Sunday Morning Book Thread 11-16-2014 [OregonMuse]


sf-.jpg
Borderlands Books, San Francisco, CA


Good morning morons and moronettes and welcome to AoSHQ's stately, prestigious, and high-class Sunday Morning Book Thread. The only AoSHQ thread that is so hoity-toity, pants are required. Or kilts. Kilts are OK, too. But not tutus.


I Left My Heart

I got today's photo from this article, San Francisco's 10 Coolest Bookstores. One of the bookstores mentioned on the list is Borderlands Books, a specialty shop:

At Borderlands Books, SF doesn't just stand for the bookstore's home city, but for its specialty literary genre: science fiction. Paired with an equally rich collection of fantasy literature, mystery, as well as horror, is unparalleled in San Francisco and many other American cities in its scope of the fictional and the fantastic.

Elsewhere in the article, I was amused by how the write-up of another shop, Modern Times Bookstore, starts out:

Located on 24th street, also known as calle 24 thanks to its status as an artery of Hispanic culture in San Francisco's Mission District, Modern Times is the go-to bookstore for literature on political engagement.

Yeah, "political engagement". Might we guess what sort of "political engagement" they're talking about here? I don't know about you, but my guess would be that it rhymes with "bommunity shmorganizing".

I was born in SF, grew up in the Bay Area in the 60s, got to see real hippies and everything, and I've always loved The City. Although I haven't visited SF in almost 30 years, I guess it's been turned into a liberal hell-hole. I remember reading a comment from zombie awhile back that said the gap between the very rich and the very poor in SF has become ridiculously wide, abd there's not much in between. You are almost required to be either one or the other just to live there.

And that's what decades of bommunity shmorganizing will get you.


Amazon and Hatchette Bury The Hatchet

Says so right here:

Hachette Book Group and Amazon have settled their dispute over terms and are returning to "normal trading" immediately and Hachette titles "will be prominently featured in promotions," the two companies jointly announced yesterday.

The multi-year agreement for e-book and print sales in the U.S. takes effect early next year and leaves the agency model for e-book pricing intact.

So there you are. Who wins? Who cares? I don't. I knew this dispute had been going on for some months, and I probably should have covered it for the book thread, but I never could get interested enough to learn much about it. But it seems to be over now, so that, as they say, is that.

What Is Best In Life?

That is, what are the virtues that make life worth living? If you can't aspire to them, you can at least laugh about them: The Seven Deadly Virtues: 18 Conservative Writers on Why the Virtuous Life is Funny as Hell by Jonathan Last (editor), includes contributions by known conservative "ha ha" funny men (P.J. O'Rourke, Rob Long, James Lileks), and some that are funny in a "hmmm..." sort of way (Jonah Goldberg, Mollie Hemingway). I didn't want to mention the presence of world champion jackass T. Coddington Van Voorhees VII in this anthology because of the well-deserved contempt heaped upon him by all of us morons for fawning over the SCOAMF back in 2008, it might put you off from buying the book, and it hope it doesn't, because I think the other writers more than make up for it. Although Buckley can be a funny writer, so who knows.

So, what virtues are covered? Pretty much all of them, actually. Part I covers what are traditionally known as the cardinal virtues: Prudence, Justice, Temperance, Hope, Charity, and Faith. You probably learned about these in Sunday school, but perhaps have forgotten them.

And then in Part II, there are the "everyday" virtues: Chastity, Simplicity, Thrift, Honesty, Fellowship, Forbearance, Integrity, Curiosity, and Perseverance.

Also, I notice that one of the contributors listed is David Burge. Is that David Burge as in, like, you know, Iowahawk? If so, that's an additional reason to buy this book. And I'm disappointed Mark Steyn isn't in it, I think he would have been a great addition.

Lastly, if you want to raise your blood pressure to dangerously high levels, go back and read Buckley's 2008 endorsement of Barak Obama. The smug, condescending arrogance of every line of that piece is absolutely maddening, and so over-the-top that Iowahawk's "T. Coddington Van Voorhees" parody is actually not much of a parody at all.


Bleg

Long time blogger and 'ette in good standing baldilocks is fund-raising for her next novel, and also for some immediate changes in her life circumstances, (including a forced move). More details here if you would like to help her out by sending a few simoleons her way. She would be very grateful.


Moron Recommendations

A long time lurker e-mailed earlier this week to recommend the novels of his friend and former next-door neighbor Paul Watkins, starting with The Forger, which is about

...French artists who were commissioned in the 1930s to forge many of the master works of art hanging in French museums for the purpose of replacing those works on the walls of those museums with the forgeries while spiriting away the originals to rural estates where they would be kept safe from the Nazis.

Paul does meticulous research in writing his novels (I know, right? it's a tough job that requires hanging around in Parisian cafes). This one is basically historical fiction: the characters as penned didn't exist, but they were more or less composite characters of real people who were alive at the time and actively involved in producing these forgeries.

Also:

Paul also writes historical fiction about crime and punishment in Soviet Russia under the pen name Sam Eastland. The hero in those novels is Inspector Pekkala, a Finn exiled to Siberia for crimes against the state, but whom Stalin brings back from exile to investigate high crimes within his own bureaucracy.

He must be referring to the novels Eye of the Red Tsar, Shadow Pass, Archive 17, and The Beast in the Red Forest. Looks like an interesting series.


___________

Here is another recommendation I received in e-mail this week:

I was thinking your readers might be interested in the ongoing book tour of John Connolly, the Irish author behind the thoroughly American Charlie Parker horror/thriller series. Connolly is on this side of the Pond to promote The Wolf in Winter (Atria Books), his 12th Parker novel. The series launched with Every Dead Thing, a gruesomely compelling serial killer tale, and has evolved into something unique. After a few books, it turns out many of Parker's foes are actually demons working toward mysterious but evil ends.

The moron I heard about this from had a good time at a Connolly book signing event in Ann Arbor:

Connolly's appearance last week at Nicola's Books in Ann Arbor, Mich., was truly special. For openers, he conducted an intimate discussion about The Book of Lost Things (a modern fairy tale that ranks among the best fantasy novels I've ever read) for an hour before his signing. Only eight people showed up, but Connolly was charming and gracious, showing as much interest in his fans as we showed in him. I have never spent a more engaging time with a writer -- and I include my friends who have published books.

At the signing itself, Connolly opted to forgo a reading in favor of giving a presentation about why an Irishman sets his thrillers in America (the Irish in the Auld Sod, it seems, generally are crummy criminals) and offering anecdotes about the writing of each of his Parker yarns. He was just as friendly at the open event as he had been during the "Lost Things" discussion.

Connolly still has upcoming stops on his book tour at Scottsdale, Austin, Houston, Dallas, Atlanta, Harrisburg (Pa.) and NYC that morons in the vicinity may want to attend. A full schedule of his book tour is available here.


___________

So that's all for this week. As always, book thread tips, suggestions, bribes, rumors, threats, and insults may be sent to OregonMuse, Proprietor, AoSHQ Book Thread, at the book thread e-mail address: aoshqbookthread, followed by the 'at' sign, and then 'G' mail, and then dot cee oh emm.

What have you all been reading this week? Hopefully something good, because, as you all know, life is too short to be reading lousy books.

Posted by: Open Blogger at 09:28 AM




Comments

(Jump to bottom of page)

1 I'll sound the whistle...

Posted by: PabloD at November 16, 2014 09:26 AM (roESk)

2 started trying to read the Illuminatus trilogy again. Been 10 years since I've tried reading it. Curious in how far I can get this time

Posted by: The Dude at November 16, 2014 09:29 AM (SyKbw)

3 2 started trying to read the Illuminatus trilogy again. Been 10 years since I've tried reading it. Curious in how far I can get this time
Posted by: The Dude at November 16, 2014 09:29 AM (SyKbw)
---
Me too! I got the same paperback versions I read many years ago just to recapture the feel (and smell) of reading them for the first time. They are very much a product of their era, but the yippie sensibility is just as applicable to our fascism-lite times.

Posted by: All Hail Eris at November 16, 2014 09:36 AM (QBm1P)

4 Just started listening to Ian Kershaw's "The End" during my morning commute. It's an examination of why Germany continued to fight so hard during the last year of WWII when it was clear that there was no realistic prospect of winning the war. So far so good-- the book that is.

Having a hard time finding a good novel to read at night. I am about half way through the first book of "The Atlantis Gene" series on my Kindle. It's ok-- though the target audience is people with attention deficit disorder. The chapters seem to be less than 5 pages each.

Posted by: nc at November 16, 2014 09:39 AM (mX/a1)

5 Yes, Dave Burge is Iowahawk.

Posted by: Polliwog the 'Ette at November 16, 2014 09:41 AM (GDulk)

6 YAY BOOK THREAD!

Resource for my fellow historical fiction writers (H/T to Horrible Histories star Mat Baynton): British Pathe has put its entire collection of over 85,000 newsreels and documentaries, covering the period 1896-1976, on YouTube. I haven't done much digging yet, as I just found out about it yesterday, but their website looks easier to navigate than their YouTube page. So, link:

http://www.britishpathe.com

Now to see whether I can corral my muse and get some writing done today....

Posted by: Elisabeth G. Wolfe at November 16, 2014 09:41 AM (iuQS7)

7 Just got to the "All About Whales (which are fish because I say so)" section of Moby Dick. Seems like Melville had a lot of opinions and was afraid there might be one person left in the world who wasn't aware of them.

Posted by: Polliwog the 'Ette at November 16, 2014 09:44 AM (GDulk)

8 For something different, watch our video of my original song and have fun tonight!

Posted by: Fungirl at November 16, 2014 09:46 AM (3U7Zc)

9 http://getoutofthegarage.amplifiertv.com/channel/The+Autographs+Band

Posted by: Fungirl at November 16, 2014 09:46 AM (3U7Zc)

10 The chapters seem to be less than 5 pages each.

Wow, that's a lot!

Does he end chapters with ellipses, as any true artiste does?

Posted by: Dan Brown at November 16, 2014 09:49 AM (u77f2)

11 Polli: that's one of the two "EPIC padding" chapters in MD. The other is the one about standing on top of the mast.

But Chapter 36 makes up for everything.

Posted by: Trimegistus at November 16, 2014 09:51 AM (pzeLb)

12 Been reading Almost a Miracle about the revolution. Pretty good.

Posted by: Nigel West Dickens at November 16, 2014 09:53 AM (Ktnum)

13 Still in the middle of Storm Front by Jim Butcher. I only managed to find time for a few chapters this week but still enjoying it.

The most prominent one-star review for the book says, "This book is a misogynistic piece of shit," so I was intrigued. Basically, the protagonist is guilty of tons of cis-male hetero-normative thought-crime. Examples include: holding doors open for women, not treating women as if they were men, and being attracted to women.

Posted by: BornLib at November 16, 2014 09:53 AM (zpNwC)

14 Anyone interested in bread?

Peter Reinhart "The Bread Baker's Apprentice" and
Rose Levy Beranbaum "The Bread Bible"

are both very good. Baking bread isn't difficult unless you are striving for perfection. You can make it with a bread machine if you can tolerate the hole in the bottom of the loaf from the beater. Or use a stand mixer and the dough hook. You might want a proofing box if your house is cold and you don't go the bread machine route. Or you can put your dough in the refrigerator overnight. You might be surprised to discover the brand of flour you use makes a difference.

If you like cheesecake, and who doesn't get "Junior's Cheesecake Cookbook" by Alan Rosen and Beth Allen; all the recipes of the place in NYC named "Junior's" and their fabulous desserts. There is also a book of Desserts from Junior's but I don't have that one and wish I did.

Posted by: Skandia Recluse at November 16, 2014 09:54 AM (qL0bx)

15 Read a coupld of books this past week:

FOR CREW AND COUNTRY, by John Wukovitz -- about the USS Samuel Roberts. If you don't know why you should know that ship, read the book. Damn. Those guys could call Leonidas and the Spartans a bunch of lightweights, and Leonidas wouldn't argue.

BIG PLANET, by Jack Vance -- one of Vance's fun, cynical space adventure yarns, set on a habitable world which is somehow about the size of Saturn.

Posted by: Trimegistus at November 16, 2014 09:55 AM (pzeLb)

16 BIG PLANET, by Jack Vance -- one of Vance's fun, cynical space adventure yarns, set on a habitable world which is somehow about the size of Saturn

Heh. Gravity must be a b*tch on that planet.

Posted by: OregonMuse at November 16, 2014 09:59 AM (yRdR4)

17 Finished the first of "The Last Policemen" series and thought it very good, although "dark" is not what I really need right now. This is another book/author I would never have sought out on my own but got from recommendations here. Thanks!

Unfortunately, this means I will probably add books 2 & 3 to the already formidable queue of unread books I have teetering on a side table plus the Kindle virtual stack. I find that although I like the Kindle, and have gotten books that really are difficult to get in hard copy, there is something nice about having an actual physical book in my hands while reading!

Posted by: Hrothgar at November 16, 2014 09:59 AM (l1zOH)

18 OregonMuse,

Did you ever get across the bay and poke around Moe's Books or Cody's Books in Berkeley?

Moe's was better; less political, and had a fantastic collection of used books that they would trade.

But both were fantastic places to meander about for a few hours.

Posted by: CharlieBrown'sDildo at November 16, 2014 09:59 AM (Zu3d9)

19 Did you ever get across the bay and poke around Moe's Books or Cody's Books in Berkeley?

I was at Cal for a couple of years, back in the 70s, and went to Cody's a lot. Moe's, not so much.

Posted by: OregonMuse at November 16, 2014 10:01 AM (yRdR4)

20 I'm still working my way through "Middlemarch," and George Eliot's work is astonishing. I've made dozens of notes in my online version expressing amazement at how she catches the reader's moral annoyance and subverts or inverts it; how her sense of the perfect figure of speech exerts itself seemingly effortlessly on every page; and how her characters are not just lifelike but *alive*.

I was always a giant Mark Helprin fan, with "Soldier of the Great War" being my favorite-favorite-favorite book. But maybe, just maybe, "Middlemarch" is going to the top of my list.


Posted by: Smallish Bees at November 16, 2014 10:01 AM (YPgXi)

21 I like this post! No like button so I must state it!

Posted by: Dr. Varno at November 16, 2014 10:02 AM (fIv/H)

22 15 Spelled with an s not a z: Wukovits

Posted by: BornLib at November 16, 2014 10:03 AM (zpNwC)

23 Just started "The Letters of JRR Tolkien" and it is interesting and delightful. I've found that collections of letters by authors who make the language sparkle are as enjoyable as their published works. E.B. White comes to mind. The Tolkien letters look to be in that vein. I suspect a collection of C.S. Lewis letters will appear sometime this winter.

To avoid any trace of consistency, I've been going through back issues of Backwoodsman magazine. This periodical is mostly articles sent in by readers and any issue might have stories about panning for gold, finding and preparing wild foods, emergency preparations, old time recipes, firearms in history and today, anything to do with self-reliance and so many others. It has the feel of "Hey! My uncle has a barn. Let's put out a magazine!" I look forward to it every two months. It has been published for 34 years, so they must be doing something right.

Posted by: JTB at November 16, 2014 10:04 AM (FvdPb)

24 I like this post! No like button so I must state it!

According to the AoSHQ Style Guide, expressions of appreciation take the form of "Uptwinkles!"

Yer welcome.

Posted by: OregonMuse at November 16, 2014 10:04 AM (yRdR4)

25 BornLib:

Butcher's novels have some wonderfully female characters. In fact, lots of the action moves with what the female characters are doing and the protagonist's forced responses to them.

Writers and readers complain about how the SF/F universe is trolled by political correctness, and this reviewer's response is obviously of a piece with that enforced conformity they wish to employ. I'm glad Butcher just keeps writing and we keep reading.

His novels get better as you go, though. "Storm Front" is probably the weakest in the series. If you like it, you have to keep reading onward into the series to get into the enjoyable world he creates, the complexity of the characters, and so on. Plus, it's fun, and he makes Bugs Bunny and pop culture references.

Posted by: Smallish Bees at November 16, 2014 10:06 AM (YPgXi)

26 If it's one thing I can stand about the Dutch its Harry Mulisch's"The Discovery of Heaven"

Posted by: Jerry'sFinger at November 16, 2014 10:08 AM (3U7Zc)

27 "I was at Cal for a couple of years..."

Posted by: OregonMuse at November 16, 2014 10:01 AM (yRdR4)

Ah....an interesting time to be there.

I was there in the 80s....lived in Barrington Hall my freshman year!

Moe's was going strong the last time I was in Berkeley (years ago) but Cody's turned into a boring, high-margin bookstore and then closed.

Posted by: CharlieBrown'sDildo at November 16, 2014 10:09 AM (Zu3d9)

28 Ever since someone mentioned it last week (and whoever did has my sincere thanks!), I've been reading the "Schlock Mercenary" web comic.

I love it! Very funny space opera centering on a company of mercenaries with characters you can actually care about, which (for me, at least) is rare in a comic. I began at the beginning strip, dated June 2000, and am up to May 2012. I'll probably finish it later today.

Highly recommended!

Posted by: Empire1 at November 16, 2014 10:11 AM (NrJCD)

29 Self-plug: Worlds-Apart Book 10 is on-line.

http://tinyurl.com/k8go5zv

Posted by: Gregory of Yardale at November 16, 2014 10:14 AM (9y18Y)

30 Ooh, JTB, you're in for a treat. LOTS of good stuff in that book. For CSL, I can heartily recommend Letters to Children and Letters to Malcolm: Chiefly on Prayer; I haven't read the other collections yet, but I'm sure they're as good. For non-literary letters, you might also enjoy Counting One's Blessings: The Selected Letters of Queen Elizabeth the Queen Mother--fascinating history, plus the Queen Mum was a *hoot*.

Posted by: Elisabeth G. Wolfe at November 16, 2014 10:15 AM (iuQS7)

31 Well on the writing front I stopped the word count at 29,800 last night and said good enough. Being two days ahead on NaNoWriMo is an interesting feeling instead of the usual chasing that slippery pig until the last day. Hope I can keep it up.

But as I was writing one scene I had these certain ideas how things would go. But suddenly the narrator of the chapter decided she had had enough. So she came down with a killer stress headache. And me, the writer, was going how do I work with this? I managed to, but has this happened to anyone else?

Posted by: Anna Puma (+SmuD) at November 16, 2014 10:16 AM (wI8iH)

32 FOR CREW AND COUNTRY, by John Wukovitz
---------------

If you haven't read it, Last Stand of the Tin Can Sailors is an excellent read: http://tinyurl.com/pujzp4y

Posted by: Mike Hammer, etc., etc. at November 16, 2014 10:17 AM (F2IAQ)

33 I don't know about you, but my guess would be that it rhymes with "bommunity shmorganizing".

Sounds like that Hilter chap is at it again.

Posted by: rickl at November 16, 2014 10:17 AM (sdi6R)

34 @15 I could not agree more. The Action off Samar is about the brass-ballsiest thing that ever took place. DE's against heavy cruisers? "Bugler, sound the charge."

And as the Largest Thing That Ever Moved slowly came about and steamed away, some bow-end gunnery chief (5-inchers against 18's) said "Damn it, boys. They're getting away." Son.of.A.bitch.

Posted by: Stringer Davis at November 16, 2014 10:19 AM (xq1UY)

35 There is a book floating around somewhere in my house about the incredible lengths the French went to to hide the great wines of Bordeaux from the Germans. They were inventive, risked imprisonment or death, and were moderately successful!

But it irked me....

The French cared far more for their wine and their art than they did for their Jews, who they enthusiastically pointed out to the German occupiers.

Posted by: CharlieBrown'sDildo at November 16, 2014 10:21 AM (Zu3d9)

36 Two interesting facts which made the air a bit dusty while I was reading about the Roberts:

The younger brother of Samuel Roberts was one of the crew (his mother wrote to the Navy Dept. to ask if he could be assigned to that ship).

The Navy has expressed the intention of always having a ship named the Samuel Roberts in commission.

Posted by: Trimegistus at November 16, 2014 10:21 AM (pzeLb)

37 Trimegistus @ 15 - DE-413 (Battle of Leyte Gulf, 1944) or FFG-58 (Persian Gulf, 198?

Posted by: butch at November 16, 2014 10:21 AM (HLx1C)

38 1988 ), not a G-D smiley face.

And I see other Morons have clarified which Sammy B.

Another good book about the Battle of Samar is "Day of Thunder."

Posted by: butch at November 16, 2014 10:25 AM (HLx1C)

39 I was there in the 80s....lived in Barrington Hall my freshman year!

I lived in Spens-Black my first year, Priestley my second, and there was no third because I liked to party rather than study and it caught up with me.

It was a hard lesson.

Posted by: OregonMuse at November 16, 2014 10:26 AM (yRdR4)

40 Anna Puma - NaNo

Novels and their characters taking on a life beyond the writer's control.

Funny you should mention this. I started out with a persona and a scenario that went over to the dark side almost immediately. So dispatched a lovely young woman to rescue the hero and it went well beyond . . . what was intended (let's not go there).

So the hero dies a heroic death and we skip ahead two hundred years where the descendants of an all too brief marriage are doing heroic stuff and it happens again. Everything goes dark. Tragic really.

I've heard rumors that medication will help these wild, out of control mood swings, but I've not tried them. (Mood swings of a sort - - Malcolm Reynolds)

So another ten thousand words or so, and I'll call it a failing win and burn the whole thing at the end of the month as not suitable for publication and call it 'experience'.

Your mileage may vary, of course.

Posted by: Skandia Recluse at November 16, 2014 10:27 AM (qL0bx)

41 I posted this on the dead thread of one of the previous book posts so I'll repeat myself.

I read Steven Pressfield's latest book, The Profession when it was first released. It wasn't one of his best but it was still good. Because it was set in the future he seemed to be focused more on technical aspects than the story. A lot like Clancy. Now with ISIS and the rest of the Middle East status and our own military direction, Pressfield may be a prophetic genius. I would highly recommend it now.

Posted by: Bob Belcher at November 16, 2014 10:27 AM (yshTX)

42 I reside in San Francisco presently.
I don't consider myself rich. I drive a 15 year old SUV.
But my house is paid for. There is that.
We stay here for various reasons, among them, it is a beautiful place to live in many ways (except for politically of course).

Posted by: navybrat at November 16, 2014 10:27 AM (JgC5a)

43 Books suck.

Posted by: Ray Charles at November 16, 2014 10:28 AM (4SQqp)

44 The most prominent one-star review for the book
says, "This book is a misogynistic piece of shit," so I was intrigued.
Basically, the protagonist is guilty of tons of cis-male
hetero-normative thought-crime. Examples include: holding doors open
for women, not treating women as if they were men, and being attracted
to women.

Posted by: BornLib at November 16, 2014 09:53 AM (zpNwC)

Tells you little about the book but more than you'd want about the reviewer.Listened to Spellbound by Larry Correia, very entertaining continuation of the Grimnoir Chronicles. Terrific characters and dialogue, stylish action-packed story. Look forward to book three. Bronson Pinchot does a great job with all the voices.Read Foundation and Empire by Isaac Asimov, book two in the Foundation series. The story from the first book is turned on its head and a search begins for the second foundation, which supposedly was setup on the opposite end of the galaxy. Pretty good cliffhanger for book three.

Posted by: waelse1 at November 16, 2014 10:28 AM (mh+LF)

45 Other books on the Battle off Samar?

Theodore Roscoe's US Destroyer Operations in WWII and its abridged version Tin Cans.

Edwin P. Hoyt in two books - The Men of the Gambier Bay and The Battle of Leyte Gulf.

Posted by: Anna Puma (+SmuD) at November 16, 2014 10:28 AM (wI8iH)

46 Anna -- if you mean a character doing something you hadn't planned and making you scramble, I most certainly have. Practically every time, in fact, to the point I quit trying to plan, and write to find out what happens.

Posted by: Empire1 at November 16, 2014 10:29 AM (NrJCD)

47 Posted by: butch at November 16, 2014 10:25 AM (HLx1C)

Here's another one:

"The Last Stand of the Tin Can Sailors" By James Hornfischer

Posted by: CharlieBrown'sDildo at November 16, 2014 10:29 AM (Zu3d9)

48
And then in Part II, there are the "everyday" virtues: Chastity, Simplicity, Thrift, Honesty, Fellowship, Forbearance, Integrity, Curiosity, and Perseverance.








I'd take issue with the idea of Chastity as a virtue.

Posted by: IllTemperedCur at November 16, 2014 10:30 AM (8v9fw)

49 Skandia I hope its not that dark though one of the other characters has crawled into his own world, playing video games, and is not talking to anyone. Still trying to figure out how to extract him.

Posted by: Anna Puma (+SmuD) at November 16, 2014 10:33 AM (wI8iH)

50 Thanks, CDB. I already own and have read both repeatedly.

Hornfischer wrote two other excellent WWII naval history books: "Neptune's Inferno" (Naval campaign at Guadalcanal; 3x sailors dies as Marines) and "Ship of Ghosts" (USS Houston's demise and her survivors' years as POWs).

And yeah, they're in my library, too.

Posted by: butch at November 16, 2014 10:33 AM (HLx1C)

51 It was a hard lesson.

Posted by: OregonMuse at November 16, 2014 10:26 AM (yRdR4)

Berkeley was never designed for the undergraduate. They paid lip service to their undergrad teaching traditions, but that was for the most part a lot of crap. And it was not an easy system to navigate. Hell, just registering for classes was a huge PITA.

Posted by: CharlieBrown'sDildo at November 16, 2014 10:33 AM (Zu3d9)

52 Anna, the mood swings go from euphoric to suicidal, and back again. One could get whiplash.

Posted by: Skandia Recluse at November 16, 2014 10:34 AM (qL0bx)

53
You know, I have read many excellent books on the subject of pipelines.

Posted by: Mary Landrieu at November 16, 2014 10:35 AM (4HYng)

54 Still trying to figure out how to extract him.

Good old-fashioned power outage ought to do the trick. (But then, one of my all-time favorite NCIS eps is "Power Down," so....)

Posted by: Elisabeth G. Wolfe at November 16, 2014 10:35 AM (iuQS7)

55 Posted by: butch at November 16, 2014 10:33 AM (HLx1C)

I loved "Tin Can Sailors!" Great book. But "Neptune's Inferno" seemed to be a bit of an afterthought for him. It was interesting because of the subject, but it wasn't written as well, and it was structured chaotically.

Do you recommend "Ship of Ghosts?"

Posted by: CharlieBrown'sDildo at November 16, 2014 10:36 AM (Zu3d9)

56 I plan on buying GW Bush's new book, Portrait Of My Father. The excerpts I've read are tearjerkers in regard to the respect and love between a son and father.

Posted by: Bob Belcher at November 16, 2014 10:38 AM (yshTX)

57 Elisabeth *smacks forehead with open palm* "Doh!"

I just might try that because I really don't want to start a fire in the apartment building. Just a matter of how good his UPS is and if the router is on it I guess. Dorks and their electronic toys.

Posted by: Anna Puma (+SmuD) at November 16, 2014 10:38 AM (wI8iH)

58 CBD - Yes, I recommend "Ship of Ghosts."

I'll have to re-read "Neptune's Inferno." I don't remember it feeling disorganized.

Posted by: butch at November 16, 2014 10:38 AM (HLx1C)

59 Elisabeth, Thanks for the suggestions on Lewis' letters. Our library has both although the Letters to Children is in the kids' section, which is stupid. Kids aren't going to care about the letters. The Queen Mother volume sounds interesting; I'll have to keep an eye open for it.

Posted by: JTB at November 16, 2014 10:39 AM (FvdPb)

60 I've been a subscriber to Ranch and Reata magazine for several years. it's available digital now, but I still get the paper issues.
It's a phenomenal magazine for anyone who appreciates really fine quality photos, and writing. Although there is of course, a heavy slant toward ranching and and horses, there are very in depth articles on western art, and books, both contemporary and historical. Interviews with current artists ranging from saddlemakers , incredible silversmiths, Native American art, etc. The paper edition is on fine, oversize paper that is substantial(not slippery cheap paper like most magazines).
The paper editions are not inexpensive, a yearly subscription is $63. But they are gorgeous, several evenings with a glass of wine type of product, something to absolutely lose yourself in even if your are not an equestrian, rancher, etc.

Here is the link to the magazine.http://www.ranchandreata.com/

And as an added bonus, they also have an online radio station that plays music with little to no advertising. And it's free.
Just click on the listen online icon and it should come up on your computer.

http://www.rangeradio.com/

Posted by: Jen, the original at November 16, 2014 10:39 AM (hjTr7)

61 Posted by: Anna Puma (+SmuD) at November 16, 2014 10:33 AM (wI8iH)

Easy. Girl video gamer.

Posted by: Bob Belcher at November 16, 2014 10:39 AM (yshTX)

62 @48 ITC "To be perfectly fair" (in itself, also not a virtue), every one of those virtues has gotten me into trouble at one time or another, sometimes overlapping. Except Chastity. Even if it's not a virtue.

Now, Enforced Chastity, or Chastity Through Lack of Opportunity, those are different traits, altogether. ("Those are different traits...")

A Senator from a Territory once expounded on this, and Bill Moyers ended up with his own network.

I am amused by "virtue." It's from virs, virtus (Man) and originally meant "manliness," which would be fine, except one of the first Christian women's magazines was called, predictably, "Virtue." That always made me giggle, unvirtuously.

Posted by: Stringer Davis at November 16, 2014 10:40 AM (xq1UY)

63
There is a book floating around somewhere in my house about the incredible lengths the French went to to hide the great wines of Bordeaux from the Germans. They were inventive, risked imprisonment or death, and were moderately successful!

But it irked me....

The French cared far more for their wine and their art than they did for their Jews, who they enthusiastically pointed out to the German occupiers.

Posted by: CharlieBrown'sDildo at November 16, 2014 10:21 AM (Zu3d9)






Wine and War. Good book. I got a kick out of the dirty tricks the Frogs would play on the Nazis, like bottling the worst rotgut crap they had with labels that stated that it was bottled especially for the Wermacht. And swapping labels on their stocks of desirable vintages with newly bottled wines (and if memory serves, raiding tombs and ossuarys for old dust to sprinkle on the bottles to make it look like they'd been stored untouched for years).

But you're right about the way they gleefully ratted out their Jews. Despicable.

Posted by: IllTemperedCur at November 16, 2014 10:40 AM (8v9fw)

64 " I didn't want to mention the presence of world champion jackass T. Coddington Van Voorhees VII in this anthology because of the well-deserved contempt heaped upon him by all of us morons fawning over the SCOAMF) back in 2008"
One of the best Iowahawk posts, if not the bestesr (imho) sadly he seems to be "Twitter only" nowadays. Although he is awesome there too.

Posted by: itchytriggerfinger at November 16, 2014 10:41 AM (8Lbu5)

65 Anna, even with power failure, your character will need a supporting character to carry him along to sanity. Band of Brothers, girl friend, not his mother.

Posted by: Skandia Recluse at November 16, 2014 10:41 AM (qL0bx)

66 The most prominent one-star review for the book says, "This book is a misogynistic piece of shit," so I was intrigued. Basically, the protagonist is guilty of tons of cis-male hetero-normative thought-crime. Examples include: holding doors open for women, not treating women as if they were men, and being attracted to women.
Posted by: BornLib at November 16, 2014 09:53 AM (zpNwC)

...And he's also a total white knight and a complete pushover.

But the series is interesting nevertheless. Read the first three, may continue.

Posted by: Secundus at November 16, 2014 10:41 AM (XDJ9n)

67 Bestesr=best
Engrish be hard.

Posted by: itchytriggerfinger at November 16, 2014 10:42 AM (8Lbu5)

68 Berkeley was never designed for the undergraduate. They paid lip service to their undergrad teaching traditions, but that was for the most part a lot of crap. And it was not an easy system to navigate. Hell, just registering for classes was a huge PITA.

Yeah, I remember getting the feeling from certain professors that the class was a huge burden to them as you were cutting into their research time. Their teaching quality was accordingly low. I remember one calculus prof whose lectures were so abstract and seemingly unconnected with anything, no one ever could ever understand what he was talking about.

I've had far better instructors at the community college level. Although some of the young GTEs were good teachers.

Oh yeah, class registration was like being on the trading floor of the Chicago exchange during a financial meltdown. I wonder if they've ever changed that?

Posted by: OregonMuse at November 16, 2014 10:42 AM (yRdR4)

69 Careful Bob or I might write you in as the love interest for the crabby neighbor who has seen her salad days go sailing by so spends her days being a terror to anything anyone is having fun with.

Posted by: Anna Puma (+SmuD) at November 16, 2014 10:42 AM (wI8iH)

70 Oh, and I get a lump in my throat when I read the USS Johnson's two charges. First one, she makes it in unscathed, launches her torpedoes, and is hit multiple times on the way out. The CO (CDR Earnest Evans) is driving from the stern, yelling down to after steering. He sees the other DDs and DEs heading in and come about for round two to help draw fire from them. Evans was awarded a posthumous MOH.

Take my man card, if you dare.

Posted by: butch at November 16, 2014 10:43 AM (HLx1C)

71 Skandia already got that covered. Roommate, being guy's friend since childhood, has never seen him like this.

Posted by: Anna Puma (+SmuD) at November 16, 2014 10:44 AM (wI8iH)

72 Like Empire1 at this point I am just chronicling what they are doing in reaction to this one traumatic event that all five experienced.

Posted by: Anna Puma (+SmuD) at November 16, 2014 10:46 AM (wI8iH)

73 So someone asked last week about the book I read about the woman who married a psychopath and who kept overruling her own better judgment in putting up with his lies and manipulations. The title was "To Dance With The Devil" and the author is Barbara Bentley. The first half was most interesting and the parts about her divorce from this jerk were interesting but I completely skipped over the parts about her lobbying for legislative change. Apparently, prior to Miss Bentley's efforts, community property rules applied in California, even if one of the spouses was abusive and I guess she managed to get a law changed to make an exception for that. Good for her, but that sort of story bores me to tears. Anyway, half of the book would get four stars and half would get two.

Mostly I've been reading short stories at bed time, although I did read Stephen King's latest "Revival." It was refreshing to see him relate a story involving a family that got along pretty well and where no one was interested in hurting the children. But I saw the ending coming a mile away, although the image he drew of it is still a bit chilling.

I will be sitting here slurping my coffee while I wait for the butter to soften a little bit more and then I will go back to making peanut-butter cookies, half of which I will bake with M&Ms and half of which I will bake with chopped-up dark chocolate Hershey kisses. If the dark chocolate ones get good reviews, next time I will try good chocolate.

Posted by: Tonestaple at November 16, 2014 10:46 AM (B7YN4)

74 34. 15. Battle of Samar

Herman Wouk's conclusion of the battle never fails to move:

"The vision of Sprague's three destroyers...charging out of the smoke and the rain straight toward the main batteries of Kurita's battleships and cruisers, can endure as a picture of the way Americans fight when they don't have superiority. Our schoolchildren should know about that incident, and our enemies should ponder it..."

That Hollywood has neglected that story, while devoting multiple treatments to the Tuskegee Airman, says much about Hollywood.

The Medal of Honor citation of Ernest Evans, one of the destroyer captains:

http://tinyurl.com/kknl9r2

Posted by: Raspail at November 16, 2014 10:50 AM (4HYng)

75 14, Skandia Recluse, I've got the Bread Baker's Apprentice but I haven't done anything yet as I only just turned on the heat last week. I have to do everything by hand as I don't have a KitchenAid. (Being a spinster sucks because no one ever throws you a shower and gives you a KitchenAid.) But I do love baking. The book I got by Rose Levy Beranbaum is "The Baking Bible."

Posted by: Tonestaple at November 16, 2014 10:51 AM (B7YN4)

76 Just finished "The Wrecking Crew," which is about the session musicians who helped create Phil Spector's "wall of sound" and provided the instrumental backing for hundreds of hit records through the late 50s through the early 70s. It's a quick but interesting read for any music lovers who grew up during that time. Everyone knows the Monkees didn't play their own instruments early on, but there are other secrets, such as Roger McGuinn being the only Byrd playing on "Mr. Tambourine Man" and Glen Campbell's years as a Beach Boy. Also lots of stories behind the hit records. I'd recommend it to anyone with an Asperger-ish interest in rock n roll history.

Posted by: wisenheimer at November 16, 2014 10:53 AM (qnhj2)

77 Love that NCIS 'Power Down' episode. I get a smug look every time I see Gibbs operate the mimeograph machine.

Posted by: JTB at November 16, 2014 10:53 AM (FvdPb)

78 G. K. Chesterton

"A good novel tells us the truth about the hero; a bad novel tells us the truth about the author."
--------------------------------
Which is why I'll be burning my manuscript at the end of the month.

I just have some confusion over 'good' and 'bad'.

Posted by: Skandia Recluse at November 16, 2014 10:55 AM (qL0bx)

79 The most prominent one-star review for the book says, "This book is a misogynistic piece of shit," so I was intrigued.

Exactly so, which is why the SJWs are unwittingly performing a valuable service for the rest of us normal people, to wit: if they're all jumping up and down and screaming like howler monkeys about a particular book, it's probably a pretty good read.

Posted by: OregonMuse at November 16, 2014 10:55 AM (yRdR4)

80 Tonestaple at November 16, 2014 10:51 AM (B7YN4)

The only problem with baking bread 'by hand' is the kneading, and maintaining a clean counter top, speaking as an old man with slovenly habits.

There are some methods where you don't have to knead the dough, or not much.

and the part that absolutely eludes me is 'shaping'. I just don't get that part, and your loaf doesn't come out quite right without it.

I would love to be able to produce hand crafted artisan style products.

Posted by: Skandia Recluse at November 16, 2014 11:00 AM (qL0bx)

81 Nothing to report from last week, bookwise. This is honestly a busy time for me, what with craft and book events almost every weekend from now until the middle of December, so I simply cannot do NaNoWrite.
And all of a sudden, it seems that my Tiny Publishing Bidness author clients have been galvanized into action on their projects, so if I am not sitting behind a pile of my own books, I am slaving over a hot computer, editing and doing layouts, and attending to the estimates and invoices.

Posted by: Sgt. Mom at November 16, 2014 11:02 AM (95iDF)

82 Another battle where the heroic sailors of the Tin Cans went in overmatched but still managed to score a victory was in Jan 1942 when four DDs of DesDiv 29 slipped into Balikpapan Bay at night.

OrBat:
USS Pope : IJN light cruiser Naka
USS Ford : Eight IJN DDs
USS Parrot : Ten auxiliary warships
USS Paul Jones : Ten transports

They sank the merchant ships - Kuretake Maru, Tatsukami Maru, Somanoura Maru. And the auxiliary warship PC-37.

USS Ford suffered four injured when a shell from a merchant ship hit the torpedo workshop.

Posted by: Anna Puma (+SmuD) at November 16, 2014 11:04 AM (wI8iH)

83 Just read the 2008 Buckley piece. It doesn't raise my blood pressure. It's all fluff. The babbling of an unserious thinker.

I can honestly say I have never before read that many words written by Chris Buckley, and have no reason to read any more. I suppose you could call what he does "style," but that seems to have been inherited from his father as well.

I wish Iowahawk (Burge) still regularly posted on his blog. I suppose he has taken to twitland (aka twitter) with so many others, which is sad. His long pieces are always worth the time.

I'll probably pick up the book eventually.

Posted by: BurtTC at November 16, 2014 11:04 AM (Dj0WE)

84 Greetings, O Morons. I'm afraid all I have for book recommendations is a warning. Avoid The Wind Merchants. On the plus side, decent cover art, decent formatting, no glaring errors of spelling or grammar, some interesting steampunk concepts. However. Most of the plot is either still in the author's head or got put in a blender. I *still* don't know why anybody was doing anything or what the bloody POV CHARACTER felt about it all. I only finished it out of a morbid sense of curiosity. It also cost too much. Massive down-tentacles.

On the other hand, I have great hopes for the next book in the pile, Captain Smith. Also steampunk, it features chapter titles such as "Smith Defeats the Space Ant Horde!" (yes, the exclamation point is in the title), "Cyber-gangsters in Martian Death Pact!" (ditto), and "Cultists Filched My Trousers". Signs point to a Moron-friendly tale.

And on the writing end of things, I anticipate the first draft of my YA fantasy being completed in about a month. Looking for beta readers, particularly young ones (age 10-13ish). Morons who can be immature on command are also welcome. Email me at firstname DOT lastname at the gmail thingy to be put on the list.

Posted by: Sabrina Chase at November 16, 2014 11:05 AM (2buaQ)

85 Sabrina, in the book Captain Smith is there perchance a chapter with the title "Priestess of the Passion Moon!" or something like it?

Posted by: Anna Puma (+SmuD) at November 16, 2014 11:08 AM (wI8iH)

86 Thank you, OM, for letting the Horde know about my troubles. I've lost my house, but I know that God sometimes open doors by closing others.

I've received a lot of donations and have sold a whole load of books! That last part, I believe, is the opened door. I hope to get it into the hands of someone who will make it into a movie.

God bless you and Ace and the rest of the Horde and though I've been away for a bit, I'll try to drop back in more often.

Posted by: baldilocks at November 16, 2014 11:08 AM (36Rjy)

87 Part I covers what are traditionally known as the cardinal virtues: Prudence, Justice, Temperance, Hope, Charity, and Faith.

Oops; SEVEN deadly virtues, so add one to this list:

Prudence, Justice, COURAGE, Temperance, Hope, Charity, and Faith

Posted by: m at November 16, 2014 11:10 AM (G891H)

88 On the other hand, I have great hopes for the next book in the pile, Captain Smith. Also steampunk, it features chapter titles such as "Smith Defeats the Space Ant Horde!" (yes, the exclamation point is in the title), "Cyber-gangsters in Martian Death Pact!" (ditto), and "Cultists Filched My Trousers". Signs point to a Moron-friendly tale.

More information on this book, please. Searching Amazon for 'Captain Smith' produces confusing results.

Thank you.

Posted by: OregonMuse at November 16, 2014 11:11 AM (yRdR4)

89 Hi, baldilocks! Nice to see you again.

Posted by: rickl at November 16, 2014 11:11 AM (sdi6R)

90 @86

Damn, Baldi, sorry to hear.

Posted by: Ricardo Kill at November 16, 2014 11:11 AM (a7BdQ)

91 42 Navy brat, same deal with Seattle: the politics are intolerant and intolerable, but the climate is unbeatable for a former Floridian.

Posted by: Tonestaple at November 16, 2014 11:12 AM (B7YN4)

92 88
Searching Amazon for 'Captain Smith' produces confusing results.

Posted by: OregonMuse at November 16, 2014 11:11 AM (yRdR4)



The most famous Captain Smith captained the Titanic.

Posted by: rickl at November 16, 2014 11:12 AM (sdi6R)

93 OregonMuse, author is Toby Frost. Look for the triumphant captain and a defeated ant-man on the cover ;-)

Posted by: Sabrina Chase at November 16, 2014 11:13 AM (2buaQ)

94 @83 Burge on Twitter -- I think his "reach" is better on Twitter than longer form blog posts. He can lampoon dear leader and co. to a wider audience and regularly gets mentioned on Twitchy.

@79 "jumping up and down and screaming like howler monkeys" -- a true point and brilliantly made

Posted by: doug at November 16, 2014 11:14 AM (yOA5a)

95 "The most famous Captain Smith captained the Titanic."


All the way into that iceberg and then to the bottom.

Posted by: Ricardo Kill at November 16, 2014 11:14 AM (a7BdQ)

96 Prayers for you, baldilocks.

Posted by: wisenheimer at November 16, 2014 11:14 AM (qnhj2)

97 Anna Puma...no, but there *is* an android sexbot. (Thunderous herd of Morons heads for Amazon). And I apologize profusely, the title is in fullness Space Captain Smith. I cannot think how I neglected to include that important modifier.

Posted by: Sabrina Chase at November 16, 2014 11:16 AM (2buaQ)

98 Thank you Sabrina, it seems that Mr. Frost has a number of books published.

And why would anyone not want to read a book called 'Wrath of the Lemming Men'?

Posted by: OregonMuse at November 16, 2014 11:16 AM (yRdR4)

99 I have lived in SF for many decades.
It's really not my fault all the lefties have moved here from points east and transformed the place beneath my feet.
Pelosi came from Baltimore.
Boxer came from NYC.
Not much different than locusts.

Posted by: navybrat at November 16, 2014 11:19 AM (JgC5a)

100 Ooohhhh Captain Smith, meet Captain Tylor.

*universe explodes*

Posted by: Anna Puma (+SmuD) at November 16, 2014 11:19 AM (wI8iH)

101 "Not much different than locusts."



Like many places, we're fighting that here in Texas.


(Texas sucks. It's hot. It's dry. It's not any fun. Don't come here.)

Posted by: Ricardo Kill at November 16, 2014 11:22 AM (a7BdQ)

102 The first line of a Medal of Honor citation never fails to give me chills and makes me want to cry that there is a world with such people in it: "For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty ...."

Posted by: Tonestaple at November 16, 2014 11:22 AM (B7YN4)

103 Books! I almost forgot.
For fans of Capt. Cook "A Voyage Long and Strange" by Tony Horowitz should be on your short list.
An enthralling account of Mr. Horowitz' attempt to recreate the voyages of Capt. Cook, minus the grog.

Posted by: navybrat at November 16, 2014 11:23 AM (JgC5a)

104 Sabrina so I see. Yeah the Horde I think will be stampeding all over that. The tone and such is giving me that pulp science fiction vibe that is so missing in today's market. Phule's Company anyone?

I should write some more of NaNoWriMo story. Slot in this one snippet between what has become the two main parts of story so far. Compile it, peruse it, recompile, and then drop it on one willing victim beta reader to see if they want to kill me.

Posted by: Anna Puma (+SmuD) at November 16, 2014 11:25 AM (wI8iH)

105 80, Skandia Recluse, believe me, there is some serious scrubbing going on before I start doing any cooking.

Posted by: Tonestaple at November 16, 2014 11:25 AM (B7YN4)

106 Not sure if it's exactly appropriate for the book thread, but there is a petition to support Dr. Matt Taylor, the #shirtstorm guy. I found it in a Breitbart article on the right sidebar.

I can't sign it because I'm not on Facebook or Twitter, but it's a good read, and it was apparently started by a woman. There's a reference to sandwiches, so maybe it's an 'ette.

http://www.ipetitions.com/petition/support-and-honour-for-the-accomplishments-of-matt

I tried to make a tinyurl, but got the following message: "The URL you entered was found in our blacklist of commonly spammed sites, or your IP address is banned."

I've never seen that before.

Posted by: rickl at November 16, 2014 11:26 AM (sdi6R)

107 102 -

Which is a nice way of saying "what the hell is that damn fool doing, he's going to get himself killed!"

And many of them did. Where the rest of us would have thought mainly of ourselves and our own safety, they went in. Or stayed. Or acted without thinking.

It's no sin to not be the guy who would have done those things, or to have thought them fools at the time. Ordinary men can be brave at times, but we recognize a level of bravery of which we are not capable.

God bless those who are.

Posted by: BurtTC at November 16, 2014 11:29 AM (Dj0WE)

108 Thank you Thank you Oregon Muse!!!!

I have just loaded a cart with John Connolly and I'm going to pick up a signed copy of A Wolf in Winter from Poisoned Pen in Scottsdale

Awesome

Posted by: ginaswo at November 16, 2014 11:29 AM (+X1qa)

109 You know, I have read many excellent books on the subject of pipelines.
Posted by: Mary Landrieu at November 16, 2014 10:35 AM (4HYng)

Mary is now releasing pro-life ads. I never knew she was such a conservative. See Twitch.

Posted by: The Great White Snark at November 16, 2014 11:33 AM (8MlTP)

110 If anyone is around the Daytona Beach area in Florida on the 19th, Embry Riddle has invited me down to speak at their "Presidents Speakers" event. Its about the book. Pretty cool, because in the interviews, I made no secret of my political leanings.
And they are still asking me to come.
Heh.
Its at the Willie Miller Center at 7. I'll recognize you by your shiny, shiny hats.

Posted by: MikeB at November 16, 2014 11:35 AM (IYmqx)

111 wisenheimer thank you for heads up on that one!! I love reading about music production and esp wall of sound will definitely check that out!

Baldi / I'm so sorry to hear about the trials and tribulations that came your way. You have such an *excellent* attitude and are very inspirational B (mebbe that's why you got them) I wish I were able to maintain such grace under such a weight

I yell and curse and stomp and cry when things go badly
Then when they go SERIOUSLY bad I start laughing like a loon and cracking cheesey jokes

Makes living with me a challenge at times but entertaining so Ive heard

Posted by: ginaswo at November 16, 2014 11:38 AM (+X1qa)

112 tonestaple, Skandia: the book that got me making decent bread was The Tassajara Bread Book, put out by the Tassajara Buddist monastery. Some bread books are incredibly technical without actually saying anything, and others are just recipe books that don't explain why you are doing things.
The Tasejara book reads sort of like those "Volkswagen repair books" with enough theory to understand what is going on but not enough to loose you in the verbage.

The author suggests not kneading on the counter top, but to get a board or a floured canvas throw to knead on.
Try getting a big enough fruit bowl to knead in, one that is heavy enough not to skid around on you but broad enough for a couple of cantaloups and a small pineapple. I find it is easier to clean and contains the spread of flour and those dingle-berries of loose dough that get everywhere.

Posted by: kindltot at November 16, 2014 11:38 AM (t//F+)

113 Mary is now releasing pro-life ads. I never knew she was such a conservative

And not only is she staunchly pro-life, she also fought for the Keystone XL pipeline "like a tiger." What a hoot.

Posted by: OregonMuse at November 16, 2014 11:41 AM (yRdR4)

114 "Mary is now releasing pro-life ads. I never knew she was such a conservative"

Neither did she.


Heh.

Posted by: Ricardo Kill at November 16, 2014 11:41 AM (a7BdQ)

115 Herman Wouk's conclusion of the battle never fails to move:

-
Would also commented to the effect that the battle is a perfect example of (then) cutting age technology being defeated by human error when Halsey falls for a Japanese trick.

Posted by: The Great White Snark at November 16, 2014 11:43 AM (8uDp/)

116 32
"Last Stand of the Tin Can Sailors" is wonderful book. I've recommended it here several times. The individual stories of courage and heroism will never leave you.

Posted by: Tuna at November 16, 2014 11:43 AM (hpWy+)

117 Why can we not figure out something to do with all the leaves?


I have a pool full, come over and get some.

Posted by: Nip Sip at November 16, 2014 11:43 AM (0FSuD)

118 99 I have lived in SF for many decades.
It's really not my fault all the lefties have moved here from points east and transformed the place beneath my feet.
Pelosi came from Baltimore.
Boxer came from NYC.
Not much different than locusts.
Posted by: navybrat at November 16, 2014 11:19 AM (JgC5a)


Yeah, but they are fun to watch when you tell them something opposite of what they hear on NPR or something they have never heard.

The look on their faces is priceless.

Scoffing at "climate change" is my favorite.

Posted by: eman at November 16, 2014 11:44 AM (MQEz6)

119 For the bread bakers, check out "The New Artisan Bread In 5 Minutes A Day" book. I've been using it for several months and their process works. The bread has been very tasty although I add more caraway seed to the rye bread recipe just because I like caraway seed. I'm no chef but the book falls into the 'so simple even I can do it' category.

Hint: Having a Kitchen Aid mixer REALLY helps.

Posted by: JTB at November 16, 2014 11:46 AM (FvdPb)

120 "Feminist" will not win Time's poll of which word should be banned.. Although it was winning by a huge margin, the SJWs threw such a fit it was removed as a choice.

Posted by: The Great White Snark at November 16, 2014 11:47 AM (vfQ05)

121 Kindltot,
thanks for that. It reminded me of another cookbook I wanted to recommend to the book thread.

"Eating Korean" by Cecilia Hae-Jin Lee.

The stories the author tells are a delight. I'm not much for vegetables but like oriental style meals with rich and this book does that including kimchi and barbecue.

Posted by: Skandia Recluse at November 16, 2014 11:48 AM (qL0bx)

122 I used to live a few blocks from Green Apple Books; three paperbacks for fifty cents back in The Day.


The most interesting bookstore in SF was a few doors down from City Lights. Can't recall the name. They had old Playboy magazines for a quarter; old issues of Ramparts ( in its early libertarian days ) were also a quah-tah.


Good times, but it closed mid-70s. City Lights, which sold mostly new books to tourists, survived.

Posted by: Lindsay Lohan, defender of The American Way at November 16, 2014 11:49 AM (8CdUx)

123 Time wants to ban words now?

Someone needs to explain to them that 1984 was not a instruction manual.

Posted by: rickl at November 16, 2014 11:51 AM (sdi6R)

124 Feminist - synonym for Victimette.

Posted by: Anna Puma (+SmuD) at November 16, 2014 11:52 AM (wI8iH)

125 See you all later. Gotta go thank the Man.

Posted by: baldilocks at November 16, 2014 11:52 AM (36Rjy)

126 "Time wants to ban words now?"


Yeah, the leaders at "Time" don't understand the irony there.

Posted by: Ricardo Kill at November 16, 2014 11:53 AM (a7BdQ)

127 123 Time wants to ban words now?

Someone needs to explain to them that 1984 was not a instruction manual.
Posted by: rickl at November 16, 2014 11:51 AM (sdi6R)

Exactly.

Time needs to look io the word shun.

Things should be shunned, not necessarily banned.

Posted by: eman at November 16, 2014 11:54 AM (MQEz6)

128 The most interesting bookstore in SF was a few doors down from City Lights. Can't recall the name. They had old Playboy magazines for a quarter; old issues of Ramparts ( in its early libertarian days ) were also a quah-tah.

Ramparts used to be a Catholic intellectual quarterly before a young David Horowitz got control of it and turned it into a commie rag.

My uncle used to write for it, I think. Or maybe it was just one article/ I should look for back issues and see if I can find it.

Posted by: OregonMuse at November 16, 2014 11:54 AM (yRdR4)

129 I went to high school in Mountain View in the late 60s, so was familiar with SF at that time. I went to SF for some training in 2002. I couldn't believe how dirty it had gotten. The streets had panhandlers. You could tell people were living next to the commuter train tracks. Training finished early and I couldn't get out of there fast enough. I feel certain Keplers is still in business in Palo Alto.

Posted by: Notsothoreau at November 16, 2014 11:54 AM (Lqy/e)

130 Look up, not look io.

Of course there's nothing wrong with looking io.

I have several friends who look io.

Several.

Posted by: eman at November 16, 2014 11:57 AM (MQEz6)

131 Time's problem is that it is the proverbial "Amazing Shrinking Periodical" and they just want to be able to claim that it is getting smaller because there are fewer words available to work with
It is either that or save up the articles they do manage to write and put out a glossy every-other month edition with nicer pictures like the yacht magazines do.

Posted by: kindltot at November 16, 2014 11:58 AM (t//F+)

132 @76 "The Wrecking Crew" -- Always been fascinated about the extraordinary session musicians like "The Section" who played on Boz Scagg's "Silk Degrees," the "Funk Brothers" who backed Detroit's Motown sessions, the "Swampers" in Muscle Shoals who backed Aretha, Paul Simon, and the Stones, as well as Stax's Booker T Jones, Duck Dunn and Steve Cropper. The Funk Brothers tribute movie "Standing in the Shadows of Motown" was great and the Swampers movie "Muscle Shoals" was interesting.

Posted by: doug at November 16, 2014 11:58 AM (yOA5a)

133 Heh. Found a searchable 'Ramparts' archive at unz.org. Did a search for my uncle's name and it came right up.

Posted by: OregonMuse at November 16, 2014 11:58 AM (yRdR4)

134 If you were a bum or a hobo, where would rather live, San Francisco or Chicago?
The sacred homeless are not just a social problem here, they are an industry. People make millions of dollars "providing" for them.

Posted by: navybrat at November 16, 2014 11:59 AM (JgC5a)

135 and could you pleeeeze re-reveal that list of publishers?????



Posted by: Lindsay Lohan, defender of The American Way at November 16, 2014 12:00 PM (8CdUx)

136 If you were a bum or a hobo, where would rather live, San Francisco or Chicago?

South Florida in the winter, northern states in the summer, maybe work for the circus.

Posted by: Skandia Recluse at November 16, 2014 12:03 PM (qL0bx)

137 I've already seen a couple of books I want. When linked on this site - does it automatically go through the AoSHQ link so Ace gets a tip?

Posted by: Jade Sea at November 16, 2014 12:03 PM (Qgn3C)

138 134 If you were a bum or a hobo, where would rather live, San Francisco or Chicago?
The sacred homeless are not just a social problem here, they are an industry. People make millions of dollars "providing" for them.
Posted by: navybrat at November 16, 2014 11:59 AM (JgC5a)

There are places in SF where the hobos swarm like bees.

Dump them all on Alcatraz and catapult food to them.

Include the douche canoes that think the hobos should freely infest the city.

Posted by: eman at November 16, 2014 12:04 PM (MQEz6)

139 Ramparts used to be a Catholic intellectual
quarterly before a young David Horowitz got control of it and turned it
into a commie rag.

My uncle used to write for it, I think. Or
maybe it was just one article/ I should look for back issues and see if I
can find it.


Posted by: OregonMuse at November 16, 2014 11:54 AM (yRdR4)


yes, the early days of the New Left: youthful rebellion, the feisty angst of aging Old Leftists, Catholic dissidents, New Puritans, homos, and semi-converted John Birchers looking for a new home.


Posted by: Lindsay Lohan, defender of The American Way at November 16, 2014 12:04 PM (8CdUx)

140 When linked on this site - does it automatically go through the AoSHQ link so Ace gets a tip?

I think you have to go through the amazon link on the front page. Bring up the link and search for the book.

Posted by: Skandia Recluse at November 16, 2014 12:05 PM (qL0bx)

141 Posted by: Lindsay Lohan, defender of The American Way at November 16, 2014 12:04 PM (8CdUx)


Until you get mugged or the trust fund dries up.

Posted by: eman at November 16, 2014 12:05 PM (MQEz6)

142 Voorhees is Iowahawk/Burge

Posted by: oldgraymarist at November 16, 2014 12:05 PM (QiU0k)

143 If I were a hobo, I sure as hell wouldn't be lurking or posting here. The Ewok would track my IP address and take my pelt!

Posted by: PabloD at November 16, 2014 12:06 PM (roESk)

144 Sidebar. Looks like Gaylord Merkin, deep in his golfing bunker, is only now being told that Jo-Hans Gruber was a key part of 404Care. Will 'Pinch' Steiner and the crack'd MSM division rescue him? Stay tuned? Oh who am I kidding...

Posted by: Anna Puma (+SmuD) at November 16, 2014 12:06 PM (wI8iH)

145 130 Look up, not look io.

Of course there's nothing wrong with looking io.

I have several friends who look io.

Several.
Posted by: eman at November 16, 2014 11:57 AM (MQEz6)


Io is a cool-looking moon.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Io_(moon)

Posted by: rickl at November 16, 2014 12:06 PM (sdi6R)

146 If you were a bum or a hobo, where would rather live, San Francisco or Chicago?



South Florida in the winter, northern states in the summer, maybe work for the circus.

Posted by: Skandia Recluse at November 16, 2014 12:03 PM (qL0bx)

One of these things is not like the others:bum

hobo

work

Posted by: Alberta Oil Peon at November 16, 2014 12:09 PM (7MWCL)

147 Jade Sea to ensure money from your Amazon order goes to Ace, have to go through the somewhat non-descript the AoSHQ Amazon Store link just above the Headlines banner on the right side of the main page.

Posted by: Anna Puma (+SmuD) at November 16, 2014 12:11 PM (wI8iH)

148 OT from the sidebar but I just can't let it go. I can't believe he actually said this, but apparently it's true.

"I just heard about this, Obama said at a news conference...The fact that some adviser who never worked on our staff expressed his opinion that I completely disagree wit --- it is no reflection on the actual process that was run."

Hubris, thy name is Obama.

Posted by: pep at November 16, 2014 12:11 PM (4nR9/)

149 Looks like Gaylord Merkin, deep in his golfing bunker,

-
Barry is a one trick pony. When you get caught in a lie, lie some more. Rinse. Repeat.

Posted by: The Great White Snark at November 16, 2014 12:11 PM (8MlTP)

150 SO, if POTUS only just found out about this, is he a typical stupid American voter too?

Posted by: bopiddy at November 16, 2014 12:12 PM (9HJf4)

151 Eh, hobos work. Traditionally they went from place to place to FIND work . . .

Bums, yeah, don't work.

Posted by: boulder terlit hobo at November 16, 2014 12:14 PM (AVEe1)

152 Gaylord Merkin is all LIP*

* Low Information President.

Posted by: Anna Puma (+SmuD) at November 16, 2014 12:14 PM (wI8iH)

153 Obama is angry, not for what Gruber said. Obama is angry because what Gruber said is being reported.

Posted by: Skandia Recluse at November 16, 2014 12:15 PM (qL0bx)

154 I've been reading Time and Time Again by Ben Elton. It is about a Brit who travels to 1914 to prevent the assassination of Franz Ferdinand and to kill the Kaiser thereby preventing WWI. I won't say it's a great book but it does have enough twists and turns to keep me interested and to allow me to overlook certain historical inaccuracies.

Posted by: The Great White Snark at November 16, 2014 12:20 PM (8MlTP)

155 Eh, hobos work. Traditionally they went from place to place to FIND work . . .



Bums, yeah, don't work.

Posted by: boulder terlit hobo at November 16, 2014 12:14 PM (AVEe1)


BTH, that distinction dates back to the days when people had to work in order to exist. Or live a life of crime. Hobos worked as little as possible to meet their needs, but would not steal. Now that welfare is so easy to get, the distinction has become blurred.

I have a friend, who is technically retired, who calls himself a hobo. He worked hard, made his pile, bought a couple of houses, and lives on rental income.

Posted by: Alberta Oil Peon at November 16, 2014 12:23 PM (7MWCL)

156 The guy I never worked with, although I did meet with him for several hours in the WH on multiple occasions, is saying things that aren't true but did in fact happen.

Posted by: Nigel West Dickens at November 16, 2014 12:25 PM (HstNY)

157 Hobos have been known to be among the homeless.
And if you were one, SF or Chicago?
SF if you have a brain.
You don't freeze here. You don't fry here.

Posted by: navybrat at November 16, 2014 12:26 PM (JgC5a)

158 Thanks Anna - if I were more computer savvy I probably would have seen that!

Posted by: Jade Sea at November 16, 2014 12:26 PM (Qgn3C)

159
Hobos have been known to be among the homeless.
And if you were one, SF or Chicago?
SF if you have a brain.
You don't freeze here. You don't fry here.


Posted by: navybrat at November 16, 2014 12:26 PM (JgC5a)


Yeah, but the buzzing of the bees in the cigarette trees does get tiresome, after a while.

Posted by: Alberta Oil Peon at November 16, 2014 12:30 PM (7MWCL)

160 And the trickling streams of alcohol through the rocks...

Posted by: navybrat at November 16, 2014 12:32 PM (JgC5a)

161 Coloring books. Nothin' beats 'em.

Posted by: Slow Uncle Joe Biden at November 16, 2014 12:33 PM (Dwehj)

162 I read an interesting horror novel recently titled-

"The Stone Man".

A minimally detailed statue like a human but eight feet tall appears in Coventry, England and begins walking in a straight line.

But it is unstoppable by buildings or any human interference

That's the opening premise. And from there it just keeps building. It is actually scary and there are some wonderful set pieces which had me racing through the book.

I f you have a science background you'll be able to guess at least part of the reason for the Stone Mans appearance fairly early on. But that takes nothing away from the tension.

The third act succumbs a bit to British lower class mawkishness and sentimentality, still it ends well and is a fun read.

I recommend it highly.

"The Stone Man" is available on the Kindle.

Posted by: Naturalfake at November 16, 2014 12:35 PM (0cMkb)

163 Hobos have a King.

Bums are anarcho-syndicalists.

Posted by: Trimegistus at November 16, 2014 12:36 PM (pzeLb)

164 Bassem Masrl
Ok #Ferguson We just looted the High school locker room got 57 football helmets. Meat at secret code place e-h at 2:30 we shut shitdown
----------------------

This guy is a hamas supporting ISIS shiling fergatard.

Posted by: The Progs at November 16, 2014 12:38 PM (iQIUe)

165 112
I've had the bread at tassajara. Most of the Buddhists at the monastery were Cali hipsters when I went there. But they were good bakers. I'll give them that.

Posted by: Drc at November 16, 2014 12:41 PM (XRYHY)

166 Honoring the sanctity and moroseness of the Book Thread.......


Where the fcuk is the Sunday Football thread.....?

Posted by: Ricardo Kill at November 16, 2014 12:41 PM (a7BdQ)

167 And nobody has an answer.


Well, Seahawks vs. Chiefs at noon on my telly. Broncs vs. Rams on the other. Queerboys are are off this week.


Posted by: Ricardo Kill at November 16, 2014 12:46 PM (a7BdQ)

168 I'm reading, go ahead & make fun of me, Dreamers & Deceivers by Glenn Beck.
I heard him on Levin's show Wednesday & they were talking about Woodrow Wilson & what an arrogant man he was & both agreed he, and Teddy Roosevelt, started progressive movement.

Wilson had a stroke & his wife Edith was president for the last two years of his term. We've already had a woman POTUS, no Hillary won't be the first.

I read that Wilson's doctor's sons released the doctor's papers in 1990. I didn't read that in book.

Posted by: Carol at November 16, 2014 12:50 PM (sj3Ax)

169 I really hate political street theater:

http://goo.gl/c5NS5S

Posted by: The Progs at November 16, 2014 12:52 PM (iQIUe)

170 Finished re-reading Good Omens by Pratchett and Gaiman.

Posted by: LochLomondFarms at November 16, 2014 12:54 PM (NwqTZ)

171 Back from church. Current read is Oliver North's 'Counterfeit Lies' . No exactly a barn-burner so far as the prose goes, but the plot is spot-on, relative to what is happening in the U.S right now. Islamic infiltrators slipping over the border, onesy-twosy and setting up isolated mosques/cells.

In North's plot, the hard-core infiltrators are annoyed that recent-convert, undisciplined native amateurs are doing small scale lone-wolf things that have the consequence of bringing violent Islam to the attention of the public. Hmm.

Posted by: Mike Hammer, etc., etc. at November 16, 2014 12:54 PM (F2IAQ)

172 Ah.

Carol, Progs.....I thought I was the only person on the interwebs.

Posted by: Ricardo Kill at November 16, 2014 12:54 PM (a7BdQ)

173 Siragusa. Useless as normal....

Posted by: Ricardo Kill at November 16, 2014 12:55 PM (a7BdQ)

174 Ricardo,
It looks like it's only The Progs, Mike us.

Posted by: Carol at November 16, 2014 12:56 PM (sj3Ax)

175 Ricardo - If I hurled a few insults, would you feel more at home? Nah, wouldn't be right. Book Thread. We're spohscated sophicical sophisticated.

Posted by: Mike Hammer, etc., etc. at November 16, 2014 12:58 PM (F2IAQ)

176 "It looks like it's only The Progs, Mike us."


Howdy, Carol.

I'm just narrating ball sense there's no thread.

Posted by: Ricardo Kill at November 16, 2014 12:59 PM (a7BdQ)

177 Mike, did you ever get a satisfactory answer on that mystery car pic you posted a few nights ago on the ONT? I am curious.

Posted by: Alberta Oil Peon at November 16, 2014 01:00 PM (7MWCL)

178 Good!
Whose thread?
My thread!
Whose thread?
My thread!

Posted by: The Progs at November 16, 2014 01:00 PM (iQIUe)

179 The discussion of virtues reminds that girls were at one time often given such names. More's the pity that the practice has faded. I guess the end came with Chastity Bono. Killed that name for sure.

I miss 'Grace' as a name. I am reminded that a g-great Aunt was named 'Thoughtful'.

Posted by: Mike Hammer, etc., etc. at November 16, 2014 01:00 PM (F2IAQ)

180 "
Ricardo - If I hurled a few insults, would you feel more at home?"


That might help.


Oh, wait, yeah, "Book Thread."

Posted by: Ricardo Kill at November 16, 2014 01:00 PM (a7BdQ)

181 Soldier was reunited with Matty his dog Friday. ISIS has beheading video too.
One is supposed to be an American aide worker, plus a number of Syrian officers.

Great job SCOAMT!!
I wonder how many Of 5 released from GITMO in May for Bergdahl are ISIS now?
I didn't watch video. It's same British accent.

Posted by: Carol at November 16, 2014 01:01 PM (sj3Ax)

182 I love how they yell this is what democracy looks like while threatening people. No, that is not what democracy looks like.

Posted by: The Progs at November 16, 2014 01:01 PM (iQIUe)

183 Alberta - Indeed I did. You, btw, disappointed me, as you have a good eye for such things, and I figured that for sure, you would recognize it, though I did not.

It is one of these :http://tinyurl.com/kjzboka

A Lancia Appia. Giveaway is the Italian-ish grille shape.

Posted by: Mike Hammer, etc., etc. at November 16, 2014 01:04 PM (F2IAQ)

184 The USA needs to do a Carthage on ISIS and the assholes who support it.

Posted by: eman at November 16, 2014 01:05 PM (MQEz6)

185 28 Posted by: Empire1 at November 16, 2014 10:11 AM (NrJCD)

I just found 'Schlock Mercenaries" as well. What a fun story! My daughter jokes, "What year are you up to now?"

Posted by: LochLomondFarms at November 16, 2014 01:05 PM (NwqTZ)

186
Ref SF's top 10 bookstores.

a. I don't remember the last time I was in a bookstore.

b. I used to OWN a bookstore!

Posted by: Arthur at November 16, 2014 01:05 PM (h53OH)

187 Eman
That won't happen with The JEF,. We need a man with guts to do it.

Posted by: Carol at November 16, 2014 01:07 PM (sj3Ax)

188 The only paper books I buy these days are gifts and big coffee table books.

Certain science and art books really have to be real world ones, not onesandzeros.

Posted by: eman at November 16, 2014 01:08 PM (MQEz6)

189 KC is on a nice drive. Down at the 6.

Posted by: Ricardo Kill at November 16, 2014 01:08 PM (a7BdQ)

190 187 Eman
That won't happen with The JEF,. We need a man with guts to do it.
Posted by: Carol at November 16, 2014 01:07 PM (sj3Ax)

Sadly so.

Posted by: eman at November 16, 2014 01:09 PM (MQEz6)

191 Picked up a leather bound edition of the Constitution of the United States of America.

It also contains On Civil War by Benjamin Franklin, John Hancocks account of the Boston Massacre, The Declaration of Independence, Common Sense, the Articles of Confederation, The Federalist Papers, The Bill of Rights George Washington's Farewell Address and other works.

It was $20.00 well worth the price.

Posted by: Kreplach at November 16, 2014 01:10 PM (bKSy7)

192 KC TD on an option.

Posted by: Ricardo Kill at November 16, 2014 01:11 PM (a7BdQ)

193 So many books, so little time...

Posted by: Mike Hammer, etc., etc. at November 16, 2014 01:11 PM (F2IAQ)

194 So many books, so little time...
Posted by: Mike Hammer

* stops to ponder pending Wall of Shame *

Posted by: Mike Hammer, etc., etc. at November 16, 2014 01:12 PM (F2IAQ)

195 It is one of these :http://tinyurl.com/kjzboka



A Lancia Appia. Giveaway is the Italian-ish grille shape.





Posted by: Mike Hammer, etc., etc. at November 16, 2014 01:04 PM (F2IAQ)


Man, I never would have guessed that. It's such a dumpy little thing, I'd have never figured it for an Italian design. Many of the Brit cars of that era had body designs by Italian designers, and they were usually "crisper".

But I got to drive an Alfa Romeo Montreal once. Now that was a real pretty car, with a DOHC V8 engine in it, too. And all the build quality of the finest Fiat.

Posted by: Alberta Oil Peon at November 16, 2014 01:12 PM (7MWCL)

196 Mike, I've known several Graces, a Prudence, and a Charity, all around my age. Seems to be more common to give virtue names as middle names now. But Jensen and Danneel Ackles named their daughter (who is now... almost 2, IIRC) Justice, so the practice isn't altogether gone.

Posted by: Elisabeth G. Wolfe at November 16, 2014 01:13 PM (iuQS7)

197 I download books from Apple's iBooks, B&N or Amazon, whichever is cheapest, on iPad.

I had $1.64 credit from B&N for some class action. I think I have at least 10 books on this that I've never read.

I'm sick of having television on, unless it's Showtime or TCM.
I find good old movies on TCM but never do catch the beginning. Usually they are on demand for a few days.

Posted by: Carol at November 16, 2014 01:13 PM (sj3Ax)

198 But I got to drive an Alfa Romeo Montreal once. Now that was a real pretty car, with a DOHC V8 engine in it, too. And all the build quality of the finest Fiat.
Posted by: Alberta
------------------

The ultimate overreach, in my opinion, was the Maserati-engined Chrysler K-car.

Posted by: Mike Hammer, etc., etc. at November 16, 2014 01:14 PM (F2IAQ)

199 Great Special Teams KC....

Posted by: Ricardo Kill at November 16, 2014 01:14 PM (a7BdQ)

200 Justice, so the practice isn't altogether gone.
Posted by: Elisabeth
---------------------

Hope springs eternal.
Which, btw, I for years thought was a Bibical quote, but was Alexander Pope, I believe.

Posted by: Mike Hammer, etc., etc. at November 16, 2014 01:18 PM (F2IAQ)

201 Lynch starting well...

Posted by: Ricardo Kill at November 16, 2014 01:18 PM (a7BdQ)

202 Kreplach
That's a bargain!
What store did you buy it from?
I'd like one.

Posted by: Carol at November 16, 2014 01:18 PM (sj3Ax)

203 TCM and Dish are still on the outs. I am unhappy.

Posted by: Mike Hammer, etc., etc. at November 16, 2014 01:19 PM (F2IAQ)

204 Oops..., brunch call, bbl

Posted by: Mike Hammer, etc., etc. at November 16, 2014 01:20 PM (F2IAQ)

205 I was reading NY Post online & they are brutal to SCOAMF.

Posted by: Carol at November 16, 2014 01:20 PM (sj3Ax)

206 "
TCM and Dish are still on the outs. I am unhappy."


Switch to DTV, Mike. Never a worry in years. They were playing "The Guns of Batasi" earlier before I switched over to ball.

Posted by: Ricardo Kill at November 16, 2014 01:21 PM (a7BdQ)

207 A real pretty car, like if a Camaro were designed by Italians: http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/8/8d/Alfa_Romeo_Montreal_Auburn.jpg

Posted by: Alberta Oil Peon at November 16, 2014 01:21 PM (7MWCL)

208 I'm sorry Mike.
My roommate asked me what's up with TCM on all the time?
No commercials, most of the movies I've never seen & I'm sick of politics.

Posted by: Carol at November 16, 2014 01:23 PM (sj3Ax)

209 "My roommate asked me what's up with TCM on all the time?"



I have them on all the time too, Carol. Ain't no thing.

Posted by: Ricardo Kill at November 16, 2014 01:24 PM (a7BdQ)

210 Mike Hammer - the virtue names haven't entirely died out. I've met a few little girls named Grace and another one named Faith. I've always wanted to name my hypothetical daughter Honor. And her hypothetical twin sister would be named Hero (from "Much Ado about Nothing).

Still in a reading slump. I need to find a page-turning trashy novel and just sit down and read it so I can get out of my slump.

Posted by: biancaneve at November 16, 2014 01:25 PM (6Turu)

211 All, right.......Nood.

Posted by: Ricardo Kill at November 16, 2014 01:25 PM (a7BdQ)

212 Football thread for you Ricardo.
I'm watching Dead Ringer on TCM on demand. Missed first 40 minutes of it.
It's okay, not great.

Posted by: Carol at November 16, 2014 01:30 PM (sj3Ax)

213 biancaneve, do you like mysteries? If so, the Cat Who books by Lillian Jackson Braun and the Teashop Mysteries by Laura Childs are good "popcorn reads"--not trashy, but pretty light and enjoyable.

Posted by: Elisabeth G. Wolfe at November 16, 2014 01:30 PM (iuQS7)

214 Some FX guy on TWD first name is Grace.

Posted by: The Progs at November 16, 2014 01:39 PM (iQIUe)

215 Chastity is not celibacy. If you are faithful to your spouse, then you are chaste.

Posted by: Terentia at November 16, 2014 01:49 PM (reqJm)

216 I want to know where Kreplach picked up leather bound Constitution etc.

Posted by: Carol at November 16, 2014 01:54 PM (sj3Ax)

217 @202

Barnes and Nobel Carol.

Posted by: Kreplach at November 16, 2014 02:05 PM (bKSy7)

218 Bernard Cornwell week. Listened to Waterloo. Read Agincourt. Started listening to the Memoirs of U.S. Grant. Zipped through BYpass Gemini recommended last week. Trying to make progress in The River War. I don't know if I'm cut out for "serious" reading.

Posted by: alo89 at November 16, 2014 02:17 PM (IacRz)

219 Loch Lomond -- just caught up to the present, so a very nice 71st birthday? And when are you up to on the strip?

Posted by: Empire1 at November 16, 2014 02:38 PM (hweP5)

220 (7): "Just got to the "All About Whales (which are fish because I say so)" section of Moby Dick. Seems like Melville had a lot of opinions and was afraid there might be one person left in the world who wasn't aware of them."

Stick with it. Melville was a composer and Moby Dick is a symphony. The chapter on whale classification is a largo movement that sets you up for the allegro of the next chapter. Melville is deliberately messing with your mind.

Posted by: Malcolm Kirkpatrick at November 16, 2014 03:01 PM (uHUBu)

221 Recently finished: Yang Jisheng, Tombstone: The Great Chinese Famine, 1958-1962 (English translation/condensation). My order, Ethan Gutmann's The Slaughter: Mass Killings, Organ Harvesting, and China's Secret Solution to Its Dissident Problem, had not arrived at the UH bookstore as of Tuesday, so I started Amity Shlaes' The Forgotten Man: A New History of the Great Depression. Chapter three, "The Junket" uses the device of the shared journey (to the 1920's Soviet Union) to introduce a cast of characters who were to play a role in Roosevelt's New Deal. I'm annoyed, but I can't decide whether to attribute my irritation to the policy, the people, or the author. Maybe things will pick up and the author will provide systematic analysis in a later chapter.

Posted by: Malcolm Kirkpatrick at November 16, 2014 03:20 PM (uHUBu)

222 I told myself I was going to seriously tackle NoNoWriMo this year. I've completed a short novel and was working on one to use my war stories since I retired from the military. But, I'm going back to school and just finished a writing intensive trimester and I am doing a miserable job of writing fiction now, wordcount is too low to worry about. Anyone have any useful techniques to combat this?

Posted by: Graves at November 16, 2014 03:27 PM (3MEXB)

223 I suppose the SF store Borderlands is name for William Hope Hodgson's 1908 novel "The House On the Borderland."

The novel is of the supernatural horror genre, and is quite good. Hodgson was a major influence on H.P. Lovecraft. He died aged 40, in 1918 in Ypres, Belgium, at which time he was a soldier in the British army.

Posted by: jbarntt at November 16, 2014 03:38 PM (I9uXW)

224
Time needs to look io the word shun.seppuku

Fixed

Posted by: The Truth, the whole Truth etc. at November 16, 2014 03:52 PM (6jKOp)

225 Kreplach
I found it at Amazon. I got thousands of results & B&B.
I ordered a new one for $26.05 from Amazon & $3.99 shipping.
Thanks!

Posted by: Carol at November 16, 2014 03:56 PM (sj3Ax)

226 Yep! If you live in San Fran you have to be rich or dirt poor. The rent is about as bad as Manhattan, and the parking is even worse. San Fran also has more homeless per capita except for maybe Berkely, which is another hell hole. Couldn't wait to get the hell out of the Bay Area. It's a dirty, disgusting, putrid place that smells of urine and feces, unless, of course, you are rich and can live in Pacific Heights or the Presidio.

Posted by: Mistress Overdone at November 16, 2014 05:42 PM (2/oBD)

227 Recently, I've read three books by Kent Haruf, an author new to me. The Tie that Binds was a story with characters and a writing style that haunted me. Plainsong offered a thoroughly satisfying story, and Eventide a welcome follow-up. Highly recommended.

Posted by: anonny at November 16, 2014 06:29 PM (e8mCn)

228 Another vote for Bypass Gemini.
The best book I read this week was Star Dogs by Dave Freer, though.
Sabrina, I volunteer to read your book and see if I can get my 14yo son to give me an opinion on it also, sending an email now. (I had my older two read The Long Way Home last year for a school assignment. The non reader had no complaints. The reader enjoyed it very much.)

Posted by: Name at November 17, 2014 12:56 AM (N2Jm6)

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Outraged "Conservatives" React to the FMA
An On-Line Impression of Dennis Miller Having Sex with a Kodiak Bear
The Story the Rightwing Media Refuses to Report!
Our Lunch with David "Glengarry Glen Ross" Mamet
The House of Love: Paul Krugman
A Michael Moore Mystery (TM)
The Dowd-O-Matic!
Liberal Consistency and Other Myths
Kepler's Laws of Liberal Media Bias
John Kerry-- The Splunge! Candidate
"Divisive" Politics & "Attacks on Patriotism" (very long)
The Donkey ("The Raven" parody)
News/Chat