Sunday Morning Book Thread 06-07-2015: The Man Within [OregonMuse]


churchill outing.jpg
Winston Churchill Goes For An Outing


Good morning to all of you morons and moronettes and bartenders everywhere and all the ships at sea. Welcome to AoSHQ's stately, prestigious, internationally acclaimed and high-class Sunday Morning Book Thread. The only AoSHQ thread that is so hoity-toity, pants are required. Or kilts. Kilts are OK, too. But not tutus. Unless you're a girl.


It is what you read when you don't have to that determines what you will be when you can't help it. -Oscar Wilde


The Most Interesting Man In The World

I'm speaking, of course of Sir Winston Leonard Spencer Churchill. Horde member in good standing "scottst" has a friend who put together what is probably the only coffee table book about this great man.

The Man Within is beautiful with many never seen before photographs, forwards from great grandson Randolph Churchill, who came to the launch party, and signed books, and the director of the Churchill Institute or Foundation or whatever.

The quotes are, of course, Churchillian which is to say erudite and penetrating. There is just enough prose to flesh out a complete picture of the man, truly the most interesting man in the world who no longer has a statue in the White House.

I think Churchill is one of the most interesting men in the world, period. And in addition to his writing, speaking, and political talents,

Few know that he was also an excellent athlete, painter, and bricklayer. His determination for success in all aspects of his life proved to be an enormously important component to all he encountered. Churchill was a ranking polo player until age fifty. He played polo with the same vigor that he played politics and acted as a war leader. And, under the nom de brush, Charles Morin, he painted landscapes with that same vigor, a critical method of avoiding what he called his "black dog" depression. Sir Oswald Birley remarked "If Sir Winston had given the time to art that he has given to politics, he would have been by all odds the world's greatest painter." Churchill built the brick walls of Chartwell, his country home, briefly becoming a trades-union member as a result.

Here's a San Francisco Chronicle article that explains how she came to publish the book. Shorter Chron: crowdsourcing.

"May I Now Rip Your Bodice Off?" "Yes, You May."

This is one of my favorite passages of Scripture:

There be three things which are too wonderful for me, yea, four which I know not: The way of an eagle in the air; the way of a serpent upon a rock; the way of a ship in the midst of the sea; and the way of a man with a maid.
--Proverbs 30:18-19

That last bit there, yeah, there's a lot to that. It comes to my mind frequently these days, what with all the fake rape stories floating around and feminists dumbing down the definition of 'rape' and ratcheting up what constitutes 'consent' and universities attempting to regulate student sexual activity with silly rules about requiring explicit consent at each stage of foreplay. Really?

There's something missing there. I mean, sure the university has to do this stupid stuff to avoid getting itself into a morass of Title IX lawsuits, but feminists have seized the opportunity to further their own agenda. They've brought in the whole toolkit of critical theory, and the oppressive patriarchy and complaints about gender bias and supposed female powerlessness to force the rest of us to accept their view that the only reasonable and moral basis for a sexual relationship is an a priori straight-up consent transaction, that the woman may unilaterally rescind at any time during the proceedings, and anything else is an assault on women (i.e rape).

However, how men and women interact with each other, the steps of the mating dance, is far more complicated. And the feminist square-peg-in-a-round-hole narrative totally ignores the popularity of the "bodice-ripping" romance novels, which are almost universally written by women for women, and hardly ever read by men. And the market is huge. Women are buying these books by the truckload. I found a list of supposedly the best bodice ripper novels and the intro is instructive:

This is a list for Bodice Ripper romance novels that you think are a 5 star read. The best of the best - with alpha heroes, un-politically correct action, forced seduction, rape, sold into slavery plot lines, mistresses and cheating - the no-holds bar world of Bodice Ripper!

Notice the selling points: (a) alpha heroes, (b) forced seduction, (c) rape, and (d) sold into slavery plotlines. But where's the consent? It's not even in the equation. Oh, I'm sure that after the female lead is raped/seduced, she eventually falls in love with the alpha male and willingly and joyfully surrenders to his alpha maleness (I haven't actually read any of these, I've just heard that that's the way most of them turn out), but that's all ex post facto.

And then beyond the bodice-rippers, there's the 50 Shades books, which takes the bodice ripper one step further, and again, huge seller. So I think there's something about how the relationships are portrayed in these books that touches women's psyche at some basic level. Women are attracted to strength. No woman likes being the partner of a weak man. I'm sure feminists would like to believe that this whole aspect of male/female relationships doesn't exist, but E L James' bank account says otherwise.

And of course, James' success has resulted in other authors piling on: 8 Series to Start After You Finish the Fifty Shades Trilogy. Don't get me wrong. I do not recommend the 50 Shades series and I'm certainly not recommending any of these wannabes, which look even sleazier, if that's possible. My point is, if what feminists want to be true is indeed true, then why are these books so popular? (hint: it must be that damn patriarchy again!)

Feminism is trying to force us all to live in a world that simply doesn't exist. Fake rape stories and real lawsuits, not to mention damaged and ruined lives, are the toxic sludge that results from mixing feminism with the sexual revolution and letting it simmer for five decades. We'll be cleaning up these messes for a very long time.

I wonder if Mattress Girl has read the 50 Shades books?


Oh, Those Dominant Women

Earlier this week, ace stole my thunder a little bit by linking to a piece in the left-wing Guardian I was planning on discussing that bemoans the "gender bias" towards men in the publishing world. It's a festering, pus-filled sore of identity politics and progressive butthurt and ace rightly pointed this out.

But my reaction was "Huh!? What planet is she living on?"

A few weeks ago (and unfortunately, I can't find the post) zombie, who works in the publishing industry in California, posted a long comment about how pretty much all the editor and decision-making positions are held by women. And the author of this piece, who tried to get his book published through a brick-and-mortar publishing house, ran into the same thing, i.e. what matters most was just playing to the tastes of upper-middle class women in New York City.

So let me mansplain this to you:

Women dominate the publishing industry. They are the gatekeepers who decide what does and what does not get published. If women are underrepresented at all the prestige literary awards and on the committees that decide who gets the awards, that's not the patriarchy's fault. Where's the patriarchy? The patriarchy was exorcised from the publishing world a long time ago.

Also, after reading that Guardian piece, it was amusing to read this earlier Guardian piece, EL James, JK Rowling, Hilary Mantel … the women who dominated publishing in 2012.

It's like the more you give them, the louder they shriek.


True Crime

There's no crime like true crime. Here are ten true-crime books, some are relatively new, some are classics of the genre. I was particularly interested in The Road Out of Hell: Sanford Clark and the True Story of the Wineville Murders because it's the basis for the Clint Eastwood directed movie 'The Changeling', which I thought was pretty good:

From 1926 to 1928, Gordon Stewart Northcott committed at least 20 murders on a chicken ranch outside of Los Angeles. His thirteen-year-old nephew, Sanford Clark, was the sole surviving victim of the killing spree. Forced to take part in the murders, Sanford carried tremendous guilt all his life. Yet despite his youth and the trauma, he helped gain some justice for the dead and their families by testifying at Northcott's trial-which led to his conviction and execution. It was a shocking story, but perhaps the most shocking part of all is the extraordinarily ordinary life Clark went on to live as a decorated WWII vet, a devoted husband of 55 years, a loving father, and a productive citizen.

Eastwood said, "How the hell did this guy go on to be a loving father and grandfather? How did he bury all that crap? That's a story in itself."

No, you can't make this stuff up.


What I'm Reading

I would like to thank moron commenter 'MotherGoos3' in last week's thread for recommending

[the] Sparrowhawk series by Edward Cline -- probably mentioned here before, but it's new to me. Historical fiction set in a time leading up to the revolutionary war. Great characters and attention to detail regarding political climate leading up to the conflict. Eager to give the series to my grandsons when they are ready to digest what the books have to offer.

Based on this, I bought the first 3 in the series. Serendipitously, they were on sale for 99 cents each. Since then, they're $2.99, which is still a pretty good deal.

I was pleased to discover that Sparrowhawk, Book One: Jack Frake, the first book in the series starts out with an Ayn Rand quote, so I knew right then it wasn't to be one of those stupid revisionist things filled with anachronistic women characters reciting modern feminist talking points or gay Minutemen eating pudding.

The second and third books in the series are Sparrowhawk, Book Two: Hugh Kenrick and Sparrowhawk, Book Three: Caxton.

Cline is an author worth looking into. Other than the 'Sparrowhawk' books, he's written a series of detective novels set in the 1930s, a suspense series, and a few one-offs.

He's also written non-fiction books, including Islam's Reign of Terror, and a companion volume A Handbook on Islam: A Counter-Jihad Guide for the Uninitiated, the Ill-Advised, the Misinformed, and the Lied-To.

He blogs here, which appears to be a capital 'O' Objectivist web site. I guess this means that religion in general and Christianity in particular is not going to come off well in Cline's novels. Well, OK. I would rather have to deal with those kind of errors than having to endure stories about colonial crossdressers and complaints about patriarchy from a poor raped woman who goes around carrying her featherbed on her back.


___________

So that's all for this week. As always, book thread tips, suggestions, bribes, rumors, threats, and insults may be sent to OregonMuse, Proprietor, AoSHQ Book Thread, at the book thread e-mail address: aoshqbookthread, followed by the 'at' sign, and then 'G' mail, and then dot cee oh emm.

What have you all been reading this week? Hopefully something good, because, as you all know, life is too short to be reading lousy books.

Posted by: Open Blogger at 09:04 AM




Comments

(Jump to bottom of page)

1 This is not the New York Times Book Review?

What have I done?

Posted by: Breathless NYT ninny at June 07, 2015 09:07 AM (+1T7c)

2 Working my way through Manchester's three-volume biography of WSC (The Last Lion). When he was posted to India, Churchill injured his left shoulder debarking a small boat. Henceforth, he played polo with one arm strapped to his torso.

Fascinating, imperfect giant.

Posted by: butch at June 07, 2015 09:09 AM (HLx1C)

3 A Book Bonanza this week! A library sale, and a trip to the Book Barn at the dump yielded the next three month's-worth of enjoyable reading.

Top o' the list is a book I recommend unreservedly to the Morons: Pope Brock's Charlatan is a biography of "Dr." John "Goat Gland" Brinkley. The book is well-written (better, in fact, than many highly regarded bios from Big-Name Authors) and applies enough humor and background of the wacko medical crazes of the early 20th Century to give an excellent portrait of one of America's biggest nutballs (SWIDT?),

Not done with that one yet, with several others ahead, including (for light reading) yet another Ed McBain (I love his 87th Precinct books) and a couple of Nero Wolfe novels. Can't imagine I've never read any of those! If I like them, there are maybe 20 more NW titles at the Book Barn....

Posted by: MrScribbler at June 07, 2015 09:15 AM (P8YHq)

4 Oh, Those Dominant Women

I was reading this piece over at the FreeBeacon this morning (it's headlining atm);

Splendid Strength
Review: The Iliad, Translated by Peter Green


a nice snack, then I hit the authors link:

http://freebeacon.com/author/kate-havard/

Some good stuff there to read, including what looks like her first entry:
The Lost Art of Reading
Review: Arthur M. Melzer's 'Philosophy Between the Lines'

BY: Kate Havard
October 18, 2014 5:00 am

The art of esoteric reading---scrutinizing a text for "hidden meanings"---has been lost.

Posted by: artisanal 'ette at June 07, 2015 09:16 AM (qCMvj)

5 I just finished the biography of Steve Jobs, written by Walter Isaacson. Very well done, but reading about Jobs can make you crazy. The man could be such an arrogant SOB. But I found the book very interesting, and I've never owned an Apple product.

I highly recommend it.

Posted by: HH at June 07, 2015 09:17 AM (Qia1Z)

6 Sadly, I think I've exhausted all the Nero Wolfe novels, as well as all the Wodehouse Jeeves novels. Thanks to the audio book collection at my branch library. Listened to a Preston and Child Pendergast novel on the drive to/from the beach. Now I've got The Island of Dr. Moreau ready to start.

Posted by: Lincolntf at June 07, 2015 09:19 AM (2cS/G)

7 as usual, I'm reading sci-fi...

for the Neal Stephenson fans, he has a new book out

Seveneves: A Novel Hardcover -- May 19 2015

From the #1 New York Times bestselling author of Anathem, Reamde, and Cryptonomicon comes an exciting and thought-provoking science fiction epic---a grand story of annihilation and survival spanning five thousand years

What would happen if the world were ending?


This is next on my list.

Posted by: artisanal 'ette at June 07, 2015 09:19 AM (qCMvj)

8 I'm reading a reprint of an older work. _War of the Gods_ by Poul Anderson. It's based on an actual Danish saga, but Anderson does a fantastic job of turning it into a novel. Damn that man could write well. It's a crime and a tragedy that he has been dropped from the SF/Fantasy canon since his death.

Posted by: Trimegistus at June 07, 2015 09:21 AM (r1Whx)

9 Now, back to reading.
My early mornings are reserved for just that.
Disappearing into sci-fi.

Posted by: artisanal 'ette at June 07, 2015 09:21 AM (qCMvj)

10 Just picked up the first of the Sparrowhawk books, like I need something else to fill my Kindle up.

Posted by: GGE of the Moron Horde, NC Chapter at June 07, 2015 09:23 AM (/2KMt)

11 "It is what you read when you don't have to that determines what you will be when you can't help it."

What the majority of today's Americans read when they don't have to is: nothing.

Not too hard to follow the logic from there.

Posted by: torquewrench at June 07, 2015 09:26 AM (noWW6)

12 If you want to understand Churchill in the context of his family, "The Churchills: In Love and War" by Mary S. Lovell is a fascinating read. They were on a downward slide after the First Duke of Marlborough, and Blenheim was an enormous drain on family reserves, but in the 19th Century the family got a shot in the arm financially by importing two American beauties, Jennie Jerome and Consuelo Vanderbilt. Blenheim was still a beautiful burden for Winston, who wrote in part for cash to maintain the family estate.

Posted by: All Hail Eris at June 07, 2015 09:27 AM (jR7Wy)

13 Being fascinated by my smaller and more numerous primate cousins, I saw and ordered the book "Primates of Park Avenue."

Never know, someday Sasquatches may just embrace civilization so that they can take advantage of all those all-you-can-eat restaurants out there!

Posted by: Sasquatch at June 07, 2015 09:28 AM (7aV8U)

14 While I am generally a fan of Churchill, a lot of dead Brit soldiers in Turkey are not.



He was born to the manor, BUT he sure as hell could drink. FDR's wife, the fag, reportedly told him he had to go home or he would kill FDR from drinking.



Wished he hadn't gone home.

Posted by: Nip Sip at June 07, 2015 09:28 AM (0FSuD)

15 Well, that was fun. Big black bear just ambled past me as I was sitting on my porch. Stood up, looked at me, and moved on. Maybe 8 feet away.

No coffee needed now. Perhaps some new underwear, though.

Back to reading the content.

Posted by: Bob's House of Flannel Shirts and Wallet Chains at June 07, 2015 09:30 AM (yxw0r)

16 The one thing I remember about Churchill was the speech he gave between the wars basically blaming America for the rise of communism and fascism in Europe because we had the temerity to rescue England from itself (thanks in no small part to a certain telegram, discovered by the Admiralty, and who exactly was Lord of the Admiralty at the time? Curious...).

The only good thing I have to say about Winnie is he was English to the core and he served his King and his country to the utmost of his ability. Otherwise fuck that hooch swilling limey bastard, we should have let the Germans have them.

Posted by: GGE of the Moron Horde, NC Chapter at June 07, 2015 09:30 AM (/2KMt)

17 Eastwood said, "How the hell did this guy go on to be a loving father and grandfather? How did he bury all that crap? That's a story in itself."

========
You could ask that about every sonderkommando. Most, however, were murdered by the nazis. A movie called Son of Saul is due to be released about the sonderkommandos rec'd high marks at Cannes.

Posted by: Bruce With a Wang! at June 07, 2015 09:31 AM (iQIUe)

18 I listened to the 50-shades-of-gray audio book. Loved the voice. Liked the protagonist until about chapter 3 when she started her SM training. Skipped to the end. The ending was ok but my understanding is the sequels do a gone-with-the-wind take which would negate the ending character growth. Anna is the down-to-earth father-on-a-pedestal girl that every man wants to marry. Works in a hardware store. What-a-pun. Delicious hack writing for women. Sex scenes are designed for women which I found enlightening by what they included and what they avoided.

Posted by: Shades at June 07, 2015 09:31 AM (PGh+Q)

19 I'm not much of a reader so maybe someone could fill me in on Churchill, between periods of tonight's game.

Posted by: TFG at June 07, 2015 09:32 AM (sAXJ5)

20 Writing a script for Amazon Studios. Not sure why I am even trying. I went through something like 20 pages of their 'comedy' script summaries and was thoroughly dismayed.

Most are centered on slackers trying to deal with the real world. That might be funny except there are so many of them written. Several were about saving funeral homes. Really?

One I just might give high praise to is about a small TSA office. They are writing it as a comedy. On their title page, they even listed a WGA #.

There was a script about an over-achieving female college student, after a long night of drinking with roommate and engaging in Drunken Combat Monopoly who wakes up to find she has become a werewolf.

Also a Fifty Shades kind of rip-off. Of an anxious young woman recruited to become part of the President of the United States private sex-ring. Yeah even the Secret Service is involved in vetting the candidates. *thud*

A security issue was also cropping up. Because the guides and software like Celtx says to put name, address, phone #, and email address on the Title Page many of them are. Even though these scripts will be seen by anyone online. As opposed to sending a script to an agent and hoping the agent's slush pile reader finds your script.

But do have 18 pages of script written. So progress right?

Posted by: Anna Puma (+SmuD) at June 07, 2015 09:33 AM (Gz2AJ)

21
My favorite Churchill quote was in anticipation of the nazis invading Britain, he argued even a British housewife is capable of grabbing a meat fork off the dinner table and plunging into the chest of the invading hun.

See, Churchill was a feminist.

Posted by: Bruce With a Wang! at June 07, 2015 09:33 AM (iQIUe)

22 @15

Holy fcuk! Do not try to shot a Black Bear with hollow point pistol rounds. It gets stuck in their fat.



That and it really pisses them off. Don't axe how I know.

Posted by: Nip Sip at June 07, 2015 09:34 AM (0FSuD)

23 Here's a question I have: if you shoot at an animal, say a bear, and it gets enraged -- how does the animal know to be enraged at you? How does it know that you pointing the shiny thing and making a bang noise over on the other side of the yard has anything to do with the hurty feeling in its shoulder?

Posted by: Trimegistus at June 07, 2015 09:36 AM (r1Whx)

24 "Very well done, but reading about Jobs can make you crazy. The man could be such an arrogant SOB."

Liberals are people:

(a) Who would have an instant huge hysterical freakout if you told them about an egocentric male corporate CEO who considered the blue handicapped parking spaces to be there for his personal use, despite being in fine health when he began this habit and for many years thereafter.

(b) Who profess to disdain conspicuous consumerism.

(c) Who created a huge irrational conspicuous-consumer cargo cult around products marketed by a CEO with a history of behaving as set forth in part (a).

(d) Who don't see anything out of the ordinary in holding beliefs (a) through (c) all at the same time.

Posted by: torquewrench at June 07, 2015 09:37 AM (noWW6)

25 @23


Has to be a joke. They have eyes, they hunt. You piss them off, you are the hunted.




Seriously, this has to be explained?



Barrel.

Posted by: Nip Sip at June 07, 2015 09:38 AM (0FSuD)

26 My favorite Churchill factoid is that he was a deadly accurate marksman well into old age.

Back in the Nineties, Steve Jackson Games published a series of books for their GURPS roleplaying game, with historical figures statted up according to the game rules. Of the World War II leaders, the consensus was that if they've got pistols, Churchill can easily take down the others, but if it's hand-to-hand Hitler would probably win.

Posted by: Trimegistus at June 07, 2015 09:39 AM (r1Whx)

27 Nip: You're saying bears know how guns work?

Posted by: Trimegistus at June 07, 2015 09:40 AM (r1Whx)

28 Wait a sec, the bible says we are supposed to be nailing the maids?

Damn I went to the wrong church I guess...

on a more serious note I am reading Roderick Thorpe's The Detective...

It is kind of a prequel to Die Hard indirectly.

Posted by: Sven S Blade a.k.a. El Assassin@sven10077 at June 07, 2015 09:40 AM (/4AZU)

29 Posted by: Lincolntf at June 07, 2015 09:19 AM (2cS/G)
======================


Have you read all the Blandings stories? And of course the great Uncle Fred, Earl of Ickenham, stories? For a quiet night at home I also love the Oldest Member stories.

If you've read them all you'll just have to read them again and again.

Posted by: MTF at June 07, 2015 09:40 AM (DkJ4E)

30 I remember I used to read and love true crime when I was in college (back before I decided to give up my voracious reading habit for doing Chem E schoolwork). I devoured Ann Something's books (the lady who wrote about Ted Bundy) until I found myself locking the door to my room within my dorm suite, which I had never done before, because I was scared some lunatic might come in and kill me.

Thanks to the Moron who mentioned the Liturgical Mysteries series. I'm on the third one, but alas, I haven't read it lately because of work and other things. I thought that perhaps the author was a little too hard on Baptists and we Pentecostals, but I realized he was also brutal to Episcopalians (the protagonist is Episcopalian). But not in an unchristian way. He clearly takes the faith seriously but has fun with silly things Christians do. And he's certainly not Pc, even threw in some Hillary mocking in one of the books.

I basically read only detective mysteries, so I would like to check out the Cline mysteries. But first, I think I'll have to get through at least some of the multitude of unread ebooks I've downloaded.

Posted by: chique d'afrique (the artist formerly known as african chick) at June 07, 2015 09:41 AM (shFKH)

31 Those liking the narrative type books mentioned may well also try 'The Frontiersman' series by Allan W. Eckert. It's historically accurate research about Tecumseh and the pioneers of the mid-west. TRULY gripping stuff. There are many books in the series, but 'The Frontiersman' really starts it off.

Those Indians? Not the soft-of Nature types you might say. The ways they had of dispatching enemies would do ISIS proud.

Posted by: Mr Wolf at June 07, 2015 09:41 AM (TU1Sh)

32 They know that you are there, they are experiencing noise and pain, and that if you weren't there, or if you were in their belly, maybe the noise and pain would go away, too. Animals have a basic sense of cause and effect.

Posted by: Lincolntf at June 07, 2015 09:43 AM (2cS/G)

33 >>>Also a Fifty Shades kind of rip-off. Of an anxious young woman recruited
to become part of the President of the United States private sex-ring.
Yeah even the Secret Service is involved in vetting the candidates.
*thud*<<<



Errah, oh great, another story about me and my brothers.

Posted by: zombie JFK at June 07, 2015 09:43 AM (xsnUW)

34 31 Posted by: Mr Wolf at June 07, 2015 09:41 AM (TU1Sh)

My family worked the southeastern Ohio area starting in the 1770s...

You know the Shawnee cry-ins we have in Ohio?

We don't have Shawneee cry-ins in Ohio nor the Miami...

turns out light howitzers worked wonders against bow and arrow....

My second favorite book in the series is "Wilderness Empire"

Posted by: Sven S Blade a.k.a. El Assassin@sven10077 at June 07, 2015 09:44 AM (/4AZU)

35 I read the previously recommended The Young Lions by Irwin Shaw. This is a novel about World War II and the years leading up to it. Great characters. One sympathizes with those on both sides of the conflict. Great dialogue, especially that which is concerned with various views of war. A classic to read and enjoy.

Posted by: Zoltan at June 07, 2015 09:44 AM (lFkeD)

36 No, never read the Uncle Fred stories, just looked them up, they sound like fun. Putting them on the list. Thanks.

Posted by: Lincolntf at June 07, 2015 09:44 AM (2cS/G)

37 I'm a big fan of Walter Mosely's Easy Rawlins novels, crime set in post war L.A.

Beautiful use if the language, though sometimes a bit weak on plot. Really good reads.

Posted by: MTF at June 07, 2015 09:45 AM (DkJ4E)

38 Yay, book thread! Thanks, OM!

Posted by: @votermom at June 07, 2015 09:45 AM (cbfNE)

39 Mosely's biggest fault is that he doesn't write enough! I think he's so excellent that I wish his production was doubled.

Posted by: MTF at June 07, 2015 09:47 AM (DkJ4E)

40 27
Nip: You're saying bears know how guns work?

Posted by: Trimegistus at June 07, 2015 09:40 AM (r1Whx)

Having been down this road any animal that you shoot at knows.
Trust me. Deer, Bears, Ducks, Dove, Quail. etc.
If they didn't they would be a hell of lot easier to kill and I would have a lot more ammo.


Posted by: Nip Sip at June 07, 2015 09:48 AM (0FSuD)

41 Oh, and they had that awful 50 shades book in the grocery store. I don't think I had even seen one before. (This was a week or so ago.)

So I picked one up to see what sad females have been going gaga over. I randomly opened a page in the middle of the book, read a bit,almost spat at the stupid thing and walked away muttering disgustedly and being ashamed, yet again, to be lumped in with women.

WTH, women? Are your lives so sad and pathetic that you stoop to reading such nonsense? Ugh.

Women Have really been covering themselves in glory lately.

Posted by: chique d'afrique (the artist formerly known as african chick) at June 07, 2015 09:48 AM (shFKH)

42 Oh, and they had that awful 50 shades book in the grocery store. I don't think I had even seen one before. (This was a week or so ago.)

So I picked one up to see what sad females have been going gaga over. I randomly opened a page in the middle of the book, read a bit,almost spat at the stupid thing and walked away muttering disgustedly and being ashamed, yet again, to be lumped in with women.

WTH, women? Are your lives so sad and pathetic that you stoop to reading such nonsense? Ugh.

Women Have really been covering themselves in glory lately.

Posted by: chique d'afrique (the artist formerly known as african chick) at June 07, 2015 09:48 AM (shFKH)

43 From Dan Simmons' "Flashback", set in future LA and Denver:

"...Los Angeles (was) celebrating the events of that old holiday called 9-11, September 11 2001, the date -- as Val had been taught in school -- of the beginning of successful resistance to the old imperialist American hegemony and a turning point in the creation of the New Caliphate and other hopeful signs of the New World Order. He knew that the Christian churches were ringing their bells in their annual attempts to join in the celebrations of the hajjis at scores of Los Angeles's mosques and to show their solidarity, understanding, and forgiveness."

Posted by: All Hail Eris at June 07, 2015 09:48 AM (jR7Wy)

44 I read The Magicians trilogy by Lev Grossman. The characters are so unlikable until the 3rd book. I feel like it is halfway between literary fiction and fantasy.

Posted by: @votermom at June 07, 2015 09:48 AM (cbfNE)

45 "Women dominate the publishing industry. They are the gatekeepers who decide what does and what does not get published. If women are underrepresented at all the prestige literary awards and on the committees that decide who gets the awards, that's not the patriarchy's fault. Where's the patriarchy? The patriarchy was exorcised from the publishing world a long time ago."

See also:

How the fashion industry, represented overwhelmingly by women and gay men, have presented runway models with the frames of 14-year-old boys as the aspirational epitome of the adult female body shape.

Feminists then freak out and say that this presentation of unrealistic, unattainable body images is a horrid scheme of "the patriarchy".

Wait, what?

Posted by: torquewrench at June 07, 2015 09:49 AM (noWW6)

46 For those interested in Churchill but don't have time for massive, multi-volume books, there are a number of articles about him on the Art Of Manliness site. They are very enjoyable.

Everyone should read the Nero Wolfe series. There isn't a bad one in the bunch. As I've said before, any author who uses the word 'thaumaturge' correctly by a 20th century character deserves our patronage.

Posted by: JTB at June 07, 2015 09:50 AM (FvdPb)

47 Thanks to the Moron who mentioned the Liturgical Mysteries series. I'm on the third one, but alas, I haven't read it lately because of work and other things. I thought that perhaps the author was a little too hard on Baptists and we Pentecostals, but I realized he was also brutal to Episcopalians (the protagonist is Episcopalian). But not in an unchristian way. He clearly takes the faith seriously but has fun with silly things Christians do. And he's certainly not Pc, even threw in some Hillary mocking in one of the books.

And the selection of his various targets makes sense if you assume the main character is that rarest of birds, the conservative Episcopalian.

Posted by: OregonMuse at June 07, 2015 09:50 AM (nWI4j)

48 Posted by: Lincolntf at June 07, 2015 09:44 AM (2cS/G)
======================

I first read of Uncle Fred in Blandings stories, but I wish I'd started with Uncle Fred Flits By, which has me in tears laughing every time I read it.

Posted by: MTF at June 07, 2015 09:50 AM (sAXJ5)

49 Who is the author of this Liturgical Mysteries series? I should check it out.

Posted by: @votermom at June 07, 2015 09:53 AM (cbfNE)

50 Ah, I see someone posted a somewhat positive reviews of the 50 shades book. Aaaakward.

Posted by: chique d'afrique (the artist formerly known as african chick) at June 07, 2015 09:54 AM (shFKH)

51 I read Ann Coulter's Adios America this week. Maybe a false note or two, and maybe most here already know most of the situations she covers. But it's good and important and if you suffer from low blood pressure it will take care of that, too. It really is the Dem/Chamber-Repub combine against the country.

Posted by: Emmett Milbarge at June 07, 2015 09:55 AM (nFdGS)

52 For those that may have missed it, on 6/4 Ace said he was going to do an Ace of Spades Book Club thread starting around next Friday afternoon with Pynchon's "The Crying of Lot 49". He hinted at following up with Moby Dick at some point.

Posted by: cool breeze at June 07, 2015 09:56 AM (6Cu7i)

53 Working my way through the Hugo Voter's packet. Three Body Problem is indeed a very unique work, slow to get to the SFnal part but it does, big time, with the bleak flavor of the Cultural Revolution covering everything. But it has a sarcastic cop I liked a lot. The Goblin Emperor was beautifully written, held my interest, but even though they kept saying the people were elves (or goblins) they sure acted like ordinary human people. It didn't feel like fantasy at all. And, nothing much happened as a story arc. Felt very much like a "slice of life" anime...

And in personal publishing news, Jinxers is out of Amazon Select purdah and now available in epub format in the usual locations.

Posted by: Sabrina Chase at June 07, 2015 10:01 AM (GQdlU)

54 And the selection of his various targets makes sense if you assume the main character is that rarest of birds, the conservative Episcopalian.
Posted by: OregonMuse at June 07, 2015 09:50 AM (nWI4j)

Definitely.

Votermom, the author is Mark Schweizer. Light mysteries, but very funny. The protagonist is the police chief/church organist/choir director. I song in a classical choir so that part of it is also a treat for me. We also went to an Anglican until I was about 8, so it's nice to read about the church services. (I haven't attended a liturgical church since then.)

Posted by: chique d'afrique (the artist formerly known as african chick) at June 07, 2015 10:01 AM (shFKH)

55 They've brought in the whole toolkit of critical theory, and the oppressive patriarchy and complaints about gender bias and supposed female powerlessness to force the rest of us to accept their view that the only reasonable and moral basis for a sexual relationship is an a priori straight-up consent transaction, that the woman may unilaterally rescind at any time during the proceedings, and anything else is an assault on women (i.e rape)

Or after, when special snowflake comes down with a bad case of coitus regretis.

Posted by: Gem at June 07, 2015 10:01 AM (c+gwp)

56 So.
Not finding what I want to read, I am writing again, the stories I would want to read that will never be published because the women who run the industry don't like the stories I want to read.

The books I do want to read, I can't afford, and who wants to read a book at the library. I want to own the library

Effit. Let the great realignment begin.

Posted by: Frankley Oportunists at June 07, 2015 10:05 AM (HH4w9)

57 Well Amazon Studios might not be a complete waste. Someone has written a script about SS judge Konrad Morgen called The Dissident. Not read it yet and probably shouldn't. Need to do my own writing.

http://studios.amazon.com/projects/25108

Wiki article
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Georg_Konrad_Morgen

Posted by: Anna Puma (+SmuD) at June 07, 2015 10:06 AM (Gz2AJ)

58 I will get to Nero Wolfe one day, sigh.

And all the Wodehouse stuff I've downloaded.

Oh, I read several Father Brown mysteries (Chesterton) and loved them. Need to continue with those.

I read only entertaining stuff (mysteries mostly), nothing particularly deep, and you book thread guys make me feel like a Philistine.

I demand you lower your standards to mine, NOW. Because equality.

Posted by: chique d'afrique (the artist formerly known as african chick) at June 07, 2015 10:07 AM (shFKH)

59 Thanks chique! Alas, my lib does not have any of his books.

Posted by: @votermom at June 07, 2015 10:08 AM (cbfNE)

60 I got them for 99 c on the Kindle store but I'm not sure if that sale is still on. (Darn it.)

If you are in a neighbouring county to a major city, you may be able to join their library and borrow ebooks without ever showing up in the cesspool of the city. That's what I've done with the Philly library.

Posted by: chique d'afrique (the artist formerly known as african chick) at June 07, 2015 10:12 AM (shFKH)

61 I', not really interested in 50 Shades of Grey, although some of the parodies are a hoot. Not much interested in bodice-ripping novels which are just a sort of female-oriented porn. I did read one once, since it was the only reading materiel in the BMTS common room, aside from a San Antonio phone book and about twenty back issues of the Air Force Times. Tedious bit of tripe, with a heroine raped so many times she must have had calluses on her tw*t. The phone book had more literary style, although it was hard to keep track of the many characters.

Posted by: Sgt. Mom at June 07, 2015 10:13 AM (95iDF)

62 Votermom .. The author of the Liturgical mystery series is Mark Schweizer. Besides the books check out his website. There is a lot of material on it and it's as creative and humorous as the books. Prepare to spend an hour or two exploring it.

Posted by: JTB at June 07, 2015 10:13 AM (FvdPb)

63 I finished reading Stephenson's Seveneves last weekend. The first half of the book worked better than the second half, in a series-of-awful-trainwrecks sort of way. Be warned, a thinly disguised Neil Degrasse Tyson is one of the protagonists, and a similarly disguised Carly Fiorina is a sort-of antagonist, insofar as there are any antagonists in the story. Very much a "Grey" book, almost like the author was tacking away from his flirtations with "Red" social signaling in the last book, Reamde. I think I'd recommend Reamde before Seveneves, but perhaps it was just because I had recently read John C. Wright's The Architect of Aeons, and the second half of Seveneves feels kind of like Stephenson's flyer at the sort of book Wright does.

In between, I've been reading Regencies like a fat man binging on popcorn. Alma Boykin cranks out Colplatschki Chronicles books at an impressively rapid pace. I don't know if someone recommended those here, they're sort of "Hapsburg Empire reborn on a colony world which has suffered a civilizational collapse".

Posted by: Mitch H. at June 07, 2015 10:13 AM (O4Nem)

64 >>WTH, women? Are your lives so sad and pathetic that you stoop to reading such nonsense? Ugh.

Think it's because they've surrounded themselves w/beta males (after decades of feminists insisting that alpha males are the worst) and they've succeeded in making it the norm for women to work --- so now they fantasize about a billionaire alpha male and being the mousy, passive gal he chooses to love. Heh.

* * *
I'm moving soon and spent several hours packing books yesterday - so many yet to read!! I'll get to them soon, just need a quiet week....

Posted by: Lizzy at June 07, 2015 10:15 AM (k2QA3)

65 Winston is my all time favorite. A man who never forgot the moral world in which we move; I believe that is why his speeches were so amazing, unlike, say, a certain sitting President.

Anyway, reading War From the Ground Up by Emile Simpson, which is dense but very well worth the time, and From Manassas to Appomattox by Longstreet, one of my (many) favorite Civil War generals.

Posted by: The Governor at June 07, 2015 10:17 AM (K0y5m)

66 Posted by: Sgt. Mom at June 07, 2015 10:13 AM (95iDF)

Hmmm. Maybe Sanders had a point about women wanting to be raped, LOL.

Just kidding, though, I think. I can't imagine anyone really desiring to be brutally violated that way. But mattress gurl gives me pause.

Posted by: chique d'afrique (the artist formerly known as african chick) at June 07, 2015 10:18 AM (shFKH)

67 Just checked out that Art of Manliness site and read the first two of a series based on Churchill, "The Winston Churchill School of Adulthood" is the series title. Very interesting. The first "lesson", on creating a moral code, is particularly good. A little self-helpy, but short and with good quotations, anecdotes.

Posted by: Lincolntf at June 07, 2015 10:18 AM (2cS/G)

68 I used to read bodice rippers. Unfortunately the newer ones ( published this century) too often have the damsel AND the hero spouting quasi-feminist claptrap.

Posted by: @votermom at June 07, 2015 10:21 AM (cbfNE)

69 But mattress gurl gives me pause.

Posted by: chique d'afrique (the artist formerly known as african chick) at June 07, 2015 10:18 AM (shFKH)

Mattress Girl is the byproduct of post-modern education and some serious psychological problems.

Hopefully she will end up costing Columbia U. a lot of money, and fade into obscurity...by next week if we are lucky.

Posted by: CharlieBrown'sDildo at June 07, 2015 10:21 AM (Zu3d9)

70 I am currently reading A Walk in the Woods after a recommendation here, and am enjoying it so far. I've always thought I'd like to hike the Appalachian Trail for an extended period of time, and it's good to read about the challenges I'd likely come across.

Posted by: Citizen Cake at June 07, 2015 10:22 AM (ppaKI)

71 It's interesting that both Churchill and Hitler were amateur painters.
What about FDR and Stalin?

Posted by: @votermom at June 07, 2015 10:23 AM (cbfNE)

72 I am reading Thomas Mallthus' Nature and Progress of Rent (because I know how to party).
I think he first described business cycles and the idea that the slumps are a correction of bad investment.

By the way, most of what you read on the Wiki page about him is... Inaccurate in a rather ideological way, and indicate that the writers of that page didn't actually read Malthus, but instead read an author critical of him.

Posted by: Kindltot at June 07, 2015 10:23 AM (3pRHP)

73 Posted by: Lizzy at June 07, 2015 10:15 AM (k2QA3)

I guess so. But I like being a strong woman (not the same as the B word) and passive helpless women irritate me. I guess I am not the target audience for the book then. Also, maybe not having to recover from negative attitudes towards men helps too.

Posted by: chique d'afrique (the artist formerly known as african chick) at June 07, 2015 10:24 AM (shFKH)

74 Hopefully she will end up costing Columbia U. a lot of money, and fade into obscurity...by next week if we are lucky.
Posted by: CharlieBrown'sDildo at June 07, 2015 10:21 AM (Zu3d9)

AMEN.

Posted by: chique d'afrique (the artist formerly known as african chick) at June 07, 2015 10:26 AM (shFKH)

75 Someone online armchair diagnosed Mattress Girl with Histrionic Personality Disorder. I looked it up and it does seem to fit.

Posted by: @votermom at June 07, 2015 10:26 AM (cbfNE)

76 52
For those that may have missed it, on 6/4 Ace said he was going to do an
Ace of Spades Book Club thread starting around next Friday afternoon
with Pynchon's "The Crying of Lot 49". He hinted at following up with
Moby Dick at some point.


Posted by: cool breeze at June 07, 2015 09:56 AM (6Cu7i)

ace promised moby dick years ago....i bought the book go thru a couple chapters and now it's gathering dust in the garage......i'll go dust it off!!!! i need a support group to get thru it

Posted by: phoenixgirl at June 07, 2015 10:27 AM (0O7c5)

77 Don't know about Stalin. I doubt FDR had time for hobbies. He was too busy destroying the Constitution.

Posted by: JTB at June 07, 2015 10:29 AM (FvdPb)

78 That story in Road Out Of He'll is extraordinary. Psychiatrists should study that case to determine how a child came come out of that and not only survive and be productive but not turn into an abuser himself. Facinating

Posted by: ThunderB at June 07, 2015 10:29 AM (zOTsN)

79 Outside of a dog, a book is man's best friend.

Inside of a dog, it's too dark to read.


-Groucho Marx

Posted by: BackwardsBoy, who did not vote for this sh1t at June 07, 2015 10:29 AM (0HooB)

80 65, take From Manassas to Appamattox with a salt-shaker full of salt. It was written a long time after the war, as his salvo in self-defense against a generation of enraged fellow officers who felt that his postwar turn to Republicanism was a betrayal of The Cause and engaged in wholesale character-assassination. Longstreet didn't exactly cover himself in historiographical glory in response, I'm afraid.

His chief of artillery, Edward Porter Alexander, wrote a much more balanced and interesting memoir, with some flashes of narrative brilliance. The bit about a frustrated Longstreet ordering the hanging of a spy with an artillery-horse's halter on the retreat from his failed siege of Knoxville really stayed with me...

Posted by: Mitch H. at June 07, 2015 10:29 AM (O4Nem)

81 This weekend I started a minor project to catalog all of my books, e-book and paper. About half way through right now I reckon, and nearing 700 books.

Recent books I've read and really enjoyed:

The two-volume history of British naval power by N.A.M. Rodger: The Safeguard of the Sea and The Command of the Ocean. Really, really, really good naval history, and quite funny (in the British idiom) at times.

Crunched through (in a day and a half) the John Ringo/Tom Kratzman SF book in Ringo's Aldenata universe, Tuloriad. Evil aliens from outer space, after getting their butts kicked by humans, get religion. Fun stuff, typical Baen/Ringo/Kratzman fare IMHO.

Currently half-way through Kate Fox's Watching the English which discusses the peculiarities of behavior of the English people. Very, very funny (in the English idiom) at times. I must have a lot of English in me, I'm afraid.

Posted by: filbert at June 07, 2015 10:30 AM (h6Mpm)

82 Forgot to note, N.A.M. Rodger has the third volume of his Naval History of Britain series coming out this September. It's on my "must acquire" list.

Posted by: filbert at June 07, 2015 10:30 AM (h6Mpm)

83 Will give my reviews and then read all the other comments.

Read The Alto Wore Tweed. I know a lot of the Horde really liked it, but I didn't and particularly hated the end. Yes, many lines *are* lol-worthy but (spoiler alert!) the chief of police letting the actual murderer off with a warning "not to do it again" when he had good evidence it was her second murder and casting suspicion on an admittedly noxious person who *was* guilty of professional misconduct as a counselor is disturbing.

I also come from a church tradition where a worship leader who is semi-living with his girlfriend just wouldn't *be* the worship leader no matter how talented, so it was not as easy to like the detective as I think it was intended to be. For me he simply showed bad character throughout and that's a problem for someone with a lot of authority.

Posted by: Polliwog the 'Ette at June 07, 2015 10:31 AM (GDulk)

84 just ordered the crying of lot 49 book!!! this will be fun....i hope

Posted by: phoenixgirl at June 07, 2015 10:34 AM (0O7c5)

85 Been listening to Churchill's The River War. It is *much* easier to get into than his autobiography. The subject is one I'm unfamiliar with and the book explains references in historical novels set in that time. One question, does anyone know why the Egyptians and Sudanese called the British "Turks"?

Posted by: Polliwog the 'Ette at June 07, 2015 10:34 AM (GDulk)

86 By the way, the Yale Lillian Goldman Law Library has digitized a lot of its texts.

http://avalon.law.yale.edu/default.asp

I found the The Barbary Treaties 1786-1836 section

http://avalon.law.yale.edu/subject_menus/barmenu.asp

Posted by: Kindltot at June 07, 2015 10:34 AM (3pRHP)

87 From a cursory web search all I could find was that Stalin liked hunting and custom cars, while FDR collected books.

Too bad - if both of them were also amateur artists we could have had a secret history real reason for WW2 being an artistic squabble.

Posted by: @votermom at June 07, 2015 10:36 AM (cbfNE)

88 50 Ah, I see someone posted a somewhat positive reviews of the 50 shades book. Aaaakward.
Posted by: chique d'afrique (the artist formerly known as african chick) at June 07, 2015 09:54 AM (shFKH)

My cousin sent me all three books. I tried three times to pick it up and read and never got further than the first chapter because the writing was just dreadful. I gave up.

I did see really movie and was left thinking the guy was basically abused as a youth and that's why he's so f'd up and if that is the point I kind of get it, but I also don't find any of it sexy. Which I thought was the point. So now I'm confused.

Posted by: Lea at June 07, 2015 10:37 AM (vmMMi)

89 Huh. I have an old old copy of In Cold Blood with the same cover of that 10 True Crime Books list. Found it a a giant used book store / warehouse years ago. I wonder if it's worth anything?


Bored, I watched a movie on cable yesterday. The Time Traveler's Wife. Reading the IMDB review before watching, I saw that it had a few decent reviews from fans of the book.

Any ever read that? Is it worth trying to find a used copy?
Interesting movie. Original idea, or so I thought.

Posted by: chi's sandwIch at June 07, 2015 10:38 AM (HffSV)

90 I am working through Chesterton's Tremendous Trifles which appears to be a collection of columns he wrote for one of the British papers.

Some of the concepts are interesting. I suspect WeirdDave would have an opinion on the idea that to poor people money is like magic and that the people of the time considered a capitalist's ability to bring in a bunch of foreign workers to do his bidding was much like the view of medieval people of a wizard able to bring a dragon to do *his* bidding.

Posted by: Polliwog the 'Ette at June 07, 2015 10:38 AM (GDulk)

91 VoterMom, whats to stop you from writing an alternate history where all these leaders were artists.

Would Stalin be of the cubist school? FDR preferring watercolors?

Posted by: Anna Puma (+SmuD) at June 07, 2015 10:38 AM (Gz2AJ)

92 "One question, does anyone know why the Egyptians and Sudanese called the British 'Turks'?"

I believe that may have been a slighting reference to buggery.

Posted by: torquewrench at June 07, 2015 10:38 AM (noWW6)

93 Kinda OT, but because people who enjoy historicals and mysteries and humor will probably enjoy watching the Spanish tv show Gran Hotel. Its on netflix as The Grand Hotel. I am still in recovery from binge watching it.

Posted by: @votermom at June 07, 2015 10:40 AM (cbfNE)

94 Finally got my new Kindle. It takes 4-6 weeks after ordering. Do they start growing the crystals for the screen when you order?!

Posted by: Polliwog the 'Ette at June 07, 2015 10:40 AM (GDulk)

95 The author of the Liturgical mystery series is Mark Schweizer. Besides the books check out his website.

Do you have a link to his web site?

Posted by: OregonMuse at June 07, 2015 10:41 AM (nWI4j)

96 Flashback by Dan Simmons. I'm not done with it, but it's keeping me up at night. It's conservative and very, very good. It kind of reminds me of the Enemies Foreign and Domestic series.

Posted by: Old Hob at June 07, 2015 10:41 AM (FFIoe)

97 WTH, women? Are your lives so sad and pathetic that you stoop to reading such nonsense? Ugh.

Chique, you are unlikely to grasp the whole "bodice ripper"/"50 Shades" thing because you grew up in a completely different culture, with very different attitudes about sexuality. Even after 50+ years of being smothered in feminist indoctrination, many if not most women still have these sorts of "being taken" fantasies. This is why these sorts of novels are and have been so popular.

In this culture, women have and have always had what I call "The Power Of The Pussy". That is, they have it, they control it, we (the guys) want it, and the girls will make us jump through multiple hoops in order to get it.

But, a lot of women still entertain fantasies about surrendering this Power, and enjoying what happens next, AS LONG AS IT IS WITH THE RIGHT GUY. Note the emphasis here; THE RIGHT GUY.

And if it is the right guy, she is most likely more than willing to play the whole rip-my-bodice/bite-me, spank-me, make-me-write-bad-checks submissive slut thing, and a good time will be had by all. Been there, done that.

But woe betide anyone who tries this who is NOT the "right guy". Then you get all the "oh he raped me/how dare you/blah, blah" thing that the feminists claim happens all the time (trust me, it does not). I have long felt that the main reason the feminists go on so about this is that most of them are closet lesbians who want to be doing all that bodice ripping themselves, and are so disappointed that most women have no interest in playing that game with them.

Bottom line, sis, it's a culture thing. You have to take with that spirit and move on...

Posted by: The Oort Cloud - Source of all SMODs at June 07, 2015 10:42 AM (yTMXB)

98 My great uncle Bill (Wild Bill Kehaly) landed on Omaha Beach in the first wave of the invasion. I spent part of a summer in high school and another after my freshman year at Rice. The last time I saw him was in March 1981, as I was going from San Diego (training at Miramarand SERE) on my way to NAS Whidbey Island, WA. He passed away after I left and was still on that trip.

Posted by: Jim at June 07, 2015 10:42 AM (lOYof)

99 Would Stalin be of the cubist school? FDR preferring watercolors?

--

I think both woukd have to be into some form of modern art, but competing. Stalin as a cubist makes a lot of sense. FDR, hm, pointillism?

Posted by: @votermom at June 07, 2015 10:44 AM (cbfNE)

100 Mattress Girl is the byproduct of post-modern education and some serious psychological problems.

Mattress girl is a child with an adult's body and an empty head that the feminists have filled with grievance politics and butthurt.

Posted by: OregonMuse at June 07, 2015 10:44 AM (nWI4j)

101 Ol' Winston looks like an entrant in the Cannonball Run.

Posted by: Count de Monet at June 07, 2015 10:45 AM (JO9+V)

102 Still reading (audiobook) the Destoyermen series, no pc crap.
It's on book 10 now
In Into The Storm, the story begins during the Second Battle of the Java Sea. The USS Walker (DD-163) is a destroyer of the United States Asiatic Fleet, commanded by Lieutenant Commander Matthew Reddy. The Walker was a part of the surviving ABDACOM fleet, consisting of the Royal Navy cruiser HMS Exeter, HMS Encounter, and the United States Navy destroyers Pope and Mahan, all of which were fleeing from Japanese Naval forces. However, the Japanese forces closed range, and opened up on the small Allied fleet. The Exeter took a major hit, and ordered the remaining four destroyers to leave the crippled cruiser.

The destroyers were systematically sunk, starting with the Encounter, followed by the Pope shortly thereafter just as happened in the real naval battle. The surviving destroyers, Walker and Mahan then encountered the Japanese battlecruiser Amagi. Seeing no other option, Lieutenant Commander Reddy commanded the pair of destroyers to stage a torpedo attack, which sinks an accompanying destroyer, and badly damages the battlecruiser, before the ships were enveloped in a freak squall, and transported to an alternate world, where humans never evolved.

There are two races, the Lemurians, evolved giant lemurs from Madagascar, who are peaceful farmers and fishermen, and live on huge oceangoing houseboats called Homes. Walker's captain, Lieutenant Commander Matthew Reddy, meets with the Lemurian leadership, and forms an alliance with them to fight the other race, the Grik, who are at war with the Lemurians. The Grik are possible descendants of the dinosaur genus, Velociraptor.

Posted by: Patrick From Ohio at June 07, 2015 10:45 AM (CxEX+)

103 Polliwog, I agree with both your points. Esp about the ending of the first one.

Regarding the 2nd point, these are Episcopalians. I think I heard a survey quoted that less than 20% of their clergy believe in the divinity of Christ, so I find the fact that the guy absolutely refused to accompany a pagan ritual organized by female clergy impressive, lol. I try not to expect people (fictional or otherwise) to adhere to my morality unless they claim to be Christians. Bible believing Christians who try to live accordinly are not that common. YMMV.

Also, I actually don't think the gf is recorded as actually ever sleeping over, unless I missed something. (Yes, I was paying some attention to that as the arrangement struck me as not being ideal.)

Posted by: chique d'afrique (the artist formerly known as african chick) at June 07, 2015 10:46 AM (shFKH)

104 I am an evil writer. My protagonist and date has just discovered they can't afford anything on the menu of this new hot trendy restaurant except a glass of water. So now they are trying to escape while avoiding Mr. Snooty Waiter.

Posted by: Anna Puma (+SmuD) at June 07, 2015 10:48 AM (Gz2AJ)

105 I don't always return busts of famous Britons, but when I do, it's Winston Church-Hill.

Posted by: Barack Obama at June 07, 2015 10:48 AM (F1Z8f)

106 I wouldn't mind having a maid. My house could use a good cleaning.

Posted by: Insomniac at June 07, 2015 10:48 AM (mx5oN)

107 I'll go back and read the comments in a bit. But first....Jerry Lee Lewis by Rick Bragg. I love the way Bragg writes. He has a love and sympathy for poor whites and blacks. I knew the book would be good and it is. He writes it as Lewis remembers it and the early stuff is fascinating. His dad was a talented musician that never pursued it. Lewis tells of when he was learning to play piano, his dad showed him how to play it. And he played it so perfectly that Lewis burst into tears. His dad never played for him again. He didn't want to show his son up.

Posted by: Notsothoreau at June 07, 2015 10:48 AM (Lqy/e)

108 But, a lot of women still entertain fantasies about surrendering this Power, and enjoying what happens next, AS LONG AS IT IS WITH THE RIGHT GUY. Note the emphasis here; THE RIGHT GUY.

Brad Pitt looks, Bill Gates money and John Holmes endowment. Otherwise you're a "creep."

Posted by: Insomniac at June 07, 2015 10:50 AM (mx5oN)

109 Not sure why Ace wants to read Moby Dick. It's so ghey...

Posted by: Bruce With a Wang! at June 07, 2015 10:50 AM (iQIUe)

110 Audrey Niffenegger wrote The Time Traveler's Wife as a metaphor for her failed relationships.

Book is at Amazon via dead tree and Kindle.

Posted by: SMFH at it all at June 07, 2015 10:51 AM (kmtse)

111 Niffenegger? That's RAAAAACIST!!!!!

Posted by: Insomniac at June 07, 2015 10:51 AM (mx5oN)

112 Mattress girl is a child with an adult's body and an empty head that the feminists have filled with grievance politics and butthurt.

From what I read, she sought out the butthurt herself.

Posted by: boulder terlit hobo at June 07, 2015 10:53 AM (AVEe1)

113 I knew you would agree on the cubist idea considering how many times Stalin put round pegs, people, into square holes, graves.

Posted by: Anna Puma (+SmuD) at June 07, 2015 10:54 AM (Gz2AJ)

114 "What have you all been reading this week? "

Ahhhh ha ha ha ha.

I just finished "The Crying of Lot 49" for Ace's book club next week.

Ahhhhh ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha

You poor bastards.

Posted by: Comrade Arthur at June 07, 2015 10:54 AM (h53OH)

115 The Oort Cloud - Source of all SMODs

Lots of girls in my high school read Mills and Boones (British version of Harlequin romances), but I dont recall them being full of rape. Also those books were not as heavy on sex. there was maybe 1 sex scene. and the plots were all the same. woman and man hate each other, then get together, then have a falling out, then get back together. Plus, plus the books were set in modern times.

Maybe living in an actual sexist society (not even close to Muslim societies as women participate in all aspects of society, professional and otherwise, but men are often chauvinistic) makes the prospect of rape less appealing?


Posted by: chique d'afrique (the artist formerly known as african chick) at June 07, 2015 10:56 AM (shFKH)

116 Churchill was a man of audacious ideas, some good, some bad, and some ridiculous.

Posted by: The Great White Snark at June 07, 2015 10:58 AM (4vx+O)

117 113 I knew you would agree on the cubist idea considering how many times Stalin put round pegs, people, into square holes, graves.

--

Perfect.

Posted by: @votermom at June 07, 2015 10:58 AM (cbfNE)

118 I don't think all bodice rippers are full of rape, particular the more modern ones. The 70s era had quite a lot though, at least the couple older ones I've read.

More recent stuff is closer to the I hate you I love you variety. Or completely ridiculous reasons for two people thrown together. Or arranged marriages if you're reading a regency or something...

Posted by: Lea at June 07, 2015 11:00 AM (vmMMi)

119 Oh kami, need to channel Marx Brothers as they play dodge the waiter while trying to escape.

Posted by: Anna Puma (+SmuD) at June 07, 2015 11:01 AM (Gz2AJ)

120 From what I read, she sought out the butthurt herself.

Yeah, but if she didn't get butthurt from coitus regretis, she would have been gotten butthurt over something else.

Posted by: OregonMuse at June 07, 2015 11:01 AM (nWI4j)

121 Working through the final edit of WA BK 11. The first third is really all talk and exposition, but it needs to be done to set up everything that happens in the next third, so I have been trying to cut it down and make it more interesting. I have already cut the manuscript from 144,000 to 140,000 words. So, that's progress I guess.

Posted by: Gregory of Yardale at June 07, 2015 11:01 AM (c/Ipt)

122 OM ... Mark Schweizer's website is:

wwwdotsjmpbooksdotcom

Posted by: JTB at June 07, 2015 11:02 AM (FvdPb)

123 Thanks, Lea. If I were into romances I could see being interested in the arranged marriage ones if their about the spouses growing to know and love each other.

Posted by: chique d'afrique (the artist formerly known as african chick) at June 07, 2015 11:02 AM (shFKH)

124 >>> 14 While I am generally a fan of Churchill, a lot of dead Brit soldiers in Turkey are not.

Posted by: Nip Sip at June 07, 2015 09:28 AM (0FSuD)


Not even remotely his fault that a great idea with promise was so thoroughly botched by the on-site commanders.

Churchill was the guy who brought the Tank/AFV into the World. Not single-handedly, but definitely a reasonable portion of congrats from thousands of Tommies in WWI France.

Posted by: Mickey Shwarma at June 07, 2015 11:02 AM (2mJMN)

125 O. Henry alert: The book thread is keeping me from reading.

Back to my coffee, classical music, and doorstop of a novel.

Posted by: All Hail Eris at June 07, 2015 11:03 AM (jR7Wy)

126 Lots of girls in my high school read Mills and Boones (British version of Harlequin romances), but I dont recall them being full of rape.

No, they weren't. The Harlequins are a different sub-genre than the bodice-rippers and should not be confused.

Posted by: OregonMuse at June 07, 2015 11:04 AM (nWI4j)

127 #122 thanks, JTB.

Posted by: OregonMuse at June 07, 2015 11:04 AM (nWI4j)

128 Gregory, perhaps something Orson Scott Card said might help with the trimming.

Make each adjective really work. Don't overload on them like its an adjective buffet.

Posted by: Anna Puma (+SmuD) at June 07, 2015 11:05 AM (Gz2AJ)

129 Not even remotely his fault that a great idea with promise was so thoroughly botched by the on-site commanders


=/=====

errr no

if you get a good look at the dardanelles you can tell at a glance it never would have worked. not with ships and men anyway

Posted by: Bigby's Knuckle Sandwich at June 07, 2015 11:05 AM (dHL+B)

130 Speaking of Mattress Girl, and inspired by Mattress Girl, I wrote a post on another blog titled "Tyranny of the Mentally Ill."

Short version is, the Mattress Girls and other psychos of the left are setting the standards for modern behavior, the rules of social interaction, and even public policy, e.g. California's "Affirmative Consent" laws.

http://tinyurl.com/pbmwpnk

Posted by: Gregory of Yardale at June 07, 2015 11:05 AM (c/Ipt)

131 Here's a perfect moron read: "The Last Great Hero." Our hero is a very standard Sword and Sorcery trope. Except he is now 55 and everything hurts and the stuff he never thought about no longer quite makes sense. He is regularly told that it's about time he grew up and just as often that he's getting old. Both are true.

The writing is fun, light and casual. But, this is all not serious, but sincere with a fine sense of humor. There is nothing particularly new in the world setting, so much so that we are saved a lot of world building and can get right to the tale of an aging man-boy who is now chased by an angry father instead of aggrieved husbands. A man with whom he bargains a peace even though he could have won the fight; "when did that ever happen before?" Our man flexes his knee before a battle to see if it can be trusted that day and only gets up quickly and walks straight when he knows there's an audience.

This is clearly book one of a series that doesn't have sequels published yet.

Posted by: Ronsonic at June 07, 2015 11:06 AM (yIVBh)

132 Posted by: Gregory of Yardale at June 07, 2015 11:01 AM (c/Ipt)

Yay! Looking forward to reading it. I would *really* like to recommend getting Anachronda to look over it though since as much as I love your books there tend to be a lot of grammatical and spelling errors that make my brain itch. He makes Sabrina Chases books completely pristine, which leads to a better reading experience.

Posted by: Polliwog the 'Ette at June 07, 2015 11:06 AM (GDulk)

133 Ol' Winston looks like an entrant in the Cannonball Run.

Heh. At first I thought the photo was an outtake from the movie "It's a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World".

Posted by: OregonMuse at June 07, 2015 11:07 AM (nWI4j)

134 My older sister read Mills & Boon in HS, while I read Barbara Cartland. In BC's world, the girl was always young and innocent, the guy handsome & virtuous & brave, and there would be a lascivious older villain who would attempt (but fail) to despoil the heroine. LOL
I guess they were bodice attempted rippers.

Posted by: @votermom at June 07, 2015 11:08 AM (cbfNE)

135 >>Make each adjective really work. Don't overload on them like its an adjective buffet.

I am thinking to make it work, the dialogue really has to snap, crackle, and pop. And most of the cuts have come out of the realization that most readers are not as into the details of project management as it relates to starship refits as I am.

Posted by: Gregory of Yardale at June 07, 2015 11:09 AM (c/Ipt)

136 "Ol' Winston looks like an entrant in the Cannonball Run."

Hate to say it, but I thought it was an ugly old woman at first. When I read it was Churchill I had to look really closely.

Posted by: Polliwog the 'Ette at June 07, 2015 11:09 AM (GDulk)

137 I have actually struggled to find a good editor I can work with. I can pay... modestly... but I can pay.

Posted by: Gregory of Yardale at June 07, 2015 11:10 AM (c/Ipt)

138 are the Gor books male versions of bodice rippers?

Posted by: Bigby's Knuckle Sandwich at June 07, 2015 11:11 AM (dHL+B)

139 Starship refit. Yeah most people, their eyes will glaze over. Much like some of the tech-babble of David Webber. Okay we know that is a Mk-23E Apollo flatpack that can blow a Solarian SD into dust bunnies. Now get on with the story.

Posted by: Anna Puma (+SmuD) at June 07, 2015 11:11 AM (Gz2AJ)

140 "most readers are not as into the details of project management as it relates to starship refits as I am."

The irony being that it could make for an interesting story itself (or at least it seems possible to me) but it's definitely not going to make the *actual* story move along at a snappy pace.

Posted by: Polliwog the 'Ette at June 07, 2015 11:11 AM (GDulk)

141 Brad Pitt looks, Bill Gates money and John Holmes endowment. Otherwise you're a "creep."

Posted by: Insomniac at June 07, 2015 10:50 AM (mx5oN)

Sadly, there is a lot of truth in this. One thing I've always found amusing is when I'd see some gal dressed all "sexy", with the low cut blouse and spray-on jeans, etc. But if the wrong guy looks at her, she gets all huffy about the "creep" looking and so forth. Thing is, what these girls don't ever seem to get is that if they are going to be out in public dressed like that, then men in general are going to look at them appreciatively, and not just the Dash Riprocks with the fast cars, fat wallets and big d*cks they are trolling for.

Posted by: The Oort Cloud - Source of all SMODs at June 07, 2015 11:12 AM (yTMXB)

142 Posted by: Gregory of Yardale at June 07, 2015 11:10 AM (c/Ipt)

I'd be willing to go through the book for a free copy. I won't catch as much as Anachronda, but I can at least find all the obvious issues.

Posted by: Polliwog the 'Ette at June 07, 2015 11:13 AM (GDulk)

143 Re #30---That would be Ann Rule. She has several "true crime" books about. I seriously detest her work.

Have seen several less than positive reviews on Sevenses. Too bad because I have enjoyed his work. Particularly "Snow Crash" and "Cryptonomicon" "Reamde" looked mostly like Stephenson wanted someone to make an action movie out of it, but it was still enjoyable imho.

Currently re-reading :"Beach Music" by Pat Conroy just because I enjoy his style and I feel if is one of his finest.

Posted by: Semilitterate at June 07, 2015 11:13 AM (6E8+u)

144 "Ol' Winston looks like an entrant in the Cannonball Run."


Yeah, but what a dumb looking car.

Posted by: Mel Tillis and Tony Danza at June 07, 2015 11:13 AM (Hr9tT)

145 I used to read a lot of true crime books. What I find interesting is that they are also biographies of the victims. These are people that normally would not be the subject of a book. It's nice that they get a little remembrance.

Posted by: Notsothoreau at June 07, 2015 11:15 AM (Lqy/e)

146 123 Thanks, Lea. If I were into romances I could see being interested in the arranged marriage ones if their about the spouses growing to know and love each other.
Posted by: chique d'afrique (the artist formerly known as african chick) at June 07, 2015 11:02 AM (shFKH)

I don't really read them anymore but I did go through a phase..

If you like historical romances, I think the Amanda quick ones are pretty entertaining. Same author as Jayne Ann krentz does some sort of romantic mystery stuff and some sci fi under another similar name.

Posted by: Lea at June 07, 2015 11:15 AM (vmMMi)

147 Could be worse for Winston, he could be in Jackie Chan's super hi-tech rice racer.

Posted by: Anna Puma (+SmuD) at June 07, 2015 11:15 AM (Gz2AJ)

148 Lincolntf--Art of Manliness is a bit self helpy.

It's designed for young men who may not know how to be classic men. They may be educated, but clueless in transitioning from boys to men.

Posted by: OneEyedJack at June 07, 2015 11:16 AM (XmOA9)

149 Okay we know that is a Mk-23E Apollo flatpack that can blow a Solarian SD into dust bunnies. Now get on with the story.

Heh!

(But what's the maximum powered range of the Mk-23E? What's the groundspeed of a laden swallow?)

Posted by: filbert at June 07, 2015 11:17 AM (h6Mpm)

150 >>I'd be willing to go through the book for a free copy. I won't catch as
much as Anachronda, but I can at least find all the obvious issues.

If you want to email me at mjk2527-at-gmail I'll let you take a pass at the manuscript.

Posted by: Gregory of Yardale at June 07, 2015 11:18 AM (c/Ipt)

151 Nood!

Posted by: johnd01 at June 07, 2015 11:18 AM (VGqjW)

152 Winston needs a better disguise if he wants to avoid the cops.

Posted by: Dean Martin and Sammy Davis Jr at June 07, 2015 11:18 AM (JO9+V)

153 Well he could be the bride on the motorcycle...

Range on the Mk-23E? Of the top of my head, three light minutes? Gyah. *thud* Why do I even think I know that?

Posted by: Anna Puma (+SmuD) at June 07, 2015 11:20 AM (Gz2AJ)

154 she would have been gotten butthurt over something else.

Posted by: OregonMuse at June 07, 2015 11:01 AM (nWI4j)

There is an infinite capacity for offense in these people, but no joy or pleasure in life.

It must suck to be them.

Posted by: CharlieBrown'sDildo at June 07, 2015 11:20 AM (Zu3d9)

155 Listened to John Ringo's Islands of Rage and Hope (Black Tide Rising #3), his mostly-comic zombie apocalypse series. Very entertaining and has more of a story than the previous book, terrific stuff.

Read The Goblin Emperor by Katherine Addison, which is up for Hugo best novel. Young male half-goblin, raised in poor circumstances and ignored by the court, suddenly finds he is the new emperor. There are elves and goblins but it's not Tolkien, it really is just the story of a young man as he grasps the reins of power. Very entertaining and a fast read.

Listened to Butcher's Skin Game (Dresden Files #15), also up for Hugo best novel. It was very good, kind of like Ocean's Eleven where Harry is forced to participate with a team of supernatural hitters, working on a criminal plot cooked up by one of his enemies.

Posted by: waelse1 at June 07, 2015 11:20 AM (x+P8L)

156 Votermom, thank God ellipses are free, otherwise Barbara Cartland would have caused a worldwide shortage. She had the most pathetic annoying female protagonists ever conceived, probably. I wish I could reach into her grave and give her a good slapping. Jeez.

Posted by: chique d'afrique (the artist formerly known as african chick) at June 07, 2015 11:20 AM (shFKH)

157 Maybe living in an actual sexist society (not even close to Muslim societies as women participate in all aspects of society, professional and otherwise, but men are often chauvinistic) makes the prospect of rape less appealing?

Chique, as I said, you grew up in a totally different culture, which is why you would have such a hard time grasping any of this. And don't get the wrong idea; this is not about rape per se (although I have known some women who did have actual "rape fantasies"). It is much more about surrendering that control, that Power, that gets a lot of women here aroused. And it is also why books and whatnot like the "bodice ripper" novels, "50 Shades of Gray" and the like are so popular here. A nontrivial difference.

Posted by: The Oort Cloud - Source of all SMODs at June 07, 2015 11:24 AM (yTMXB)

158 Winston Churchill gave a nation hope in the darkest of days.

However, in the book called Goerge C. Marshall by Mark A. Stoler, Winston Churchill was very difficult to deal with, particularly with his attempts to convince Roosevelt at Hyde Park to constantly attack the Nazi's through Italy rather than Normandy. Marshall finally won out, but the outcome of WWII may well have been different otherwise.

Posted by: OzarkMountain at June 07, 2015 11:25 AM (skxUg)

159 Lea, unfortunately (? ) the older I get, the less romance interests me. Although I do enjoy the dignified romance of (now) period pieces like Pride and Prejudice.

Posted by: chique d'afrique (the artist formerly known as african chick) at June 07, 2015 11:26 AM (shFKH)

160 Oort Cloud, you are right. I lived here my entire adult life but aspects of American culture still mystify me.

Posted by: chique d'afrique (the artist formerly known as african chick) at June 07, 2015 11:28 AM (shFKH)

161 Example: American women cry at the drop of a hat. Even the most emotional Nigerian women I know / teenagers I knew don't do that.

Posted by: chique d'afrique (the artist formerly known as african chick) at June 07, 2015 11:29 AM (shFKH)

162 The ground speed of a unladen swallow:

http://tinyurl.com/3ucvwtt


The link also answers What is the capital of Assyria?

Posted by: NaCly Dog at June 07, 2015 11:35 AM (u82oZ)

163 I read "First Into Outer Space" by Theodore Gordon & Julian Scheer. It's about the first three American attempts to launch a space probe to the Moon in 1958. It was published in 1959 and is long out of print, but I found a used copy at AbeBooks.

Gordon was the Test Conductor for the Air Force's Thor ballistic missile program. I assume Scheer was the writer who cobbled his notes into a book. Nothing is mentioned about him other than his name on the cover. It's a short, easy read, the sort of book I would have read when I was 12 if I had known about it. I'm interested in the early history of the Space Age, so it was right up my alley.

We all know how the Russians shocked the world with the launch of Sputnik 1 & 2 in late 1957, and how the Americans found themselves playing catch-up. The Air Force was developing Thor, an intermediate-range ballistic missile. It was determined that by adding a small second and third stage that had already been developed for the Vanguard satellite program, it was theoretically possible to send a small instrumented package to the vicinity of the Moon. The combined rocket was known as Thor-Able.

Secret meetings were held in January 1958, before we had even orbited our first satellite. The project was announced to the public on March 27. At that time there were only four satellites in Earth orbit: one Russian and three American. (Sputnik 1 had already decayed.)

As Test Conductor, Gordon writes from the point of view of the men in the blockhouse at the launch site. Fun fact: The men responsible for launching the missile couldn't see it fly. All they had was a TV monitor with a static view of the rocket on the launch pad. Once it lifted off, it quickly went out of view, and they busied themselves with monitoring their dials and gauges. There were no fancy tracking cameras or rocket cams as we know them today. The book is well-illustrated with photos and diagrams, some showing their spartan accommodations.

The first launch attempt was on August 17, 1958, and the first stage exploded 77 seconds later. Nevertheless, it was mankind's very first attempt to launch a rocket to the Moon, so it deserves to be remembered.

The second attempt on October 11 went better. It didn't make it to the Moon, but reached a distance of 71,300 miles before falling back to Earth and burning up the next day. It was the first spacecraft to go beyond low Earth orbit, hence the book's title. While it failed to reach the Moon, it radioed back useful scientific data and was considered largely successful. After all, nobody had made it that far before. By today's standards it would be considered an unmitigated failure, but they were pretty pleased at the time.

On the third launch on November 8, the third stage failed to fire and the vehicle re-entered over Africa.

Not mentioned in the book was the fact that the Russians were also trying for the Moon. They also had three failed attempts, on September 23, October 11, and December 4. They finally succeeded with the launch of Luna 1 on January 2, 1959, which flew past the Moon a couple days later. (That is mentioned at the end of the book. Back in those days the Russians only announced their successes and never mentioned their failures.)

So the first Moon Race occurred in 1958, and it was won by the Russians.

Posted by: rickl at June 07, 2015 11:36 AM (sdi6R)

164 American women cry at the drop of a hat. Even the most emotional Nigerian women I know / teenagers I knew don't do that.

Those Nigerians need to get in touch with their feminine side, I know I have.

Posted by: John Boehner at June 07, 2015 11:36 AM (c/Ipt)

165 @145 - Notsothoreau - I agree about the true crime genre of books. Unlike the MSM, which tends to ignore the victims and focus on the criminal, these books often humanize the victims. I have noticed that law enforcement officers often cooperate with the authors on these books. These officers are concerned about the victims and their families - not the criminals.

Posted by: Jen at June 07, 2015 11:38 AM (msAGT)

166 156 I don't think being dead has stopped Barbara Cartland from writing. Her estate keeps "discovering" new manuscripts.

Georgette Heyer has fun regencies.

Posted by: @votermom at June 07, 2015 11:39 AM (cbfNE)

167 hell

there's a depressingly large segment of American men that'll do that chicque

Posted by: Bigby's Knuckle Sandwich at June 07, 2015 11:40 AM (pnTUQ)

168 Gregory, you can cut and save the project mgt stuff and maybe write it as a side story with some supporting characters later on. Just an idea.

Posted by: @votermom at June 07, 2015 11:43 AM (cbfNE)

169 Random thought - Proverbs 30:18-19 in the Septuagint, the version Christ and the Apostles used, actually says the "ways of a man in his youth," which actually makes more sense (stupidity of youth).

Also, for anyone who is into theological writing, I would highly recommend the 6 volume (though they aren't too thick) Orthodox Dogmatic Theology series by Fr. Dumitru Staniloae. Even in translation from Romanian, his writing is almost poetry at times.

Posted by: Patrick at June 07, 2015 11:43 AM (U6YEj)

170 Votermom I've read a few of Georgette Heyer's mysteries and I'd be willing to read her romances, which have been recommended by a friend.

Posted by: chique d'afrique (the artist formerly known as african chick) at June 07, 2015 11:43 AM (shFKH)

171 There is an infinite capacity for offense in these people, but no joy or pleasure in life.

It must suck to be them.


That's because they're bearing the weight of mental illness, and it's a tiresome burden.

Posted by: OregonMuse at June 07, 2015 11:44 AM (nWI4j)

172 151 Nood!

What nood?! There's no nood! I command everybody to stay here! This thread ain't dead yet!!

Posted by: OregonMuse at June 07, 2015 11:47 AM (nWI4j)

173 170 I've never been able to get through Heyer's mysteries, but her Regencies are superb, and basically coined the sub-genre. They're hilarious, which is something a lot of her imitators fail to replicate. They also don't fall into the "period time-travelling tourist" trap that so many modern Regencies get tangled up in.

Posted by: Mitch H. at June 07, 2015 11:49 AM (O4Nem)

174 Gregory, you can cut and save the project mgt stuff and maybe write it
as a side story with some supporting characters later on. Just an idea.


Interesting idea. I have been putting side-stories, notes, and background stuff into the Wiki.

Posted by: Gregory of Yardale at June 07, 2015 11:50 AM (c/Ipt)

175 Promise of Blood
It's a French revolutionary setting up with magic, the king has made the country broke and he gets more money by a treaty with the country's sworn enemy. So the Treaty sells the army short so the General rises up, So far so good.

The Dragons Path
He sure can World Build, but not much action. The back story on the main character is soo interesting. He was a great General who was betrayed and now he wants nothing to do with being a Solder.
I love the fact the world was ruled by Dragons until the Great War, he just needs to move the story faster.

Posted by: Patrick From Ohio at June 07, 2015 11:54 AM (CxEX+)

176 Gregory, if you want I can read your book and give feedback in terms of what sections I like and what doesn't hold my ibterest.
No charge.

Posted by: @votermom at June 07, 2015 11:54 AM (cbfNE)

177 "it is what you read when you don't have to..."

does gilligan's island count?

Posted by: steinmetz at June 07, 2015 11:55 AM (CrYC8)

178 What nood?! There's no nood! I command everybody to stay here! This thread ain't dead yet!!

--

Hear, hear!
Sunday belongs to the book thread.

Posted by: @votermom at June 07, 2015 11:56 AM (cbfNE)

179 Quick! Someone give the parrot CPR!

Posted by: Anna Puma (+SmuD) at June 07, 2015 11:57 AM (Gz2AJ)

180 Random thought - Proverbs 30:18-19 in the Septuagint, the version Christ and the Apostles used, actually says the "ways of a man in his youth," which actually makes more sense (stupidity of youth)

Oh, I don't know, that translation kind of doesn't make sense. The first three items in the list are given as mysterious and hard to figure out. But "ways of a man in his youth", i.e. foolishness, is easy, obvious, and well-defined.

So I'm not convinced.

Also, are you saying that when Jesus stood up in the synagogue and read from the scriptures, he was handed a copy of the Septuagint (with Greek letters) and not Torah scrolls written in Hebrew?

Posted by: OregonMuse at June 07, 2015 11:58 AM (nWI4j)

181 I've been dabbling a bit in the Cadfael mysteries which have also had romance subplots. Very very pure romance where the heroine manages to marry her true love even if its against tradition in 12th century Wales or England in the first two books. It is sweet and cute but after book 2 I was finding it a bit trite. I suspect it continues so I'll be exploring other authors and save Cadfael for when I'm in the mood for a cozy read and don't mind if it strays into being trite.

Posted by: PaleRider at June 07, 2015 12:00 PM (iA/+T)

182 161 Example: American women cry at the drop of a hat. Even the most emotional Nigerian women I know / teenagers I knew don't do that.
Posted by: chique d'afrique (the artist formerly known as african chick) at June 07, 2015 11:29 AM (shFKH)
---
Pretty broad statement there, Chique. Not sure I'd agree.

Posted by: All Hail Eris at June 07, 2015 12:00 PM (jR7Wy)

183 Niffenegger? That's RAAAAACIST!!!!!

Posted by: Insomniac at June 07, 2015 10:51 AM (mx5oN)
---
Not as racist as Niffereggen.

Posted by: La Notprahs at June 07, 2015 12:01 PM (F1Z8f)

184 Yeah, I don't like this "nood" stuff, not in a thread that's lively and interesting. It only makes sense in an old, stale thread where everybody has run out of things to say and are just marking time. Anybody who doesn't care about the book thread is already busily refreshing the main page, looking for a new thread.

Posted by: rickl at June 07, 2015 12:01 PM (sdi6R)

185 Yeah, I don't like this "nood" stuff, not in a thread that's lively and interesting.

Actually, considering the book thread has been at the top of the heap for 3 hours, I don't mind the noods. Particularly since the book thread remains (minimally) active throughout the day and well into the evening.

Posted by: OregonMuse at June 07, 2015 12:07 PM (nWI4j)

186 #23

Refer back to the Richard Pryor gag:

"Why did you kill everyone in the house?"
"They was home."

The bear doesn't need to know what a gun does to know it has been attacked and will seek to kill the first living thing that catches its eye in assumption it is the culprit. If you are far away and somebody you'd like to see become bear food is much closer to the bear...

Posted by: Epobirs at June 07, 2015 12:08 PM (IdCqF)

187 So now they are trying to escape while avoiding Mr. Snooty Waiter.
Posted by: Anna Puma (+SmuD) at June 07, 2015 10:48 AM (Gz2AJ)


My favorites if asked? "You have nothing au-gratin" or "We really need more than 2 square feet of table" or "thank you but we can get a better seating at Micky-Dee's"

Posted by: Kindltot at June 07, 2015 12:08 PM (3pRHP)

188 >>Gregory, if you want I can read your book and give feedback in terms of what sections I like and what doesn't hold my ibterest.

Email meh.

Posted by: Gregory of Yardale at June 07, 2015 12:10 PM (c/Ipt)

189 I love mysteries and true crime books. The latest I read was The Devil in the White City by Erik Larson. I found it well researched and very interesting. I checked it out because I became fascinated with H.H. Holmes after watching a documentary about him on Netflix. He was a very scary, evil individual.

Posted by: California Girl at June 07, 2015 12:21 PM (l+qoZ)

190 Women want "Brad Pitt looks, Bill Gates money, John Holmes endowment"

The problem with this is that so few men fit this bill--and most of them are probably gay. So women who are looking for this usually end up with "Bill Gates looks, John Holmes money (who was always broke and blew his money on drugs) and Brad Pitt endowment." *




* nude pictures of him were published ten or so years ago; his dick is nothing to brag about.

Posted by: JoeF. at June 07, 2015 12:26 PM (8HGb7)

191 Well, one of my nieces is about to come out with one of those books you've been talking about. She teamed up with another woman who's a best-selling author and they wrote the book together. In fact they combine their names on the book.

It comes out at the end of the month. Not my cup of tea, but I wish her well.

Posted by: HH at June 07, 2015 12:32 PM (Qia1Z)

192 that looks like anthony quinn behind the wheel.

Posted by: steinmetz at June 07, 2015 12:34 PM (CrYC8)

193 that looks like anthony quinn behind the wheel.

Posted by: steinmetz at June 07, 2015 12:34 PM (CrYC


My guess would be Aristotle Onassis.

Posted by: A. Guy at June 07, 2015 12:39 PM (d6iMX)

194 that looks like anthony quinn behind the wheel.

yeah, and the guy sitting next to him in the funny hat is Peter Ustinov.

Posted by: OregonMuse at June 07, 2015 12:41 PM (nWI4j)

195 "gay Minutemen eating pudding."

I literally spit coffee on the iPad Muse. Thanks for the morning belly laugh.

Posted by: Tuna at June 07, 2015 12:42 PM (JSovD)

196 And in the back seat we have Gina Lollobrigida and her mother.

Posted by: OregonMuse at June 07, 2015 12:42 PM (nWI4j)

197 Also, are you saying that when Jesus stood up in the synagogue and read from the scriptures, he was handed a copy of the Septuagint (with Greek letters) and not Torah scrolls written in Hebrew?

If Jesus ever cited this particular proverb, we'd know. It doesn't seem that he did cite it. And there's no real reason he would, except as a literary allusion; given that as a Jew he'd consider the Proverbs to be "Writings" and not Prophetic.

Posted by: boulder terlit hobo at June 07, 2015 01:06 PM (AVEe1)

198 I just finished Gulag Archipelago (v1) by Solzhenitsyn. I walked past it in the library and I thought "hmm, I could use a little light reading about the Stalin era gulag system!" and scooped it right up. I know people seem to adore it (Amazon readers pretty uniformly love it), but it is not really a novel, but more a cataloging. with lots of disjointed stories and meanderings. Maybe that's what happens post gulag. When I finished it I was left thinking about what an apocalypse would look like and whether I would be a lamb or a wolf. Weird, but your mind goes to weird places after this book. For a more novelish book on the same subject written by the same author try One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich. You may have read it in HS, but if you have not and care about such things, it is worth the read. Plus it is a normal novel length.

I believe I am the only female who has not read the 50 Shades novel or a bodice ripper. Not sure what that says about me. But I do love me a strong man. No PJ boys for me.

I am looking for a good book on chess tactics. If anyone has a good suggestion... I'd like to win a game.

Posted by: Shan at June 07, 2015 01:09 PM (O7Swd)

199 Anyway as far as "citing the Septuagint" is concerned -

Luke cited from a version of the Septuagint and aped its style. The historian Josephus was from the Pharisees and so cited from the proto-Masoretic Text which he was able to read in the original. (For instance: Josephus's "Antiquities of the Jews" retells the long, Hebrew version of the David-Goliath story in 1 Samuel; not the short version in the Septuagint and Dead Sea Scrolls.) Josephus used the Septuagint for convenience, because that was the text in his audience's mind; much like modern Anglo-Jews (like the ones we got here at the HQ) might use the King James Version.

Not sure about Paul. 1 Thessalonians might be quoting from the long Hebrew version of Jeremiah 10 on the "living and true god" and such. But Paul does this second hand, from a community that had this version (which community he scolds). Paul preceded the Tishe b Av and so had access to both Hebrew "vorlages", of "Reigns" / Samuel and of Jeremiah.

As for Jesus himself - that depends on what you think he was.

If Jesus was from the Pharisees like Paul and Josephus, then he could deliver his own translations in Aramaic and Greek. If he was a popular Galilean preacher and wannabe prophet, then he might not have been that good at Hebrew, and would have preached mainly from the targums - the Aramaic translations floating around the synagogues.

Fortunately (for such a preacher) the Jewish Bible had already been transcribed into Aramaic script. Also Aramaic itself is close to Hebrew. So a literate Aramaic speaker with half a brain and a Jewish background would not make too many mistakes in reading the Hebrew Bible.

The New Testament assumes Jewish tradition, not just the Torah alone. Much of this is documented in James Kugel "The Bible As It Was". So Jesus's dependence on the targums is most likely.

*phew*

Posted by: boulder terlit hobo at June 07, 2015 01:29 PM (AVEe1)

200 Chess tactics - you need to practice, practice, practice. I suggest the Tactics Time puzzle books by Tim Brennan, available for cheap on kindle or paperback

Posted by: OregonMuse at June 07, 2015 01:36 PM (dAKb5)

201 I second Tuna @195 comment. Except no spitting and no ipad. But I did pause and give thanks for all things humor. Then I went and watched the puppy video.

The pic associated with this post: Churchill looks like the Old Man on that pawn shop reality show. Driver - Kramer on Seinfeld. An interesting combo for The Great Race. And as a feminist might say "We see the women relegated to the backseat - - - AS USUAL!

Posted by: Shan at June 07, 2015 01:39 PM (O7Swd)

202 f I were into romances I could see being interested in the arranged marriage ones if their about the spouses growing to know and love each other.

Consider finding Georgette Heyer, Chique. I loathe bodice rippers. Georgette Heyer is about as far as you can get from a body rippers as you can get because she wrote in the 30 40s and 50's. and maybe into the 70's There is no sex. People may kiss-that's about it and the villains may have had checkered pasts but they don't do anything untowards sexually to/with the women they end up with. The best thing about the writing is that both the women and the men are very clever and usually intelligent so the verbal wordplay is great. So, it's a romance in the best way if using that word and nothing you couldn't give a grandmother or mother that had no intention of reading "Fifty Shades of Grey"

Posted by: FenelonSpoke at June 07, 2015 01:43 PM (9HoBs)

203 And I think another nice thing about Heyer is that she was very meticulous about her research as a historical fiction writer. I think some people may have a bad taste about romances because modern ones are often about "manly" men overpowering and raping (although it's sometimes put in terms of a seduction) women who then fall in love with them. Uggh, In Georegtte Heyer the woman often have to grow to like the men they end up with, or the men have to end up liking the women so the romance comes in terms of knowing and appreciating each others personalities. Unlike some modern romances there is also a good deal of humor.

Posted by: FenelonSpoke at June 07, 2015 01:50 PM (9HoBs)

204 "The Devil In The White City" yes, very good book, creepy, really creepy.

Posted by: FenelonSpoke at June 07, 2015 01:51 PM (9HoBs)

205 Posted by: Patrick at June 07, 2015 11:43 AM (U6YEj)

I think that's great that you're recommending a six volume work of theology. I'd probably read it. :^)

Posted by: FenelonSpoke at June 07, 2015 01:53 PM (9HoBs)

206 Thanks, FenelonSpoke, I intend to read one of her romances soon. I love witty dialogue and romance unsullied by sex obsession. I really do love that period among the gentry, at least as portrayed in books. Although being an introvert, I'd hate to have to visit people all the time. And having my life circumscribed by so many social rules. But there is something to be said for the sense of duty, civility, chivalry, etc.

But it's loads of fun to read and imagine being there.

Posted by: chique d'afrique (the artist formerly known as african chick) at June 07, 2015 01:57 PM (shFKH)

207 All Hail Eris, perhaps I was painting with a broad brush, but I have come across so many women who tear up about things women in some other cultures wouldn't, e.g., a sweet commercial. Or, I'm just so happy you guys (who I saw last week) are here, *all choked up*, but it's all good.

Posted by: chique d'afrique (the artist formerly known as african chick) at June 07, 2015 02:00 PM (shFKH)

208 I think they've ben reissued so they should be around
but if not you can try the library. There was someone else who really liked Heyer; I can't recall which poster that was, but my favorites are Sylvester or the wicked uncle (they loathe each other to begin with), Masqueraders, The Devil's Cub and The Toll Gate. And yes, the men are masculine. They just don't need to force women to do things which are morally objectionable. It's more along the lines of a Jane Austen novel than modern bodice rippers.

Posted by: FenelonSpoke at June 07, 2015 02:07 PM (9HoBs)

209 Thanks for the recommendations, FenelonSpoke!

Posted by: chique d'afrique (the artist formerly known as african chick) at June 07, 2015 02:11 PM (shFKH)

210 That picture of Churchill cracks me up. It looks like he knew he had to wear a hat because of the sun but was not too happy about being in that particular one.

Posted by: FenelonSpoke at June 07, 2015 02:12 PM (9HoBs)

211 Posted by: FenelonSpoke at June 07, 2015 02:07 PM (9HoBs)

Tammy Al'Thor and I both really like and have recommended Heyer in the past. I really like Sylvester too and think it might be a good intro to her romances.

Posted by: Polliwog the 'Ette at June 07, 2015 02:14 PM (GDulk)

212 Some of the recent reissuings of Heyer romances have been appallingly bad bindings, so cheap that they'll fall apart on the first read. Forty-year-old used copies can be more durable than something you just picked up off a Barnes & Noble shelf.

Has anyone read the ebook editions? Are they well-converted? Some Regency romance kindle editions I've read recently were sloppily scanned, full of doubled words, dropped spaces and the like.

Posted by: Mitch H. at June 07, 2015 02:15 PM (O4Nem)

213 As for a good intro Heyer Regency - I started with Cotillion, which is an airy, light confection, but I think Faro's Daughter is probably the funniest. The Corinthian is also a good one.

Posted by: Mitch H. at June 07, 2015 02:19 PM (O4Nem)

214
200
Chess tactics - you need to practice, practice, practice. I suggest the
Tactics Time puzzle books by Tim Brennan, available for cheap on kindle
or paperback


Oregonmuse, The Art of the Checkmate by Renaud and Kahn is a classic, and Fred Reinfeld has any number of "find the winning line" compendia. All the above are available on Amazon.

Posted by: Mickey and Sylvia at June 07, 2015 02:19 PM (QP2lF)

215 I usually try to get them out of the library, but yes, the reissues have had bad bindings. Good point. I don't have a Kindle; I should probably get one. Too many books!!

What makes me enjoy Sylvester is that's it's so funny. He gets embroiled in the situations and he certainly doesn't want to; It's also like Jane Austen in that the main characters get some insight into what how "top lofty" (that's a good Georgian expression! :^) they are or how someone might be put off by their impetuous ways of behaving and speaking. They learn something about themselves and it usually requires some humility.

Posted by: FenelonSpoke at June 07, 2015 02:20 PM (9HoBs)

216 I forgot "Faro's Daughter" That's good too.

Posted by: FenelonSpoke at June 07, 2015 02:21 PM (9HoBs)

217 Posted by: Mitch H. at June 07, 2015 02:15 PM (O4Nem)

I've gotten The Tollgate and The Reluctant Widow on Kindle since my copies of both were old standard paperbacks before I bought them second hand. I've read The Tollgate so far and it seemed to have been transferred very well. I think I'm still looking for The Talisman Ring (not looking for Cousin Kate because I *hate* psycho characters) in a newer/digital copy but I only get the Kindle versions when they're on sale. I guess I've been fortunate in not having binding issues with any of the reprints I've gotten.

Posted by: Polliwog the 'Ette at June 07, 2015 02:43 PM (GDulk)

218 OregonMuse: Thanks for the suggestion. The Amazon description of the book gave me a good chuckle. So me!
"Most amateur games are won by rather primitive means, compared to the
cool and fancy moves that masters need in order to gain victory. This
book only takes positions from amateur games and puts them out there,
warts and all."
Perfect!

Michey And Sylvia - also thank you!

I put both books on my wish list for my birthday. My hubs never knows what to get me and these books would be a gift to both of us. Currently I am no challenge. At all. Even if he has had a few drinks and I am well rested.

Posted by: Shan at June 07, 2015 02:52 PM (O7Swd)

219 Yes; "Cousin Kate" was an unpleasant book. I wonder sometimes what was going on with Heyer than she had such an abrupt departure from her usual style to produce that. Very dark.

Posted by: FenelonSpoke at June 07, 2015 02:56 PM (9HoBs)

220 I second the recommendation for "The Art of the Checkmate". It teaches you to look for patterns where a checkmate might be possible.

I had several of Fred Reinfeld's books when I was younger, but was not terribly impressed with them. But he's written more chess books than I have, so what do I know?

One of the all-time classics is "My System" by Aron Nimzovich. It was originally published in the 1920s. While there might be better books today, an amateur player who has read it has a definite advantage over one who hasn't.

https://tinyurl.com/nh3jk48


I haven't played seriously in many years, but I saw another book that looks good. I haven't read it myself, but it's gotten rave reviews. If I ever get back into the game I'll have to check it out:

https://tinyurl.com/k6qslv8

Posted by: rickl at June 07, 2015 03:13 PM (sdi6R)

221 rickl-- Your first link is to a new translation of the Nimzowich classic. I'm very curious to see how it is and it is definitely on my wish list

Your second link does get rave reviews, but I have an earlier edition and it is quite advanced. I need to get better before it will help my game, I'm afraid.

Posted by: OregonMuse at June 07, 2015 03:53 PM (nWI4j)

222 My problem with chess is that I have zero killer instinct. I feel bad capturing pieces.

Posted by: @votermom at June 07, 2015 04:18 PM (cbfNE)

223 I think this lady has the killer instinct for chess...

http://tinyurl.com/qg4tr6z

Posted by: Anna Puma (+SmuD) at June 07, 2015 04:21 PM (Gz2AJ)

224 No one has asked the obvious question..., what car is that?

Posted by: Mike Hammer, etc., etc. at June 07, 2015 04:24 PM (F2IAQ)

225 163 I read "First Into Outer Space" by Theodore Gordon & Julian Scheer. It's about the first three American attempts to launch a space probe to the Moon in 1958. It was published in 1959 and is long out of print, but I found a used copy at AbeBooks.
...
Posted by: rickl at June 07, 2015 11:36 AM (sdi6R)

This looks like just the thing for Christmas. Thanks!

Posted by: gingeroni at June 07, 2015 04:27 PM (baKy9)

226 Made it through Transfer of Power (solid plot and moves very fast) and Third Option (is it really 2:00 am? I have to get up and go to work tomorrow. It is a good thing caffeine exists) by Vince Flynn. Part of me wants to read really fast and finish up quite a few more books by Flynn; the other part of me knows that there is limited number of books.

About to start reading the material in the Hugo packet that I had not read, which is mostly the novellas and short stories.

Posted by: Charlotte at June 07, 2015 04:34 PM (xUmRZ)

227
Most of my reads come thru the Library, via this book thread.
"Flashback", Dan Simmons - The stuff of nightmares to come. But... Confusing author - in "Darwin's Blade" about accident investigation - reads OK, but then has a character "flip the safety on a revolver", or some such.
And... A must read; want to own for reference:
American betrayal : the secret assault on our nation's character (2013)by West, Diana
Thanks for all the suggested reading, 'rons.

Posted by: OK, thanks, bye at June 07, 2015 04:46 PM (UiOkZ)

228 My problem with chess is that I have zero killer instinct. I feel bad capturing pieces.

You have to learn to treasure the look of hopeless disgust on your opponent's face when he realizes he's lost. There's nothing quite like it

Posted by: OregonMuse at June 07, 2015 04:59 PM (nWI4j)

229 Oregon Muse - yeah, for many, if not most, of the average synagogues, they would have used the Septuagint. Hebrew just wasn't understood much, even in the Middle East. That's why the Apostles have even Christ quoting the Septuagint and about 90% of all the quotes from the OT that are found in the NT are from the Septuagint. It was the version of the OT that the vast, vast majority of people understood and could read. Greek was sorta like the English of the day. That's why it was compiled in the first place - so few Jews knew or understood Hebrew.

And as far as the quote: actually, I disagree. It is MUCH easier to define the "ways of a man with a maid." That's just lust. The foolishness, the egocentrism, of youth becomes something, I think, far more people forget as they get older.

Posted by: Patrick at June 07, 2015 05:12 PM (U6YEj)

230 One of the all-time classics is "My System" by Aron
Nimzovich. It was originally published in the 1920s. While there might
be better books today, an amateur player who has read it has a definite
advantage over one who hasn't.



https://tinyurl.com/nh3jk48


Posted by: rickl at June 07, 2015 03:13 PM (sdi6R)

One of my favorite chess books, wish it'd come out on Kindle, have a beaten up paperback.

Posted by: waelse1 at June 07, 2015 05:48 PM (dqOGd)

231 I'd recommend Rook Endings by Smyslov to improve your play. Many players study openings and middle game tactics, but get them into an endgame and you'll find their weakness.

Posted by: waelse1 at June 07, 2015 05:52 PM (dqOGd)

232 Chess books - what do you guys think of Logical Chess: Move by move by Chernev?
It would be for my older teen who is mildly interested in learning chess after watching some games on youtube. (She knows the rules but that's about it)

Posted by: @votermom at June 07, 2015 05:58 PM (cbfNE)

233 132 He makes Sabrina Chases books completely pristine, which leads to a better reading experience.

Much as I'd like to take credit for a chunk of Sabrina Chase's awesomeness, her stuff lately has been very clean by the time it reaches me.

I'd certainly be willing to take a look at Gregory of Yardale's epic; I read one of his and enjoyed the story. I can be reached under this name at hotmail.

Posted by: Anachronda at June 07, 2015 06:02 PM (o78gS)

234 Patrick - the Septuagint was compiled (btw, it's good you used the term "compiled") in Lower Egypt, where those Jews did speak Greek.

But in Judaea, especially as one got closer to the Syrian highlands... like in Galilee... the Jewish language was Aramaic. So was the Christian language up there: the Syriac language is basically the Aramaic of Edessa.

Posted by: boulder terlit hobo at June 07, 2015 06:08 PM (AVEe1)

235 The Gospels were, however, written in Greek. It was the lingua franca of the Jewish diaspora and the eastern half of the Empire. By the time the Gospels were needed, Christianity had gone through the Aramaic back country as far as they were going to go; the market was saturated, as it were. (What survived of it - last time I checked, most of the extant gospels were written down during or after the Jewish War, weren't they? Galilee in particular got pretty well harrowed.) They were evangelizing the urban, Greek-speaking polities. Thus, the use of the Septuagint and so forth - no point in translating from another source when there was a common text right at hand.

Posted by: Mitch H. at June 07, 2015 06:36 PM (O4Nem)

236 Chess books - what do you guys think of Logical Chess: Move by move by Chernev?

Excellent choice for beginners. By playing through the games, and the variations, a beginner will learn a lot.

Another good choice -- Chess Master vs. Chess Amateur by Max Euwe. A classic book that explains bad moves and why they're bad.

Posted by: OregonMuse at June 07, 2015 07:01 PM (nWI4j)

237 If you like Wodehouse, there are the Mulliner stories. Hilarious.
The BBC did a series about 40 years ago with the wonderful Pauline Collins and John Alderton.

Just read my first "cosy" in years - it was supposed to be set in a yarn shop, but there was very little about actual knitting. It was like a Hallmark Movie in book form.

There is a Churchill alcove in the Dallas Museum of Art, in the Reeves collection part, with one or two of his landscapes, and a few mementoes.

Posted by: Sal at June 07, 2015 07:01 PM (MRX6w)

238 Posted by: Sal at June 07, 2015 07:01 PM (MRX6w)

Which Cosy series was it? There is a series by Maggie Sefton set in "my" (or at least the one I go to most often when in Colorado) yarn shop in Fort Collins.

Posted by: Polliwog the 'Ette at June 07, 2015 08:25 PM (GDulk)

239 Thanks OM

Posted by: @votermom at June 07, 2015 08:39 PM (cbfNE)

240 The whole point of that kind of romance novel? It's the same thing as all the romance novels where the heroine starts with amnesia, or those novels where the entire world dies of a plague except the hero and heroine, or where the aliens kidnap Captain Kirk and make him have sex with Ensign Mary Sue.

The point is that readers don't want it to happen in real life. They want to have the author create a dreamlike or nightmarish situation that isn't realistic in any scary way, yet which makes the heroine unable to avoid having lots of sex without it being her fault or her choice. Therefore she is not a slut, and therefore the reader is not a slutty reader for reading a porny no-plot romance book.

There. I've explained it to you.

Posted by: Suburbanbanshee at June 07, 2015 10:17 PM (ZJVQ5)

241 And as far as the quote: actually, I disagree. It is MUCH easier to define the "ways of a man with a maid." That's just lust.

No, actually I don't think that's what's meant here; there's a whole lot more to man/woman than that, see, for instance, the Song of Solomon.

The foolishness, the egocentrism, of youth becomes something, I think, far more people forget as they get older.

As a matter of fact, I don't think most people "forget" youthful stupidity as they get older, in fact, they remember it all too well. At least I do.

So I can't agree.

Posted by: OregonMuse at June 08, 2015 12:56 AM (RML+n)

242 8 I'm reading a reprint of an older work. _War of the Gods_ by Poul Anderson. It's based on an actual Danish saga, but Anderson does a fantastic job of turning it into a novel. Damn that man could write well. It's a crime and a tragedy that he has been dropped from the SF/Fantasy canon since his death.
Posted by: Trimegistus at June 07, 2015 09:21 AM (r1Whx)

I absolutely loved Anderson's "The Broken Sword" and "The High Crusade."

Baen just published a tribute anthology "Multiverse: Exploring the Worlds of Poul Anderson" edited by Greg Bear and Gardner Dozois a week ago.

Posted by: BornLib at June 08, 2015 02:59 AM (zpNwC)

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