Sunday Morning Book Thread 06-14-2015: Serious Cheese [OregonMuse]


cheeses.jpg
For That Special Ewok In Your Life

Good morning to all of you morons and moronettes and bartenders everywhere and all the ships at sea. Welcome to AoSHQ's stately, prestigious, internationally acclaimed and high-class Sunday Morning Book Thread. The only AoSHQ thread that is so hoity-toity, pants are required. Or kilts. Serious you guys. Kilts are OK, too. But not tutus. Unless you're a girl.


Books are better than TV. If you fall asleep, you don't miss the ending.
-Family Circus


TRIGGER WARNINGS: the AoSHQ book thread extols the virtues of Western Civilization in general and America in particular, considers a well-armed citizenry a much-neglected necessity, voting being a privilege, not a right, believes that the propagation of fake rape stories for the sake of a particular narrative is actually harmful to women, and indulges in promiscuous use of the word "guys".


The AoSHQ Book Club

Hey you guys! This is a reminder that the Ewok-In-Chief will be putting up his first regular book club thread later on today, about 7PM Eastern/4 PM Pacific, assuming he's conscious. A book club was suggested here a few months ago, but I really don't have time for it, so I'm glad ace has started one.

So the book you're supposed to be reading for the book club is The Crying of Lot 49 by Thomas Pynchon. The Amazon blurb says

The highly original satire about Oedipa Maas, a woman who finds herself enmeshed in a worldwide conspiracy, meets some extremely interesting characters and attains a not inconsiderable amount of self-knowledge.


The Big Cheese

And speaking of ace, since he kind of let on in a thread earlier this week that he's bi-curious about cheese, I figure there must be something he could read to whet his appetite. So maybe he could start out with something mild, like Mastering Cheese: Lessons for Connoisseurship from a Maître Fromager by Max McCalman:

After years of teaching courses for amateurs at the Artisanal Premium Cheese Center, where he is Dean of Curriculum, McCalman has developed a compelling set of classes for understanding and experiencing cheese. A full master's course in a book, Mastering Cheese covers the world of cheese in twenty-two distinct lessons, featuring tasting plates that deliciously demonstrate key topics. For example, a chapter titled "Stunning Stinkers" explains why some of the strongest-smelling cheeses can be among the best tasting and then recommends several stars of this category. Learn about the issues facing real raw-milk cheeses and then go out and taste the differences between these cheeses and those made with pasteurized milk.

So if ace wants to be a cheese connoisseur, it sounds like this book would be perfect for him.

The pastor of my church thought it would be fun to sample all of the cheeses mentioned in Monty Python's infamous Cheese Shop sketch (all except for "Venezuelan beaver cheese", which is a "joke cheese", kind of like "Biggus Dickus" is a joke name) and last week he served Limburger. It's actually quite a mild cheese and he told us that the bacteria that gives Limburger cheese its strong smell is the same bacteria that causes foot odor. Which makes me wonder who it was that decided that a stinky foot would make great cheese.

It tasted OK, but I could not get past the aroma.

But, many people like it, so I shouldn't make fun of it. One of the guys at church said his father enjoyed liverwurst and Limburger sandwiches for lunch every day. Which I think should be on one of those "I Dare You To Eat This" reality TV shows. Although it does have the advantage that your lunch is pretty much guaranteed that it will never be stolen.

Anyway, after that, ace would probably be ready for The Science of Cheese by Michael Tunick:

Today we know of more than 2,000 varieties of cheese from Gorgonzola, first noted in year 879, to Roquefort in 1070 to Cheddar in 1500. But Tunick delves deeper into the subject to provide a wide-ranging overview that begins with cows and milk and then covers the technical science behind creating a new cheese, milk allergies and lactose intolerance, nutrition and why cheese is a vital part of a balanced diet. The Science of Cheese is an entertaining journey through one of America's favorite foods.

Sounds yummy. Finally, perhaps he'd like something a little stronger and tangier, like Cheese and Culture: A History of Cheese and its Place in Western Civilization by Paul Kindstedt:

Behind every traditional type of cheese there is a fascinating story. By examining the role of the cheesemaker throughout world history and by understanding a few basic principles of cheese science and technology, we can see how different cheeses have been shaped by and tailored to their surrounding environment, as well as defined by their social and cultural context. Cheese and Culture endeavors to advance our appreciation of cheese origins by viewing human history through the eyes of a cheese scientist.


Big Brother Is Watching You

Hey you guys, I got 90% on this Test Your Knowledge of 1984 quiz. See how well you can do. It's only 10 questions, so it won't take very long.

The Martian -- Trailer

Many of you guys have read and enjoyed Andy Weir's novel The Martian. It was adapted to a screenplay and here's the trailer to the movie. I haven't read it, so I don't know if this trailer gives any indication of the faithfulness of the adaptation:


New Pratchett Novel

Title: The Shepherd's Crown:

The Shepherd's Crown is a forthcoming comic fantasy novel, and the last novel to be written by Terry Pratchett, set on the Discworld. It will be the fifth novel within the Discworld series to be based on the character of Tiffany Aching. It is to be published in the UK on 10th September 2015.

According to Sir Pratchett's daughter Rhianna, this will be the last Discworld novel:

The author, videogame and comics writer told a fan last week that her late father’s forthcoming novel, The Shepherd’s Crown, featuring teenage witch Tiffany Aching, would be the final Discworld book. And asked by a fan if she would be continuing the series herself, she ruled out the possibility.

“No. I’ll work on adaptations, spin-offs, maybe tie-ins, but the books are sacred to dad,” she wrote on Twitter. “That’s it. Discworld is his legacy. I shall make my own.”

She added: “To reiterate – no I don’t intend on writing more Discworld novels, or giving anyone else permission to do so.”

So, fin.

I will miss Captain Vimes and Corporal Carrot, my two favorite Discworld characters.


A YA Novel -- By Philip K. Dick?

Dick actually wrote this book quite some time ago:

Dick sent the manuscript to Doubleday in the late 1960s alongside his acclaimed time-slippage story for adults, Ubik, but his editor decided to decline. Nick and the Glimmung found a publisher in 1988, six years after its author's death, but slid out of print around 1990. A limited run was produced by the US publisher Subterranean Press in 2008, but has since sold out. Gollancz are now due to release a UK edition in September 2015.

The novel, Nick and the Glimmung, takes place on a futuristic earth where

pets are illegal, jobs are rationed, and school is taught in multiple classrooms by one teacher. Nick and his family face the Anti-Pet Man when news of their secret cat gets out. To save Horace, they leave Earth for Plowman's Planet, a 10-day journey into space. Awaiting them there are colonists caught between alien species, who are at war with each other. Nick encounters Glimmung, the most feared creature on the planet, who guards a book that tells the future.

It's funny, I read that plot description and I just know this is a PKD book without ever seeing his name.

Also, what would make this even more awesome would be if the audio CD version could be narrated by Christopher Walken. I'm not sure why, it just sounds appropriate. Unfortunately, they chose someone else.


Guess That Tweet

What famous author tweeted this:

"Where 99.3% of women report having been sexually harassed & rape is epidemic – Egypt – natural to inquire: what's the predominant religion?"

(a) Brad Thor
(b) Pamela Geller
(c) Michelle Malkin
(d) Joyce Carol Oates

Try to guess. As the poet E.L. Clickbait once said, the answer may surprise you.


You Guys Tired of Game of Thrones?

I'm not. Actually, that's because I never watch it. Mrs. Muse and I got about 75% through the very first episode, and after the 3rd barnyard sex scene, we said 'enough'. Whatever good points GoT may have, it's simply not worth picking through all of the crap to find. So I was mildly curious about this WaPo piece, If you’re burned out on ‘Game of Thrones,’ read these books.

This being a WaPo piece, you pretty much have to assume that the author is way left of center, so naturally she's going to be recommending books commensurate with her to-the-left values. With that in mind, she had a couple of interesting selections:

Kim Stanley Robinson's Mars trilogy...They're set in the future and concern the colonization of Mars, so the biggest animals in question are anaerobic bacteria that can find a foothold in the Martian landscape. But if you love getting lost in the details of a fictional universe, then these are the books for you.

Red Mars
Blue Mars
Green Mars

These are "hard" science fiction novels, so everything is made to sound as plausible as possible, and the scientific descriptions are pretty detailed. The 5-star Amazon reviews are enthralled by this, while the 1-stars complain of intense boredom and desperate need for better editing.

Another of her selections which sounds like it could be interesting is The Lions of al-Rassan by Guy Gavriel Kay. It's a one-off novel set in an alternate "fantasy" universe (no magic) that looks very much like medieval Spain:

Though the setting is the fictitious Al-Rassan, and there are passing references to the "Star-born," any ancillary connection with science fiction is almost irrelevant to the story. Kay provides insightful glimpses into the goals and motives of his many characters, including King Almalik of Cartada, his adviser Ammar ibn Khairan, a young soldier, Alvar de Pellino, and the compelling female physician Jehane...Studded with poetry that is evocative of Spain (some selections are reminiscent of El Cid), the story is buttressed with convincing cultural and social details and descriptions of medicine as it was practiced in the 12th century.

Medieval Spain before the time of Columbus was quite a lively place. I found this out by reading Christianity and Islam in Spain 756-1031 A.D. by C. R. Haines. First published in 1889, it's a Kindle freebie. This book, which I am finding very interesting, and not at all dry, came to my attention when it was listed among the books found in Osama bin Laden's hidey-hole, as I mentioned a couple of weeks back.

Kay has created these sorts of different-but-strangely-similar universes in some of his other books, notably Sailing to Sarantium (really the Byzantine Empire) and also Tigana (Renaissance Italy). Not quite "historical fiction", call it "alternate historical fiction".


Books By Morons -- And A Freebie

Long-time lurker John D. Payne e-mailed me a few days ago to recommend his own novel:

The Crown and the Dragon is the story of a dangerous outlaw and a paladin in training, thrown together by fate. He and she are on the run together, chased by a fiery dragon, an invading army, an evil sorcerer, and a demon monster made of crows.

And then it gets even worse:

There's also an ex-wife with a grudge, in case things weren't scary enough.

Truly the stuff of nightmares. You can buy this novel from Amazon for $4.99 or as part of this Epic Fantasy Bundle available only for a limited time. It's one of those "storybundles" where the price is determined by the reader:

The StoryBundle concept is pretty simple. There are a fixed set of books that we offer in a bundle, and each bundle is available only for a limited time. If you miss out on the bundle, you'll have to buy the books individually from each author.

Again, one of the central concepts is that you get to decide how much each bundle is worth to you. Think each individual book in a bundle of five books is worth $2? That's fine! Pay $10 and get five books! Only think they're worth $1 each because you're not sure if you like a certain genre? That's fine too. If you want to reward these authors and encourage more independent writers by giving a bit more, that's fantastic as well.

The deal on this bundle ends on June 18th. In addition, the author is offering some freebies:

I have codes that can be redeemed for the whole ebook bundle, 13 books. I will give away these codes to people who share a link to the storybundle website on their Facebook/Twitter/etc. and then link that in the book thread comments so I can see they did it.

Mr. Payne informs me he will draw 5 random winners from the book thread comments at midnight Sunday/Monday. Presumably, you guys who wish to participate in this should have you contact information on Facebook/Twitter/whatever or include it in the comment, so your redemption code can be sent to you.


___________

So that's all for this week. As always, book thread tips, suggestions, bribes, rumors, threats, and insults may be sent to OregonMuse, Proprietor, AoSHQ Book Thread, at the book thread e-mail address: aoshqbookthread, followed by the 'at' sign, and then 'G' mail, and then dot cee oh emm.

What have you all been reading this week? Hopefully something good, because, as you all know, life is too short to be reading lousy books.

Posted by: Open Blogger at 09:01 AM




Comments

(Jump to bottom of page)

1 I found a Kindle version of what is supposed to be one of the best biographies of James K. Polk.

http://tinyurl.com/ncjunwj

I just bought the first part, but I'm hopeful. I'll buy the second part if I like the first.

I've been reading this:

http://tinyurl.com/ovf92lo

It's a biography of Stonewall Jackson that's probably the best single biography I've ever read. The narrative feels so natural, and the author (who's Civil War class I took at Virginia Tech) makes the knowledge of Jackson so intimate that it really feels like we get to know the man. It's 800 pages and really doesn't feel like it.

So very highly recommended.

Posted by: David at June 14, 2015 09:04 AM (GkcHG)

2 Reblechon - the cheese of cheeses.

Posted by: goatexchange at June 14, 2015 09:05 AM (uBTYu)

3 Finishing Washington's Spies. The show is good entertainment too.

Posted by: NCKate at June 14, 2015 09:05 AM (pBnwl)

4 Blessed are the cheesemakers.

Posted by: Taro Tsujimoto at June 14, 2015 09:05 AM (/pB9Z)

5 3 Finishing Washington's Spies. The show is good entertainment too.
Posted by: NCKate at June 14, 2015 09:05 AM (pBnwl)

Do you think the first season is better or the second?

I prefer the first, but I've heard that most people prefer the second.

Posted by: David at June 14, 2015 09:09 AM (GkcHG)

6 If anyone wants to know where I come up with stuff for my books. This happened three days ago. I promise it will be in Amy Lynn #4.

Two days ago, there I was mowing my back yard when I smelled something dead off in the corner. I turned of the mower and went to investigate but couldn't find anything. I didn't want my dogs rolling in it. After I finished mowing the grass, I was rinsing off mower beside the house when I saw the neighbor rinsing out the bed of his new polaris side by side. It was 10AM and he already had a beer in his hand so I figured there was something up. I greeted him and he shook head and gave me a look that made clear something was up. He said, "Well, I kind left my mind last night."
I said, "You want to talk about it."
He replied, "Later."

Later rolled around as did a roll back truck loading up his wife's 1 day old BMW. 1 DAY old. So I asked him what happened to his wifes car? The story went like this;

He ran out of cigarettes about midnight and decided to take his wifes new car for a test drive and pick up some smokes. About a half-mile from the house a Deer shot out and slammed into the side of the brand new car, caving in the front fender and damaging the hood and the door. Needless to say he felt horrible and after driving the care home he got his wife to show her the damage. She went from disbelief to furious in about 15 seconds then accused him of wrecking it because he was drunk, said there was no deer. I have been with a drunk neighbor Adam at about 130 MPH on the back roads in his GTR he can drive after a few.

Now I don't think he's ever lied to her about something that big, he is after all a fine American and a follower of Joel Osteen. That's when he "Left his mind." He jumped in the polaris side by side and found the deer that hit the car. It wasn't quite dead so he ran over it with the Polaris till it was. Then he pulled out his brush clearing machete and proceded to hack off the Deers head. Put it in the back of the four wheeler, drove it home carried it in the house and slammed it on the kitchen table and said, "Here it is, bitch."

This quickly removed any doubt as to what happened to her car and also explained what that smell was in the wood line behind my house.

Posted by: Oldsailors Poet at June 14, 2015 09:11 AM (KbNXw)

7 "...earlier this week that he's bi-curious " shouldn't that be... brie-curious?

Posted by: JJLive at June 14, 2015 09:12 AM (aXdIa)

8 So this book we are reading is supposed to be a satire?

Posted by: Le-a is on a boat, MFers! at June 14, 2015 09:13 AM (kjgqD)

9 David, I liked the first season too, but the second isn't bad. Got the Jackson book for my husband and he's really enjoying it.

Posted by: NCKate at June 14, 2015 09:13 AM (pBnwl)

10 >>I prefer the first, but I've heard that most people prefer the second.
Posted by: David at June 14, 2015 09:09 AM (GkcHG)

I haven't seen the second season yet, glad it sounds like it's pretty good.

Posted by: Le-a is on a boat, MFers! at June 14, 2015 09:18 AM (kjgqD)

11 >>... shouldn't that be... brie-curious?

Or bi-camembert?

Started John Ringo's "Last Centurion" this week (Ringo and this book in particular recommended by many 'rons) and loving it so far...My first Ringo book, but likely not the last.

Posted by: Lizzy at June 14, 2015 09:20 AM (k2QA3)

12 6 out of 10.

Some of those questions aren't about the book itself, though.

Posted by: Pappy O'Daniel at June 14, 2015 09:20 AM (oVJmc)

13 Books!

Brief O/T, sorry! I left the ONT thread very early last night. If any of you see ChristyBlinky today, could you ask her to contact me either on Twitter, at MoxieMom, or at my gee ma i l bailesworth?

Thanks!

Posted by: Y-not at June 14, 2015 09:20 AM (RWGcK)

14 Quoting "Family Circus" should be a flaying offense.


It isn't, but it should be.

Posted by: Bob's House of Flannel Shirts and Wallet Chains at June 14, 2015 09:23 AM (yxw0r)

15 Speaking of cheese, and the raging PC commentary about the advisability of raw milk and 'public health,' I am reminded of when I was in Geneva and a lot of our neighbors were UN-types. Went to a BBQ hosted by a Danish WHO official. BIG mistake - he must have flipped our burgers 30 times as he cooked them while lecturing us on the 'advisability' of cooking every molecule to 400F for 30 minutes or something. Worst burger ever. NEVER let a WHO official be the chef.

Posted by: goatexchange at June 14, 2015 09:23 AM (uBTYu)

16 >>Posted by: Oldsailors Poet at June 14, 2015

Um....wow. That's one way to win an argument.

Posted by: Lizzy at June 14, 2015 09:23 AM (k2QA3)

17 Love the trigger warnings, OregonMuse!

Posted by: Lizzy at June 14, 2015 09:25 AM (k2QA3)

18 I hope the overly dramatic base-heavy promo for "The Martian" is just your typical "In a world..." trailer, because it was the lead character's sense of humor and ingenuity that made the novel such a hoot.

I'll see it in spite of Matt Damon. Maybe even because of Matt Damon. He's entirely tolerable on-screen.

Posted by: All Hail Eris at June 14, 2015 09:26 AM (jR7Wy)

19 WOW, OSP, the things you can't make up! (Also proving the truth of the saying that writers are always writing, even when we're not putting pen to paper or fingers to keyboard!)

Making some slight progress on Loyal Valley: Captives. There's a subplot I haven't done much with yet, but some of the characterization of one of the people involved will likely bear a good bit of influence from recent Horde discussions of Tumblrinas. *evil chuckle*

To read this week, if I can make the time: Hesiod's Theogony.

Posted by: Elisabeth G. Wolfe at June 14, 2015 09:28 AM (iuQS7)

20 The narrative feels so natural, and the author (who's Civil War class I took at Virginia Tech)

Posted by: David at June 14, 2015 09:04 AM (GkcHG)


You too? Dr. Robertson's Civil War class was one of the best classes I ever took in college, and one of the hardest to enroll in.

I remember him talking about being head of the Civil War Centennial and traipsing around Petersburg. It had been raining and he said at one point the ground began to rumble and shake and the ground fell away and they fell into The Crater; ignoring the possiblity of serious injury, he said he was so excited that had happened. Dr. Robertson is simply a great storyteller, really makes History come alive. A National treasure of whom hardly anyone has heard.

Posted by: RickZ at June 14, 2015 09:29 AM (Oa9pF)

21 So which is faster, reading The Crying of Lot 49 or OregonMuse's post?

Posted by: lowandslow at June 14, 2015 09:30 AM (dItuC)

22 On my radio show I use the last half hour for Authors corner. Last week I had a gentleman on by the name of Pierre Comtois. If you are a comic book person or a Marvel fan, he wrote, among other things three books called Marvel Comics, a field guide to a pop culture Phenomenon. 60's 70's 80's all covered. I personally don't like comic books, I don't like sci fi, but this man was fascinating.

Posted by: Oldsailors Poet at June 14, 2015 09:31 AM (KbNXw)

23 Posted by: RickZ at June 14, 2015 09:29 AM (Oa9pF)

I completely agree. My dad, who teaches at Tech, got me the book for my birthday last year, and I had hoped that he could get the book signed for me. I hadn't realized that Robertson was old enough to retire, so I never got it signed.

I'm more than happy with the book itself though. As I said, it's magnificent.

Posted by: David at June 14, 2015 09:33 AM (GkcHG)

24 Aside from finishing the book club selection (I'll save comments for tonight) this has been a week of browsing. I came across reference to Dorothy Sayers. Never realized she wrote academic materials let alone translations. Got a copy of her Song of Roland translation and it is wonderful. She treats it as one of a genre of heroic romance poetry not historical fact. The intro section is helpful and the actual translation maintains the scheme of the original. Haven't read this since college. It's a lot of fun and something of a challenge.

Posted by: JTB at June 14, 2015 09:33 AM (FvdPb)

25 FOUND THE KEYS!!!

wife did the laundry

who the hell would think of that?!?

Posted by: Bigby's Knuckle Sandwich at June 14, 2015 09:35 AM (rI257)

26 Posted by: Elisabeth G. Wolfe at June 14, 2015 09:28 AM (iuQS7)

I know right? just look around. Keep pounding away. I have Amy Lynn #3, the lady of Castle Dunn being edited and I'm trying to get my model scheduled for a cover shoot. It never ends, it's almost like work.

Posted by: Oldsailors Poet at June 14, 2015 09:36 AM (KbNXw)

27 One fish, two fish, red fish, blue fish.

Posted by: Joyce Daryl Bunches of Oates at June 14, 2015 09:36 AM (Dwehj)

28 I've always wondered how cheese became associated with movies, bad acting, cheepnus, etc. Is there a story behind that?

Posted by: freaked at June 14, 2015 09:37 AM (BO/km)

29 I've always wondered how cheese became associated with movies, bad acting, cheepnus, etc. Is there a story behind that?
Posted by: freaked at June 14, 2015 09:37 AM (BO/km)


That sounds like a question for MP3.

Posted by: Oldsailors Poet at June 14, 2015 09:38 AM (KbNXw)

30 "...earlier this week that he's bi-curious " shouldn't that be... brie-curious?

Ha! I wish I had thought of it.

Posted by: OregonMuse at June 14, 2015 09:39 AM (RML+n)

31 Still reading Dan Simmons' dystopian novel "Flashback" and savoring all the great snarky gumshoe lines. Thanks to the people who've recommended it in the book thread. And let me do likewise.

I recently flashed back to my old classics teacher Professor Potter's exhortation to "Don't forget your Polybius!" in his Major Winchester lockjaw, so I dug up my dusty old Penguin paperback copy of "The Rise of the Roman Empire".

And Polybius was a cryptographer!

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Polybius_square

Posted by: All Hail Eris at June 14, 2015 09:39 AM (jR7Wy)

32 Casu Marzu......gotta be a cheese lover


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vZ_-JzM-YQg

Posted by: BignJames at June 14, 2015 09:41 AM (j7iSn)

33 bundleofholding DOT com has 3 great RPG deals right now

Posted by: Bigby's Knuckle Sandwich at June 14, 2015 09:41 AM (hYJj3)

34 I've read The Martian and from what I can see the trailer doesn't show anything that's not from the book. There _may_ be more time in the film devoted to the crew of the Hermes and the rescue attempt, but I wouldn't call that a deal-breaker.

Deal-breakers for me:

1. Discovery of aliens/alien artifacts/etc.
2. Characters defying physical laws
3. Angst and high-school drama among the spacecraft crew

Posted by: Trimegistus at June 14, 2015 09:42 AM (VXChD)

35 Finished reading Ellis Peters' Cadfael book, The Confession of Brother Haluin, at the doctor's on Friday. I enjoyed it, but it's no great shakes. I wouldn't recommend it unless you're a diehard Cadfael fan.

Am now into the first few pages of Orson Scott Card's Earth Awakens, part of the Formic War saga. We'll see how that one reads.

Posted by: RickZ at June 14, 2015 09:45 AM (Oa9pF)

36 Forgive a minor OT comment, but it's Flag Day. One of those days you can determine your neighbors' political leanings by just a cursory glance. Fly that sucker.

Posted by: Bob's House of Flannel Shirts and Wallet Chains at June 14, 2015 09:45 AM (yxw0r)

37 12 6 out of 10.

Some of those questions aren't about the book itself, though.
Posted by: Pappy O'Daniel at June 14, 2015 09:20 AM (oVJmc)


I got 7 out of 10. How the heck am I supposed to know the pen name he didn't use?

Posted by: rickl at June 14, 2015 09:46 AM (sdi6R)

38 Tom Baker relocated my Limburger.

Posted by: Spencer Johnson at June 14, 2015 09:47 AM (3F6F8)

39 Do you think the first season is better or the second?

I prefer the first, but I've heard that most people prefer the second.
Posted by: David at June 14, 2015 09:09 AM (GkcHG)

The second season got off to a slow start but is getting better quickly.

Posted by: Golfman at June 14, 2015 09:47 AM (9HX7k)

40 I read "Red Mars" some years ago, and it started out well. It was an interesting story of the effort to terraform Mars.

Later in the book, of course, it takes off on a thinly veiled overall attack on American culture, in the form of a criticism of what happened once Mars become tolerable to live on, as the terraforming proceeded, and it sort of goes of the rails (for me). Then it moved on to some psycho-sexual new age nonsense, which to me was babble. After that, I could not get up the enthusiasm to read "Green Mars" or "Blue Mars". Who knows, they might be good?

Posted by: Bossy Conservative....lost in America at June 14, 2015 09:48 AM (+1T7c)

41 Fresh milk, dirty feet. Yeah, it's all the same to us. We're not fussy eaters.

Posted by: bacteria at June 14, 2015 09:48 AM (cIoI4)

42 Just finished reading Le Carre's _The Honorable Schoolboy_ last night. Good book. I'd almost call it great, but there are some bits which don't quite fit. There's a whole long sequence in which the main character goes into besieged Phnom Penh in 1973 to talk to some guy, but he doesn't really learn anything new or important. Nor is it thrilling enough to be worth it just for fun.

It's the sequel to _Tinker Tailor Etc._ and is about George Smiley trying to set up a major intelligence operation in Hong Kong to rebuild his agency's reputation.

The ending kind of presupposes a level of liberal indignation about the stuff intelligence agencies do which I don't possess.

I don't want to sound as if I'm not endorsing the book heartily. It's a good spy thriller, one of the novels that gave LeCarre the reputation he has spent the last thirty years pissing away.

Posted by: Trimegistus at June 14, 2015 09:49 AM (VXChD)

43 One of those days you can determine your neighbors' political leanings by just a cursory glance

======

you can tell mine by the fact i took it down on Obama's second win. ain't going back up

Posted by: Bigby's Knuckle Sandwich at June 14, 2015 09:50 AM (MtPHn)

44 Not quite finished with The River War because I downloaded the "Overdrive" app to my new Kindle and have been binge listening to the Charlie Bone YA series (a knock-off of Harry Potter but I like it),and old Heinlein YA novels that I read 25 years ago. Oh, and Brandon Sanderson's Alloy of Law.

I'm enjoying the Heinlein books again, but I'm enjoying *different* things about them. As an adult I can see his libertarian beliefs and notice the astronomy lessons more clearly. I'm not sold on the ending of Have Spacesuit Will Travel, but I'm not sure if that's personal preference or Heinlein had a hard time deciding how to end the book.

I liked Alloy of Law and have a hold on the first of the Mistborn trilogy since I haven't read those yet. Eldest Kidlet heard me listening to it and has decided she's interested as well, which is something I have to admit I was hoping for (not Sanderson per se, but getting the kids interested in different authors).

Posted by: Polliwog the 'Ette at June 14, 2015 09:51 AM (GDulk)

45 I agree with Bossy's assessment of Robinson's Mars trilogy. Red Mars is a pretty good book about a bunch of lefty Mars colonists failing to pull off a revolution. Blue and Green Mars I cannot actually remember. They were all just people sitting in rooms having arguments.

Posted by: Trimegistus at June 14, 2015 09:52 AM (VXChD)

46 According to Wikipedia, beavers are not native to Venezuela.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Beaver

Posted by: rickl at June 14, 2015 09:52 AM (sdi6R)

47 About every 15 or 20 years I think I should learn to play chess. I played a bit as a child but it got lost in sports, music and girls. Anyway, I picked up "The Complete Idiot's Guide to Chess" and started going through it. Very helpful so far as it assumes the reader knows absolutely nothing. (A generous assumption.) I've looked at other chess books and this one suits me best: clear instructions and a logical presentation.

In theory, I should do okay with chess. I made a career of anticipating and solving problems as a systems analyst. But that was the job. My natural approach to solving problems is to get a bigger hammer or call in heavier artillery. SIGH! Maybe I need chess more for attitude than for a game.

Now to look for a computer chess game that has a negative skill category.

Posted by: JTB at June 14, 2015 09:53 AM (FvdPb)

48 I read "The Martian" earlier this year on my Kindle, so it is fresh in my mind.

Matt Damon? No, just no.

For one thing, he's too old for the part. He was cast for this part to try and restore him as a mainstream movie personality. They think us teabagging knuckledraggers in flyover country will hold our collective runny noses and go see the movie, despite MATT DAMON.

For another, he's an asshole. Tolerable on the screen? In all the Bourne movies, he's tolerable when he doesn't have to speak.

He can go and take his Howard Zinn stories from growing up and shove it.

Posted by: Bossy Conservative....lost in America at June 14, 2015 09:53 AM (+1T7c)

49 He can go and take his Howard Zinn stories from growing up and shove it.
Posted by: Bossy Conservative....lost in America at June 14, 2015 09:53 AM (+1T7c)


RIGHT ON! RIGHT ON!

Posted by: Oldsailors Poet at June 14, 2015 09:54 AM (KbNXw)

50 I liked Alloy of Law and have a hold on the first of the Mistborn trilogy since I haven't read those yet.

Posted by: Polliwog the 'Ette at June 14, 2015 09:51 AM (GDulk)
----
Loved the Mistborn trilogy! Though I can't imagine reading the steampunky follow-on novel Alloy of Law first.

Posted by: All Hail Eris at June 14, 2015 09:54 AM (jR7Wy)

51 My natural approach to solving problems is to get a bigger hammer or call in heavier artillery.
Posted by: JTB at June 14, 2015 09:53 AM (FvdPb)
---
The BFH resolves many issues quickly.

Posted by: All Hail Eris at June 14, 2015 09:56 AM (jR7Wy)

52 9 out of 10, even though half of it was Eric Blair trivia questions.
And it wouldn't tell me which one I got wrong, bastard guardianista bleeps.

Posted by: sock_rat_eez at June 14, 2015 09:57 AM (OCcU9)

53 Speaking of Overdrive, I have got to figure out how to recommend the library get e-books from Larry Corriea (sp?), John Ringo, Sabrina Chase, Sarah Hoyt, etc. They either don't have *any* of those except a couple of John Ringo's "March to...." collaborations, or else the Houston virtual catalog site navigation is even worse than I think it is (and after using it for 3-4 days I'm *not* impressed)

Posted by: Polliwog the 'Ette at June 14, 2015 10:00 AM (GDulk)

54 you can tell mine by the fact i took it down on Obama's second win. ain't going back up

I turned mine upside down when the election was called. Then it came down. I put it out now on Veteran's Day, Flag Day and 4th of July only.

Posted by: Infidel at June 14, 2015 10:00 AM (pTIsp)

55 I don't need to take the 1984 quiz...

Yesterday OPM finally sent me a letter that was written in the most bureaucratic weasel wording way to downplay the data breach as a big nothing.

They said my information might have been compromised. ^%()%@

So just in case, log into OPM to change passwords and get some free identity protection.

Posted by: Anna Puma at June 14, 2015 10:02 AM (S55pX)

56 So just in case, log into OPM to change passwords and get some free identity protection.
Posted by: Anna Puma at June 14, 2015 10:02 AM (S55pX)


Holy Crap, that sucks.

Posted by: Oldsailors Poet at June 14, 2015 10:02 AM (KbNXw)

57 Infidel,

I have my flag and Army flag hanging up right now. I too only display them on those dates only.

Posted by: SMFH at it all at June 14, 2015 10:03 AM (kmtse)

58 2
Reblechon - the cheese of cheeses.

Posted by: goatexchange at June 14, 2015 09:05 AM (uBTYu)


Wrong! Government Cheese is the cheese of cheeses.

Posted by: Welfare Recipient #37,295,128 at June 14, 2015 10:03 AM (0IhFx)

59 20
Dr. Robertson's Civil War class was one of the best classes I ever took in college, and one of the hardest to enroll in.

Posted by: RickZ at June 14, 2015 09:29 AM (Oa9pF)



I dropped out of high school, then got a GED and took some courses at a local community college before going on to college. The Intro to U.S. History course I took at the community college was one of the best courses I took anywhere. The first lecture, where the teacher described late medieval Europe and the events leading up to Columbus' first voyage, was riveting and sparked a lifelong interest in history.

Posted by: rickl at June 14, 2015 10:03 AM (sdi6R)

60 I hope Oates won't allow the left browbeat her out of the few sane opinions she holds.

Posted by: Blind Squirrel with broken clock at June 14, 2015 10:04 AM (F1Z8f)

61 Posted by: JTB at June 14, 2015 09:53 AM (FvdPb)



Thanks. I'm with you...I played chess now and then, but never had the foggiest grasp of "strategy." I'd like my girls to know the fundamentals, at least, so this might help.

Posted by: Bob's House of Flannel Shirts and Wallet Chains at June 14, 2015 10:05 AM (yxw0r)

62 Got 7 out of 10 on the 1984 quiz. I nailed all the questions about the content of the book, but not the ancillary questions.

Posted by: Insomniac at June 14, 2015 10:05 AM (mx5oN)

63 52 9 out of 10, even though half of it was Eric Blair trivia questions.
And it wouldn't tell me which one I got wrong, bastard guardianista bleeps.
Posted by: sock_rat_eez at June 14, 2015 09:57 AM (OCcU9)

There's a link at the end that gives you the answers.

Posted by: Insomniac at June 14, 2015 10:06 AM (mx5oN)

64 54 you can tell mine by the fact i took it down on Obama's second win. ain't going back up

I turned mine upside down when the election was called. Then it came down. I put it out now on Veteran's Day, Flag Day and 4th of July only.

Posted by: Infidel at June 14, 2015 10:00 AM (pTIsp)



Memorial Day and Veterans Day only for me now.

I flew it upside down on Independence Day in 2013, then figured that it probably isn't a good idea to call too much attention to myself here in the USSA.

Posted by: rickl at June 14, 2015 10:07 AM (sdi6R)

65 cheeses of nazareth?

Posted by: phoenixgirl at June 14, 2015 10:09 AM (0O7c5)

66 Mars novels?

Red Thunder by John Varley. A bunch of suburban misfits cobble together a spaceship in a Daytona warehouse. Why? Because they want to rescue the Ares Seven Mar's mission and to beat the Communist Chinese.

Posted by: Anna Puma at June 14, 2015 10:09 AM (S55pX)

67 65 cheeses of nazareth?
Posted by: phoenixgirl at June 14, 2015 10:09 AM (0O7c5)

Did 'e say "blessed are the cheesemakers"?

Posted by: Insomniac at June 14, 2015 10:11 AM (mx5oN)

68 >>Yesterday OPM finally sent me a letter that was written in the most bureaucratic weasel wording way to downplay the data breach as a big nothing.

Did they send a letter in the mail or did they send an email on saturday? We got several emails last week but they were all useless.

Posted by: Le-a is on a boat, MFers! at June 14, 2015 10:13 AM (vmMMi)

69 cheeses of nazareth?


Posted by: phoenixgirl at June 14, 2015 10:09 AM (0O7c5)

That's a muensterously bad joke.

Posted by: Secundus at June 14, 2015 10:14 AM (e4KYx)

70 I received a physical dead tree letter.

Posted by: Anna Puma at June 14, 2015 10:15 AM (S55pX)

71 I hope Oates won't allow the left browbeat her out of the few sane opinions she holds.

No, folded up like a cheap ironing board after she got a sh*tstorm on twitter and realized she had offended the wrong people.

Posted by: OregonMuse at June 14, 2015 10:15 AM (RML+n)

72 69 cheeses of nazareth?


Posted by: phoenixgirl at June 14, 2015 10:09 AM (0O7c5)

That's a muensterously bad joke.
Posted by: Secundus at June 14, 2015 10:14 AM (e4KYx)

But most saviory in flavor.

Posted by: Insomniac at June 14, 2015 10:15 AM (mx5oN)

73 Posted by: Oldsailors Poet at June 14, 2015 09:11 AM (KbNXw)

Honorary Morons at the very least!

Posted by: Hrothgar at June 14, 2015 10:15 AM (ftVQq)

74 The Intro to U.S. History course I took at the community college was one of the best courses I took anywhere.

The quality of the teaching I received at the community colleges I went to was way better than that at the university level.

Posted by: OregonMuse at June 14, 2015 10:17 AM (RML+n)

75 Posted by: All Hail Eris at June 14, 2015 09:54 AM (jR7Wy)

It was the only one of Sanderson's books that was actually *available* ( I have holds on the others) and is set several centuries in the future of Mistborn, so I figured it would work as long as I kept in mind that the world-building had been done already. I'm looking forward to learning the backstory as well as continuing with the new series.

Sanderson is a very good writer who writes different worlds well. I have enjoyed Way of Kings and Steelheart already. My concern is that he seems to have taken Robert Jordan as a model instead of an object lesson and that makes me worry he will get the same outcome.

Posted by: Polliwog the 'Ette at June 14, 2015 10:17 AM (GDulk)

76 Now to look for a computer chess game that has a negative skill category.

Posted by: JTB at June 14, 2015 09:53 AM (FvdPb)

I have this same desire occasionally to improve my chess game. This happened a while back when my younger nephew came over with a book about chess.

In the future, I plan on taking chess lessons on the internet. I don't have the links readily available, but they have courses that looked really interesting and are on my list of things to do in the future.

Posted by: Stateless Infidel at June 14, 2015 10:18 AM (AC0lD)

77 listen jack!

Posted by: phoenixgirl at June 14, 2015 10:19 AM (0O7c5)

78 Read 1984 about a year ago. Only got 6 of 10 right.

Saw the trailer for The Martian and though I loved the book, don't know if I can take a whole movie devoted to Matt Damon. Probably a rental.

I enjoyed Red Mars, especially the premise, but I thought the books went downhill and didn't enjoy the third volume very much. I can understand the mixed reaction.

Still reading Hugo books, completed The Dark Between The Stars (The Saga of Shadows #1) by Kevin Anderson. Big sprawling space opera with aliens, space battles, mysterious enemies from deep space. Enjoyed it a lot, it has a solid ending though leaves threads to pursue in later books. Haven't read the previous series but apparently it involved war between races on one of the spiral arms.

Posted by: waelse1 at June 14, 2015 10:19 AM (zRPC0)

79 Here's another interesting fact about 1984: it actually espouses a pro-Communist point of view.
Big Brother symbolizes the opressive, tyrannical, greedy Tea Party type capitalists.

Posted by: Chrystal Ball, MSNBC newscaster at June 14, 2015 10:21 AM (F1Z8f)

80 Just watch the Martian preview. Read the book more than once, and liked it.

Movie looks... Okay. Any adaptation is going to suffer from Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy disease: so much of the humor is in the text and would be very difficult to translate onto film.

Posted by: Secundus at June 14, 2015 10:21 AM (e4KYx)

81 Well you know that cliche about seizing opportunities. Went to an event a friend was holding. She is a minor but published author with multiple books.

As I was tinkering on a story and chatting she mentioned an editor she just met at a conference who said a certain area for historical fiction is hot. Immediately thought of a real but obscure event from that and told her about it. And last night rummaged in the stacks to find I already have a start on research material to build a story with. So emailed my friend pitching a rough outline along with listing sources and offering to show a sample of similar work the editor mentioned was hot.

Posted by: Anna Puma at June 14, 2015 10:22 AM (S55pX)

82 In the future, I plan on taking chess lessons on the internet. I don't have the links readily available, but they have courses that looked really interesting and are on my list of things to do in the future.

Once you locate the links, could you please do me a favor and send them to the book thread email address? I love chess, and I'm always looking for ways to improve my chess game, which ranges from laugh-out-loud bad to "good god, what the hell did you do THAT for!?"

Thanks.

Posted by: OregonMuse at June 14, 2015 10:23 AM (RML+n)

83 Still reading Dan Simmons' dystopian novel "Flashback" and savoring all the great snarky gumshoe lines. Thanks to the people who've recommended it in the book thread. And let me do likewise....


Posted by: All Hail Eris at June 14, 2015 09:39 AM (jR7Wy)



AHE,

If you like Simmons in his gumshoe mode-

check out his short series (3 books).

Starting with "Hardcase".

They are his attempt to write the hardest-boiled, hard-boiled private eye ever.

and he succeeds.

The other two books are "Hard Freeze" and "Hard as Nails".

Posted by: naturalfake at June 14, 2015 10:25 AM (KUa85)

84 "28 I've always wondered how cheese became associated with movies, bad acting, cheepnus, etc. Is there a story behind that?"

Speaking as a home cheese maker, "cheesey" referring to cheap flashy or trashy items, comes from Urdu for a "thing". Somehow in the British Raj this became associated with a flashy thing. One imagines the stiff upper lip types then carrying this work back to jolly olde England as a hip word for lower class, Chav types and their preferred products.

By the way, I strongly endorse Max's Mastering Cheese book. If I could only have one book on cheese (rather than the large library of books on cheese I do have) it would be Mastering Cheese. Dr. Kindstedt's Cheese and Culture is also a fine historical account of cheese through the ages.

Posted by: TxDan at June 14, 2015 10:25 AM (mBNLc)

85 >>>faithfulness of the adaptation

Well, the book lacks the awesome soundtrack. I don't know how I managed to read the whole things without that exciting soundtrack driving through my head.

Plus, the book didn't have any quotes along the lines of, "Well, I'm going to have to science the shit out of this." Maybe the book just doesn't love science the way the movie will.

Plus, Matt Damon! Need I say more?

Posted by: Anon Y. Mous at June 14, 2015 10:26 AM (IN7k+)

86 Infidel ... I hadn't considered internet resources. Once I'm done with the Complete Idiot's Guide, I'll check them out.

For another book, is Capablanca's "Chess Fundamentals", the original version, worth a try? I don't know if he starts at a sufficiently basic level.

Posted by: JTB at June 14, 2015 10:27 AM (FvdPb)

87 Take me to your Liederkranz.

Posted by: Cheese alien at June 14, 2015 10:27 AM (W5DcG)

88 Waiter, there's cheese in my book thread!!!!

Posted by: @votermom at June 14, 2015 10:29 AM (7ngif)

89 *gets the strainer out*

For too much whey today....

Posted by: Anna Puma at June 14, 2015 10:30 AM (S55pX)

90 I hope Oates won't allow the left browbeat her out of the few sane opinions she holds.

No, folded up like a cheap ironing board after she got a sh*tstorm on twitter and realized she had offended the wrong people.

Posted by: OregonMuse at June 14, 2015 10:15 AM (RML+n)



So, Joyce Carol Oates allowed the opinions of the SJWs to -

Rotterdam brain out.






*Yep, that's right, bitchez. I crossed memes.

Posted by: naturalfake at June 14, 2015 10:30 AM (KUa85)

91 "Cheese it, the (Book Thread) Cops!"

Posted by: goatexchange at June 14, 2015 10:30 AM (AWqX6)

92 89 *gets the strainer out*

For too much whey today....
Posted by: Anna Puma at June 14, 2015 10:30 AM (S55pX)

Casein point.

Posted by: Insomniac at June 14, 2015 10:31 AM (mx5oN)

93 I'm the only guy on my block flying my flag. Now I have the sadz. I'll cheer up when the boy and I get in a little trigger time this afternoon.

As to cheese, where's the pic of the kind that comes in between two pieces of plastic?

Posted by: fairweatherbill at June 14, 2015 10:33 AM (xrURQ)

94 Face it, guys, so far as viable book threads go, we bleu it.

Posted by: goatexchange at June 14, 2015 10:33 AM (AWqX6)

95 I'm enjoying 'Buzz', about a terrorist group who figured out how to weaponize the common mosquito to cause horrible death in about 10 seconds.
Economy grinds to a halt because everybody is afraid to go outside.
It's by David Lebedoff.

Posted by: Retired Geezer at June 14, 2015 10:34 AM (ti6CY)

96 Tread caerphilly when reading through the cheese book thread.

Posted by: TxDan at June 14, 2015 10:35 AM (mBNLc)

97 Posted by: naturalfake at June 14, 2015 10:30 AM (KUa85)

Heh.

Posted by: Golfman at June 14, 2015 10:35 AM (FsvzE)

98 An interesting thread; I gotta 3 on the quiz and I've read the book twice.

I blame it on the extremely low energy thingy I'm suffering from. Something that has me exhausted.

Posted by: Quintos Kaine at June 14, 2015 10:35 AM (ve56t)

99 I Stilton know what the fuss is about!

Posted by: Hrothgar at June 14, 2015 10:36 AM (ftVQq)

100 We experimented with making cheese at home a couple of years ago, and I might pick it up again, since there is a farm in the Hill Country where you can get raw goat-milk.

Still soldiering away on "Orphans Preferred - The Twisted Truth and Lasting Legend of the Pony Express" by Christopher Corbett. Got up to a chapter where the explorer Richard Burton traveled west, and not quite hilarity ensued. In one of the works in progress, I might have a character ride briefly for a pony express mail service. Not the famous one, but apparently there were small enterprises delivering mail in the California gold country for a while.

Otherwise, working away on the next book; finished a chapter last night, which puts me about halfway through, nearly.

Posted by: Sgt. Mom at June 14, 2015 10:37 AM (95iDF)

101 Posted by: OregonMuse at June 14, 2015 10:17 AM (RML+n)

I moved to CA to go to Berkeley, but got there a few months in advance and stayed with from ends in Santa Rosa. I took a few classes at the local, and well regarded junior college.

Without a doubt the best art history class i ever took, and one of the best classes. The instructor taught because he loved the topic and loved conveying that to his students.

Posted by: CharlieBrown'sDildo at June 14, 2015 10:38 AM (qoJbS)

102 Nearly forgot to add to the cheese pun thread...

What a friend we have in cheeses.

I'll be here all week. Try the veal and don't forget to tip your waiter.

Posted by: Sgt. Mom at June 14, 2015 10:38 AM (95iDF)

103 Bartender, morbier please! The cheese thread is going extra innings!

Posted by: TxDan at June 14, 2015 10:38 AM (mBNLc)

104 WWCD?

Posted by: goatexchange at June 14, 2015 10:38 AM (AWqX6)

105 Anon: I can't tell if you're being sarcastic, but the line "I'm going to have to science the shit out of this" is actually from the book.

Posted by: Trimegistus at June 14, 2015 10:39 AM (VXChD)

106 Posted by: naturalfake at June 14, 2015 10:25 AM (KUa85)
---
Just requested "Hardcase" from my library. Thanks!

Love the book thread and our Horde recommendations.

Posted by: All Hail Eris at June 14, 2015 10:40 AM (jR7Wy)

107 Oh, Chess, love the game, can't play it. I'ma fish. They used to call us, the guy who knows enough to be an interesting challenge to those who can play the game. Too obvious, too methodical, too impatient, too often blunders.

Chess, like all games, is really a mind game where you have to get inside the head of your opponent.

Posted by: Quintos Kaine at June 14, 2015 10:40 AM (ve56t)

108 By the way, some of the writing in these comments is a bit Stiltoned.

Posted by: Trimegistus at June 14, 2015 10:40 AM (VXChD)

109 As I mentioned last week, I like Aron Nimzovich's "My System". It was originally published in the 1920s, and while there may be newer books that are better, it is justifiably regarded as a classic.

This is the version I have, but there are newer translations available:

https://tinyurl.com/oogx76h


It's been a long time since I read it, and I had already been playing chess for a while before I read it. My memory is notoriously fuzzy, but I don't know whether it is too advanced for beginners. I think it probably isn't. A beginner could do worse than to study it. It might keep you from developing bad habits, at least. And as I said last week, an amateur player who has read it has a decided advantage over one who hasn't.

Posted by: rickl at June 14, 2015 10:40 AM (sdi6R)

110 Try to say "fromage" and smile.

Can't be done.

Wouldn't be prudent....at this juncture.

Posted by: Bossy Conservative....lost in America at June 14, 2015 10:40 AM (+1T7c)

111 Mimolette you guys carry on while I return to my book.

Posted by: All Hail Eris at June 14, 2015 10:41 AM (jR7Wy)

112 I wonder if Airedale cheese tastes like dog? Somebody ask Barky.

Posted by: fairweatherbill at June 14, 2015 10:41 AM (FviSe)

113 Trimegistus: Definitely sarcastic.

The quote is not in my book. What chapter do you find it in?

Posted by: Anon Y. Mous at June 14, 2015 10:42 AM (IN7k+)

114 Posted by: TxDan at June 14, 2015 10:25 AM (mBNLc)

------

So "cheesy" is a false cognate? Fascinating, mainly because it seems oddly appropriate somehow, and I like cheese.

Posted by: Richard Cheese at June 14, 2015 10:43 AM (F1Z8f)

115 I still remember the first time I tasted Stilton in the UK. I knew all of the cheese I had eaten previously was not good. It is still my favorite and I buy it whenever I can find the real stuff.

Posted by: Lester at June 14, 2015 10:43 AM (2UPXV)

116 I wonder if "cheesy" as a synonym for trashy or cheap is just an abbreviation for the older term "cheese-paring," meaning someone who slices the cheese very thin rather than generously thick.

Posted by: Trimegistus at June 14, 2015 10:43 AM (VXChD)

117 On Kim Stanley Robinson's Red Mars:

Couldn't finish it. He's a actually a pretty good writer, but his understanding of economics is Marxist twaddle. A main character talks with an Indian character and they casually talk about India is being kept poor by 'exploitation', something they both treat as obviously true, even though an educated Indian would be unlikely to believe this and would actually be pro-trade. At another point, supposedly intelligent characters are talking about how they should assign prices to commodities by voting on it. I had to stop. The stupid, it burned.

Posted by: Bill at June 14, 2015 10:43 AM (M2AI3)

118 if the punning continues......we will be bid a fondue!

Posted by: phoenixgirl at June 14, 2015 10:43 AM (0O7c5)

119 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rE3j_RHkqJc

Strong mental hygiene. Liberals are animated by some forgotten bible-thumping redneck that is as far removed from the levers of power as they need to be.

Posted by: BourbonChicken at June 14, 2015 10:43 AM (+4uXG)

120 Don't worry, Brie happy!

Posted by: TxDan at June 14, 2015 10:44 AM (mBNLc)

121 Quatrain 2015

In the year of the Jenner 2015
A beast will arise in the city of York
whom shall make even Cthulhu tremble.

You will know the beast by it's suit of pants
and that it is in no ways tired.

The beast will devour all in it's wake before leaving the river Hudson and inhabiting the house of white.

The beast will dwell on the Potomac with it's mate Huma, whom shall lick the beast for 8 years and keep it content.

Posted by: Joe Biden Nostradamus at June 14, 2015 10:44 AM (JG47A)

122 I moved to CA to go to Berkeley, but got there a few months in advance and stayed with from ends in Santa Rosa. I took a few classes at the local, and well regarded junior college.

Holy crap. I went to Cal for two years (1975-1977). I did not go to SRJC, but the junior college in Napa, and my experience was similar to yours: the teachers were there because they loved to teach, and they conveyed this to their students in all of their classes.

At Cal, I got one crappy professor after another. Some of the GTEs were very good, but the profs were uniformly bad. They were there to do research and I think having to teach a class was something they just didn't want to do. And it showed.

Posted by: OregonMuse at June 14, 2015 10:45 AM (RML+n)

123 Speaking of cheese, who was the first person to discover that milk that had turned solid, could be eaten?

Someone desperate probably.

The first person to eat a mushroom.

The first person to lick a toad.

Posted by: Quintos Kaine at June 14, 2015 10:45 AM (ve56t)

124 The old feminist lefties I used to work with had such high opinion of Ms. Oates. I suspect they will have to Emmanuel Goldstein her to hide their fear of consequences now.

I finished another anthology of Christopher Anvil's shorts, The Trouble With Aliens. The shorts were written in the 50's 60's and early 70's
Anvil was a fantastic writer. The principal story arc of the shorts are the "war with the Outs" and shows the problem of fighting a two-front war: against the enemy and against your own bureaucracy. Technically proficient writer and dead-on mocking the idea that it is more important to support the bureaucratic niceties than to win.
There is a heavy thread of the idea that you have to outthink your problems by outthinking your preconceptions.

It was edited by Eric Flint, and I thinkh Baen would have done better to break it up into shorter books the size of the old 180 page yellow-spine DELLs instead of the giant goat-gaggers they printed. (My hands are stiff, a 600 page paperback is hard to hold sometimes)

Oh, and an open letter to Eric Flint: Found typos you missed.

Posted by: Kindltot at June 14, 2015 10:46 AM (3pRHP)

125 who cut the cheese?

Posted by: phoenixgirl at June 14, 2015 10:46 AM (0O7c5)

126 Oregon Muse might want to save this image for a later book thread.

http://www.ufunk.net/wp-content/uploads/2015/06/selection-du-weekend-144-55.jpg

Posted by: Anna Puma at June 14, 2015 10:46 AM (S55pX)

127 53 Speaking of Overdrive, I have got to figure out how to recommend the library get e-books from Larry Corriea (sp?), John Ringo, Sabrina Chase, Sarah Hoyt, etc.
Posted by: Polliwog the 'Ette at June 14, 2015 10:00 AM (GDulk)


Joe Konrath has a project to get indie and rational publisher ebooks to libraries at sane prices and restrictions. I applied when the project was first announced but was turned down :-( My guess is they wanted real celebrities and heavy hitters first, to convince the libraries this was a Good Thing.

*whines* but how am I going to *be* a celebrity if I can't get my books in the library?

The California library system has a way to get books in, but it is hard for indies (they are set up for publishers). I 'm still working on that one. The current Overdrive system is not easy to use, and so many publishers set insane conditions on ebooks -- charging $25 per copy, only one checkout per copy, and a max limit of something like 25 borrows before a new copy must be purchased (like an electronic file wears out or something....) They are terrified of libraries and ebooks, especially together, so they have little incentive to make things easier. Konrath's project sets the terms as the library *owns* the copy, and can use it just like a physical book. And the author gets paid just like a regular sale.

Posted by: Sabrina Chase at June 14, 2015 10:47 AM (GQdlU)

128 117 On Kim Stanley Robinson's Red Mars:
Couldn't finish it. He's a actually a pretty good writer, but his understanding of economics is Marxist twaddle.


Which is probably one of the reasons hy the author of that WaPo piece loved the series: all of those examples of stupidity you mentioned were just accepted wisdom to her.

Posted by: OregonMuse at June 14, 2015 10:49 AM (RML+n)

129 Posted by: Quintos Kaine at June 14, 2015 10:45 AM (ve56t)

They credit unspecified desert nomads who are thought to have put milk in a skin canteen and then rode all day. the enzymes on the inside of the skin, along with the heat and motion, are supposed to have resulted in a chunky-but-not-spoiled solid and refreshing whey at the end of the day.

Posted by: Polliwog the 'Ette at June 14, 2015 10:49 AM (GDulk)

130 Posted by: OregonMuse at June 14, 2015 10:45 AM (RML+n)

Sad that a great university can't manage to find professors who actually love the craft of teaching.

I can count the great teachers I had at Cal on one hand.

And the greatest of them was an RA who taught English 1B!

Posted by: CharlieBrown'sDildo at June 14, 2015 10:50 AM (qoJbS)

131 Has anyone read Neal Stephenson's new book yet? I've been super busy and haven't gotten a chance to pick it up yet, but it looks interesting.

Posted by: Lauren at June 14, 2015 10:50 AM (DZq3O)

132 #123

Also, the first person to eat an egg: "Hey, look at that thing coming out of that chicken's butt. I wonder what it tastes like?"

Posted by: OregonMuse at June 14, 2015 10:50 AM (RML+n)

133 But not tutus. Unless you're a girl.



We all get to decide now. I think I am a Somalian girl with big tits.

Posted by: Mohamed, the goat fucker at June 14, 2015 10:51 AM (0FSuD)

134 Posted by: Anna Puma at June 14, 2015 10:46 AM (S55pX)


Nice, I am photoshopping and printing that and then gluing the result onto a box that I can place on my bookcase shelf to get that special erudite look!

Posted by: Hrothgar at June 14, 2015 10:51 AM (ftVQq)

135 Lauren, judging by Horde reaction on Neal Stephenson's new book... it seems evenly divided between loving it and disliking it.

Posted by: Anna Puma at June 14, 2015 10:51 AM (S55pX)

136 Also, the first person to eat an egg: "Hey, look at that thing coming out of that chicken's butt. I wonder what it tastes like?"

Lobster is the one I wonder about. "Hey! I'm going to put that thing in my mouth!"

Posted by: Weirddave at June 14, 2015 10:51 AM (WvS3w)

137 "it seems evenly divided between loving it and disliking it."

Crossbows!

Posted by: Lauren at June 14, 2015 10:52 AM (DZq3O)

138 136
Lobster is the one I wonder about. "Hey! I'm going to put that thing in my mouth!"
Posted by: Weirddave at June 14, 2015 10:51 AM (WvS3w)


Or crabs. Who was the first to decide to eat a gigantic sea spider?

Posted by: rickl at June 14, 2015 10:53 AM (sdi6R)

139 By the way, some of the writing in these comments is a bit Stiltoned.

Oh, I'm not fussy, all of these cheesy comments are Gouda nuff for me.

Posted by: OregonMuse at June 14, 2015 10:54 AM (RML+n)

140 Origin of cheese. I think Alton Brown conjectured that the natural rennet in goat hide bags used to transport milk might have created the first cheese. Don't know if it's true but it sounds possible.

Posted by: JTB at June 14, 2015 10:54 AM (FvdPb)

141 Lobster? Piffle..

Acadians in the swamps of south Louisiana seeing these mudbugs. "Hey Beaudreaux you dink dey be good to eat?"

Posted by: Anna Puma at June 14, 2015 10:54 AM (S55pX)

142 Posted by: Weirddave at June 14, 2015 10:51 AM (WvS3w)

My understanding is that, at least in the US, lobster was something the poor and Chinese ate until sometime in the 20th century. According to a multi-generational biography I read a couple of years ago, love of lobster was one of the things that "proved" the Chinese were inferior.

Posted by: Polliwog the 'Ette at June 14, 2015 10:54 AM (GDulk)

143 136 Also, the first person to eat an egg: "Hey, look at that thing coming out of that chicken's butt. I wonder what it tastes like?"

Lobster is the one I wonder about. "Hey! I'm going to put that thing in my mouth!"
Posted by: Weirddave at June 14, 2015 10:51 AM (WvS3w)
---
Hakarl. Once you get past the topnotes of fermented shark pee it's really quite tasty!

Posted by: All Hail Eris at June 14, 2015 10:54 AM (jR7Wy)

144 From what I understand eating shellfish started from the desperation of poor fishermen. "Well, maybe that horrible sea spider won't be *that* bad..."

Posted by: Lauren at June 14, 2015 10:55 AM (DZq3O)

145 "Nick and the Glimmung" shares a lot of stuff with "Galactic Pot Healer."

Posted by: Null at June 14, 2015 10:55 AM (xjpRj)

146 According to Wikipedia, beavers are not native to Venezuela.


Posted by: rickl at June 14, 2015 09:52 AM (sdi6R)


Perhaps you would like some of this Queso de coypu? No? We have some very fresh Tapir Koumiss, the lechera she have to slap it down two times today, it is so fresh.

We have all sorts of delicacies here at Castor's Casa de Queso!

Posted by: Kindltot at June 14, 2015 10:55 AM (3pRHP)

147 Off goat fcker sock.

Posted by: Nip Sip at June 14, 2015 10:55 AM (0FSuD)

148 Sad that a great university can't manage to find professors who actually love the craft of teaching.

One of the biggest problems is the tenure system's reliance on "publish or perish." There's nothing wrong with encouraging and even rewarding professors who publish, mind. When professors' jobs are dependant on who can publish the most articles in the most prestigious journals, however, that forces them to spend time writing and researching that they would otherwise be able to spend on teaching. And of course, that kind of system attracts the sort of professor who doesn't want to teach in the first place.

Posted by: Elisabeth G. Wolfe at June 14, 2015 10:56 AM (iuQS7)

149
Posted by: Lauren at June 14, 2015 10:50 AM (DZq3O)

Amazon's rating today.

Average customer review:

(420 reviews)


You reminded me I need to order this!

Posted by: Hrothgar at June 14, 2015 10:56 AM (ftVQq)

150
Posted by: Lauren at June 14, 2015 10:50 AM (DZq3O)

Amazon's rating today.

Average customer review: four of five stars (thanks pixy)

(420 reviews)


You reminded me I need to order this!

Posted by: Hrothgar at June 14, 2015 10:57 AM (ftVQq)

151 Anon: This is weird. I can _picture_ that sentence in the book, but I can't find it in my copy of _The Martian_. I _know_ I didn't hear it from the trailer because I watched the trailer with the sound off, so I didn't actually know that line was in the trailer, if you follow me.

This is driving me nuts. Does anyone have an e-book version of the Martian they can search electronically for the phrase "science the shit out of"?

Posted by: Trimegistus at June 14, 2015 10:57 AM (VXChD)

152 Consuming raw oysters HAS to have started this way: "Here, hold my mead - dare me to crack open that rock and let the innards slide down my gullet."

Posted by: goatexchange at June 14, 2015 10:58 AM (AWqX6)

153 Actually, come to think of it, that should be the second person to eat a mushroom since, in all probability, the first one died from it.

It was the Europeans who thought tomatoes were poisonous.

Posted by: Quintos Kaine at June 14, 2015 10:58 AM (ve56t)

154 Lobster? Piffle..

Acadians in the swamps of south Louisiana seeing these mudbugs. "Hey Beaudreaux you dink dey be good to eat?"

Posted by: Anna Puma at June 14, 2015 10:54 AM (S55pX)

The Japanese eat anglerfish. The first fisherman who carved one of those must have been facing imminent death by starvation.

Posted by: Secundus at June 14, 2015 10:59 AM (e4KYx)

155 Posted by: goatexchange at June 14, 2015 10:58 AM (AWqX6)

Sounds like it should be part of a fairytale where the hero tricks the giant into thinking he can get to the soft, tasty heart of a rock.

Posted by: Polliwog the 'Ette at June 14, 2015 10:59 AM (GDulk)

156 You've really got to love the Acadians. Their bastardization of French cuisine with various swamp creatures is truly a thing of beauty.

Posted by: Lauren at June 14, 2015 11:00 AM (DZq3O)

157 Christopher Anvil was a master of science fiction comedy. The short story "Cargo" is hilarious. I love the banjo birds.

Posted by: the guy that moves pianos for a living... at June 14, 2015 11:00 AM (W6ipS)

158 Lobster is the one I wonder about. "Hey! I'm going to put that thing in my mouth!"


Posted by: Weirddave at June 14, 2015 10:51 AM (WvS3w)

At one time, Massachusetts served lobster, then cheap and abundant, to prisoners so often they complained and wanted anything else for meals.

Posted by: Hrothgar at June 14, 2015 11:00 AM (ftVQq)

159 Weird Dave has a new post up.

Posted by: Fourth Horseman at June 14, 2015 11:01 AM (baCne)

160 Yum!!!!! Lobster!

http://www.ufunk.net/wp-content/uploads/2015/06/selection-du-weekend-144-62.jpg

Posted by: Anna Puma at June 14, 2015 11:01 AM (S55pX)

161 *whines* but how am I going to *be* a celebrity if I can't get my books in the library?

Posted by: Sabrina Chase at June 14, 2015 10:47 AM (GQdlU)


I read Jinxers this week and it was wonderful. You're already a celebrity to me!

Posted by: Tunafish at June 14, 2015 11:02 AM (6FsbQ)

162 The genus Homo goes back over 2 million years and all of its members, including we, have eaten anything and everything.

Posted by: eman at June 14, 2015 11:02 AM (MQEz6)

163

The quality of the teaching I received at the community colleges I went to was way better than that at the university level.
Posted by: OregonMuse at June 14, 2015 10:17 AM (RML+n)

***********
This kills me. You clearly had a prof who got through the rings or around them.

I have 18 years of experience as a professional editor, I'm a published author, have a B.A. in English from a Top 20 school, and a J.D., but the local community college won't even consider me for a job teaching composition because I don't have a master's in English. The idiot Phys. Ed. major who got a master's from Phoenix, and now "teaches" to supplement his salary as a junior-high football coach? No problem.

Grrr.

Posted by: Bob's House of Flannel Shirts and Wallet Chains at June 14, 2015 11:03 AM (yxw0r)

164 Oh, and regarding universities: I know at least one school (it's in the Midwest) where the Award for Excellence in Undergraduate Instruction was known more informally as the "kiss of death" award because if you won the teaching award your department head would immediately decide you weren't producing enough research, and start looking for a replacement.

Posted by: Trimegistus at June 14, 2015 11:03 AM (VXChD)

165 Completely obscure fictional cuisine from a science fiction novel.

glenna un petit - black cheese-like stuff extracted from the anal glands of a Vegan weasel-like creature. And tastes like rotten cocktail onions.

Posted by: Anna Puma at June 14, 2015 11:06 AM (S55pX)

166 Eating things like lobsters, eggs, oysters, etc. -- those all predate humanity. "We" were eating them before "we" were even human.

The things that baffle me are the ones that require extensive prep before they're edible -- like olives, or cassava. Who figured that out?

Posted by: Trimegistus at June 14, 2015 11:07 AM (VXChD)

167 Posted by: Secundus at June 14, 2015 10:59 AM (e4KYx)

I saw (relatively) recently that a Japanese show had on three generations of women. They gave each of the women a fresh fish (I'm assuming the same kind) and told them to use as much as possible of the fish in various dishes. The grandmother used something like 95% while the granddaughter could only use about 25%. It's pretty clear the grandmother grew up on short rations (probably during WW2, to be sure, but starvation was a common concern among the common people). You can tell how short people are on food based on what they're willing to do for protein. Makes me wonder how many Scots still eat haggis and how many Chinese actually eat the scorpions sold in the night markets or if they leave those for the tourists and then laugh when they get home.

Posted by: Polliwog the 'Ette at June 14, 2015 11:08 AM (GDulk)

168 G.G. Kay was also the editor of the Silmarillion, chosen by Tolkien before his death, and has a couple of VERY good pseudo-Imperial China novels in the same vein as Tigana and his others. Kay loves history, writes it well, with believable characters. But he doesn't like the twisting of fact to facilitate story of typical historical fiction, so he writes them as low-to-no-magic alternate history fantasies instead.

And he does it very well. Tigana is still his best, and the most fantastic of the lot. But Under Heaven, the 1st of the alt-China books, is lush and complex with bare hints of magic, and still a beautiful story.

Posted by: Shawn at June 14, 2015 11:09 AM (eK3xL)

169 and thanks for that pic, Anna, I've grabbed it.

Posted by: OregonMuse at June 14, 2015 11:10 AM (RML+n)

170 the local community college won't even consider me for a job teaching composition because I don't have a master's in English.

Now, on this one, I see both sides. I completely understand the requirement that one must have at least 18 hours of graduate credit, if not a Master's, in the field taught--that ought to ensure that the prof has the minimum education required to teach the subject competently. But I agree that UPhoenix shouldn't count, and considering that my experience as a translator wouldn't count toward my getting a job as a German prof because I have only a BA, I can totally relate to the frustration.

Posted by: Elisabeth G. Wolfe at June 14, 2015 11:12 AM (iuQS7)

171 I'm currently reading Paul Johnson's "The Birth of the Modern". It concerns the period roughly from 1815-1830. I started it a couple of years ago, then got distracted by something shiny. Last week i started over from the beginning.

The text is exactly 1000 pages long, not including endnotes and index.

https://tinyurl.com/ojsysyp

The first chapter deals with the aftermath of the Napoleonic Wars and the War of 1812, which resulted in one of the most successful peace settlements in history. The second chapter is about writers, artists, sculptors, and musicians.

I'm about 150 pages in. It's interesting, but I'm looking forward to the parts dealing with science and technology. At any rate, it's more pleasant to read about the birth of the modern world than to witness the beginning of a new Dark Age in real time.

Posted by: rickl at June 14, 2015 11:15 AM (sdi6R)

172 I just want to say thanks for recommending Terms Of Enlistment, really good so far. The only problem is I find it hard to believe that a corporal can have a relationship on a spaceship with an officer and nobody would say or punish them.

Posted by: Patrick From Ohio at June 14, 2015 11:20 AM (CxEX+)

173 I bought and read "The Martian" a couple of years ago. A pretty decent read given it was done by a beginning writer. I did come away with the clear conclusion that Andy Weir is a server weenie who knows absolutely nothing about aerospace in general, or how NASA and it's various departments operate, or even the basics of how government procurement works. Also, the book is so PC it creaks with every turn of the page. What he does know about Mars, spaceflight and the like he clearly got solely from reading the works of people like Robert Zubrin, Buzz Aldrin (yes, him too) and others who have written books on how best to get a manned mission to Mars. This had the net result of some real howlers in the way of technical and/or process errors slipping into the book. Being that Weir is a server guy, he at least did get the computer-related aspects of the story right. Even with all the errors, the book is worth a read, and I'll even see the movie, after it comes out on disc...

Posted by: The Oort Cloud - Source of all SMODs at June 14, 2015 11:22 AM (AYY6Y)

174 Mmmmm....limburger cheese!

A few times each year, I motorcycle to Monroe, Wisconsin to have a limburger on rye at Baumgartner's Tavern. Monroe is the only place in the US where is still made, and it's actually made several miles out of town because of its aroma.

Fresh limburger is pretty good. It isn't very pungent, and the flavor is much a good brie. I have my sandwich with an added slice of raw onion.

The only drawback is having toe wear a full-face motorcycle helmet on the way home. Whoa.

Posted by: Michael Haz at June 14, 2015 11:30 AM (APCKW)

175 I hate cheese and I cant understand why anyone would put in their mouth anything that offends their nose.
I hate cheese. I have never ever had a cheeseburger.

But I love pizza. Figure that out.

Posted by: JoeF. at June 14, 2015 12:25 PM (6OCqa)

176 Amish store down the road made a 1200 pound cheddar. They do this every year, then have a celebratory 'cut the big cheese' party.

Posted by: Cicero Kaboom! Kid at June 14, 2015 12:30 PM (jRh9M)

177 Oort: I'll defer to you on the NASA/government inside-baseball stuff, but I only spotted one genuine technical error in the book, and it's one Weir himself acknowledges. What problems did you find?

Posted by: Trimegistus at June 14, 2015 12:32 PM (VXChD)

178 Must de-lurk for a moment to say how much I love the comments and subjects here. Books, cheese and puns galore. A happy Sunday morning for me.

Posted by: Katherine at June 14, 2015 12:33 PM (5p9SP)

179 I know Im late, but The Honorable Schoolboy is one of my favorite books. I spent one summer travelling, taking care of sick relatives. I took that book with me and read it everywhere. It kept me sane during some points in my journeys. I reread it every summer, now on my deck with a glass of wine.

Posted by: Abby Coffey at June 14, 2015 12:45 PM (Bt2Rc)

180 I will never watch effing Matt Damon in anything. Will not do it. Don't care what he is in or how faithful the screenplay is to the source material. I didn't care for him as an actor before he started spewing his political nonsense so it is no loss to me anyway.

Finished the 4th book in Gary Corby's mysteries of Ancient Greece series, " The Marathon Conspiracy" about ancient Athens' first and only P.I. Light, fun reads. The cover art is worth the price of admission.

Posted by: Tuna at June 14, 2015 12:50 PM (JSovD)

181 Cheese, glorious cheese with the exception of goat cheese which I think tastes really icky.

Posted by: Tuna at June 14, 2015 12:53 PM (JSovD)

182

Finished the 4th book in Gary Corby's mysteries of Ancient Greece series, " The Marathon Conspiracy" about ancient Athens' first and only P.I. Light, fun reads. The cover art is worth the price of admission.
Posted by: Tuna at June 14, 2015 12:50 PM (JSovD)

Sounds a lot like the Falco Series by Lindsey Davis, he is a private informer set during Roman Period.

I will have to check it out.

Posted by: Patrick From Ohio at June 14, 2015 01:01 PM (CxEX+)

183 As far as the weird things we eat, I'd say someone saw an animal eating them first, then got hungry enough to say wth, let's give it a go.

I will share the book bundle on all my social media, but will buy mine, no need to enter me. I have a Kindle, do I have to figure out what format to use, or will it take me by the hand and tell me which format Kindle is?

Posted by: Tammy al-Thor at June 14, 2015 01:04 PM (L+Tc2)

184 Also keep meaning to say how much I love this thread, not the least because it seems to bring out lurkers.

Hello, lurker bees, and thank you so much, Oregon Muse!

Posted by: Tammy al-Thor at June 14, 2015 01:05 PM (L+Tc2)

185 90% on the 1984 quiz. Missed, the final one, about pen names for Orwell.

Posted by: Iowa Jim at June 14, 2015 01:17 PM (ekIVI)

186 The Martian trailer was kinda meh except for the line "I'm gonna have to science the shit outta this!" That gives me a lot of hope for it.

KS Robinson has a bad habit for his trilogies:

Book 1: Big idea, great characters, interesting events
Book 2: Politics, politics, politics (and guess what, the progs are always right and their opponents are stupid/evil) with some few events
Book 3: Prog politics and wandering around while thinking

He did it with the Mars trilogy and he did it with the Science in the capitol series (Forty Signs of Rain, etc...)

The exception is the "Orange County" trilogy, but each book in that one was a completely different story/future...

Posted by: Captain Comic at June 14, 2015 01:19 PM (pKrex)

187 Heh.

I recall Red Mars and Green Mars as being great.

And Blue Mars was an utter piece of crap.

It's like the author was exploring new literary frontiers ... it's like he was attempting the heretofore-thought impossible task of writing a novel without any kind of a plot, or the main character(s) working toward any recognizable goal.

Early on in it, he introduces one character who sparks the reader's interest, but then he kills her off right quick ... the one interesting character in an entire book full of dull.

Ugh, worst ending to a trilogy EVAR.

Posted by: Lewis at June 14, 2015 01:42 PM (Zv1gb)

188 Patrick: I loved the Falco books.
Tammy al-Thor thanks for the welcome.
A little bit on topic. I like to make cream cheese at home, and so strange am I, I use the drained whey to make our evening bread. Tangy.

Posted by: Katherine at June 14, 2015 01:45 PM (5p9SP)

189 I was young and malleable enough to enjoy reading Red Mars when it first came out, and I made it to the end of Blue Mars without ragequitting, but I think I would have dumped the trilogy a hundred pages into Red if I tried to read it today. Robinson was worse than a Marxist retread - he had this pseudo-Lovelockian mystical notion of "environment" without life. Sort of a soft-power version of that nihilist guy that Ace was talking about last year who got ripped off for that True Detectives show.

I look back at that era and marvel that a philosophically nihilistic misanthrope like Kim Stanley Robinson could be a core member of a writers' movement called "the Humanists" without everyone involved expiring from a toxic dose of irony.

Posted by: Mitch H. at June 14, 2015 01:46 PM (hmXKG)

190 Well. That was embarrassing:

4 out of a possible 10

As the Party says, Ignorance Is Strength.

Posted by: Mike Hammer, etc., etc. at June 14, 2015 02:12 PM (F2IAQ)

191 Posted by: Katherine at June 14, 2015 01:45 PM (5p9SP)


Welcome, welcome, and oooooooh on both your homemade cream cheese and your use of whey.

If you're of a mind to share, I am fascinated as to how both happen!

Posted by: Tammy al-Thor at June 14, 2015 02:58 PM (L+Tc2)

192 Posted by: Katherine at June 14, 2015 01:45 PM (5p9SP)

Hey, great minds and all that! I use the whey in our sourdough.

Posted by: Polliwog the 'Ette at June 14, 2015 03:00 PM (GDulk)

193 Thank you for your kind words, Katherine, and don't be afraid to jump up and say "hi" once in awhile, like you did today.

Posted by: OregonMuse at June 14, 2015 03:04 PM (RML+n)

194 And even though this is the book thread, I'd like to hear more about this homemade cream cheese myself.

Posted by: OregonMuse at June 14, 2015 03:06 PM (RML+n)

195 You know, actually, it looks like the weekly food thread is scheduled to go live about 45 minutes from now (4PM Eastern), so maybe that would be a more appropriate venue for the homemade cream cheese details (and the home-baked bread thereof). Yummy.

Posted by: OregonMuse at June 14, 2015 03:10 PM (RML+n)

196 Mastering Cheese.

Now that's funny, right there. Genius.

Posted by: Insert Clever Name Here at June 14, 2015 03:39 PM (1WydT)

197 Mastering Cheese.

Now that's funny, right there. Genius.

Posted by: Insert Clever Name Here at June 14, 2015 03:39 PM (1WydT)

198 Recently finished "The Kindegarden of Eden" by Evan Sayet. Entertaining political theory of why liberals are the way the are. Its not much more than a pamplet at 120 pages, and a good chuck of it can be found in the speech he gave at the Heritage Foundation which is online, but I do recommend it.

Posted by: Darth Randall at June 14, 2015 04:44 PM (6n332)

199 I was wandering around the intertubes and came across the wonderful phrase "cheddar mammoth."

The mind boggles with delighted absurdist wonder.

"And then the cheddar mammoth rolled out from the thick stand of trees to my left. When it saw me, it let out a shrill squee of cheesy anger and charged. My cheese slicer suddenly seemed very, very small."

Posted by: filbert at June 14, 2015 05:00 PM (h6Mpm)

200 It was the Europeans who thought tomatoes were poisonous.
Posted by: Quintos Kaine at June 14, 2015 10:58 AM (ve56t)

Well, they ARE in the nightshade family, right?

Posted by: RushBabe at June 14, 2015 07:31 PM (zdw2Z)

201 195 OregonMuse, placed where requested.
The wonderful thing about the bread, is that once dough is mixed (takes less than ten minutes) it sits placidly in the refrigerator waiting to be made fresh the rest of the week.
I admit I'm lazy as the day is long and having fresh dough ready to go, is a great thing.
Flour, salt, water and yeast. No preservatives or additives and if I don't govern them carefully, my family will eat the entire loaf in one fell swoop, and look for more at dinner time.

Posted by: Katherine at June 14, 2015 09:03 PM (5p9SP)

202 Biggus Dickus is a joke name? Who knew?

Posted by: Incontinentia Buttocks at June 14, 2015 09:42 PM (IBZ02)

203 "114 Posted by: TxDan at June 14, 2015 10:25 AM (mBNLc)

------

So "cheesy" is a false cognate? Fascinating, mainly because it seems oddly appropriate somehow, and I like cheese.

Posted by: Richard Cheese at June 14, 2015 10:43 AM (F1Z8f)"

Whoa,"false cognate?" High-falutin term there. Actually had to look it up. Actually the Urdu term is "chiz" though I don't know whether the i is pronounced as an e or an "ih" sound. Clearly it crossed over to English long enough ago that most people are not aware that it is not related to a dairy product.

Actually "cheesy" may have crossed to English at about the same time that American industrialized cheese started producing really inferior cheddar from skim milk but adding lard to get the fat content up a bit. The butter fat was being sold separately as butter, but the skim milk cheese tasted bad. The addition of lard did not really help, but the cheese was being sold cheaper than good cheese so the average joe or joette could more easily afford it. Not to mention the exceptional moronette or moron. We Americans developed a really bad reputation for cheese from the mid-1800's through the late 1900's. Only now are we beginning to regain a good reputation in artisan cheese.

Lame to comment on such an old thread, I know, but I just noticed the learned Richard Cheese's reply. Dr. Paul Kindstedt's Cheese and Culture does a fine job discussing the decline and rebirth of American artisan cheese. I don't remember if he addressed the whole Urdu chiz etymology though.

Posted by: TxDan at June 14, 2015 09:44 PM (mBNLc)

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