbows? Football be comings up.

Posted by: Nip Sip at October 18, 2015 12:21 PM (jJRIy)

207 Drudge has weird headlines. I'm a Giants fan so I
like Eli Manning, and I respect his brother Peyton. But who cares if they are supporting Jeb!! Will the vote of one NFL fan change because of that?

Posted by: JoeF. at October 18, 2015 11:21 AM (Nao8N)

_____________

We live a LIV world. Shit like this unfortunately matters.

Posted by: Monsieur Mew Mew at October 18, 2015 12:23 PM (0LHZx)

208 So this is more journalism than book-writing, but I stumbled across this and it nails a lot of current verbal tricks employed by journalists in an entertaining way. Of course, the example at the end is a Lefty one, but it could just as easily be a about a violence in Israel.

http://www.mcsweeneys.net/articles/an-interactive-guide-to-ambiguous-grammar

Posted by: Lizzy at October 18, 2015 12:24 PM (NOIQH)

209 a description of homosexuality as a "perversion" akin to bestiality and pederasty

What was upsetting was not equating homosex with bestiality and pederasty, but rather saying that any of the three were a perversion.

Posted by: tenterama at October 18, 2015 12:26 PM (9mTYi)

210 If only McClure moved a bit, you could see Dylan's elbow. Dylan was portayed by a woman in his biopic.

Now why would Roberta consent to such a portrayal? It's almost as if she had some secret she wanted to tell us.

Posted by: Caitlyn Jenner at October 18, 2015 12:26 PM (Fv3UZ)

211 _Declare_ is one of my favorite books, for several reasons.

First, it's incredibly well-written. It works as both a spy thriller and a fantasy, and the building-a-ship-in-a-bottle aspect of fitting the whole thing into actual 20th Century history is masterful.

Second, because it doesn't ignore the elephant in the room that so much modern-day fantasy tiptoes around: Christianity. There's none of the multiculti "all myths are real" bullshit, or the solipsistic "if you believe it, you make it true" nonsense. No, the things they're fighting are (at best) fallen angels, and at least one plot moment can only be explained as a miracle.

If there's one weak point in the story, it's the hero, who could be more charismatic. I think that making him a kind of gray, forgettable person was deliberate -- his Evil Twin had all the charisma -- but some leavening of eccentricity would have helped.

Posted by: Trimegistus at October 18, 2015 12:28 PM (AOCjz)

212 Know what I mean, Vern?

Posted by: Varney the Vampyre at October 18, 2015 12:30 PM (9Fc79)

213 John Scalzi has fizzled out. I have a hard time believing it is the same writer. The brain in the box stuff has no redeeming features. Every time you think you might get an uplift he kills off another good character on stage. Good writers always do that offstage. I think Scalzi has started to hate people who read his books.

Posted by: sf reader at October 18, 2015 12:33 PM (PGh+Q)

214 Count Crackula-

Lives in the Holland Tunnel and will...uh...suck your essence out for one rock, just one little rock. You got a rock?


Posted by: naturalfake at October 18, 2015 12:35 PM (0cMkb)

215 I think Scalzi has started to hate people who read his books.

Posted by: sf reader at October 18, 2015 12:33 PM (PGh+Q)

*****

Sadly, ^^^this.

Posted by: Elinor, Who Usually Looks Lurkily at October 18, 2015 12:38 PM (NqQAS)

216 A vampire with incredibly bad dental hygiene (possibly British) terrorizes a convention of dentists.

Posted by: Count Plaqueula at October 18, 2015 12:40 PM (lqmAz)

217 Sherlock Holmes Was Wrong by Bayard.

this sounds fun ...

I got a copy of Sherlock {hemlock - auto cucumber?!?} Holmes stories to see how the new Sherlock series melded and parted. The Study in Scarlett v. the Study in Pink is fun to compare. Their Hound is quite good I think ...

Posted by: Adriane the Literary Critic ... at October 18, 2015 12:43 PM (qOsoH)

218 Count Barackula - a vein, small-time spoiled hack with an arrogant sense of undeserved self-entitlement preys upon the greatest civilization in history. Despite having no talent or skills, his rein of terror seems endless.

Posted by: goatexchange at October 18, 2015 12:45 PM (+IrMF)

219 Well if Scalzi is starting to hate his fans, let's hope he avoids Appin Dungannon's fate.

Posted by: Anna Puma at October 18, 2015 12:48 PM (IjmeC)

220 >>>What was upsetting was not equating homosex with bestiality and pederasty, but rather saying that any of the three were a perversion.Posted by: tenterama


I think mayor Nakeem is some kind of deviated prevert.

But I've stopped worrying and love the 'bama.

Posted by: Col. Bat Guano at October 18, 2015 12:48 PM (Fv3UZ)

221 A vampire terrorizes a convention of feminists by tugging on his crouch and doing a package check before he goes for the jugular. Happens in a flash, quicker than you can say "Trigger warning!"

Posted by: Count Sacula at October 18, 2015 12:49 PM (P8951)

222 178 WIKI:
While Ferlinghetti has expressed that he is "an anarchist at heart," he concedes that the world would need to be populated by "saints" in order for pure anarchism to be lived practically. Hence he espouses what can be achieved by Scandinavian-style democratic socialism.

So, he'd PREFER no gummint at all, but figures the best he can get is some good old socialism.All the counter-culture douchebags are really just commies at heart.

Posted by: Pappy O'Daniel at October 18, 2015 11:51 AM (oVJmc)


This is more of a Fundamental Concepts discussion, but the main thing to remember is that anarchist is a like the word "sauce". It needs the modifier that lets you know what is being talked about, and the lefties love to leave that modifier off to be hidden and vague so they can tell you how you are wrong.

The original social anarchists believed that the goal was to make everyone equal in all things, all possessions, and all access. They saw the first step in taking away all controls and the established orders of kings and royalty and governance. Hence, Anarchists.

Then, since people aren't saints, and there is favoritism in distribution of goods and benefits - say preferentially to your children and family, and to people who are adept at doing something for you - a mechanism had to be created to enforce this equality.

The social anarchists, the true anarcho-socialists are outgrowths of the socialism/communism movements originating in the late 1800s. In many ways it is the exact same philosophy, with the only argument as to whether the state should be set up to enforce the new socialist mind-set on society, or if the state should be set up because the new socialist mind-set is not being accepted willingly by the society.

Ferlingehetti is in no way an Anarcho-captialist, and would probably be insulted if you assumed that he were.

Good great Ghu, I type a lot. I am wordy. Sorry.

Posted by: Kindltot at October 18, 2015 12:51 PM (3pRHP)

223 Thanks to you, the readers, and the overwhelming success of Count Plaqueula, I am proud to present the sequel Nosferatooth.

Posted by: the author of Count Plaqueula at October 18, 2015 12:52 PM (lqmAz)

224 Schlock Homes was a pretty good parody.

"Inspector Balustrade, do not rail at me!" Not Muldoon level, but close.

Posted by: Bruce Boehner at October 18, 2015 12:52 PM (Fv3UZ)

225 I am not saying that I don't like his work. I really even liked Epitaph in Rust (Laser Books!) and loved Dinner at Deviants Palace, and I liked the Fisher King stuff too, in spite of that series' tone of "chips on the flood" fatalism. There is some really clever stuff there.
But at a point I had enough, and it irritates me because if it weren't for that I would want to read more.
Posted by: Kindltot at October 18, 2015 12:20 PM (3pRHP)


Have you read The Anubis Gates or The Drawing of the Dark? In both of those, an important part of the protagonist's struggle is to escape inevitability.

Posted by: Splunge at October 18, 2015 12:59 PM (iMxBJ)

226 "Inspector Balustrade, do not rail at me!"


***

Heh. Don't ever get into a stairing contest with Inspector Balustrade! The results could be treadful.

Posted by: Seamus Muldoon at October 18, 2015 12:59 PM (mvenn)

227 Well if Scalzi is starting to hate his fans, let's hope he avoids Appin Dungannon's fate.

Maybe ... maybe he'd like to go out with a bang!

Just sayin'

Posted by: Adriane the Literary Critic ... at October 18, 2015 01:02 PM (qOsoH)

228 >>Heh. Don't ever get into a stairing contest with Inspector Balustrade! The results could be treadful.

Would it ascend you to the nuthouse or descend into laughter?

Posted by: Lizzy at October 18, 2015 01:03 PM (NOIQH)

229 Read Do Androids Dream Of Electric Sheep? by Philip K Dick, the basis for the Bladerunner movie. Pretty good, matches the film quite a bit though there's additional details that, it being PKD, are kinda trippy, and the ending is less dramatic.

Listened to Pawn Of Prophecy (Belgariad #1) by David Eddings, Very good classic YA fantasy, young farm boy had great destiny that he slowly learns about. Object of great magical power, which protects the land from attack by an ancient enemy, is stolen and may be used to allow this enemy to return. First book of this long series is a good introduction, has some exciting action but the main storyline is barely touched upon. Hope to continue with book two soon, though they're unfortunately not on Kindle.

Also read two short novels by Conrad, Youth and The Shadow-Line, both pretty good adventures of a young man on a ship in trouble (becalmed, storms, illness). Trying to complete all his books this year.

Posted by: waelse1 at October 18, 2015 01:06 PM (4MNTj)

230 Listened to Pawn Of Prophecy (Belgariad #1) by David Eddings,
Very good classic YA fantasy, young farm boy had great destiny that he
slowly learns about. Object of great magical power, which protects the
land from attack by an ancient enemy, is stolen and may be used to allow
this enemy to return. First book of this long series is a good
introduction, has some exciting action but the main storyline is barely
touched upon. Hope to continue with book two soon, though they're
unfortunately not on Kindle.

Posted by: waelse1 at October 18, 2015 01:06 PM (4MNTj)



They are available on Kindle but only in England. There is a war on among the children of the Eddings over copyright ownership.

Posted by: Vic-we have no party at October 18, 2015 01:11 PM (t2KH5)

231 Old bookplates - remember those?

http://www.collectorsweekly.com/articles/
when-book-lovers-guarded-their-prized-possessions-with-tiny-artworks/

Posted by: Lizzy at October 18, 2015 01:12 PM (NOIQH)

232 Excuse me while I rant a moment.

How the F*CK do people get so many damned reviews??? I've shopped my book out to reviewers, I've asked for reviews, I've posted information everywhere, I market the book the best I can, and I get this tiny trickle of (good) reviews. I look around at books, I see 20, 30 reviews, I have 6 on the book with the most. What the hell am I doing wrong???

Posted by: Christopher Taylor at October 18, 2015 01:17 PM (39g3+)

233
On a side note, you had mentioned Chelsea Clinton's book in a thread a few weeks ago, and despite poor reviews, it is an Amazon bestseller. Have to wonder if Hillary is making donors purchase it, or worse, it's being purchased by all the public schools. Is anything not a scam with these grifters?

Posted by: Daryl Dixon at October 18, 2015 11:32 AM (NOIQH)


Politicians writing books, and getting huge advances for them is an old scam, long used by those on the Left. Obama's books, anyone? People on the Left buy them so as to be seen to own them, not to read them. And the income so raised gives the politician some walking-around money, or riding limos-around money, as the case may be. It's not "officially" a campaign contribution, see?


Some politicians on the right do it, too, but I suspect they actually do write their own books.

Posted by: Alberta Oil Peon at October 18, 2015 01:17 PM (0yhH4)

234 I rarely buy books because A) I'm cheap, and B) I can usually get what I want from the library free. I like free. I'm a big fan of free.


However, I did spring for the Moody Bible Commentary, which arrived just a couple of days ago. It's about 2200 pages in length and I got it at half-price because I'm a regular supporter of the Moody Bible Institute in Chicago, founded by D.L. Moody in 1886.


The main editors of the commentary (which covers the entire Bible) are Dr. Michael Rydelnik, Professor of Jewish Studies at Moody, and himself a Christian of Jewish descent, and Michael VanLaningham, Professor of Bible. These two professors occasionally lead tours to Israel, which I hope to be able to join one day.


I have not begun to dig into it as yet as it unfortunately came at the same time as the Cubs playoffs. What that says about my spiritual life, I will leave for you to decide.


I got my copy through Moody Publishing, but I believe it is also available on Amazon.

Posted by: grammie winger, Psalm 27:1 at October 18, 2015 01:20 PM (dFi94)

235 Yeah people buy crates full of books from leftists as a dodge to donate money to them. They don't care, I mean how many boxes of books were found stored in a Congress basement room one time for a Democrat? Its the same way they game the NYT bestseller list by going to the specific stores that the NYT uses for their list and buying bunches of that book to make it seem like its selling well. Cheap advertising, really.

Posted by: Christopher Taylor at October 18, 2015 01:22 PM (39g3+)

236 >>I got my copy through Moody Publishing, but I believe it is also available on Amazon.


That looks like a good resource, grammie!

Posted by: Lizzy at October 18, 2015 01:26 PM (NOIQH)

237 232 - Chris, I feel the pain. I've done the same, begged the fans (yes, I have a handful!) and people that I sell books to at events to post reviews. I think that the first of my novels has a whole whopping fifteen reviews ... which are all 4s and 5s, which I do appreciate, but if there's a magic trick to getting reviews, I don't know it either.

Posted by: Sgt. Mom at October 18, 2015 01:29 PM (95iDF)

238 Regarding the Moody Bible Commentary --

I have only heard good things about the work they do on textual analysis and general do-goodery, even in my agnostic bubble. In the top of my cabinet I have an old copy of Asimov's guide to the Bible -- time to take that down and read (only skimmed the first time).

As a general question, I would like to know why we have so few polymaths now. Is it our educational systems? Asimov is one of those outrageously talented and interested/interesting people who worked across the narrow specializations. How many more are there.

Posted by: mustbequantum at October 18, 2015 01:31 PM (MIKMs)

239 I come for a picture of a beautiful library. I get a photo of a bunch of scuzzy, smelly radicals.

Posted by: Tuna at October 18, 2015 01:31 PM (JSovD)

240 yes, I liked Drawing of the Dark very much, and Anubis Gates. (Anubis Gates is the reason I tried researching in the research stacks for Ashbless' other works)

I don't know what the point was that I had trouble. Maybe Expiration Date. I think that was the point that I didn't understand what was going on and I didn't see any chance of figuring it out, and so I wasn't so committed to go on to find out what was going to happen, because I suspected I wouldn't understand it anyways.

This is just my opinion, by the way.

Posted by: Kindltot at October 18, 2015 01:35 PM (3pRHP)

241 138
Absolutely! We also had book fairs. They were usually held in the gym. I was always so excited when those came around every year.

Posted by: Tuna at October 18, 2015 01:45 PM (JSovD)

242 Here's a beautiful library. It's from a seminary; It has parquet flowers, wrought iron railings and a picture in the very back which says something "Rev_______" and his dates-saying something like a "A servant of the Gospel who died in the pulpit."

It's just one of the libraries you feel good going into because it's lovely and particularly so if you have an interest in theology, the Dutch Reformed Church (now Reformed Church in America) and a history of the Dutch in NJ and NY

http://tinyurl.com/p3cqnyf

Posted by: FenelonSpoke at October 18, 2015 01:47 PM (GERXL)

243 Currently reading 'Battle of Wits, The Complete Story of Codebreaking in World War II.

This was a Moron-recommended purchase, and a hat tip to the whichever of you suggested it. Sorry I do not recall, but remind me if you read this.

A wonderful book. Even though I was familiar with the various code-breaking efforts, this book provides a great deal of insight into the individuals and specific methods employed. AAA+++

Posted by: Mike Hammer, etc., etc. at October 18, 2015 01:47 PM (9mTYi)

244 Reading School of Darkness by Bella Dodd and am about 60 percent done. It shows how *organized* the statist push to subjugate the U.S. has been for over a century which gives me very little hope of our being able to undo the damage without a miracle. Conversely, it show that the internal secretiveness and paranoia of the leadership can also cause I high level of disarray so the situation isn't actually hopeless, only dire.


Posted by: Polliwog the 'Ette at October 18, 2015 11:01 AM (GDulk)

This was my intro to Bella Dodd -- and the info that US Catholic seminaries had been infiltrated by the commies: http://bit.ly/Jzaw6k

Posted by: RushBabe at October 18, 2015 01:51 PM (/NEnw)

245 Picked up Infidel by Ayaan Hirsi Ali when it was on sale a few weeks back. Fascinating. Highly recommended.

Posted by: Anachronda at October 18, 2015 01:58 PM (o78gS)

246 Robert Macfarlane, Landmarks

Posted by: Feh at October 18, 2015 01:58 PM (Uk9e2)

247 next up is Ferguson on Kissinger

Posted by: Feh at October 18, 2015 02:00 PM (Uk9e2)

248 223
Thanks to you, the readers, and the overwhelming success of Count Plaqueula, I am proud to present the sequel Nosferatooth.

Sounds like the sort of thing Lemming of the BDA would enjoy.

Posted by: Anachronda at October 18, 2015 02:01 PM (o78gS)

249 232 Excuse me while I rant a moment.

How the F*CK do people get so many damned reviews??? I've shopped my book out to reviewers, I've asked for reviews, I've posted information everywhere, I market the book the best I can, and I get this tiny trickle of (good) reviews. I look around at books, I see 20, 30 reviews, I have 6 on the book with the most. What the hell am I doing wrong???
-----------
Not sure that you're doing anything wrong except acting ethically. That does, of course, put you at a disadvantage.

Insty had a 'book in the mail' today - A Beginner's Guide to Paradise: 9 Steps to Giving Up Everything - published 9/1//15 with 41 reviews already. A bunch came from NetGalley, but their fee is much too high for a indy-publisher like me. I checked into the 'Verified Purchaser' group - most of those folks had a single review up, for this book, which makes me think that the major publishers are playing fast and loose with the rules, too.

A small trad publisher release that I reviewed (Pandora's Gun, YA sci-fi, James Van Pelt) was pretty good. Still, it only has a total of five reviews because the cost of 'acquiring' (buying) reviews is so high.

I do a fair number of book reviews, mostly in a narrow niche, though I'm starting to branch out a bit. Every little bit helps, like Anna Puma above sharing links to everyone's books.

Posted by: Long Running Fool at October 18, 2015 02:02 PM (L0bUn)

250 #205 Oschisms -

Thanks! Let me know what you think. I designed it to be an easy-to-use guide - and to make my day job easier! An 800 page monstrosity would never get read.

Posted by: Long Running Fool at October 18, 2015 02:04 PM (L0bUn)

251 Also if you do a bing search for Admont Abbey Library which is apparently the largest monastic library in the world, it's beautiful. Good to take a look before it gets taken over by Radical Islam and only Muslims can view it.

Posted by: FenelonSpoke at October 18, 2015 02:04 PM (GERXL)

252 The books that get given away on goodreads seem to get reviews ... I don't know if you can do ebooks on their giveaways though.

Posted by: @votermom at October 18, 2015 02:08 PM (cbfNE)

253 Speaking of reviews, wish there was an option to copy Goodreads reviews into Amazon. I review books I've read in Goodreads as a personal database but only rarely post them on Amazon.

Posted by: waelse1 at October 18, 2015 02:12 PM (4MNTj)

254 130
Back to writing now...Posted by: Sabrina Chase at October 18, 2015 11:10 AM (GG9V6)
Yay!

Posted by: Anachronda at October 18, 2015 02:28 PM (o78gS)

255 Purchased Captain Vorpatril's Alliance on the Kindle and started it already. The set up sounds like a trope in Regency romance so I'm curious to see how Bujold handles it in Sci-Fi.

I agree with whoever said earlier that she writes great prose and have already chuckled multiple times at her wording with only having read 3 percent.

Posted by: Polliwog the 'Ette at October 18, 2015 02:39 PM (GDulk)

256 Posted by: waelse1 at October 18, 2015 02:12 PM

I thought you could if your Amazon and goodreads are synced up.

Posted by: @votermom at October 18, 2015 03:19 PM (cbfNE)

257 @votermom, I know you can import your Amazon books into Goodreads but that doesn't sound desirable, it would just flood my Goodreads account with unread books.

Posted by: waelse1 at October 18, 2015 03:30 PM (HIg4l)

258 It's just one of the libraries you feel good going into because it's lovely and particularly so if you have an interest in theology, the Dutch Reformed Church (now Reformed Church in America) and a history of the Dutch in NJ and NY
http://tinyurl.com/p3cqnyf
Posted by: FenelonSpoke at October 18, 2015 01:47 PM

FS, where is said library? I have just such an interest as some of my ancestors were early settlers of the area.

Posted by: Farmer at October 18, 2015 03:43 PM (3hlFs)

259 For some undefined reason I am doing a review of business ethics, and I
ran across a discussion on Kant. Now, all I remember about Kant is that
he had monads and sought to get rid of them (life was hard before germ
theory)

But then I ran across this gem: [Kant] complains of 'fictitious forces fabricated at will,
which, not finding any obstacle in the principle of contradiction are
poured forth in multitudes by those of speculative mind."


Then I realize that the man predicted Trolls, fake followers on Twitter and false book reviews on Amazon. And Spammers.

Posted by: Kindltot at October 18, 2015 03:49 PM (3pRHP)

260 61
There is a teensy problem with the interpretation of the Star of
Bethlehem as a comet: In the ancient world, comets were almost
universally regarded as evil omens. They were more likely to
foretell the death of kings, not their birth. Not to mention wars,
plagues, famines, earthquakes, and you name it.



There is another book, first published around 2000, "The Star of
Bethlehem: The Legacy of the Magi" by Michael R. Molnar, who is a Ph.D.
in astronomy. I've been linking it around Christmastime for the last
few years.



https://tinyurl.com/ozzzedw



Despite being an astronomer, he offers an astrological
interpretation for the Star. Before about 1600, astronomy and astrology
were one and the same. The ancients studied the heavens for signs and
portents, and Molnar discovered that on April 17, 6 B.C. conditions
would have been ripe for a prediction of a great king born in Judea.



Molar's theory takes into account what people at the time would have
considered important, rather than a physical object that would appeal
to modern eyes. Note the blurbs from professional astronomers lavishing
praise on his astrological interpretation. You don't see that every
day.

ricki- that's sounds very interesting. Off to see if library has a copy...

Posted by: Charlotte at October 18, 2015 04:09 PM (I6BCJ)

261 249
232 Excuse me while I rant a moment.

Well, Amazon just sued 1500 "will review for pay""reviewers," so there's that...

Posted by: Richard McEnroe at October 18, 2015 05:03 PM (Kucy5)

262 Figures Adriane would get my reference.

Anyone use FundAnything?
http://fundanything.com/en

Posted by: Anna Puma at October 18, 2015 05:29 PM (IjmeC)

263 Reading The Great Gatsby and throughly enjoying it. It had been so long since having to read in high school. That Fitzgerald was screwed up but wrote a pretty good yarn.

Posted by: RGallegos at October 18, 2015 07:11 PM (49Jfq)

264

I have a chapter out in a recent book on archaeological economics, if anyone is interested in those sorts of things.

http://www.amazon.com/The-Ancient-Maya-Marketplace-Archaeology/dp/081650041X

"The Ancient Maya Marketplace"

It's an interesting book, an edited volume on the sea-change currently taking place in Native American archaeology, the recognition of complex economies deep in the American past. My own contribution is on the statistical analysis of ceramic frequencies in a ruined city in Guatemala.

Why does it matter? I mean, it's not a detective thriller, it's not science fiction... it's the analysis of market economics in Ancient America. It matters, because if we can identify and prove the existence of market forces in the Ancient American past, it means that such economic systems arise naturally out of any complex society. Maya civilization developed quite independently from the Old World.

Maybe it is a detective thriller?

Posted by: Keith Eppich at October 19, 2015 02:02 AM (IbaBH)

Posted by: Vic-we have no party at October 19, 2015 04:09 AM (t2KH5)

266 That is apparently one of Peter Orlovsky's brothers. Peter was Allen Ginsburg's longtime partner.

Posted by: somercet at October 27, 2015 04:03 AM (fNo7p)

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