Sunday Morning Book Thread 02-08-2015: Footnotes to Solzhenitsyn [OregonMuse]


labor camp at night - 525.jpg
"You Know, Maybe I Should've Just Baked That Damn Wedding Cake"

Good morning to all of you morons and moronettes and all the ships at sea. Welcome to AoSHQ's stately, prestigious, and high-class Sunday Morning Book Thread. The only AoSHQ thread that is so hoity-toity, pants are required. Or kilts. Kilts are OK, too. But not tutus. Unless you're a girl.

Book Quote

It is a good rule after reading a new book, never to allow yourself another new one till you have read an old one in between.

-C.S. Lewis


Americans In The Gulag

In his best-selling memoir Angela's Ashes, Frank McCourt tells how life got so bad for his Irish immigrant family in New York during the 1930s that they relocated back to Ireland. Which was still a pretty dismal place, never having really recovered from the potato famine of 1845-1852. But that McCourt's family thought their lives would be better there is an indication of just how bad the Depression was in the United States.

Others left the country, too. A number of progressives and commies, faced with grim prospects at home, and hearing that Russia was implementing a communistic system they were enamored with, packed up and moved, some with their entire families, to the USSR. They saw the future, and they were told that it worked.

If I remember correctly, one of the 7 companions of Slavomir Rawicz on his Long Walk out of Siberia was an American commie who went to the land of his dreams and ended up in one of Stalin's labor camps. And he wasn't the only one.

Ideology wasn't the only reasons for emigration to the USSR, but a number of Americans who went there were eventually imprisoned. Particularly when Stalin was in power, when things were definitely crazy.

Some were fortunately able to write of their experiences.

For example, Alexander Dolgun's Story: An American in the Gulag is the account of an American embassy employee who was kidnapped by the KGB, imprisoned, tortured, and falsely convicted of espionage, political terrorism, anti-Soviet propaganda, etc. He spent eight years at a forced labor camp. After his release, he met Solzhenitsyn, who interviewed him while writing The Gulag Archipelago.

And then there is the unfortunately titled Coming Out of the Ice: An Unexpected Life by Victor Herman. I say 'unfortunate' because these days, any book with 'Coming Out' in the title makes you think it's going to be one of those "hey everybody, I'm gay now and aren't I wonderful?" fiestas of cornholery, but fortunately, that's not true in this case. This memoir is written by

...a young American man who was sent to the Soviet Union with his parents by the Ford Motor Company to set up an auto plant. He was eventually thrown into Soviet prisons and could not return to America until forty-five years later.

In other words, they ruined his entire life. But that's not all:

During his life in and out of Russian prisons, he met and fell in love with a beautiful Russian gymnast who followed him into exile and lived with him and their child for a year in Siberia, in a cave chopped out under the ice.

What human beings can endure never ceases to amaze me.

A movie was made based on Herman's book, available on VHS, but I don't think it ever made it to DVD.

Not a first-person account, but a carefully researched investigation by British writer and filmmaker Tim Tzouliadis, The Forsaken: An American Tragedy in Stalin's Russia, tells of American men and women who went to the USSR during the Great Depression in search of jobs, ideology, or both. They were welcomed when they were needed to help build Soviet industry. Then they began to disappear into the gulags.

You'd think that the American government would raise holy hell because of missing American citizens, but that never happened. Tzouliadis cites extreme "Russian duplicity" in dealing with the FDR administration, and while that no doubt is true, there was also the question of Roosevelt's government being lousy with commie agents and spies, and maybe that had something to do with it.

And not only Americans. Hungarian Rupert Raphael was working from the British embassy in Budapest when, in 1947, he was arrested, convicted of "spying" and sent into the Gulag. Fortunately, he survived and wrote about his experiences in A Hidden World: My Nine Years in the Soviet Gulag, first published in 1963.

Hell On Earth: Brutality And Violence Under The Stalinist Regime by Ludwik Kowalski, the son of Polish civil engineer and "idealistic communist" who emigrated to the USSR in 1931. His wife and his infant son joined him soon after. In 1938 he was arrested and sent to a Gulag camp in Kolyma, where he died two years later at the age of 36.

After All These Years

When I first heard the news earlier this week that Harper Lee, the author of the modern classic To Kill A Mockingbird, had written a new book, I thought, why? After all this time, what could she possibly have to say?

But, as this NY Times article points out, this is not a new thing:

On Tuesday, Ms. Lee’s publisher announced its plans to release that novel, recently rediscovered, which Ms. Lee completed in the mid-1950s, before she wrote "To Kill A Mockingbird." The 304-page book, "Go Set a Watchman," takes place 20 years later in the same fictional town, Maycomb, Ala.

So it's not actually a "new" book, but rather a "new old" book, and it's from a hitherto lost manuscript:

Ms. Lee said she had thought the draft of "Go Set a Watchman" had been lost or destroyed. Then last fall, Tonja Carter, her friend and lawyer, discovered the manuscript in a secure place where Ms. Lee keeps her archives, attached to an original typed manuscript of "To Kill a Mockingbird."

This actually makes me feel more hopeful that it might be worthwhile. I had assumed that Lee had written it recently, and I was dreading how bad a progressive morality play it was going to be, and speculating about how much Kool-Aid Lee had been drinking.

To Set A Watchman is available for pre-order on Amazon, where it's already a bestseller. It's scheduled to be released in July.

And incidentally, the NY Times piece I linked to is a good example of the kind of interesting, informative journalism they're capable of when they're not acting as shills for the Democratic Party.

Ms. Lee has occasionally addressed the question of why she never published another book after "To Kill A Mockingbird." She has said she found the publicity surrounding "To Kill a Mockingbird" overwhelming and that she had said all she had to say in that single work.

So in other words, she said she what she had to say, then shut up. I admire her restraint.


Ideas Have Consequences

So, a while back I told of some brick-and-mortar bookstores in San Francisco that were still somehow managing to survive in spite of Amazon and other internet book sources. These included Borderlands, a science fiction/fantasy bookshop located on Valencia Street.

In November, San Francisco voted to increase the minimum wage to $15 by 2018.

So, yay living wage! Yay fairness! Yay equality!

But how's it working out?

About like you'd expect. They're going out of business! From the Borderlands web page:

In November, San Francisco voters overwhelmingly passed a measure that will increase the minimum wage within the city to $15 per hour by 2018. Although all of us at Borderlands support the concept of a living wage in principal and we believe that it's possible that the new law will be good for San Francisco -- Borderlands Books as it exists is not a financially viable business if subject to that minimum wage. Consequently we will be closing our doors no later than March 31st.

Heh. The progressive is strong in this one. One the one hand, it is possible to argue that something is generally beneficial even though it may hurt you personally. But even so, the Borderlands owner must believe that there has to be other businesses in San Francisco that can absorb the wage increase, thus benefiting bottom tier employees. I wonder if it had occurred to him that other businesses are subject to the same economic pressures as his, and that every regulation that adds to the cost of hiring will result in less hiring.

Richard Weaver e-mailed to tell me "See? I told you so."


Little Free Libraries

You might come across a little caches of book in a box or case in some public area, with the instruction "Take A Book, Return A Book". These are little free libraries and they're springing up all over:

Little free libraries are becoming more and more common to communities from Maine to California and all over the world, according to the non-profit FreeLittleLibraries.org.

They allow for members of a community to exchange their favorite books with their neighbors. The trading of these books can generate discourse and an exchange of ideas between neighbors who may not interact often, despite their physical proximity to one another.

Naturally the government has to get in and screw things up:

Actor Peter Cook, who acts under the name Peter Mackenzie, and his wife Lili Flanders, a writer, operated a little free library at their home in Los Angeles. But one day last month, a city investigator demanded that they remove the library. The "library" was nothing more than a series of wine crates containing the books fastened to a redwood post near the curb, or face a fine, according to the Los Angeles Times.

I wonder what public good the city thought it was doing by threatening Mr. Cook. No man's life, liberty, or property is safe when the legislature is in session. Or when power is given to petty, small-minded bureaucrats.

Update: a moron emailed me, noting that these little free libraries are perfect opportunities for conservative infiltration. So, my question to you is, what conservative-learning books could we put in a free exchange library that are fun, easily accessible, and that won't scare people off?


What I'm Reading

I've started Unbroken by Laura Hillenbrand and it is surprisingly good. I never would have suspected that the juvenile Zamparini was a sneak thief and petty criminal and Nrs. Muse, who's also reading the book, remarked to me that he's fortunate he didn't wind up in reform school or jail. Also, I'm learning stuff about WW II that I never knew before. Like, if you were a pilot or part of a flight crew, you were far more likely to get killed in a training accident than you were by enemy action. That's just weird.

I also discovered that Zamparini has written his autobiography, Devil at My Heels: A Heroic Olympian's Astonishing Story of Survival as a Japanese POW in World War II and I think that's an embarrassing, full-of-yourself kind of title, but maybe it was written by some guy in the publisher's marketing division. At least I hope it was.

___________

So that's all for this week. As always, book thread tips, suggestions, bribes, rumors, threats, and insults may be sent to OregonMuse, Proprietor, AoSHQ Book Thread, at the book thread e-mail address: aoshqbookthread, followed by the 'at' sign, and then 'G' mail, and then dot cee oh emm.

What have you all been reading this week? Hopefully something good, because, as you all know, life is too short to be reading lousy books.

Posted by: Open Blogger at 09:04 AM




Comments

(Jump to bottom of page)

1 I made it through book 4 in the WOT series and noted that, as before, it started bogging down. I have moved on. Read the second book in the John Ringo Black Tide Rising series. It is pretty good, but not up to his usual standards.


I am now going back for a re-read of the WEB Griffin Men At War series while I wait for some of these new issues to come don in price.

Posted by: Vic at February 08, 2015 08:57 AM (wlDny)

2 I honestly expected a Brian Williams joke after reading the title of the Zamparini book.

Posted by: pep at February 08, 2015 09:06 AM (4nR9/)

3 >>> I honestly expected a Brian Williams joke after reading the title of the Zamparini book.

The B-24 missions that I flew during The Big One are still classified.

Posted by: Brian Williams at February 08, 2015 09:10 AM (Ua6T/)

4 Yes, that title most certainly was written by "some guy in the publisher's marketing division". I've heard plenty of stories about authors who had to fight over every letter that appears on the cover of the book.

Posted by: I know publishing at February 08, 2015 09:11 AM (3MNCs)

5 Read Cancer Ward. It is a masterpiece.

Posted by: Super Creepy Rob Lowe at February 08, 2015 09:11 AM (XBL5+)

6 Another Gulag classic, The Blond Knight of Germany.

Posted by: Jean at February 08, 2015 09:12 AM (ztOda)

7 I repeat myself but please read The Profession by Steven Pressler. Everyday that goes by, Pressler seems more and more like Nostradamus .

It's a story of the Middle East and war 25 years from now. These wars are mostly fought by professional mercenaries hired by governments and corporations .

Posted by: Bob Belcher at February 08, 2015 09:12 AM (Xrson)

8 The first thing you do in the camps is out someone. That way you get two blankets. Well, for awhile. And remember to hide your toothbrush up your ass so no one else will use it.

Posted by: Super Creepy Rob Lowe at February 08, 2015 09:13 AM (XBL5+)

9 I've been reading Sepulchre by Kate Mosse, which I had bought for Miss Mega over the summer. I think it's kind of a chick book but oh man can she write. I've never been much of a fiction reader but I'm a sucker for anyone who can write like she does.

Posted by: The Mega Independent at February 08, 2015 09:14 AM (QCo5R)

10
I was never awarded the Purple Heart, but my service in Iraq and the close calls should entitle me to the award. The standard for award should be the criteria established by John Kerry who served in Vietnam.

Posted by: Brian Williams at February 08, 2015 09:16 AM (P330y)

11 So FDR and the Obama Administration both sucked at protecting kidnapped Americans.

Posted by: Evi L. Bloggerlady at February 08, 2015 09:17 AM (UYjru)

12 Brian Williams, Brian Williams.

Brian Williams Brian Williams Brian Williams?

Brian Williams Brian Williams Brian Williams Brian Williams Brian Williams Brian Williams Brian Williams Brian Williams.

- Brian Williams.

Posted by: Brian Williams at February 08, 2015 09:20 AM (0HooB)

13 I don't remember the American from The Long Walk being a commie, I thought he was an architect/engineer of some type, sent here on business. Might have been a commie, too, just don't remember it being mentioned in the book.

Posted by: Lincolntf at February 08, 2015 09:21 AM (2cS/G)

14 It happened again. The federal Vaccine Injury Compensation Program (VICP) has awarded Ryan Mojabi and his family a multi-million dollar settlement for autism as the result of an injury from the Measles Mumps Rubella (MMR) vaccine. Ryan's family joins Hannah Poling and at least 85 others who have received judgments for vaccine-induced autism from the VICP. These people aren't supposed to exist. We are told again and again that vaccines cannot cause autism, vaccines have never caused autism, and vaccines never will cause autism. Except when they do.

Posted by: Doctor J at February 08, 2015 09:22 AM (e8kgV)

15 Sorry, I was distracted there for a second.

Posted by: BackwardsBoy, who did not vote for this sh1t at February 08, 2015 09:22 AM (0HooB)

16 Rx for perspective:

The Gulag Archipelago (all three volumes) by Solzhenitsyn are a must in addition to the books reviewed in the posting above.

Add to that Varlam Shalamov's Kolyma Tales + The Land of Green Plums by Herta Muller + Present Past, Past Present: A Personal Memoir by Eugene Ionesco for a greater appreciation of current events.

Sprinkle in a little Locus Solus by Raymond Roussel for a little sanity/insanity and Alfred Jarry's Ubu Roi for comic relief.



Posted by: ouch at February 08, 2015 09:23 AM (zYgqi)

17 g'mornin', 'rons

Posted by: AltonJackson at February 08, 2015 09:24 AM (4gN5w)

18 Speaking of Solzhenitsyn, his Warning to the west is superb when changing the focus from external to internal/domestic socialization.

"I would like to call upon America to be more careful with its trust and prevent those wise persons who are attempting to establish even finer degrees of justice and even finer legal shades of equality - some because of their distorted outlook, others because of short-sightedness and still others out of self-interest - from falsely using the struggle for peace and for social justice to lead you down a false road. Because they are trying to weaken you; they are trying to disarm your strong and magnificent country in the face of this fearful threat - one which has never been seen before in the history of the world."


Posted by: Locus Aqui at February 08, 2015 09:25 AM (+Y0h2)

19 Currently reading the next volume in the excellent Lost Fleet series. I read Ark Royal and enjoyed it, but Jack Campbell's Lost Fleet is clearly superior. For Sanderson fans, I would heartily recommend the novella Legion and its sequel. Set in a contemporary world, it is a about a genius who is totally sane, its just that all his hallucinations are mentally ill. Very different and a lot of fun to read. I was rewatching Firefly series at the time and kept seeing the J.C. hallucination character as Jayne (Adam Baldwin).

Posted by: countrydoc at February 08, 2015 09:26 AM (Yj/Vy)

20 Ouch, I would add Witness by Whitaker Chambers.

Posted by: Locus Aqui at February 08, 2015 09:26 AM (+Y0h2)

21 I finished the CS Lewis sci-fi trilogy, which I hadn't read since about 1970. What would my reaction be now in what (I hope) is middle age compared to that first reading in my late teens?

Holy Moly! There are layers of meaning and relevance that I couldn't see 40 plus years ago. It was surprising how much of the third book, back on Earth, is pertinent to the problems (evils) we face now. I'm tempted to go back and re-read the trilogy right away to see what else might pop up. But I think some other Lewis writings are in line.

One thing I've noticed about Lewis' writing: he generally writes about faith, not religion. It's an interesting distinction.

Posted by: JTB at February 08, 2015 09:27 AM (FvdPb)

22 I vaguely recall someone wondering what happened to the good old planetary romances like the Barsoom novels. Very happy to discover Stirling's In the Court of the Crimson Kings is carrying on the tradition. I liked it much better than Peshawar Lancers, even. Very funny bit where the hero bitterly realizes *he's* the helpless love interest who can't do anything at that moment but wait to be rescued by the Martian princess ;-) (Don't worry, it's only temporary and there's plenty of swordfighting.)

Got two free books via Amazon's Kindle First program for Prime members. (If you have Prime, check it out -- four books offered, pick two for free). First one I read was a bit of a disappointment. Dead Key is a mystery/thriller with a very interesting premise, good writing, but unfortunately all the characters are rather unpleasant in some way. Abandoning in mid-read. Trying The Mermaid's Sister next.

Posted by: Sabrina Chase at February 08, 2015 09:30 AM (yCJWD)

23 That "Coming Out of the Ice" book looks interesting, but $45 for a paperback? Ouch.


Current reads are The Walking Dead comics and I'm on the third book of a series called Sleepers. Kind of post-apocalyptic and an interesting plot, but it is poorly edited, which makes it tough to read at times.

Posted by: DangerGirl and her 1.21 gigawatt Sanity Prod (tm) at February 08, 2015 09:31 AM (KuU4f)

24 12 Brian Williams, Brian Williams.

Brian Williams Brian Williams Brian Williams?

Brian Williams Brian Williams Brian Williams Brian Williams Brian Williams Brian Williams Brian Williams Brian Williams.

- Brian Williams.
Posted by: Brian Williams at February 08, 2015 09:20 AM (0HooB)

***************


I tried singing that to "Rock Me Amadeus," but it didn't quite work.

Posted by: Bob's House of Flannel Shirts and Wallet Chains at February 08, 2015 09:31 AM (yxw0r)

25 Three quarters of the way through The Looming Tower by Lawrence Tribe. Worth the read in light of my paucity of knowledge about the culture of Islamic cultures. But tedious....

Posted by: Locus Aqui at February 08, 2015 09:32 AM (+Y0h2)

26 I don't read many biographies, but on the recommendations of several morons here, I read William Manchester's biography of Winston Churchill, The Last Lion Vol I: Visions of Glory, 1874-1932. What an interesting man living in interesting times. I learned much about both and I am looking forward to reading Vol II: Alone, 1932-1940 and Vol III: Defender of the Realm, 1940-1965.

Posted by: Zoltan at February 08, 2015 09:32 AM (EGaHt)

27 I tried singing that to "Rock Me Amadeus," but it didn't quite work.


John Malkovich liked it.

Posted by: BackwardsBoy, who did not vote for this sh1t at February 08, 2015 09:33 AM (0HooB)

28
Bob Dole stands behind Brian Williams as the foremost newscaster in the nation. Mr. Williamson has contributed to our culture, and Bob Dole recognizes his large and voluminous effort to enlighten the unwashed.

Bob Dole believes Brian Willis should be allowed to state his combat experiences without interference from the peanut gallery. Bob Dole believes Brian Willy and congratulates him on a career established with honesty, truthfulness, and forthrightness. Bob Dole would vote for Brian Will in a national election for president. Bob Dole is ready, willing, and able to hold the position of Secretary of State.

Posted by: Bob Dole at February 08, 2015 09:33 AM (P330y)

29 extreme "Russian duplicity" in dealing with the FDR administration

I had a lot of flexibility after winning all those elections...

Posted by: FDR at February 08, 2015 09:33 AM (FcR7P)

30 Just a reminder. Reggie Love's new book ( "Power Forward: My Presidential Education.") has been released.

http://tinyurl.com/puhqyyz

Posted by: Mikw Hammer, etc., etc. at February 08, 2015 09:35 AM (vPh3W)

31 I read Gulag as a teenager and it changed my life forever, turning me from a wannabe hippie revolutionary into a real non-conformist: a long hair dope-smoking anti-communist, who's life goal was the overthrow of the Soviet Empire (my HS teachers had no idea what to do with me).

I'd say I did pretty well too, until our leadership (ha) squandered victory in that 70 year twilight struggle.

Posted by: motionview at February 08, 2015 09:35 AM (hqjPT)

32 Trying The Mermaid's Sister next.


Posted by: Sabrina Chase at February 08, 2015 09:30 AM (yCJWD)


The Kindle First program is really neat. I also got The Mermaid's Sister and picked up Wreckage as my second book. Haven't started either of them yet.

Posted by: DangerGirl and her 1.21 gigawatt Sanity Prod (tm) at February 08, 2015 09:35 AM (KuU4f)

33 Another good book, "With God in Russia" by Walter Ciszeck, S.J. American-born Polish priest spent 23 years (1939-1962) in the prisons and dregs of Soviet Russia.

Posted by: Moconc Txorca at February 08, 2015 09:36 AM (16xBP)

34 In yesterday's Weirddave thread, Amity Schlaes' "The Forgotten Man" was mentioned. The second chapter described a trip to the USSR in the late 20s by Americans who were eager to see the glorious future that was being built. Several of them went on to work in the Roosevelt administration.

Posted by: rickl at February 08, 2015 09:36 AM (sdi6R)

35 May I say this is one if the more EPIC (tm) Sunday Book Threads of recent memory. Thank you, Sir 'Muse.

Recently read The Martian, by Andy Weir, and absolutely loved it. Also read Red Shirts by John Scalzi and love that even more.

Now just about to start the Book of Revelations in a year-long, cover-to-cover reading of the Bible that started in April last year. Great Read, which helped me get through a pretty tough year, though the Old Testament tends to drag a bit in the middle.

Annoyingly, Brian Williams just emailed me to ask me how I liked His Book.

Posted by: Sharkman at February 08, 2015 09:37 AM (dHTqa)

36 Continuing reading everything that I can get my hands on about the Fred Harvey hospitality empire. This is in aid of the book after the next - a heroine who hires on to go west to work in a railway restaurant concession run by Harvey. Not only will I be able to tell a story that has been pretty well forgotten since the last of the Harvey House restaurants closed in the mid-1950s, but I can point up an enterprising businessman as a hero. (He worked hard, had special knowledge, vision ... and had the creativity to see an opportunity and run with it.)

One of the things that I didn't know - was how Fred Harvey also created a chain of lavish destination hotel/spas in the Southwest - they were the cornerstone of a thriving upscale tourist industry ... and the company's in-house designer and interior decorator (a woman) practically created what we call Southwest Style. A handful of the Harvey hotels still are in existence as hotels - El Tovar and Bright Angel at the Grand Canyon, and La Fonda in Santa Fe.

Posted by: Sgt Mom at February 08, 2015 09:37 AM (95iDF)

37 34
In yesterday's Weirddave thread, Amity Schlaes' "The Forgotten Man" was
mentioned. The second chapter described a trip to the USSR in the late
20s by Americans who were eager to see the glorious future that was
being built. Several of them went on to work in the Roosevelt
administration.

Posted by: rickl at February 08, 2015 09:36 AM (sdi6R)


That was a great book, and if there are any Morons out there who have not read that book yet it is a MUST read for how liberals and commies have screwed to economy of this country for decades.

Posted by: Vic at February 08, 2015 09:39 AM (wlDny)

38 I'll second the recommendation for

"Kolyma Tales" by Varlam Shalamov


A collection of very short tales told in a flat, matter of fact style. Mostly slices of concentration camp life and/or brutality.

Shalamov spent roughly a decade and a half in the camps including Kolyma.

Too bad so much of this great and important literature appears to be getting memory-holed as "irrelevant" in this Our Great and Glorious Age of Hopey-Changey.

Posted by: naturalfake at February 08, 2015 09:39 AM (KBvAm)

39 Mornin' readin' 'Rons 'n' 'Ettes.

"Coming out of the Ice" can be found on YouTube. Linky to Part I:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=48jHfRVZ7rQ

Or is that "Coming Out: On Ice!"


Posted by: All Hail Eris at February 08, 2015 09:40 AM (KH1sk)

40 I had no interest in the WOT stuff, as most fantasy doesn't engage me. But I have a different Brandon Sanderson series to suggest. The first book is Steelheart.

Around 2010 a new moon-like object, blood red and dubbed Calamity, appears in the sky and soon after superhumans start to make themselves known. Unlike the stories of such beings, they aren't divided into alignments of good and evil. They're all evil, every last known one of them. The most powerful is Steelheart, who makes himself Emperor of Chicago as the governments of the world collapse.

Ten years later, a young man who was witness to Steelheart's first public appearance, where he murdered David's father and many others, has a secret. He has seen the invulnerable Steelheart bleed. And he has dedicated his life to making it happen again in a big way.

Following the first book is a novella, Mitosis, then a second novel, Firefight. The third book, Calamity, is due this year.

I took in the audio versions of these and found them enjoyable. They're aimed at the YA audience but not overly so.

Posted by: Epobirs at February 08, 2015 09:40 AM (IdCqF)

41 #37

I regard it as the single most important history book of the last decade.

Posted by: Epobirs at February 08, 2015 09:41 AM (IdCqF)

42 There's more than just "set up an auto plant" to that Ford story. Old Henry was all over the place ideologically -- as you'd expect from an autodidact who openly distrusted the educational processes of his day. He had that Peace Ship thing during WWI, got turned on to The International Jew by the owner of Sloan Valve Chicago ("Royal Silent Flush," the most-read phrase ever engraved), later was feted (though there is argument about how comfy he got with it) by von Ribbentrop, and fellow-traveled a little.

Quite a little. He shut down the Model T works and took two model years to come up with his new model. That was when Chevrolet passed him in sales. And he grandly made a gift of the Model T, complete with the shop-floor supervisors, to Glorious People's Revolution. Many who went were not "volunteers" at all.

A dangerous man. Progressive and reactionary, anti-union and pro-communist, and a biblical-scale importer of Middle Easterners of several stripes. You can still start a barfight almost anywhere speculating what the hell he was up to.

Posted by: Stringer Davis at February 08, 2015 09:41 AM (xq1UY)

43 It is not a Gulag book, but one of the best books about life under Stalin is The Master and Margarita by Mikhail Bulgakov.

The Devil and his retinue, including a naked witch and a giant talking cat, show up in Moscow and start causing mayhem. But in atheist Soviet Russia no one can admit that it really is Satan who is raising Hell. The Soviets banned the book for decades.

Many have probably read it. Those that haven't, owe it to themselves to do so.

Posted by: cool breeze at February 08, 2015 09:42 AM (A+/8k)

44 It should be recalled that FDRs first foreign policy move was to aid and abet Stalin. It should be recalled that Stalin's genocide got Hitler elected in 1933. All of Europe and the US knew what Stalin was doing. It was only the NYTs that pretended otherwise. Nice people in NYC.

Posted by: Super Creepy Rob Lowe at February 08, 2015 09:42 AM (XBL5+)

45 About 1/4 of the way through 'American Sniper'. If you've seen the movie, it is (as always) only a shadow of the book. *Lots* of detail in the book that make it well worth the read.

Posted by: Mike Hammer, etc., etc. at February 08, 2015 09:42 AM (vPh3W)

46 FYI and OT.l

Dean Smith has passed at the age of 83.

Posted by: Golfman in NC at February 08, 2015 09:44 AM (GqEzX)

47 40
I had no interest in the WOT stuff, as most fantasy doesn't engage me.
But I have a different Brandon Sanderson series to suggest. The first
book is Steelheart.


Posted by: Epobirs at February 08, 2015 09:40 AM (IdCqF)



I have been reading that series as well. In fact, I have been reading all his stuff now.

Posted by: Vic at February 08, 2015 09:46 AM (wlDny)

48 #14

Courts are not arbiters of reality.

Posted by: Epobirs at February 08, 2015 09:46 AM (IdCqF)

49 I read Red Rising by Pierce Brown. Previously mentioned here, the story is set on Mars which has a class system of oppression and secrecy. Darrow, a member of the lowest Red class, is recruited to infiltrate the highest Gold class to bring revolution from within. Written for YA's, this exciting story can be appreciated by adults as well. The second book of the trilogy, Golden Son, is available now; but the third, Morning Star, will not be published until April, 2016. Can't wait to read both.

Finally, just finished the first in a series recommended by OM a few weeks ago, The Skull Mantra, by Eliot Pattison. It is the first in the Inspector Shan Tao Yun series. It's not only a very good detective story, but I learned much about Chinese occupied Tibet where the story takes place and about Buddhism there. I'm looking forward to reading the next seven books in the series that are available in my county library.

Posted by: Zoltan at February 08, 2015 09:46 AM (EGaHt)

50 Element 1. I have an on-going beef with American sci-fi publishers, starting with the fact that the "SciFi New Releases" section of Barnes & Noble only carries three kinds of books - fantasy, alternative history, and SJW tripe. Occasionally something readable will slip through, but in general the major publishing houses have stopped inventing the future in any kind of positive way.

Element 2. I have long resisted the notion that the future belongs to the Chinese, that the focus of the world has moved westward from London to New York to Silicon Valley and is now on on it's way to Shanghai.

Element 3. I read a pretty good piece of new hard-cover science fiction recently, "The Three Body Problem" by Cixin Liu, translated from Chinese by Ken Liu. Exciting, thoughtful, fully-futuristic, and of course with Chinese characters as heroes and Americans as the butt of jokes.

Conclusion: We're fucked. Thanks Obama.

Posted by: motionview at February 08, 2015 09:47 AM (hqjPT)

51 Little Free Libraries?

Conformity is Mandatory.. Resistance is Futile.

Posted by: franksalterego at February 08, 2015 09:49 AM (Fh+WR)

52 @36 Sgt Mom, Woolworth's was still using the Harvey name on their cafeterias and lunch counters through the 1970's at least. You have seen the first ten minutes of "The Harvey Girls," right? Possible the greatest music video ever shot, on the Atcheson, the Atcheson Topeka. Also, enough to turn Chuck Norris ghey.

Railway hotel tourism campaigns created most of the imagery of the West. Glacier Park wouldn't be there without the money-grubbing empire builders. "Some" say that Navajo weaving as it exists today was a mere by-product of the rail trade.

Posted by: Stringer Davis at February 08, 2015 09:49 AM (xq1UY)

53 Dean Smith has passed at the age of 83.
Posted by: Golfman
-----------------

RIP
He was a revered figure at Chapel Hill.

Posted by: Mike Hammer, etc., etc. at February 08, 2015 09:49 AM (vPh3W)

54 50 Posted by: motionview at February 08, 2015 09:47 AM (hqjPT)


Read some of our own Moronette Sabrina Chase. She writes "space opera" genre.

Posted by: Vic at February 08, 2015 09:49 AM (wlDny)

55

Now just about to start the Book of Revelations in a year-long, cover-to-cover reading of the Bible that started in April last year. Great Read, which helped me get through a pretty tough year, though the Old Testament tends to drag a bit in the middle.

Posted by: Sharkman at February 08, 2015 09:37 AM (dHTqa)



I salute you, sir. I've had the honor of copy editing my pastor's sermons for the past year since I rededicated, and except for Jeremiah, he's almost exclusively focused on the minor prophets in that time. There's good stuff there.

Posted by: Bob's House of Flannel Shirts and Wallet Chains at February 08, 2015 09:50 AM (yxw0r)

56 You listed what seem to be some very interesting books. If I can ever manage to sit down and focus long enough to read the two I now have on my coffee table, I'll pick one or two of these up as well.

Posted by: Niedermeyer's Dead Horse at February 08, 2015 09:51 AM (DmNpO)

57
So, the publishing world wants you to know this is a thing:

Slipstream Fiction Goes Mainstream

The label slipstream encompasses writing that slips in and out of conventional genres, borrowing from science fiction, fantasy and horror. The approach, sometimes also called fantastika, interstitial and the New Weird, often feathers the unexpected in with the ordinary, such as the hotel in Ms. Links new collection of stories Get in Trouble, where there are side-by-side conferences, one for dentists and another for superheroes in save-the-world costumes and regalia.

Genre-crossing work is striking a chord with readers because its cocktail of the familiar and unexpected mirrors todays unpredictable and chaotic world. Readers many primed for the imaginary by a diet of Dungeons Dragons and Harry Potter are identifying with the inexplicable events that unfold in slipstream tales.

http://tinyurl.com/naclrk5



Sounds like Fantasy - without even the minimal internal consistency of good Fantasy, with some labored 60s New Wave hand-wankery thrown in.

When you point towards Cloud Atlas as your genre's defining work, you're doomed to go the way of "Mirrorshades".

Posted by: Laurie David's Cervix at February 08, 2015 09:52 AM (kdS6q)

58 >>I don't read many biographies, but on the recommendations of several morons here, I read William Manchester's biography of Winston Churchill, The Last Lion Vol I: Visions of Glory, 1874-1932.

My mother is just finishing the series and said it was fantastic. I'm grabbing them from her next time I see her.

Posted by: Brian Williams at February 08, 2015 09:52 AM (g1DWB)

59 Son of a ....

Posted by: JackStraw at February 08, 2015 09:53 AM (g1DWB)

60 About three-quarters through Mark Russinovich's "Rogue Code," a novel which explores the intersection of high-frequency trading, stock exchange (in-)security. international crime, and hacking.

The book is a little bit geeky, but you can skip over the geeky paragraphs and still enjoy the novel. Fans of Daniel Suarez will be at home.

Russinovich is a Microsoft Technical Fellow and well-known in the IT and security community. The tech in the book is accurate, which makes his concerns all the more worrying.

Recommended, if the thought of a few geeky bits doesn't turn you off. Better written than his previous two novels, IMO.

Posted by: doug at February 08, 2015 09:53 AM (yFA5I)

61 And speaking of Amazon's peccadilloes, has anyone else noticed that their Daily Deals for e-books have pretty much turned to junk?

Posted by: Vic at February 08, 2015 09:54 AM (wlDny)

62 Looking for a personal finance book, not an investement book. Is Dave Ramsey the way to go?

Posted by: doug at February 08, 2015 09:56 AM (yFA5I)

63 Just finished Sabrina Chase's "The Scent of Metal", about a team sent to investigate an alien structure found inside Pluto. Computer scientist Lea Santorin is only supposed to research and report on the alien technology but somehow revives the long-dormant entity running the station.
Liked the interaction between nerdly Lea and the crack SF team assigned to protect her. I would not be opposed to a sequel *hint hint*

Posted by: All Hail Eris at February 08, 2015 09:56 AM (KH1sk)

64 I watched the film production of One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich as a young lad, and it made a lifelong impression on me. I'd like to get around to actually reading the book one of these days. Solzhenitsyn was an incredible man, and someone I'm sure Obama and his cohort wished had never lived to write his books.

Posted by: Insomniac at February 08, 2015 09:57 AM (mx5oN)

65 "Dean Smith has passed at the age of 83."


Condolences to family and fans.


Not a big round-ball guy but you didn't have to be to understand his greatness in college sports.

Posted by: Ricardo Kill at February 08, 2015 09:58 AM (VT6UM)

66 62 Looking for a personal finance book, not an investement book. Is Dave Ramsey the way to go?
Posted by: doug at February 08, 2015 09:56 AM (yFA5I)

Yep. I don't take every word out of his mouth as gospel, but his advice is generally solid.

Posted by: Insomniac at February 08, 2015 09:58 AM (mx5oN)

67 And speaking of Amazon's peccadilloes, has anyone else noticed that their Daily Deals for e-books have pretty much turned to junk?
Posted by: Vic at February 08, 2015 09:54 AM (wlDny)
----
I've noticed it too! I downloaded one "book" and it was nasty, amateurish, and very short. At least it was cheap. Are they just cleaning out their basement now?

Posted by: All Hail Eris at February 08, 2015 09:59 AM (KH1sk)

68
I watched the film production of One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich as a young lad, and it made a lifelong impression on me
Posted by: Insomniac



The "Grass Soup" scene...

Given the way things are going, now I kinda wish I'd written down the recipe. Might come in handy soon.

Posted by: Laurie David's Cervix at February 08, 2015 09:59 AM (kdS6q)

69 The "Grass Soup" scene...

"The best thing about boiled grass is that it has no taste."

Posted by: Insomniac at February 08, 2015 10:00 AM (mx5oN)

70 "The Forsaken" by Tzouliadias is certainly worth a read. Stalin's murderous ways were helped along by the media especially the NY Times through their bullshit writer Walter Duranty who won a Pulitzer in the process.

Plus ca change...

Posted by: Libra at February 08, 2015 10:03 AM (GblmV)

71 Re Churchill: Don't forget that he was a literature Nobelist as well. His A History of the English-Speaking Peoples is widely available and the first volume alone is worth the price of the set. It's also available on Project Gutenburg, so free if you like.

Posted by: Enby at February 08, 2015 10:04 AM (QP2lF)

72 And speaking of Amazon's peccadilloes, has anyone else noticed that their Daily Deals for e-books have pretty much turned to junk?

Vic, I gave up reading the Daily Deals over a year ago. What a complete waste of time.

Bookbub is much better.

Posted by: OregonMuse at February 08, 2015 10:06 AM (dDqvN)

73 I saw "Fiestas of Cornholery" open for Erasure in 1990 at the Days of Flame and Rage.

Posted by: Roy at February 08, 2015 10:07 AM (fWLrt)

74 62... Doug, check out the books by Ric Edelman, especially the latest version of "The Truth About Money". There are earlier versions. Great advise on all aspects of personal finance. Check out his website.

Posted by: JTB at February 08, 2015 10:07 AM (FvdPb)

75 Listened to Citadel, book 2 in John Ringo's Troy Rising series. Even better than book 1, it introduces new characters as they train as techs on the new asteroid/space base Troy followed up with some epic space battles. Look forward to reading book 3 soon.

Posted by: waelse1 at February 08, 2015 10:07 AM (qqkbR)

76 43 It is not a Gulag book, but one of the best books about life under Stalin is The Master and Margarita by Mikhail Bulgakov.

Mick Jagger (who, unlike most rock stars, is a voracious reader) was inspired to write the lyrics to "Sympathy for the Devil" after reading Bulgakov's novel. I have it - it's one of many books on the "to read" pile.

Good book thread, Oregon Muse.

Posted by: Donna &&&&&& V. (brandishing ampersands) at February 08, 2015 10:09 AM (+XMAD)

77 When Churchill's name comes up, I generally post this link to a short video re his passing, worth a minute or so. I don't think we will see this sort of collective grief/respect again for a leader: http://tinyurl.com/pyf9gg4

Posted by: Mike Hammer, etc., etc. at February 08, 2015 10:10 AM (vPh3W)

78
good old planetary romances like the Barsoom novels.
Posted by: Sabrina Chase



There's also the George RR Martin edited anthologies Old Mars and his forthcoming Old Venus.


Posted by: Laurie David's Cervix at February 08, 2015 10:12 AM (kdS6q)

79 I watched the film production of One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich as a young lad, and it made a lifelong impression on me.

This is another movie that unfortunately never made it to DVD.

It was a hard-to-find movie even in the glory days of VHS.

Posted by: OregonMuse at February 08, 2015 10:12 AM (dDqvN)

80 If you're on a Soviet kick I recommend Execution by Hunger, by Miron Dolot. He survived the Stalin's Ukrainian holodomir in the 1930s. (And conscription in the Soviet army in WWII, for that matter.) That leftists everywhere refuse to acknowledge exactly how barbarous the Soviets were is one of the blackest crimes to their name.

Posted by: Zoomie at February 08, 2015 10:14 AM (X+iyv)

81
This is another movie that unfortunately never made it to DVD. It was a hard-to-find movie even in the glory days of VHS.
Posted by: OregonMuse



*psst* Youtube.

Posted by: Laurie David's Cervix at February 08, 2015 10:15 AM (kdS6q)

82 To sear "Stalin was a psycopath" into your brain, try "Koba the Dread" by Martin Amis.

Amis was a friend of Hitchens, son of Kingsley, grew up in the commie milieu of upper class Brits, and like Hitchens came to see through it.

Koba was Stalin's boyhood nickname. The book was recommended to me by an emigre Russian Jew, and is one of the most concise indictments of all things Stalin. (That's my way of saying that it's not very long or difficult and doesn't take the commitment of the Gulag Archipelago).

Posted by: Bandersnatch at February 08, 2015 10:16 AM (1xUj/)

83 Oh happy day!

If you search for "One Day In The Life of Ivan Denisovich" on Youtube, you will find several full-length uploads. So this movie has not been lost after all.

Well worth watching.

Posted by: OregonMuse at February 08, 2015 10:17 AM (dDqvN)

84 Thank you, LDC for the youtube tip.

Posted by: OregonMuse at February 08, 2015 10:17 AM (dDqvN)

85 So many to read. Thanks, OregonMuse, for, among all the others, Coming Out of the Ice: An Unexpected Life in VHS. I keep the ability to play these tapes and this one will be shown to grandchildren -- never forget. We know our President would go down this road if he could. Can't remember where, but some good-hearted smarta$$ wrote that Obama's drones have killed more individuals than the Inquisition!

Posted by: pyromancer76 at February 08, 2015 10:18 AM (zvcr8)

86 Sorry. OT
Basketball legend Dean Smith has passed.
His roots and branches are thick in this neck of the woods.

Posted by: has a sad at February 08, 2015 10:18 AM (GVZIJ)

87 @79
it's available on YouTube

Posted by: pep at February 08, 2015 10:19 AM (4nR9/)

88 I read Unbroken last year and concur it was a good read, and the training-casualty was surprising. Also last year, after reading a Sunday book thread, I purchased Gavan Daws' "Prisoners of the Japanese". There are some numbers in it that are simply stunning. One is the numbers of POW's that tragically became casualties, as - later in the war - they were being transported from the outer reaches of the Japanese sphere back to the Japanese islands as it was collapsing around the Japanese, and the vessels were sunk by Allied action.

Posted by: Roscoe at February 08, 2015 10:19 AM (LYVbX)

89 Re Churchill: Don't forget that he was a literature Nobelist as well. His A History of the English-Speaking Peoples is widely available and the first volume alone is worth the price of the set.

I've read as much by and about Churchill as I could get my hands on. I was looking forward to reading a history of English speaking peoples.

What I read was more a propaganda piece about why America and the British Empire should always stand side by side. Which I agree with, but I didn't get much history out of the book.

Posted by: Bandersnatch at February 08, 2015 10:20 AM (1xUj/)

90 I finished reading A Double Barreled Detective Novel by Mark Twain.
Twain did not like A. Conan Doyle's scientific investigation method, it seems.

It is a fairly rambling story about a young man who could smell like a bloodhound being raised as a weapon of vengeance against his father, unleashed against the wrong man, and who wound up matching wits in a whodunnit in a mining camp.

The plot is kinda meh, but the interplay of the miners is pure Twain.

Posted by: Kindltot at February 08, 2015 10:21 AM (t//F+)

91 62 Doug

We like the Dave Ramsey stuff. Best part for me is the attitudinal change towards money and wealth.

We're not 100% behind everything he talks about (psst, we have a credit card...some individual stocks . . .) but the focus he talks about has helped us get three kids through college with no debt.

Posted by: Far Post at February 08, 2015 10:24 AM (H2Nmx)

92 I've started "The Day of the Jackal" and I have to say, it does grab you pretty quickly.

Since the book is set in 1963, I keep noticing certain details which illustrate how times have changed. The Jackal commits identity theft by stealing the passport of an American and a Danish clergyman (right there you know we're not talking about 2015 - how many Danes go to church these days?). They both resemble him, but to cover his bases, he has to go to a store in London which specifically sells American clothes to buy an outfit. He then flies to Copenhagen to buy his Danish clerical suit and shirts and even underwear. Why? Because the makers' tags inside the clothes displayed where they were made. An American's clothes would have American tags, a Dane would wear clothes made in Denmark and wearing clothes made in the UK would give the game away.

Nowadays, the Jackal wouldn't have to go to all that trouble, as everyone's tags would say "Made in China."

Posted by: Donna &&&&&& V. (brandishing ampersands) at February 08, 2015 10:28 AM (+XMAD)

93 Ramsey talks about why to get out of debt, and provides tools to lever yourself out. He is the first one to say that he never invented any of this stuff, but borrowed it. He also provides some references if you want to look at his sources too.

One of the books to read is The Millionaire Next Door. It is a fascinating read. Most American millionaires don't live like millionaires. Which is why they are millionaires to begin with.

Posted by: Kindltot at February 08, 2015 10:29 AM (t//F+)

94 Been trying to get a wee bit ahead of my kiddos so I don't have to cram when I'm out of town for an author gig.* So this past week's reads were "Caedmon's Hymn," The Dream of the Rood, Wulfstan's Sermo Lupi ad Anglos (take out the references to slavery and wergild and replace Vikings with Muslims, and it could be preached almost anywhere in the West today), and Bernard of Clairvaux's On Loving God. Next up: Bonaventure's Itinerarium Mentis ad Deum and The Cloud of Unknowing.

* Houston-area 'rons and 'ettes, I'll be in Wharton a week from Monday, speaking to the Book Review Club at the Wharton County Historical Museum at 10a.

Posted by: Elisabeth G. Wolfe at February 08, 2015 10:34 AM (iuQS7)

95 Interesting photo of a Library at the top of the page.

Posted by: HugoStiglitz at February 08, 2015 10:39 AM (Moh0M)

96 Talking about Communist evil and brutality is just about ignored these days. People just don't want to hear it or care. They combine a predisposition to thinking anything anti-communist is hysterical, with a suspicion you really just want to attack Russia and cause WW3, with a "that's a long time ago" attitude because for millennials, anything before 1995 was prehistoric.

Plus, for leftists, they have a vested interest in hushing up and ignoring communist evil.

Posted by: Christopher Taylor at February 08, 2015 10:39 AM (39g3+)

97 7 The Profession by Steven Pressler

For those of you trying to find the book, its author is Steven Pressfield.

Posted by: praecisio at February 08, 2015 10:41 AM (xFZkJ)

98 "Angela's Ashes" isn't a good example. Frank McCourt's dad had many jobs and got fired for being the worst alcoholic I have ever heard of. After getting paid, he would spend all of the money at a bar. If he had been a stand-up guy, he and the family would not have had to move back to Ireland.


Posted by: Grampa Jimbo at February 08, 2015 10:41 AM (V70Uh)

99 Prep manuals for us when the camps come to a row near you.

Posted by: Misanthropic Humanitarian at February 08, 2015 10:42 AM (4ka5+)

100
I've read as much by and about Churchill as I could get my hands on. I was looking forward to reading a history of English speaking peoples.

I read that years ago in my 20s and really liked it. I probably should look into reading it again or perhaps going the audiobook route, since I much prefer to have something spoken going in the background when I am doing other tasks.

Posted by: Krebs v Carnot: Epic Battle of the Cycling Stars (TM) at February 08, 2015 10:42 AM (bWFHa)

101 Town near you

Posted by: Misanthropic Humanitarian at February 08, 2015 10:43 AM (4ka5+)

102 On the Podcast Jay Cost was talking about his political corruption book. It brings to mind the book "On the Take" by William Chambliss.

Chambliss is a sociologist who went and recorded interviews with... well, criminals that supported, benefited, and worked with Washington state politicians in the 60's and 70's. The upshot is that politics there was based on prostitution, drugs, gambling and money laundering.
One of the interesting asides in this book is Chambliss' interpretation of Nixon's actions to start kicking this stuff apart and pushing investigation on it. Granted, Nixon did not appear to do this out of altruism, but because he had scores to settle with the pols that were trying to hamstring him during his election.

Posted by: Kindltot at February 08, 2015 10:44 AM (t//F+)

103
As much as he was a basketball legend and, yes, it was within the rules at the time, I never was a fan of Dean Smith's four corners' "offense". It was stalling, pure and simple.

Of course, they don't call walking anymore, either... so basketball -- never one of my favorite sports to watch or play -- is dead to me.

Posted by: Krebs v Carnot: Epic Battle of the Cycling Stars (TM) at February 08, 2015 10:44 AM (bWFHa)

104 I read History of the English Speaking Peoples in high school, partly for a report on the War of the Roses. My brother and I were playing a lot of an old Avalon Hill bookshelf game back then, and it was a topic of interest to me. I'd like to re-read it some time.

Posted by: Christopher Taylor at February 08, 2015 10:45 AM (39g3+)

105 Nowadays, the Jackal wouldn't have to go to all that trouble, as everyone's tags would say "Made in China."
Posted by: Donna &&&&&& V. (brandishing ampersands

My new hoodie was made in Pokemonstan as the JEF would pronounce it

Posted by: Misanthropic Humanitarian at February 08, 2015 10:45 AM (4ka5+)

106 Interesting photo of a Library at the top of the page.

Heh. I've got a shot of the actual prison library from the same photo series. I'll probably use it in a future book thread.

Posted by: OregonMuse at February 08, 2015 10:45 AM (dDqvN)

107 Oregon Muse, this weekly thread is much appreciated. Thank you and all the others for your work and insight.

Posted by: HugoStiglitz at February 08, 2015 10:47 AM (Moh0M)

108 92
Nowadays, the Jackal wouldn't have to go to all that trouble, as everyone's tags would say "Made in China."

Posted by: Donna &&&&&& V. (brandishing ampersands) at February 08, 2015 10:28 AM (+XMAD)



I've had the same thought with Sherlock Holmes stories. He could look at a footprint and tell where the shoe was made.

He still could today, but it wouldn't be particularly helpful.

Posted by: rickl at February 08, 2015 10:48 AM (sdi6R)

109 Of course, they don't call walking anymore, either... so basketball -- never one of my favorite sports to watch or play -- is dead to me.

I've wondered about this. I haven't watched pro basketball in years, then I recently happened to glance up at an NBA game playing on a video screen at a local brewpub, and I swear this guy took 4 or 5 steps up to the basket to complete his layup. I was waiting for the traveling call, but it never came. I thought, WTF, this sport has changed.

Posted by: OregonMuse at February 08, 2015 10:49 AM (dDqvN)

110 In much the same way that the leftists can never blame islam for the never-ending brutality everywhere it goes; they can never blame communism for the never-ending brutality everywhere it is and has been.

The American Left is an ideology of brutality--there is no other way to explain why they excuse so much evil in the world.

Posted by: RoyalOil at February 08, 2015 10:49 AM (5yHi1)

111 Thanks @66, @91 and @93. Those posts are helpful.

I've listened to Ric Edelman on the radio and he is oriented toward financial planning and asset allocation. Not my thing.

***

Re: Steven Pressfield -- You can't go wrong on anything he has written.

Posted by: doug at February 08, 2015 10:49 AM (yFA5I)

112
30 Just a reminder. Reggie Love's new book ( "Power Forward: My Presidential Education.") has been released.

http://tinyurl.com/puhqyyz
Posted by: Mikw Hammer, etc., etc. at February 08, 2015 09:35 AM (vPh3W)

Written in crayons, with drool and jizz on the pages, alternatively of course.

Posted by: Misanthropic Humanitarian at February 08, 2015 10:50 AM (4ka5+)

113 My best friend decided to put in a Free Little Library. Her husband was very meh about building it but such was her determination that she finally figured out how to construct a little house with a swing door, inset with clear plastic... And then came the day when they were going to put it up. They didn't call before they dug...punctured a gas line. That's the most expensive little library around. But the idea is really fun and builds neighborliness (unless you shut down your neighborhood for an entire day with city maintenance vehicles) so of course the Nanny State is not for them.

Posted by: Beanerschnitzel at February 08, 2015 10:51 AM (8d63Z)

114 Thank you for your kind words, HugoStiglitz.

Posted by: OregonMuse at February 08, 2015 10:52 AM (dDqvN)

115 Totally aside from this morning's conversation, but I submitted one of my chapters to the Future Writer's contest last week at the recommendation of one of you fine folk. It's good stuff, but I guess we'll see how it compares to other people's good stuff.

Posted by: Df82 at February 08, 2015 10:52 AM (IAqYG)

116 Finished John Ringo's Black Tide Rising zombie quadrology sp?
Pretty good, nice twist at the end.

He always leaves things undone. I don't know if this is deliberate to encourage other to write (in this universe) follow-ons or just not what he's interested in in the story.

Clearly there is a need for a clarifying amendment Constitutionally defining when Fcuk This Guy is the solution to TFG. How many mega-deaths are needed before someone just resigns, knocks the defective top off and takes whatever punishment the survivors agree on.

Posted by: DaveA at February 08, 2015 10:53 AM (DL2i+)

117
They didn't call before they dug...punctured a gas line.

You are a unwittingly cruel person. I'm three days removed from undoing a bilateral inguinal hernia repair (via laparoscopy, praise God!).

To laugh still hurts, and I'm laughing at this... a lot! ;-)

Posted by: Krebs v Carnot: Epic Battle of the Cycling Stars (TM) at February 08, 2015 10:56 AM (bWFHa)

118 Forced labor camps? Gulags?

Hey, they came to work, so I just put 'em where the jobs were.

Posted by: Uncle Joe Stalin at February 08, 2015 10:57 AM (TqyFL)

119 30 Just a reminder. Reggie Love's new book ( "Power Forward: My Presidential Education.") has been released

Soon to be followed up by Barry's foreign policy memoir, "Power Bottom: Playing Catcher to the World."

Posted by: Insomniac at February 08, 2015 10:57 AM (mx5oN)

120 All Hail Eris I would not be opposed to a sequel *hint hint*

You will be pleased to hear two more books are planned ;-) There will be much nerdery!

Posted by: Sabrina Chase at February 08, 2015 10:57 AM (yCJWD)

121 O/T

Well, Dean Smith, long time UNC-CH coach, has died.



I knew him pretty well. Did a book with him and another friend. Even though I am a State guy, he was always a gentleman.



I just wish he could have kicked that damn smoking habit, I swear that contributed to his health problems.



There won't be another like him.

Posted by: Nip Sip at February 08, 2015 10:58 AM (0FSuD)

122 "with a "that's a long time ago" attitude because for millennials, anything before 1995 was prehistoric. "

That attitude is not confined to leftist millennials either. When Paul Newman died, we had 2 20-somethings working in our office. Neither of them knew who Newman was. I expressed some shock about that and was told by one "I don't watch movies made before 1990. They're too old fashioned and boring." The other one nodded.

I was taken aback by that as a tail end Boomer who grew up on the Late Night show and preferred the 30's and 40's stars to those of my own era.

Yes, it just movie stars - but that was their attitude toward everything. (And they were not political radicals at all. On the contrary, both voted for Walker.)

Yeah, the young people of every generation have always thought their elders were old fogies and Americans as a whole have never been terribly interested in history - but the millennials seem to take a special pride in being ignorant of the past.

I have noticed that many take an inordinate pride in the fact that they are more computer savvy then their elders. I like to deflate their cockiness a bit by pointing out that they did not invent the technology they use: those oldsters did.

Posted by: Donna &&&&&& V. (brandishing ampersands) at February 08, 2015 10:58 AM (+XMAD)

123 Posted by: Sabrina Chase at February 08, 2015 10:57 AM (yCJWD)

Excellent news! Thank you!

Posted by: All Hail Eris at February 08, 2015 10:59 AM (KH1sk)

124 Re: Angela's Ashes.

I was a half-time single father of young boys when that came out. (We did every other night with the kids). I was pretty good about getting the kids to eat healthy, but there were always negotiations in the supermarket. Fruit Loops? (I say no). Plain Cherios? (They say no). Honey Nut Cherios? (Deal).

Except when I was reading Angela's Ashes and about the deprivations McCourt and his cohort went through. I was halfway crying in the supermarket and saying "yes, I can buy you all the crap in the world so I will".

Posted by: Bandersnatch at February 08, 2015 11:01 AM (1xUj/)

125 Forever Flowing by Vasily Grossman. Also his great novel Life and Fate.

Posted by: Emily at February 08, 2015 11:02 AM (7Rn+/)

126 ...support the concept of a living wage in principal and we believe...

principal? princiPAL????

You'd expect folks working at a book shop to be literate.

Posted by: Citizen Moron Anachronda at February 08, 2015 11:03 AM (o78gS)

127 Brian Williams Brian Williams Brian Williams?

Bob Dole Bob Dole. Bob. Dole.

Posted by: Bob Dole at February 08, 2015 11:05 AM (Evja3)

128 principal? princiPAL????

You'd expect folks working at a book shop to be literate.

Posted by: Citizen Moron Anachronda at February 08, 2015 11:03 AM (o78gS)


Yah, but "Progressive" so they got Teh Feels Socially Correct.

Posted by: filbert at February 08, 2015 11:06 AM (xr58G)

129 You'd expect folks working at a book shop to be literate.

More opinionated than literate these days, alas...

Posted by: Sabrina Chase at February 08, 2015 11:07 AM (yCJWD)

130 I thought, WTF, this sport has changed.

I'm nearly old enough to remember when it was a non-contact sport.

And "granny shots" as free throws.

And yes, that is indeed my lawn you're standing on.

Posted by: BackwardsBoy, who did not vote for this sh1t at February 08, 2015 11:08 AM (0HooB)

131 "I don't watch movies made before 1990. They're too old fashioned and boring." The other one nodded.

Yep.

I know some who make it a point of pride never to watch B&W movies.

Even if the B&W movie is recent.

"Too fake".

Posted by: naturalfake at February 08, 2015 11:08 AM (KBvAm)

132 I have recommended this book before but since this thread deals with life in Soviet Russia, I thought I'd bring it up again. A very moving spiritual work is "He Leadeth Me" by an American Jesuit, Fr. Walter Ciszek who went over to minster to people in Russia during the Stalinist ear. He is caught, imprisoned as a Vatican spy (He wasn't a spy) and spent years in Soviet prison and in the Gulag. It's a profound testimony to this faith. He has another book, "With God in Russia" but I found "He Leadeth Me" to be the more personally inspiring of the two:

http://tinyurl.com/l5858rx

Posted by: FenelonSpoke at February 08, 2015 11:09 AM (DXzRD)

133 I just finished The House of Silk by Anthony Horowitz. It is a Sherlock Holmes novel. The premise is that the elderly Dr. Watson looks back on a case too shocking to tell at the time. Horowitz does a fine job of imitating Conan Doyle's late Victorian prose although the story is considerably darker than the originals and, perhaps after years of contemplation, Watson is a good deal more insightful, even poetical. I qute enjoyed it and have now bought the sequel, Moriarty. I heartily recommend it. It's full of enough twists and turns to keep anyone guessing.

Posted by: The Great White Snark at February 08, 2015 11:09 AM (LImiJ)

134 @133 -- I agree about both novels. Recommended.

Posted by: doug at February 08, 2015 11:12 AM (yFA5I)

135 Thanks, Bob's HoFSaWC.

You are to be commended as well, and I am glad to hear you dedicated.

Posted by: Sharkman at February 08, 2015 11:13 AM (dHTqa)

136 @133: That sounds intriguing. I took a shot at the original Doyle works, but was irritated by the fact that you couldn't solve the mystery. Literally could not. The clues and details necessary remained secret from the reader and known only to Holmes. I felt like I was being led around by the nose (that I wasn't allowed to use) only to be delivered a deus ex machina solution; "Oh, of COURSE the Mormon SOB did it, because X, Y, and Z," where X, Y, and Z were not mentioned until the end.

So the same characters in a dark investigative story without that particular irritation might be fun.

Posted by: Df82 at February 08, 2015 11:14 AM (IAqYG)

137 129
You'd expect folks working at a book shop to be literate.

More opinionated than literate these days, alas...


Posted by: Sabrina Chase at February 08, 2015 11:07 AM (yCJWD)

I had to go to a Barnes and Nobles around Christmas. Most unorganized group of grandmothers I have ever met. It's a self service place now. I was told to find a book by using one of their computers to locate it in the store.
I told the old woman, if I had wanted to use a computer I would have ordered from Amazon. Then her damn computer did not have the book where it was suppose to be.


May Amazon put them out of business tomorrow.

Posted by: Nip Sip at February 08, 2015 11:16 AM (0FSuD)

138 Little Free Libraries?

The little town on BWCA lake we had a summer fishing cabin on has one of these in the chapel.

Posted by: DaveA at February 08, 2015 11:17 AM (DL2i+)

139 88
One is the numbers of POW's that tragically became casualties, as - later in the war - they were being transported from the outer reaches of the Japanese sphere back to the Japanese islands as it was collapsing around the Japanese, and the vessels were sunk by Allied action.

Posted by: Roscoe at February 08, 2015 10:19 AM (LYVbX)



One of the more ironic cases of that in the war involved two American submarines.

The USS Squalus sank during sea trials in 1939. Her sister ship Sculpin discovered the missing sub and helped with rescue efforts.

Squalus was raised and renamed Sailfish. Both subs saw action in the Pacific in WWII.

In November 1943, Sculpin was damaged by depth charges and forced to the surface. Her crew was captured. While some of them were being transported to Japan aboard the carrier Chuyo, it was torpedoed and sunk... bySailfish.

Posted by: rickl at February 08, 2015 11:18 AM (sdi6R)

140 The back story I read on Lees new/old book was that it was the original To Kill a Mockingbird. Then the publisher asked her to rewrite it.

However the new/old one fits seamlessly with To Kill only later. Or something.

Just sayin'

Posted by: Badda Bing at February 08, 2015 11:19 AM (Msg5U)

141 Soon to be followed up by Barry's foreign policy memoir, "Power Bottom: Playing Catcher to the World."

Heh. You jest, but that's probably the most accurate title for a book on BHO's foreign policy.

Except for maybe: "President Swallows (Not African OR European . . . )"

Posted by: Sharkman at February 08, 2015 11:21 AM (dHTqa)

142
Yep.

I know some who make it a point of pride never to watch B&W movies.

Even if the B&W movie is recent.


On the other hand, when you encounter the few of those who do watch anything "old", you can have some pretty interesting discussions regarding the relative worth of older vs newer films. I take great delight in pointing out the pretentious, repetitive and thin resume of Quentin Tarantino vs say, Martin Scorcese. Fun times...

Posted by: Krebs v Carnot: Epic Battle of the Cycling Stars (TM) at February 08, 2015 11:22 AM (bWFHa)

143 Still working through War and Peace a few pages before I talk asleep but find it mesmerising.

Posted by: Badda Bing at February 08, 2015 11:22 AM (Msg5U)

144 You'd expect folks working at a book shop to be literate.

I blame evil corporations. And, the patriarchy.

Also, racism.

Posted by: progressive bookstore guy who's going out of business due to progressive minimum wage laws at February 08, 2015 11:24 AM (dDqvN)

145 And here's a bit about Walter Ciszek and discerning God's will . Ciszek was from a coal mining region of PA. The article-which I find odd to be in "HUffpo" is by James Martin, a Jesuit who also also written some books which I have enjoyed:

http://tinyurl.com/akar5bx

Posted by: FenelonSpoke at February 08, 2015 11:24 AM (DXzRD)

146
Yep.

I know some who make it a point of pride never to watch B&W movies.

Even if the B&W movie is recent.

"Too fake".


One of my favorite movies to listen to is "The Maltese Falcon" (the Bogart version). The dialogue all by itself is supremely entertaining.

Posted by: Krebs v Carnot: Epic Battle of the Cycling Stars (TM) at February 08, 2015 11:24 AM (bWFHa)

147 129 You'd expect folks working at a book shop to be literate.

More opinionated than literate these days, alas...

Posted by: Sabrina Chase at February 08, 2015 11:07 AM (yCJWD)




What's the over/under on the number of nose rings among the soon-to-be-ex-employees of Borderlands?

Posted by: Jay Guevara at February 08, 2015 11:25 AM (oKE6c)

148 PJ Media has been running an occasional series aimed at Millennials about the arts and culture. There was a very good post about essential 1970s movies.

Posted by: rickl at February 08, 2015 11:26 AM (sdi6R)

149 141 Soon to be followed up by Barry's foreign policy memoir, "Power Bottom: Playing Catcher to the World."

Heh. You jest, but that's probably the most accurate title for a book on BHO's foreign policy.

Except for maybe: "President Swallows (Not African OR European . . . )"

Posted by: Sharkman at February 08, 2015 11:21 AM (dHTqa)



Good choices, given that "African Queen" was already taken.

Posted by: Jay Guevara at February 08, 2015 11:26 AM (oKE6c)

150 Posted by: Donna &&&&&& V. (brandishing ampersands) at February 08, 2015 10:58 AM (+XMAD)
---
Donna, I too am a tail-end Boomer, and I think the reason there was a little more pop continuity was that older movies were used as cheap spackle to fill air time, hence gaining new audiences. Now that there are so many channels appealing to just about every niche out there, there's less cross-generational or cross-genre mingling. Classic Hollywood movies are relegated to TCM, hosted by film buffs lovingly tending to the gravesite a la Max taking care of Norma Desmond in her crumbling mansion. I love TCM, but I was already exposed to these films so I actively seek them out. When I was a kid it was a real thrill to stumble on the Marx Brothers or Bogie and Bacall, or truly execrable 50's sci-fi. There's less serendipity now, maybe. Or maybe I'm just blathering.

And yes, there's a Millenial in my office who thinks Old Movie means John Hughes. Seriously.

Posted by: All Hail Eris at February 08, 2015 11:26 AM (KH1sk)

151 Posted by: rickl at February 08, 2015 11:18 AM (sdi6R)

I guess you just know your number's up when something that ridiculously unlikely up happens to you.

Posted by: Sharkman at February 08, 2015 11:26 AM (rXB/r)

152 There are so many great conservative books out there:
Pilgrim's Progress
Watership Down
Lord of the Flies
Swiss Family Robinson
Animal Farm
One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest
Jonathan Livingston Seagull
Brave New World

And, of course, anything by Andrew Klavan.

Posted by: JohnJ at February 08, 2015 11:27 AM (TF/YA)

153 Good choices, given that "African Queen" was already taken.


Posted by: Jay Guevara at February 08, 2015 11:26 AM (oKE6c)

Awesome.

Posted by: Sharkman at February 08, 2015 11:27 AM (rXB/r)

154 And here's a bit about Walter Ciszek and discerning God's will . Ciszek was from a coal mining region of PA. The article-which I find odd to be in "HUffpo" is by James Martin, a Jesuit...

Actually, I don't think this is odd at all. Jesuits usually lean to the left. Heck, a lot of them are out and out commies.

Posted by: OregonMuse at February 08, 2015 11:28 AM (dDqvN)

155 13 I don't remember the American from The Long Walk being a commie, I thought he was an architect/engineer of some type, sent here on business. Might have been a commie, too, just don't remember it being mentioned in the book.
Posted by: Lincolntf at February 08, 2015 09:21 AM (2cS/G)
-----------------------------
Almost all who immigrated to the USSR were commies and naturalized citizens. Their children were born in the US/Canada and had citizenship. They, too, ended up with their hands tied behind their backs, bullet in the neck, thrown in a ditch.

Posted by: Big Vag at February 08, 2015 11:29 AM (iQIUe)

156 109 Of course, they don't call walking anymore, either... so basketball -- never one of my favorite sports to watch or play -- is dead to me.

I've wondered about this. I haven't watched pro basketball in years, then I recently happened to glance up at an NBA game playing on a video screen at a local brewpub, and I swear this guy took 4 or 5 steps up to the basket to complete his layup. I was waiting for the traveling call, but it never came. I thought, WTF, this sport has changed.

Posted by: OregonMuse at February 08, 2015 10:49 AM (dDqvN)




Exactly the same experience here. It looked like a handoff on first and ten that picked up another first down. I guess if you dribbled sometime earlier in the game that's good enough.

Posted by: Jay Guevara at February 08, 2015 11:32 AM (oKE6c)

157 But his comments have nothing to do with leftism or communism. It has to do with discerning God's will in the midst of everyday life even in the midst of suffering and Ciszek as an explar of that. I have no idea of Fr. Martin's political views. Of the books I have read they speak very powerfully of the love of Christ and discipleship.

Posted by: FenelonSpoke at February 08, 2015 11:33 AM (DXzRD)

158 I've been wading through "Gulag Archipelago" for months. It's very well written, and it has fascinating insights into human nature and reasoning... er "reasoning," but it's damn depressing. Far to many parallels with modern life. So I can only read it a little bit at a time.

While in the middle of the first book I also read "Make the tigers fight" in the "Riding the Red Horse" anthology, and it explains a lot of otherwise inexplicable Russian foreign policy and actions. It makes a sick, twisted sort of sense, now.

Posted by: Rolf at February 08, 2015 11:33 AM (H+WqQ)

159 What I find odd is that Huffpo would include an article that speaks so highly of following the Christian life.

Posted by: FenelonSpoke at February 08, 2015 11:34 AM (DXzRD)

160 It happened again. The federal Vaccine Injury Compensation Program
(VICP) has awarded Ryan Mojabi and his family a multi-million dollar
settlement for autism as th
============================

The date on the story I found on this guy is in January of 2013. So maybe it happened, but not again?

Posted by: GoCougsGo at February 08, 2015 11:35 AM (3m0cF)

161 So...

Sabrina Chase drops by, but doesn't mention she has a new short story up on Amazon?

Hmm....

Posted by: Citizen Moron Anachronda at February 08, 2015 11:35 AM (o78gS)

162 And Ciszek's book is not an endorsement of communism. It's clear about the brutalities of the system yet he came to love the Russian people he ministered to secretly.

Posted by: FenelonSpoke at February 08, 2015 11:36 AM (DXzRD)

163 157-meant "exemplar"

Posted by: FenelonSpoke at February 08, 2015 11:37 AM (DXzRD)

164 Mr. Lewis was a wise man. I have followed his advice for years, switching between new books and old favorites. Some of those new books have become old favorites with the passing of time.

I sympathize with Ms. Lee over all the ballyhoo surrounding her novel. She didn't want to be the second coming of Harriet Beecher Stowe, she just wanted to sell a good book about moral determinist attitudes in American criminal justice, as opposed to the moral and very non-determinist attitude of the Constitution. But the reading public sometimes has the very different idea of what is going on than the author.

I wish I had read some more of those memoirs by survivors of the Great Socialist Worker and Farmer's Paradise. They were all very hard to find when I was in school during the Eighties. Somehow I do not think that is a coincidence...


Posted by: exdem13 at February 08, 2015 11:38 AM (/mTq0)

165 131
I know some who make it a point of pride never to watch BW movies.



Even if the BW movie is recent.



"Too fake".


MiniChronda had an interesting approach to TV back when he was about 8 or so. If it was animated, he would watch it. If it was live-action in color, he wasn't interested. If it was black and white, he'd watch it for a bit to see if it was interesting.

Posted by: Citizen Moron Anachronda at February 08, 2015 11:39 AM (o78gS)

166 Sabrina Chase drops by, but doesn't mention she has a new short story up on Amazon?

Oh, hey guys! Speaking of gulags, got a nice cheery distopian short story up!

(thanks for the reminder, Citizen Moron Anachronda! And I'll have a book for you to check in a few weeks, if you have time...)

Posted by: Sabrina Chase at February 08, 2015 11:39 AM (yCJWD)

167 When I was a kid it was a real thrill to stumble on the Marx Brothers or Bogie and Bacall

I'm a tail end boomer, too. I bought into the "everything old is bad" thing the hippies before me were preaching, because I had to grow up cool.

Then in college I saw Bogie and Bacall. Holy snikies! Opened my mind.

Posted by: Bandersnatch at February 08, 2015 11:39 AM (1xUj/)

168 96 Talking about Communist evil and brutality is just about ignored these days. People just don't want to hear it or care. They combine a predisposition to thinking anything anti-communist is hysterical, with a suspicion you really just want to attack Russia and cause WW3, with a "that's a long time ago" attitude because for millennials, anything before 1995 was prehistoric.

Plus, for leftists, they have a vested interest in hushing up and ignoring communist evil.

Posted by: Christopher Taylor at February 08, 2015 10:39 AM (39g3+)




OK, this is my cue. How many times do I have to tell you effing people?

Posted by: George Santayana at February 08, 2015 11:39 AM (oKE6c)

169 But his comments have nothing to do with leftism or communism. It has to do with discerning God's will in the midst of everyday life even in the midst of suffering and Ciszek as an explar of that.

I was speaking of Jesuits in general, not Ciszek in particular.

That HuffPo piece is quite interesting, though. Thanks for bringing it to my attention.

Posted by: OregonMuse at February 08, 2015 11:42 AM (dDqvN)

170 26
I don't read many biographies, but on the recommendations of several
morons here, I read William Manchester's biography of Winston Churchill,
The Last Lion Vol I: Visions of Glory, 1874-1932. What an interesting
man living in interesting times. I learned much about both and I am
looking forward to reading Vol II: Alone, 1932-1940 and Vol III:
Defender of the Realm, 1940-1965.
--------------------
The three volumes are collectively the best biography on Churchill available, lots of detail but all relevant to the theme, which does not always happen in biographies. I know that modern biographers don't want to be Plutarch, but one sometimes wonders if they needed a better editor.

Posted by: exdem13 at February 08, 2015 11:42 AM (/mTq0)

171 168
OK, this is my cue. How many times do I have to tell you effing people?

Posted by: George Santayana at February 08, 2015 11:39 AM (oKE6c)



Those who do remember history are condemned to repeat it anyway, because those who don't are in the majority.

Posted by: rickl at February 08, 2015 11:43 AM (sdi6R)

172 I know some who make it a point of pride never to watch B&W movies.

-
I tried to get my daughter's to watch Paper Moon but they wouldn't. It was inB&W.

Posted by: The Great White Snark at February 08, 2015 11:43 AM (LImiJ)

173 166
(thanks for the reminder, Citizen Moron Anachronda! And I'll have a book for you to check in a few weeks, if you have time...)

I'm sure I can squeeze in some time, despite my foolishly allowing the Latin professor at the local community college to talk me into taking more Latin alongside my continuing attempts to learn Russian (he's also the Russian professor, so he knows he has some leverage over me).


Posted by: Citizen Moron Anachronda at February 08, 2015 11:45 AM (o78gS)

174 Posted by: OregonMuse at February 08, 2015 11:42 AM (dDqvN)

You're welcome; Thanks- as always- for your very thoughtful and interesting book threads and for the time you spend on them.

Posted by: FenelonSpoke at February 08, 2015 11:45 AM (DXzRD)

175 When I was a kid it was a real thrill to stumble on the Marx Brothers or Bogie and Bacall


I LOVED Marx Brothers movies. A Night at the Opera and Monkey Business were pee-your-pants funny.

Posted by: Insomniac at February 08, 2015 11:45 AM (mx5oN)

176 New one for gun-loving corgis.

Posted by: Insomniac at February 08, 2015 11:50 AM (mx5oN)

177 OT: In the news.google site is a "suggested for you" section.

It is scary how accurate it is, even though it's things I haven't searched google on lately. (In this case, Bobby Jindal's rebuttal to Obama, a thing about the Patriots, and one about Tiger Woods).

I'm glad to have no filters or desire for privacy because this would bother me if I did.

Posted by: Bandersnatch at February 08, 2015 11:52 AM (1xUj/)

178 137
129

You'd expect folks working at a book shop to be literate.

More opinionated than literate these days, alas...




Posted by: Sabrina Chase at February 08, 2015 11:07 AM (yCJWD)

I
had to go to a Barnes and Nobles around Christmas. Most unorganized
group of grandmothers I have ever met. It's a self service place now. I
was told to find a book by using one of their computers to locate it in
the store.
I told the old woman, if I had wanted to use a computer I
would have ordered from Amazon. Then her damn computer did not have the
book where it was suppose to be.


May Amazon put them out of business tomorrow.
---------------------------
Have no fear, it will happen before too long. Between Obummer's idiot followers and their "living wage" and Amazon.com crushing storefront competitors by selling one the book one wants, when one wants it, the future looks bleak for first-run sellers.

The Books A Million at Bridgewater Falls near Fairfield was my favorite bookstore for a decade. It was staffed by twenty-something and thirty-something bibliophiles who were perfectly happy to locate books and magazines, and put in the order pronto if something came out short. There was a good assortment of stuff, and the coffee in the mini-shop was pretty good. But due to a re-organization and success of online sales, the store was closed. Now in terms of local book shopping I am left in 3-D shopping with two choices. Half-Price Books (not really a choice but fun) and a Barnes and Noble with more aisle space than shelf space, and whose staff are about as useful as NipSip's experience.


Posted by: exdem13 at February 08, 2015 11:56 AM (/mTq0)

179 I LOVED Marx Brothers movies. A Night at the Opera and Monkey Business were pee-your-pants funny.

Posted by: Insomniac at February 08, 2015 11:45 AM (mx5oN)


When I started grad school (once we saw off the dinosaurs) I got into the Marx Brothers in a big way, and also 1930s gangster movies. They used to show regularly at a nearby hole-in-the-wall movie theater (now long gone, of course) a few blocks away. Great stuff.

Posted by: Jay Guevara at February 08, 2015 11:57 AM (oKE6c)

180 Jesuits usually lean to the left. Heck, a lot of them are out and out commies.
Posted by: OregonMuse at February 08, 2015 11:28 AM (dDqv

The radicalization of the Jesuits occurred in the 1960's. According to Paul Johnson, Georgetown U was actually a conservative university in the 1950's, as difficult as that is to imagine. The GU regent of the school of Foreign Service, Fr. Edmund Walsh, was a friend of Sen. Joe McCarthy's. He expressed his concerns to McCarthy regarding the large numbers of radicals in the State Department. Not long after, McCarthy made his Wheeling speech.

I somehow doubt that anybody at Georgetown U mentions that particular bit of history very much these days.

Posted by: Donna &&&&&& V. (brandishing ampersands) at February 08, 2015 11:57 AM (+XMAD)

181 131
"I don't watch movies made before 1990. They're too old fashioned and boring." The other one nodded.


Yep.


I know some who make it a point of pride never to watch BW movies.


Even if the BW movie is recent.


"Too fake".


As someone who enjoys old movies and tv, I've made it sort of my job to train my grandkids (currently 9, 11, 15, and 16) when they visit to enjoy and watch old shows. Get them to watch the first 5 minutes and they'll usually watch it all. When she was 13, my oldest granddaughter once told my wife that she was glad she didn't live when the world was black and white. My youngest got "hooked" on silent movies when she found out she had to read what the people were saying.



Posted by: GoCougsGo at February 08, 2015 12:01 PM (3m0cF)

182 50
Element 1. I have an on-going beef with American sci-fi publishers,
starting with the fact that the "SciFi New Releases" section of Barnes
Noble only carries three kinds of books - fantasy, alternative
history, and SJW tripe. Occasionally something readable will slip
through, but in general the major publishing houses have stopped
inventing the future in any kind of positive way.



Element 2. I have long resisted the notion that the future belongs
to the Chinese, that the focus of the world has moved westward from
London to New York to Silicon Valley and is now on on it's way to
Shanghai.



Element 3. I read a pretty good piece of new hard-cover science
fiction recently, "The Three Body Problem" by Cixin Liu, translated from
Chinese by Ken Liu. Exciting, thoughtful, fully-futuristic, and of
course with Chinese characters as heroes and Americans as the butt of
jokes.



Conclusion: We're fucked. Thanks Obama.
-----------------------------------

You have independently realized why Larry Correia and friends run the Sad Puppies nominations for every Hugo awards show each year. The liberal elites really don't believe the future can be bigger, brighter, and better. They long ago dismissed "sci-fi" as escapist pulp for the masses while using every media means at hand to try to force Socialism down our throats. Now the ever-present plague of SJW types in popular media has gotten a lot of people to see how far gone the process of imaginative speculative fiction has gotten, and it's gotten pretty weak on the ground.

Posted by: exdem13 at February 08, 2015 12:04 PM (/mTq0)

183 Posted by: Jay Guevara at February 08, 2015 11:57 AM (oKE6c)

I still love the Marx Brothers. I guess that makes me a Marxist of sorts Give me Groucho over Karl any day.

I remember it wasn't that uncommon for local universities to have "Bogart nights" or "Film Noir nights" and show old movies in the Student Union or someplace else on campus - it was a cheap night out.

Posted by: Donna &&&&&& V. (brandishing ampersands) at February 08, 2015 12:06 PM (+XMAD)

184 181 My youngest got "hooked" on silent movies
when she found out she had to read what the people were saying.


Heh. MiniChronda's big motivation for learning to read was that he loved to play Final Fantasy and Mrs. Chronda got tired of reading the menu entries to him.

Posted by: Citizen Moron Anachronda at February 08, 2015 12:07 PM (o78gS)

185 One of my favorite movies to listen to is "The Maltese Falcon" (the Bogart version). The dialogue all by itself is supremely entertaining.
Posted by: Krebs v Carnot: Epic Battle of the Cycling Stars (TM) at February 08, 2015 11:24 AM (bWFHa)


The film's dialogue is virtually identical to Dashiell Hammett's novel.

Posted by: waelse1 at February 08, 2015 12:07 PM (qqkbR)

186 *pulls from shelf Joseph E. Davies' book Mission to Moscow 13th printing*

On the subject of Americans held by the Russians in his final report No 1342 on June 6, 1938.

pg 419
Protection to American Citizens
The traditional policy of the United States which has been reiterated and emphasized by the Secretary of vigilantly protecting the rights of American citizens has been at all times vigorously projected by this mission. Two major situations are pending at the present time. They are the Hrinkevich and the Rubens case. They are the only two American citizens held in prison at the present time on what appears to be political grounds.*

...It is a condition bordering on panic. This government is obsessed with the idea that it is being isolated by a hostile world and that the hands of all capitalist nations are against it. The war psychology is strong. ...


* Hrinkevich was subsequently, upon my representation, promptly released. Mrs. Rubens refused our aid and manifested no desire to return to the United States, where she was confronted with possible prosecution of Federal law connected with alleged passport frauds.

Posted by: Anna Puma (+SmuD) at February 08, 2015 12:08 PM (2s5VM)

187 Barnes and Nobles won't be around for too much longer. What used to be shelf space devoted to books has morphed into movies, music, games, and toys.

Posted by: Anna Puma (+SmuD) at February 08, 2015 12:14 PM (2s5VM)

188 The film's dialogue is virtually identical to Dashiell Hammett's novel.
Posted by: waelse1 at February 08, 2015 12:07 PM (qqkbR)

Peter Lorre! So great in that movie!

So was the entire cast.

These young 'uns don't know what they're missing.

Posted by: Donna &&&&&& V. (brandishing ampersands) at February 08, 2015 12:19 PM (+XMAD)

189 As much as he was a basketball legend and, yes, it was within the rules at the time, I never was a fan of Dean Smith's four corners' "offense". It was stalling, pure and simple

Posted by: Krebs v Carnot: Epic Battle of the Cycling Stars (TM) at February 08, 2015 10:44 AM (bWFHa)


Not to knock Dean Smith at his passing (RIP), but I also recall his team getting a small lead, and then just holding the ball with that 4-corner BS. Why they created the 45-second time limit for the offense, I believe.

Posted by: waelse1 at February 08, 2015 12:23 PM (qqkbR)

190 There are so many great black and white movies. Um where to start?

Metropolis, M, Phantom of the Opera, Maltese Falcon, The Big Sleep, Madame Curie, and so on...

Posted by: Anna Puma (+SmuD) at February 08, 2015 12:28 PM (2s5VM)

191 187
I've noticed that too. Yet, both the B and N stores I frequent are always busy.

Posted by: Tuna at February 08, 2015 12:29 PM (JSovD)

192 A question for Canadian morons and moronettes, especially those old enough to remember the 1970's: any resolution of the Demidenko and Lenko cases?

The plaintiffs were Nadia Demidenko and Jim Lenko - both Canadian-born, both taken back to Ukraine by their families after World War II (I believe they were young teens at the time of the move). As of about 1974, Lenko and Demidenko (who had never surrendered their Canadian citizenship) were fighting to get out of the USSR and go home. Then the story disappeared from the Toronto press, and I never did find out what happened. Search engines have turned up nothing.


Anybody know?

Posted by: Annalucia at February 08, 2015 12:31 PM (a5bF3)

193 190
I believe " Casablanca " is on TCM tonight. I never get tired of that one. So well cast, directed, scripted, etc.. Just a perfect movie.

Posted by: Tuna at February 08, 2015 12:34 PM (JSovD)

194 89
Re Churchill: Don't forget that he was a literature Nobelist as well.
His A History of the English-Speaking Peoples is widely available and
the first volume alone is worth the price of the set.



I've read as much by and about Churchill as I could get my hands on.
I was looking forward to reading a history of English speaking
peoples.



What I read was more a propaganda piece about why America and the
British Empire should always stand side by side. Which I agree with,
but I didn't get much history out of the book.
----------------------------
That's a shame, because you missed the chief virtue of Churchill's work, which was the development of the processes that created and maintained the UK Monarch in Parliament and US Constitution that we know and take for granted. I agree with the first commenter here, Volume I is worth the price of admission alone.

In the first volume Churchill lays out Alfred I's invention of "English" as a real description of a people and a nation, and his successors' putting thought into practice to build a strong and successful state until wussy Aethelred Unraed nearly ruins it. (Appeasement is older than a lot of people think, and it's always had the same useless result.) His next big thread is Henry I's supervision of the organization of English law into what will be called "Common Law", and the creation of the Assizes Courts to give a national justice for all appellants, not just nobles. Then he tells about the history of Magna Carta in the reigns of John, Henry III, and Edward I to show how three tyrannical kings ended up having Magna Carta as the core of their ruling law, and the eventual creation of a Parliament to see that the Great Charter remained in force. Then to finish things off he explains in clear and non-academic language why the Wars of the Roses happened and why they had an effect beyond ambitious nobles creating plotlines for Shakespeare.

That's all just English-speaking history to AD 1485. You still get to enjoy Churchill wading into the Tudors re-inventing monarchy, the various attempts of the Stuarts to (fail to) imitate Louis XIV, the growth of Parliament in the 18th Century, the First Empire, the American Revolution (Churchill was all for it), the Second Empire, why Hitler was no better than Bonaparte (and vice versa), Peel and modernization, the growth of the United States to the American Civil War (an affirmation of the Republic), and the new Golden Age of Victoria, which we now consider "Old Britain".

Posted by: exdem13 at February 08, 2015 12:35 PM (/mTq0)

195 187
Barnes and Nobles won't be around for too much longer. What used to be
shelf space devoted to books has morphed into movies, music, games, and
toys.
-----------------
My Books A Million was like that too Anna, but the store was still mostly bookshelves with just enough room for two slender people in the aisles, they gave out bookbags to help with shopping, and there was a wide selection of authors and titles that didn't have an agenda. B and N is run by a bunch of snobby wanna-be liberal elites, and it shows in their selections.

Posted by: exdem13 at February 08, 2015 12:39 PM (/mTq0)

196 175
Indeed! The ship cabin scene in " Night at the Opera" can not be topped.

Posted by: Tuna at February 08, 2015 12:43 PM (JSovD)

197 Well I best get cracking on non fiction book. Need to polish it up and meet with a local AlphaGraphics this week to discuss if what they offer is worth the price they charge.

Posted by: Anna Puma (+SmuD) at February 08, 2015 12:47 PM (2s5VM)

198 The USS Squalus sank during sea trials in 1939. Her sister ship Sculpin discovered the missing sub and helped with rescue efforts.
-------------

Several books have been written about that incident. It is an amazing story. Worth pursuing if you are of a nautical bent.

Posted by: Mike Hammer, etc., etc. at February 08, 2015 12:53 PM (l1zOH)

199 Has anyone read "The Introductory Phrase: The Relationship Between What Comes Bofore and After the Colon"?

Posted by: Clay at February 08, 2015 01:35 PM (X8Djy)

200 182 - Speaking of the Hugos and such, if anyone here is able to vote for such things, the "The Stars Came Back" makes me eligible for Campbell award. I don't expect I'd win, but it would be cool to be on the final ballot. Nearly done with the sequel, then the editors get to have a go at it.

Posted by: Rolf at February 08, 2015 01:56 PM (H+WqQ)

201 Buzz I'm hearing is Go Set a Watchman is not a recently-found manuscript but something they've known about for years. It was what Lee first sent to publishers and was returned for rewrites that eventually became TKAM. The reclusive (and now mentally-infirm) Lee had a sister who acted as her attorney and protector who would have nixed the publication of the sub-par Go Set a Watchman (and probably did nix it for decades) had she not recently died. And now Lee is in no condition to say no to the money-grubbing publishers. I'm expecting to be disappointed in this book so maybe I'll be pleasantly surprised.

Posted by: Jack Squat Bupkis at February 08, 2015 02:03 PM (bitPb)

202 Solzhenitsyn: The essays, the novels, the short stories, the prose poems, the historical studies. Everything but the plays. The Gulag Archipelago is the most important book of the twentieth century. The Cancer Ward is Solzhenitsyn's meditation on the question "when may one person prescribe for another?". His answer: only when there is a bond of love between them (and this love must be personal, not an abstract Marxist-style "love of the people"). I await the translation into English of the rest of the Red Wheel cycle.
Alexander Barmine, One Who Survived.
Shalamov, Kolyma Tales.
Conquest, Kolyma.
I put aside Ethan Gutman's The Slaughter for a while and just finished. The Chinese Communist Party deals with Uighurs, Tibetans, and Falun Gong by harvesting their organs for transplant. A horror as deadly as ISIS, but cold instead of hot.

Posted by: Malcolm Kirkpatrick at February 08, 2015 02:31 PM (uHUBu)

203 I check the book thread every Sunday. and I've developed a list of recommended books. It's been a while since I last posted, but I finished a bunch of books in that time. All but one were free e-book loans from amazon prime.

Just A Minor Perspective: Through The Eyes of a Minor League Rookie by Eric Pettis - Eric played two seasons in the Phillies low minor leagues. This book covers his first season at Williamsport. I recommend it to baseball fans. But I finished the book not really knowing the author.

Mob City (Reno) by Al W. Moe - This is an independently published book. It's the second book I read from this author. Like the first book, it needs some better editing and organization. I was not really familiar with the history of the town. I would recommend to to those interested in the mob

Wiseguy: Life in a Mafia Family by Nicholas Pileggi - The movie Goodfellas was based on this book. I'm a fan of the film and it proves to be a pretty accurate representation of the book. Highly recommended.

The Gift of Fear: Survival Signals That Protect Us from Violence by Gavin De Becker - Recommended by a few posts on an earlier book thread. Basically, the author tells us to listen to our subconscious signals. If you sense that someting seems off about a situation you find yourself in, it may be wise to move on, if possible.

I typically read non-fiction, but I decided to try some novels. I read: Casino Royale (James Bond #1), Live and Let Die (James Bond #2) and Moonraker (James Bond #3) all by Ian Fleming. Mr. Bond seems a bit darker, not as confident at times, but always flirtatious. However, here he does not always get the girl. I believe that these books are considered classics in the genre. Originally published in the 1950s. Recommended for those who like the films.

Posted by: long time lurker at February 08, 2015 02:54 PM (YDLei)

204 My saying is as goes, "Inside every lefty is someone just waiting for the Gulags to open back up." Never forget the current crop of lefty's would open up prison camps for political prisoners just as fast as the Soviets as soon as they were able.

Posted by: skip at February 08, 2015 03:02 PM (Cg1MP)

205 19
Currently reading the next volume in the excellent Lost Fleet series. I
read Ark Royal and enjoyed it, but Jack Campbell's Lost Fleet is clearly
superior. For Sanderson fans, I would heartily recommend the novella
Legion and its sequel. Set in a contemporary world, it is a about a
genius who is totally sane, its just that all his hallucinations are
mentally ill. Very different and a lot of fun to read. I was rewatching
Firefly series at the time and kept seeing the J.C. hallucination
character as Jayne (Adam Baldwin).

Countrydoc,
Didn't know about Sanderson writing novellas. Off to load some more stuff on my Kindle app. Liked Firefly and Lost Fleet as well.

Posted by: Charlotte at February 08, 2015 03:09 PM (eZQEL)

206 Hi all,

I'm looking for some recommendations on period mysteries featuring a detective-type as main character. My Mom loves them and I wanted to get her some for her birthday that she hasn't read.

I got a list of some that she's read, but I lost it. The only one I remember is Judge Dee. There were some other similar series that she had read. I know she's gone through most / all of the Cadfael books too. It doesn't have to be any particular era / region although I know she really liked the Judge Dee, and I think there was a Japanese one with a female (what's the proper term for XX these days?) protagonist.

I'll keep looking for the list but I wanted to post this before the thread dies (if it hasn't already).

Thanks!

Posted by: Where're my ping pong balls at February 08, 2015 03:12 PM (YxaXw)

207 I'm looking for some recommendations on period mysteries featuring a detective-type as main character. My Mom loves them and I wanted to get her some for her birthday that she hasn't read.

Posted by: Where're my ping pong balls at February 08, 2015 03:12 PM (YxaXw)


I don't know how "period" it needs to be to qualify, but here's a list of mystery authors/protagonists to consider:

Dorothy Sayers/Lord Peter Wimsey
S.S. van Dine/Philo Vance
P.D. James/Adam Dalgliesh
Margery Allingham/Albert Campion
Michael Innes/Inspector Appleby
G.K. Chesterton /Father Brown
John Mortimer/Rumpole

I also enjoyed Asimov's Murder at the ABA.

Posted by: CQD at February 08, 2015 03:40 PM (2dzsA)

208
Anybody know?


Posted by: Annalucia at February 08, 2015 12:31 PM (a5bF3)

Nadia Golik Demidenko and her family returned in 1971 to be followed by Jim Lenko and his family and Valerie
Wolchuk and her parents in 1976.

Posted by: Shannow at February 08, 2015 03:45 PM (SuF6A)

209 "The Gift of Fear" is good.
So is "The Dark side of Man" by Michael Ghiglieri.

Posted by: Rolf at February 08, 2015 03:47 PM (H+WqQ)

210
I don't know how "period" it needs to be to qualify, but here's a list of mystery authors/protagonists to consider:

Dorothy Sayers/Lord Peter Wimsey
S.S. van Dine/Philo Vance
P.D. James/Adam Dalgliesh
Margery Allingham/Albert Campion
Michael Innes/Inspector Appleby
G.K. Chesterton /Father Brown
John Mortimer/Rumpole

I also enjoyed Asimov's Murder at the ABA.

Posted by: CQD at February 08, 2015 03:40 PM (2dzsA)


Thanks, I know she likes the Asian ones a lot. I'll look those up. I just found Boris Akunin's Sister Pelagia series about a 19c Russian nun.

Posted by: Where're my ping pong balls at February 08, 2015 03:58 PM (YxaXw)

211 Re: Kindle First program for Prime members: thanks for the tip.

Had never heard of it before. To steal a local radio host's line: if it's free, it's for me.

Posted by: long time lurker at February 08, 2015 04:05 PM (YDLei)

212 Currently reading Ghost Boy: The Miraculous Escape of a Misdiagnosed Boy Trapped Inside His Own Body by Martin Pistorius. Fascinating. It's inspiring how Pistorius was able to stay positive and hopeful despite the years of being unable to speak or move his lifeless body. He's no Pollyanna, and his story is compelling.

Posted by: jix at February 08, 2015 04:10 PM (/AU0d)

213 Another book in the "Americans abandoned in Russia by Henry Ford" genre is "Dancing under the Red Star." Margaret Werner went to Russia with her parents as a young girl ; her father was a Ford worker and a Communist sympathizer who volunteered to help set up the factory in Gorky. When she was 17, her father was arrested for treason, and she and her mother wound up in the gulag for decades. It's a very engaging read.

Posted by: Michael Bates at February 08, 2015 06:21 PM (y6u0c)

214 If she likes mysteries she might like the Sister Fidelma mysteries which are set in the 7th century (?) in Ireland and England and feature am Irish nun and a Saxon monk. I learned a lot of history from them. They author Peter Tremayne is also an Irish historian.

Posted by: FenelonSpoke at February 08, 2015 06:42 PM (DXzRD)

215
214 If she likes mysteries she might like the Sister Fidelma mysteries which are set in the 7th century (?) in Ireland and England and feature am Irish nun and a Saxon monk. I learned a lot of history from them. They author Peter Tremayne is also an Irish historian.

Posted by: FenelonSpoke at February 08, 2015 06:42 PM (DXzRD)


Thanks, I'll check that one out too. I don't think she mentioned it.

Posted by: Where're my ping pong balls at February 08, 2015 07:26 PM (YxaXw)

216 Re: "Texts that might inspire political conversions, for seeding little libraries"--

THE FORGOTTEN MAN, by Amity Shlaes (mentioned elsewhere on this thread);

THE DREAM AND THE NIGHTMARE: THE SIXTIES' LEGACY TO THE UNDERCLASS, by Myron Magnet

Anything short by Thomas Sowell

Posted by: Joy McCann/Miss Attila at February 08, 2015 07:43 PM (Kczql)

217 "102
On the Podcast Jay Cost was talking about his political corruption book.
It brings to mind the book "On the Take" by William Chambliss.

Chambliss
is a sociologist who went and recorded interviews with... well,
criminals that supported, benefited, and worked with Washington state
politicians in the 60's and 70's. The upshot is that politics there was
based on prostitution, drugs, gambling and money laundering.
One of
the interesting asides in this book is Chambliss' interpretation of
Nixon's actions to start kicking this stuff apart and pushing
investigation on it. Granted, Nixon did not appear to do this out of
altruism, but because he had scores to settle with the pols that were
trying to hamstring him during his election.


Posted by: Kindltot at February 08, 2015 10:44 AM (t//F+)"

Nixon sent his Justice Department after corrupt Democratic Party machines all over the United States. He put the Mayor of Newark, New Jersey in prison and I believe he went after many more. I have often wondered if Watergate was Democrat payback for sending so many of their compatriots to prison or if it was a deep cover Communist operation to cause America to lose the Vietnam War -- which was the actual result of Watergate.

Posted by: Obnoxious A-Hole at February 09, 2015 08:41 AM (KDbAT)

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