Sunday Morning Book Thread 09-21-2014: End of Summer Reading [OregonMuse]


summer-reading.jpg


Good morning morons and moronettes and welcome to AoSHQ's stately, prestigious, and high-class Sunday Morning Book Thread. The only AoSHQ thread that is so hoity-toity, pants are required.


Scots Wha Hae!

OK, so first there was How the Irish Saved Civilizaton. Hooray for they Irish! Then there was Sprezzatura: 50 Ways Italian Genius Shaped the World. Hooray for the Italians! But in light of this week's historic vote in Scotland to remain a part of Great Britain, it's helpful to be reminded what the original unification, ratified in 1707, brought a great gift to the modern world: mainly, the modern world. How the Scots Invented the Modern World: The True Story of How Western Europe's Poorest Nation Created Our World & Everything in It. Of course that's a bit of an exaggeration, but the Scottish Enlightenment was a direct result of the original union with the British Empire providing Scotland's thinkers, inventors and statesmen with unprecedented freedom and mobility. Francis Hutcheson, Adam Smith, David Hume, Lord Kelvin, James Watt, Charles Napier, and even Andrew Carnegie and Alexander Graham Bell all were products of this historic flowering of men and ideas from Scotland.

Reading about this Little Country What Did Big Things reminded me of another country, namely Portugal. Nowadays it's pretty much a socialist backwater, (just Like Scotland, I guess) )but it's amazing to remember that in previous centuries, that tiny little country bestrode the world like a colossus. So, in remembrance of glory days long past, I picked up Prince Henry the Navigator, the Hero of Portugal and of Modern Discovery, 1394-1460 A.D. With an Account of Geographical Progress Throughout the Middle Ages As the Preparation for His Work, first published in 1894 and available for free on Kindle. It's basically a biography of the great Portuguese explorer Henry the Navigator, including much background information on the state of "geographic science" as understood by diverse groups such as Greeks, Arabs, Christian pilgrims, Vikings, etc. I really admire books like this: fine. old-school 19th century scholarship, a bit dry, perhaps, and dated, but that's part of its charm.


The Lit Crit Life Coach?

It's not your conventional life coaching, but I guess there are an awfully lot of "I read X and it changed my life" type of self-help books out there. This article in The New Republic pokes fun at the genre, which includes titles such as How Adam Smith Can Change Your Life: An Unexpected Guide to Human Nature and Happiness and A Jane Austen Education: How Six Novels Taught Me About Love, Friendship, and the Things That Really Matter. I suppose you could read all of them at the same time and get really confused.


Back To School

Here's another one of those quizzes, this one having to do with schools in literature. I started it, but was doing so poorly, I just gave up.

The Political Ideas of H.P. Lovecraft

To be honest, I didn't know he had any. But that's one of the topics touched upon in the longish essay Master of Modern Horror that appeared in the May 2014 issue of the Claremont Review of Books. The essay contains a brief biography as well as analysis of his writings, and what makes them so effectively horrific and creepy. It provides some details about Lovecraft's life I had not known before.

For example:

A kind of reactionary Anglophilia spurred Lovecraft to reject the American Revolution. Throughout his life, he displayed his anachronistic loyalty through his British spelling, rendering color as colour and odor as odour. Although he despised Woodrow Wilson - mostly for refusing to jump into the First World War and defend Mother England - he also distrusted capitalism, especially for its corrosions of culture. Progressive ideas seeped into his thought: "The masses of mankind must remain subject to the will of a dominant aristocracy so long as the present structure of the human brain endures," he wrote. By "aristocracy," Lovecraft didnít mean a ruling class of noble bloodlines but an elite selected for their intelligence and expertise.

I've learned that when someone makes the claim that "mankind needs to be ruled by an intelligent elite", what he usually means is "guys like me". But politics is just a smaller aspect of the greater Lovecraft philosophy that underlies all of his horror stories which he called "cosmic indifferentism", which is

an atheistic, amoral materialism that insisted on human irrelevance - along with the related idea that most people can't handle this hard truth.

For horror fans, the essay is worth reading in its entirety.


And Now For Philosophy Completely Different

And while I bouncing around the CRB site, I stumbled upon another essay, The Soul of Liberty, which is actually a review of the book Conscience and Its Enemies: Confronting the Dogmas of Liberal Secularism by Robert P. George, who is a Professor of Jurisprudence at Princeton University. New York Times Magazine calls him "this country's most influential conservative Christian thinker", so perhaps I should be embarrassed to admit that I've never heard of him (and I hang out in conservative Christian circles).

From the introduction:

Many in elite circles yield to the temptation to believe that anyone who disagrees with them is a bigot or a religious fundamentalist. Reason and science, they confidently believe, are on their side. With this book, I aim to expose the emptiness of that belief.

In George's view, a decent, well-ordered society is built on three principles"

1. Respect for the human person
2. Respect for the family,
3. A "fair and effective system of law and government."

And he goes on to show how the liberal dogma violates these principles. The only sad part is that no one is listening except those of us in the choir.

George is also the co-author (with Sherif Girgis) of What Is Marriage?: Man and Woman: A Defense, which is, as the title suggests, a defense of traditional marriage.


Kindle Security

Apparently, someone found a security hole in the Amazon Kindle management system so that your Amazon account can be hacked via a Kindle eBook.

Thanks to this hole, a hacker can gain access to the Amazon account simply by getting his victims to download an ebook which was itself hacked.

The author of the article has a straightforward workaround:

I have a rule against downloading apps from questionable websites, one which I have long since applied to Epub ebooks (because they can contain Javascript) and PDFs (because they can hold entire apps). Now it would seem that rule needs to be expanded to include Kindle ebooks as well.

Me, I sideload ePub books a lot, also pdf files, probably more than I should. But never Kindle books. Too much of a pain.

Update:

PC World is reporting that the security hole appears to have been fixed, but Amazon hasn't confirmed this.


And Speaking of Sideloading

One of the things I liked about the Nook was the download feature. Not only would my Nook eBook purchases go to my Nexus, but I could also download them to an archive folder on my desktop PC.

But not any more.

Nook customers on MobileRead Forums and on B&N's own support forums are reporting that the download buttons for their Nook ebook purchases are no longer present in the My Nook section of the B&N website. These buttons enabled readers to download a copy of their ebook and transfer said ebook to another app or device.

That's too bad. Of course, if you use the Nook app for Windows, you can download e-books from your library to your "My Barnes & Noble eBooks" folder. And then you'll have to use that Calibre plug-in if you want to remove the DRM, but that's not hard.

B&N says:

The ability to download from the NOOK website and then sideload certain NOOK eBooks has been discontinued as part of a recent security update.

I'm uncertain as to why this is more "secure". Secure for them, maybe. It's certainly not for their customers' benefit, so I don't know what they think they'll be getting out of it. The Nook is already on the brink of extinction, so I don't see how this is going to be conducive to higher sales.


Books Of Note

The latest history book by Bill O'Reilly is scheduled to be released this week. Killing Patton: The Strange Death of World War II's Most Audacious General looks into the mysterious circumstances surrounding the freak traffic accident that all but ended the life of General Patton. I have no doubt there's a conspiracy theory about this, as there is for most historical events, but even so, I don't know if that's the path O'Reilly takes in his book. I must confess I've wondered about this. It's like Patton did his job, and it's over, so God simply yanked him, the way a pitcher gets sent to the showers. Perhaps this is not a good explanation, but I think Patton himself would not greatly object to it.


Moron Recommendations

These came in e-mail this week:

The Dead Will Tell by Linda Castillo, the sixth of her Kate Burkholder mysteries:

Kate Burkholder is the Chief of Police in a small Ohio town with Amish and "English" inhabitants. A murder occurs which can be connected back to an unsolved Amish family massacre some 35 years ago.

Add small town politics, a State police agent boy friend with unresolved issues with the murder of his own family, and the Amish / "English" culture clash, and you have a good yarn.

The Lost Island by Douglas Preston and Lincoln Child:

A scientist and accomplished thief, Gideon Crew, has an incurable brain syndrome. His doctors give him about 10 months to live. His employer tasks him with stealing a page from "The Book of Kells", an illustrated book from Irish Medieval times. This leads to an arcane ancient map, which claims to pinpoint a plant which will prolong life, and cure many diseases. Of course a mysterious attractive Asian woman who is an experienced boat captain is in the mix.

Sniper's Honor by Stephen Hunter, which is the 9th of his novels featuring former marine sniper Bob Lee Swagger. In this installment, Swagger

is lead to a famous Soviet WWII female sniper, Ludmilla Petrova, who had such a reputation on the Eastern Front that the Germans referred to her as "Die Wiesse Hexe" (The White Witch). She was apparently a very attractive young blond, with a very good eye.

And then she disappeared from history. Or, as the AoSHQ poet says, WHERE LADY SNIPER GO? Swagger decides he needs to find out.

Thanks to Dave for these.

A lurking 'ette informs me that the short read Auntie Jodi's Helpful Hints by Jodi Adler is a real hoot. Aunti Jodi, provides, as one Amazon reviewer says, "insightful and witty comments on the world around her, offering sage and sound advice on navigating the waters of today's hi-tech, low-mannered, politically correct society." For example:

When in public, if you should be engaged in a mad, passionate, or achingly sweet embrace or kiss, be sure to slyly check for surveillance cameras, drones, or snoopy neighbors. Privacy, as we knew it just a few years ago, no longer exists. However, if you should be lucky enough to observe a high-profile A-lister in such a situation itís best to snap your photos quickly - so that you can be first in line to collect a high finderís fee from a tabloid, website, or government agency.

And then there'a Appalling Yarns by Dutch Heckman (yeah, I bet that's his real name), described as "an anthology of truly bent surrealistic vignettes." Like the one about the Yellowstone Park bear who wakes up one morning with human desires and tastes, which manages to riff both Franz Kafka and Hanna Barbera. Or the one about an ogre who makes himself very popular in his town by consuming the neighborhood brats.

Hee hee.


___________

So that's all for this week. As always, book thread tips, suggestions, rumors, threats, and insults may be sent to OregonMuse, Proprietor, AoSHQ Book Thread, at the book thread e-mail address: aoshqbookthread, followed by the 'at' sign, and then 'G' mail, and then dot cee oh emm.

What have you all been reading this week? Hopefully something good, because, as I keep saying, life is too short to be reading lousy books.

Posted by: Open Blogger at 09:46 AM




Comments

(Jump to bottom of page)

1 When Cthulhu calls, he calls collect.

Posted by: Dr. Varno at September 21, 2014 09:46 AM (fIv/H)

2 Another pick of a musty old library.

Posted by: mindful webworker at September 21, 2014 09:47 AM (WVXtz)

3 Currently reading The Complete Wardstone Trilogy. Pretty good so far and the price is just right.



http://tinyurl.com/ovc9thx

Posted by: Vic at September 21, 2014 09:49 AM (T2V/1)

4 pic not pick.

Sigh.

At least I shook off the "mindless webworker" sock I still wore from some post yesterday and apparently had on all through the morning thread.

Not that it's inaccurate...

Posted by: mindful webworker at September 21, 2014 09:50 AM (WVXtz)

5 To whomever recommended The Liturgical Mysteries, thank you. Very funny. The bit about the woman who died climbing out of the sunroof so she wouldn't miss the rapture was hilarious.

Posted by: The Great White Snark at September 21, 2014 10:00 AM (8MlTP)

6 Consume the neighborhood brats?

Why would anyone want to do that?

Posted by: Harry Reid at September 21, 2014 10:01 AM (0HooB)

7 The Lit Crit Life Coach?

-
Beck recommended Start With Why by Sinek as a life changing book so I bought it. I haven't read it but so far nothing. I don't know what went wrong.

Posted by: The Great White Snark at September 21, 2014 10:05 AM (8MlTP)

8 I've learned that when someone makes the claim that "mankind needs to be ruled by an intelligent elite", what he usually means is "guys like me".

-
I believe society should be ruled by an aristocracy of Uptons who use me as a sex slave.

Posted by: The Great White Snark at September 21, 2014 10:09 AM (8MlTP)

9 Thanks to the 'rons and 'ronettes who volunteered to be alpha readers for the next book - Lone Star Sons is ready to go, and will be available by mid-October on Amazon and B&N (and in Nook and Kindle, too)

My brother finished the cover - which has a slightly skewed pulp-Western vibe, very different from my usual covers, but this book is a little different from the usual; more of a romp through Texas in the time when it was an independent nation. I've aimed it more for YA, with six different adventures or mysteries. If anyone wants to order an autographed copy direct from me, here is the link on my website, with a sample of the set-up adventure - http://tinyurl.com/m7m7len
It's a kind of re-working of the Lone Ranger, but in a historical setting and with most of the identifiable features like the mask carefully sanded off.

Posted by: Sgt. Mom at September 21, 2014 10:12 AM (Asjr7)

10 Boy, it's a slow day here at the O'Spades Ranch. Must be why I'm having no trouble with port 1080.

Posted by: The Great White Snark at September 21, 2014 10:21 AM (8MlTP)

11 Reading "Hollow Space" by T. F. Grant.

Posted by: GGE of the Moron Horde, NC Chapter at September 21, 2014 10:33 AM (6fyGz)

12 Speaking of Scottsman,
the book 'Tai-Pan' by James Clavell fictionalizes the establishment of Hong Kong, and turns into a series. Very interesting work.

In The Scottsman, a brief mention of the opium wars that opened early China to European trade and the establishment of a trading company that continues.
http://tinyurl.com/l2p79fb

Being too lazy to research further the whole mid 19th century saw the building of empire by Dutch, British, and the occasional Scottish traders world wide. Interesting history, interesting people.

Cecile Rhodes (British) is another interesting fellow especially in light of what has happened in the late 20th century, and don't skip over the British East India Company or the Dutch East India Company.

Posted by: fallacies galore at September 21, 2014 10:35 AM (X1txt)

13
I believe society should be ruled by an aristocracy of Uptons who use me as a sex slave.

I had already called dibs on that society. You can have the Melissa McCarthy aristocracy.

Posted by: chad at September 21, 2014 10:36 AM (gYowz)

14 So there's been, like, 12 comments in the last hour. Sheesh, slow day. Where are all the morons? Was there a batch of bad Valu-Rite or something?

Posted by: OregonMuse at September 21, 2014 10:37 AM (yRdR4)

15 Where's the bottle of Corona is the picture above?

Posted by: JoeF. at September 21, 2014 10:37 AM (6caFV)

16 Oh, and reading about the Portuguese Navigators,

Shogun also by James Clavell starts with the (fictional) dramatization of the first Navigator to reach Japan.

Posted by: fallacies galore at September 21, 2014 10:40 AM (X1txt)

17 I believe society should be ruled by an aristocracy of Uptons who use me as a sex slave

----

Well okey-dokey then. C'mere.

Posted by: Fred Upton, noted aristocrat at September 21, 2014 10:44 AM (Xt646)

18 8 I've learned that when someone makes the claim that "mankind needs to be ruled by an intelligent elite", what he usually means is "guys like me".

-
I believe society should be ruled by an aristocracy of Uptons who use me as a sex slave.
Posted by: The Great White Snark at September 21, 2014 10:09 AM (8MlTP)

Oh Snarky! Come to my chamber!

Posted by: Fred Upton at September 21, 2014 10:46 AM (mx5oN)

19 What is a "Portugal"?

Posted by: qzy at September 21, 2014 10:47 AM (riPbb)

20 Oh look, Fred Upton's already dimmed the lights.

Posted by: boulder terlit hobo at September 21, 2014 10:47 AM (3kZUM)

21 I believe there are books you can stumble across and read that will inspire you, or even "change your life." But they're usually not going to be books that are advertised as " this book will change your life!"

Posted by: JoeF. at September 21, 2014 10:48 AM (6caFV)

22 I downloaded book written by Mike B, who wrote in September 11, 2001 Thread how great it is to be in a US Service uniform in Iraq. It's A Flowershop in Baghdad. I haven't read it yet.

I'm reading rose magazines that I skipped during winter.

Posted by: Carol at September 21, 2014 10:53 AM (sj3Ax)

23 Clavell did for history what Michener would have done had Michener been a better writer.

Posted by: jwpaine at September 21, 2014 10:56 AM (68O4K)

24 I downloaded book written by Mike B, who wrote in September 11, 2001 Thread how great it is to be in a US Service uniform in Iraq. It's A Flowershop in Baghdad. I haven't read it yet.

'Flowershop' is a good book. You need to start reading it ASAP.

Posted by: OregonMuse at September 21, 2014 10:56 AM (yRdR4)

25 I'm in the middle of Sniper's Honor, after having read all the preceding novels. As far I've read in this book, Swagger hasn't killed anyone yet, unfortunately, and I'm sure he'll get busy on that shortly, but the Russian girl sniper is fascinating, as are the accounts of the Eastern Front in WW2.

Posted by: stace at September 21, 2014 10:57 AM (9PXzx)

26 I have The Dark God trilogy by John Brown but I haven't started on books 2 or 3 yet. I already read book 1, I will probably have to read it again so I can refresh the story line in my mind.

Posted by: GGE of the Moron Horde, NC Chapter at September 21, 2014 10:58 AM (6fyGz)

27 Oregon Muse,
I have over 200 roses & season is almost over & I love being out in my garden even though I hurt myself taking care of them.
I'll read it next month.
It sounded good when Mike B wrote about what the US Flag on his uniform stood for to people in Iraq.

Go to that thread & read what he wrote last week

Posted by: Carol at September 21, 2014 10:59 AM (sj3Ax)

28 I finished John Ringo's "Troy Rising" trilogy as well. John Ringo is one of those guys that sleeps on a pile of money and when he notices his mattress getting flat he goes out and writes a bunch of books to fill it back up again.

Posted by: GGE of the Moron Horde, NC Chapter at September 21, 2014 11:00 AM (6fyGz)

29 Go to that thread read what he wrote last week

Mike Banzet showed up in a thread last week? Which one, the book thread, or a different one?

Posted by: OregonMuse at September 21, 2014 11:01 AM (yRdR4)

30 I have always thought that Gen. Patton was created for WW2, it was his reason for existing. When it was finished, so was he. He would have been a liability in peace time for Truman, no one woukd have kniwn what to do with him. He was a warrior, did his job, then left.

Posted by: abbygirl at September 21, 2014 11:02 AM (iR4Dg)

31
I have always thought that Gen. Patton was created for WW2, it was his
reason for existing. When it was finished, so was he. He would have
been a liability in peace time for Truman, no one woukd have kniwn what
to do with him. He was a warrior, did his job, then left.

Posted by: abbygirl at September 21, 2014 11:02 AM (iR4Dg)



I am certain the General would have approved of your theory.

Posted by: GGE of the Moron Horde, NC Chapter at September 21, 2014 11:03 AM (6fyGz)

32 I have always thought that Gen. Patton was created for WW2, it was his reason for existing. When it was finished, so was he. He would have been a liability in peace time for Truman, no one woukd have kniwn what to do with him. He was a warrior, did his job, then left.

Thank you for this, this is basically what I was trying to say, but you put it so much better.

Posted by: OregonMuse at September 21, 2014 11:04 AM (yRdR4)

33
Hello from Way Down Here and it's another bloody Monday...

Sadly, instead of staying home and reading the zillions of unread books I have on my Kindle (due toa total lack of control when confronted by a big BUY button) I have to go to work in a few hours

This week I've started rereading all my James Ellroy books - I really enjoyed them a few years back

I'm starting with L.A Noir - the Lloyd Hopkins Trilogy

And on my Kindle - I now have "War and Peace" by Leo Tolstoy , which I hope to start and finish before I fall off the perch....

Posted by: aussie at September 21, 2014 11:04 AM (EGwwB)

34 28 Posted by: GGE of the Moron Horde, NC Chapter at September 21, 2014 11:00 AM (6fyGz)


I have every book he has written.

Posted by: Vic at September 21, 2014 11:05 AM (T2V/1)

35 Hello down there, aussie, it's a slow day here on the book thread.

And on my Kindle - I now have "War and Peace" by Leo Tolstoy , which I hope to start and finish before I fall off the perch....

Heh. That'll keep you busy for awhile.

Posted by: OregonMuse at September 21, 2014 11:06 AM (yRdR4)

36 Patton died in an accident.

That's it.

Posted by: eman at September 21, 2014 11:08 AM (MQEz6)

37 Just finished The Eziekel Option by Joel Rosenberg. I did not know that Reagan came up with the Axis of Evil based on his study and belief in the end time prophecies. As others have, he identified Russia as Gog and Magog as Moscow. Fascinating read.

Posted by: DailyDish at September 21, 2014 11:09 AM (ceM10)

38 I have every book he has written.


Posted by: Vic at September 21, 2014 11:05 AM (T2V/1)



I'm working on it.

Posted by: GGE of the Moron Horde, NC Chapter at September 21, 2014 11:09 AM (6fyGz)

39 Ok this guy has written lots of books on why other people should die sooner rather than later, now he has written an article in The Atlantic about why he (says) he should die at 75.

The author? Ezikiel Emanuel, aka Dr. Death.

http://tinyurl.com/mduyh43

Posted by: WhyMe at September 21, 2014 11:10 AM (l9mF2)

40 "...fall off the perch." I have never heard it expressed that way. It's a wonderful metaphor. I will use it now. Thank you.

Posted by: abbygirl at September 21, 2014 11:11 AM (iR4Dg)

41 Aussie,
Hello!

Posted by: Carol at September 21, 2014 11:11 AM (sj3Ax)

42 Your score Average reader score Expert score
25
Correct 5
Wrong 83% You answered 25 of 30 questions correctly for a total score of 83%.


*************

I had no idea what some of them were and guessed based on the cover on 2 of them.

You have to be up on your children's lit, especially the girly ones, for this one.


I have been reading absolute trash for the last several weeks, and have nothing to suggest, sadly.

It was not even good trash; poorly written, beyond histrionic and very, very sappy. Blegh.

Posted by: Tammy al-Thor at September 21, 2014 11:11 AM (T8j45)

43 Why Me
He's a sick SOB!!

Posted by: Carol at September 21, 2014 11:12 AM (sj3Ax)

44 Joel C. Rosenberg


Make sure you put that "C" in there because there is another author named Joel Rosenberg.

Posted by: Vic at September 21, 2014 11:13 AM (T2V/1)

45 new one

Posted by: Vic at September 21, 2014 11:14 AM (T2V/1)

46 39 Ok this guy has written lots of books on why other people should die sooner rather than later, now he has written an article in The Atlantic about why he (says) he should die at 75.

The author? Ezikiel Emanuel, aka Dr. Death.

http://tinyurl.com/mduyh43

Posted by: WhyMe at September 21, 2014 11:10 AM (l9mF2)


He is the King of the Granny Slayers.

Collectivization always leads to shortages which lead to rationing which lead to mass death.

All in the name of making a more compassionate, less greedy society (a lie for the dummies to swallow).

It is evil and it is the signature of our times.

Posted by: eman at September 21, 2014 11:14 AM (MQEz6)

47 Mike Banzet showed up in a thread last week? Which one, the book thread, or a different one?
Posted by: OregonMuse at September 21, 2014 11:01 AM (yRdR4)



He is MiketheMoose, no?


LOVED the book, especially once I got over the fact that it had very little to do with an actual flowershop, per se.

Posted by: Tammy al-Thor at September 21, 2014 11:17 AM (T8j45)

48 I haz a sad.

I just finished reading the new novel
by one of my favorite authors-

"Echopraxia" by Peter Watts

the follow-up (sort of a sidequel) to his totally awesome SF novel "Blindsight".

And...it's just not very good. I'd rate it between C and B--.

Watts can be brilliant in combining hard, bleeding-edge science into plots that use and reflect upon what the science may mean for humanity and how it will be used. Both "Blindsight" and a previous novel "Starfish" did this wonderfully in a dystopian, paranoid kind of way.

This time around the novel's concern are mostly: is free will real? What is the universe? What is God? Is consciousness (personality) a glitch in the human mind?

It takes place 14 years after "Blindsight" right at the cusp of the Singularity. There are group-minds, godlike minds, mechanically/genetically/surgically enhanced minds, Plus vampires resurrected from the "inactive junk DNA" of autistics(if I remember correctly) used for their unique parallel processing ability.

Daniel Bruks, the main protagonist, is more or less "the last unaugmented man" accidentally cast among all of these godlike and nearly inhuman intelligences on a voyage to meet "The Angels of the Asteroids" and perhaps get a true glimpse of the nature of God(god).

An-n-n-n-nd, given that situation Bruks is passive as hell and prone to loooooong discussions about consciousness/free will that Watt's was unable to shoehorn organically into the plot.

So, this novel's problems mainly relate to two things:

1) Plotwise: The journey of the main protagonist, Daniel Bruks makes no difference at all, everything important that happened to him could easily have happened on Earth. Really. Esp. with all these near gods prancing around him.

2) Pretty much the concerns of plot are jettisoned for the equivalent of (highly informed) late night stoned college dorm wankery.

3) The novel seems to recycle the same sort of things/scenes over and over again and this kills the forward momentum of the novel.

As you might expect of a novel that concerns itself with free will - the novel comes down to an act of free will by protagonist, Daniel Bruks. Or was it really free will?

Anywho, Watts at his best is an excellent read - check out "Blindsight".

"Echopraxis" just isn't his best, but for those who like novels of ideas and info-dumps as dialogue will find something to their liking.

Posted by: naturalfake at September 21, 2014 11:17 AM (KBvAm)

49 I read Close Reach by Jonathon Moore purchased on Book Bub. Horror/mystery about a husband and wife repairing their marriage while sailing in the Drake Passage in Antarctica when someone starts to follow them. The book is fast paced, believable and completely enthralling. I couldn't stop reading it and when done, I read it again. I have never done that.

Posted by: bossy barbara at September 21, 2014 11:17 AM (lchei)

50 He is MiketheMoose, no?

Well, maybe. I snooped around and found the Sept. 11th anniversary thread:

http://minx.cc
:1080/
?post=351724

He posted as 'MikeB'. He has a pretty good rant.

Posted by: OregonMuse at September 21, 2014 11:20 AM (yRdR4)

51 Posted by: aussie at September 21, 2014 11:04 AM (EGwwB)

Text to Speech was a Godsend for that book. I did like it better than Les Miserables though, which surprised me.

Posted by: Polliwog the 'Ette at September 21, 2014 11:20 AM (GDulk)

52 Oregon Muse,
September 11, 2011 Thread on September 11, 2014. I believe it was last thread by Ace before the ONT that night. I know it was Ace's thread & it was late enough that I read in my house & not looking at iPad outside. He had a thread that was almost Polish pron before that one & may have had one more before the September 11, 2001 thread. I'm going to guess it was close to 9 pm.

Posted by: Carol at September 21, 2014 11:20 AM (sj3Ax)

53
35 OregonMuse

Hi, and I think everyone is outside enjoying the last days of summer over there ... down here we're now just getting ready for barbies, cricket, swimming with sharks..

As for War and Peace, I had that on my bucket list so when I found a freebie version on Kindle - well I just had to have it!

Does anyone reread favourite books - more than twice?
This is one of them for me..

"The Cell - Inside the 9/11 Plot and Why the FBI and CIA Failed to Stop It" by John C Miller, Michael Stone and Chris Mitchell
I meant to post this around the 9/11 anniversary but my copy was lost in the bookshelves somewhere

It's a fascinating read, and very disturbing

Posted by: aussie at September 21, 2014 11:21 AM (EGwwB)

54 I got 67% on the schools quiz, but I guessed on some; I had never even heard of some of the novels.

Posted by: FenelonSpoke at September 21, 2014 11:22 AM (glk59)

55 I thought they stopped making the Nook.

Posted by: Null at September 21, 2014 11:22 AM (xjpRj)

56 I read a couple of pages of "Forgetting to be Afraid" by Wendy Davis until I threw up in my mouth a little. But I am going to soldier on, for no good reason. By the time I am done marking the gross inanities, I expect I will have cornered the mark.et on the little Post-It tape flags.

And I'm reading some true crime foolishness about a Baptist preacher/predator who murdered his wife and, I'm sure this is the implication, his sick child. It's interesting because he really did truly sexually assault a girl in college but Baylor did nothing. No alcohol involved, just an opportunity to put a predator in prison completely blown.

"History of the Jews" is still there, waiting for me to come back to it. Some day, some day.

Posted by: Tonestaple at September 21, 2014 11:24 AM (B7YN4)

57 Posted by: aussie at September 21, 2014 11:04 AM (EGwwB)

The first hundred pages of War and Peace are tough, then you get hooked!

Posted by: Hrothgar at September 21, 2014 11:24 AM (o3MSL)

58 38 I have every book he has written.

Posted by: Vic at September 21, 2014 11:05 AM (T2V/1)

I'm working on it.
Posted by: GGE of the Moron Horde, NC Chapter at September 21, 2014 11:09 AM (6fyGz)

***************

What's a good starting book for John Ringo? On Amazon it looks like he has several series.

Posted by: Elinor, who usually looks lurkily at September 21, 2014 11:25 AM (95xxa)

59
40 abbygirl

"...fall off the perch." I have never heard it expressed that way. It's a wonderful metaphor. I will use it now. Thank you."

Hi, it must be an Aussie thing to say then- now instead of going to bed I'll be looking up the origins of this!

Posted by: aussie at September 21, 2014 11:25 AM (EGwwB)

60 Oregon Muse,
September 11, 2011 Thread on September 11, 2014.


Yup, found it, thank you, he posted as 'MikeB'. Posted several very interesting comments.

Posted by: OregonMuse at September 21, 2014 11:25 AM (yRdR4)

61 I read "Blasphemy" by Douglas Preston -- good premise at first, but you could see the plot points a mile away. Plus the two dimensional cliches of religious fundamentalists pretty much ruined it.
He even had an addendum to the book trying to defend it. Pretty weak.

Posted by: Dr. Varno at September 21, 2014 11:26 AM (fIv/H)

62 Maybe he was MiketheMoose before he let on about writing the book.

Or maybe I am an idiot.

Posted by: Tammy al-Thor at September 21, 2014 11:26 AM (T8j45)

63 Eat your vegetables. Make the bed as soon as you get up. Drink plenty of water. Be polite. Major in STEM. Marry a person whose three most closely held values are identical to yours and stay faithful and married to them unless they commit a serious crime, and perhaps even then. Hold your family close. Attend a Christian church. Get outside for a walk every day. Be grateful for your ability to work hard and provide for yourself and those you love. Dress simply in a practical, classic wardrobe. There, that's a really short book and it most certainly can change anyone's life for the better. You're welcome.

Posted by: raincityjazz at September 21, 2014 11:28 AM (epu55)

64 Posted by: Dr. Varno at September 21, 2014 11:26 AM (fIv/H)

I tried, but I never could really get into the Preston books.

Posted by: Hrothgar at September 21, 2014 11:29 AM (o3MSL)

65 Posted by: OregonMuse at September 21, 2014 11:20 AM (yRdR4)

Yes, he posts as MikeB.

Posted by: Polliwog the 'Ette at September 21, 2014 11:30 AM (GDulk)

66
41 Carol

Hi Carol, and hope all is well with you!
And a big thank you for all the handy hints about roses

We don't grow them (we're lazy gardeners at Chez Aussie with a total native plant garden ie plants look after themselves ) but my SIL is a roses fan and is always looking for roses advice

So I've passed on some info to her and she's very appreciative

Posted by: aussie at September 21, 2014 11:30 AM (EGwwB)

67 The past two weeks, I waited until after 100 comments to add my silly 2¢ "bathroom reader" review. If the pace doesn't pick up, this thread may never get there. Okay, when I started writing this, there were

Actually, this book-but-not-a-read has a Famous Author.
Have a Great Day - Every Day!
by Mr Power of Positive Thinking himself, Norman Vincent Peale

I hear the title in the Perfesser's voice from Futurama. "Have a Great Day, Every Juan!"

The format is a year's worth of "inspirational messages," one for each day, in the category of devotional calendar.

So, let's open it up to Sep 21.

"Keep the mouth lines up. Smile and be happy. William James claimed that we are happy because we smile rather than we smile because we are happy. The smile comes first. It is also a fact that happiness in the heart puts a smile on the lips. Cultivate optimism, always looking on the bright side, and you will develop a happy state of life."

There was a memorable Sunday Zits comic strip on this line.

Oh, look, there's a Feb 29 entry: "… On this one day in Leap Year, God gives us an extra chance at living. …"

Hm.

I'm all for positive thinking. Still, I think it's good these are meant to be taken only one per day, lest my argumentative inner grump be aroused by hoppy thawghts overdose.

Posted by: mindful webbooker at September 21, 2014 11:30 AM (WVXtz)

68 What's a good starting book for John Ringo? On Amazon it looks like he has several series.



Posted by: Elinor, who usually looks lurkily at September 21, 2014 11:25 AM (95xxa)

A Hymn Before Battle was his first book and it is a good read.

Posted by: Vic at September 21, 2014 11:31 AM (T2V/1)

69 Posted by: Tammy al-Thor at September 21, 2014 11:26 AM (T8j45)

MiketheMoose is a different commenter.

Posted by: Polliwog the 'Ette at September 21, 2014 11:32 AM (GDulk)

70 The past two weeks, I waited until after 100 comments to add my silly 2Ę "bathroom reader" review

Good luck with that. We might not make it to 100 today.

Posted by: OregonMuse at September 21, 2014 11:35 AM (yRdR4)

71 @53 - Thanks, aussie. "The Cell" sounds interesting and my library has a copy.

Posted by: doug at September 21, 2014 11:36 AM (GlxNC)

72
49 bossy Barbara

Hi, and thanks for the recommendation- clicked the BUY button for "Close Reach"

Posted by: aussie at September 21, 2014 11:37 AM (EGwwB)

73 Just finished American Sniper by Chris Kyle. Good story, but terribly written. It was interesting having his wife's point of view tucked in here & there.

I'm now starting on First Man by James R. Hansen. It's the authorized bio of Neil Armstrong. Seeing how I also love science in a sexual manner, I'm expecting it to be a fun read.

Last book on tap from this library trip is Stephen Hunter's Time To Hunt.

Posted by: Yep, I'm a nerd... at September 21, 2014 11:39 AM (FCgaq)

74 I peaked with Ringo a while back, but The Last Centurion is now in my very large stack based on recommendations here. I guess I need to go back to the Baen catalog and take another look.

I feel bad that I am not reading true classics or good history books. Maybe when the gloom of winter sets in I will find the discipline.

Posted by: Hrothgar at September 21, 2014 11:41 AM (o3MSL)

75
51 Polliwog the 'ette

Thanks, it is such a long book so listening to it might help get through it

How do I convert it or do I get an audio version?

Posted by: aussie at September 21, 2014 11:42 AM (EGwwB)

76
57 Hrothgar
If you never see me again here, I'll be reading "War and Peace"....

Seriously, as it's on my bucket list I will give reading it a good try...

Posted by: aussie at September 21, 2014 11:45 AM (EGwwB)

77 I got 33% on the quiz, which I don't think is too bad since I've only read one of the books, and haven't even heard of several of them. I've never been much of a fiction reader.

Of course, many of them were strictly guesses, but I got a few right because I picked answers that seemed right based on what I had heard about the book.

I wonder what the random chance score would be? Thirty questions, each with four choices. Hopefully someone with a statistics background will chime in.

Posted by: rickl at September 21, 2014 11:50 AM (sdi6R)

78
Bedtime here ..

So have a wonderful yesterday everyone, and happy reading!

BTW this is my very favourite thread - I look forward toreading about all of your book choices here

So my weekly thanks to you OregonMuse for organising this , and to all who post here!

Posted by: aussie at September 21, 2014 11:51 AM (EGwwB)

79 What's a good starting book for John Ringo?

*****************

A Hymn Before Battle was his first book and it is a good read.

Posted by: Vic at September 21, 2014 11:31 AM (T2V/1)

*****************

Thanks, Vic!

Posted by: Elinor, who usually looks lurkily at September 21, 2014 11:51 AM (95xxa)

80 I just reviewed my answers, and I was actually doing pretty good for awhile. I was 10 for 19, then missed the last 11 in a row. Ouch.

Posted by: rickl at September 21, 2014 11:56 AM (sdi6R)

81 Just checked on Amazon, and the first two books of John Ringo's "Legacy of the Aldenata" series, A Hymn Before Battle and Gust Front are available for $.00 for Kindle!

Posted by: Elinor, who usually looks lurkily at September 21, 2014 11:57 AM (95xxa)

82 Speaking of books that influence people...


I've always had an interest in infectious diseases. Dunno why, just had. Maybe because my mom was a nurse? Anyhow, over the years I've read a number of books on that subject, and I think to a person every author has mentioned 'Plagues and Peoples' by William H. McNeill as pretty much the reason they got interested in the subject.


I read the book shortly after it came out. Fascinating and well written. I was working in medicine at the time, at a large Medical Center in L.A.. So when the AIDS epidemic hit, I had a feeling that I was sort of in a new historical moment. Lot's of fear at the time, but somehow that book prepared me for what I was going through.


So a very influential book, and not only for me.

Posted by: HH at September 21, 2014 12:01 PM (Ce4DF)

83 re the sniper book with the Russian sniper chick ... one book I well recall from my younger days researching WWII was about the battle for Leningrad - 'Enemy At The Gate'. I think the only book that highlighted the horrors of that era more was 'General Wainwrights War'.
Like Aussie, I seem to have a real problem with the Amazon BUY button, as my Kindle has a ton of books on it right now. (I remove them from the carousel when read) BUT I also find myself tossing more and more after reading a chapter or two ... what's the old saying about quantity and quality?
Also, is it just me, or have others noticed that we have a definite hero/heroine tilt? In reading reviews (or the books themselves) we seem to have tilted dramatically to the feminine side in SF, Fantasy, and detective/mystery. Good thing us old farts are dying out ... heh.

Posted by: WingNut at September 21, 2014 12:04 PM (bjTxr)

84 "Give War and Peace A Chance" and the Jane Austen book remind me of something I read a while ago. I think I was reading one of Elizabeth Gaskell's books and one of the characters would turn to Robinson Crusoe for advice and guidance. He would treat it like the Bible - close his eyes, let the book fall open, and stab at the page with his finger. Wherever his finger landed, that section of the book was supposed to solve his problems. According to the footnotes, this was common during the Victorian era, or at least common among certain people.

Posted by: biancaneve at September 21, 2014 12:04 PM (6Turu)

85 I understand that a lot of college majors are useless, but personally I would find it a boring world if the only jobs available or considered important were in science, technology, math or engineering.

Posted by: FenelonSpoke at September 21, 2014 12:06 PM (glk59)

86 Posted by: Tammy al-Thor at September 21, 2014 11:26 AM (T8j45)

MiketheMoose is a different commenter.
Posted by: Polliwog the 'Ette at September 21, 2014 11:32 AM (GDulk)


See, I'm an idiot! Not that this will surprise anyone here!

All is well with you and yours in the new abode, I trust? I don't see you much on the ONT of late. ( It would help if I were there more often, I suppose)

Posted by: Tammy al-Thor at September 21, 2014 12:09 PM (T8j45)

87 Just finished "The Martian" by Andy Weir, upon recommendation of some here at the AoS Book Club and Quilting Bee. Enjoyed every page. Sci-fi with real sci (no froton energy transmogrifiers, or giant benevolent alien horseshoe crabs). Just how a guy could use his wits, knowledge, and perseverance to stay alive after being left for dead on Mars using only the remnants of the abandoned exploration station, pending the return of the next Mars ARES mission.

Good news: To be a Ridley Scott movie in 2015
Bad news: Starring Matt Daaaaamon.

Anyway, thanks for the recommendation. Loved it.

Posted by: Sketchy at September 21, 2014 12:10 PM (7RHQv)

88 I did not know that Reagan came up with the Axis of Evil based on his study and belief in the end time prophecies.

Reagan never used the term "axis of evil". That was David Frum and George Bush II.

Posted by: boulder terlit hobo at September 21, 2014 12:14 PM (3kZUM)

89 I finished The Essence of Style: How the French Invented High Fashion, Fine Food, Chic Cafes, Style, Sophistication and Glamor this week. Very interesting - apparently Louis XIV wanted to increase revenues to the state and decided the best way to do so would be to market luxury goods. He also realized the value of lighting the city at night, which would extend the hours for shopping, dining and entertaining. Thus Paris became the first city with a night-life, and the first city that people wanted to travel to just for the sight-seeing and shopping.

Posted by: biancaneve at September 21, 2014 12:15 PM (6Turu)

90
I am glad you found post Oregon Muse


Aussie
you are probably in bed now

I had to read some important emails and I am sorry I left

Posted by: Carol at September 21, 2014 12:18 PM (sj3Ax)

91 Finished the second to the latest Pendergast book by Preston and Child: Two Graves. Already have the next one on the Kindle. Their Pendergast series is the only one I read. Also finished the 4th of the Liturgical Mysteries "The Bass Wore Scales. I have all of Schweizer's books on Kindle and will start the nest one soon. (Glad my recommendation for them helped.) Just started the Perelandra sci-fi books by CS Lewis. I haven't read them since college about 40 years ago. (Yeah, I'm about Vic's age!) I enjoyed them back then and am curious how they will seem now.

Posted by: JTB at September 21, 2014 12:20 PM (FvdPb)

92
"...fall off the perch." I have never heard it expressed that way. It's a wonderful metaphor. I will use it now. Thank you.

I read it in a Dick Francis novel years ago. And was it part of the Dead Parrot sketch?

Dorothy Dunnett is my favorite for re-reads. I usually find something I missed and I've read some of them four or five times.

Posted by: Retread at September 21, 2014 12:21 PM (l7hog)

93 Wow - I only got 53% on the quiz. Lucky guesses for books I've never read, wrong answers on books I have read.

Posted by: biancaneve at September 21, 2014 12:25 PM (6Turu)

94 Even my children quote the Dead Parrot sketch, I've probably heard it a million times and just did not make the connection. Monty Python is big in our house.

Posted by: abbygirl at September 21, 2014 12:25 PM (iR4Dg)

95 The one I hadn't heard until recently was 'taking a dirt nap.' Still makes me snicker.

Posted by: Retread at September 21, 2014 12:28 PM (l7hog)

96 95
The one I hadn't heard until recently was 'taking a dirt nap.' Still makes me snicker.


Posted by: Retread at September 21, 2014 12:28 PM (l7hog)


That came out years ago on a Richard Prior album.

Posted by: Vic at September 21, 2014 12:32 PM (T2V/1)

97 OM,

Thanks as always for the book thread and for the historical books you mentioned. The library has the Scots book and my Kindle now has the Prince Henry book.

A long term reading plan is to start the Patrick O'brian sea stories. I grew up on an island and always loved historical naval and sailing books, even if we didn't have a boat. Something to be accomplished over several years.

Posted by: JTB at September 21, 2014 12:37 PM (FvdPb)

98 The one I hadn't heard until recently was 'taking a dirt nap.' Still makes me snicker.

There was a funny sketch on the Tonight Show back in the days of Johnny Carson, and he's an executive who has to do the funeral eulogy for one of his employees at Roget's Thesaurus, and he goes through dozens of expressions for dying: buying the farm, kick the bucket, etc., and they just keep getting more and more bizarre.

My favorite was 'trawling for topsoil trout'. I laffed.

Posted by: OregonMuse at September 21, 2014 12:39 PM (yRdR4)

99 Oh, hey. Looks like we're going to break 100 after all.

Posted by: OregonMuse at September 21, 2014 12:40 PM (yRdR4)

100 Reading Lolita on my kindle which helps with all of the French words that crop up.

Posted by: NCKate at September 21, 2014 12:43 PM (MJJ2s)

101 Oh, I could have posted something that would have started a firestorm, but decided not to.

Posted by: HH at September 21, 2014 12:45 PM (Ce4DF)

102 OregonMuse, thanks for doing this thread, I may lurk but I always check it, in fact I like checking on monday since there is even more posts!
Ive been reading Roanoke: Mystery of the Lost Colony by Lee Miller, dry but presented as a mystery with alot of historical background. It is surely not the tale we learned in school

Posted by: FCF at September 21, 2014 12:47 PM (kejii)

103 "......trawling for topsoil trout" That is priceless, but when I first read it I thought it said trowling, like using a trowel. I thought that was kind of creepy. Then I read it again.

Posted by: abbygirl at September 21, 2014 12:53 PM (iR4Dg)

104 For those who haven't gone gluten free, Check out "The New Artisan Bread In Five Minutes A Day". The title is slightly misleading. It only takes 5 minutes to make the dough but it still has to rise and, of course, bake. But it really does simplify the whole process. Their basic white crusty bread is great but their caraway rye is exquisite! I add more caraway seeds. (I like caraway.)

Seriously, even I can make wonderful bread using this book. It is worth a look. I bet most libraries have a copy.

Posted by: JTB at September 21, 2014 12:55 PM (FvdPb)

105 I read Sabrina Chase's Dragonhunters, the sequel to The Mage Guardian, where the main characters have returned to deal with a new threat to the land. Very enjoyable read, hope the series continues.

Also read Robin Hobb's Assassin's Quest, completing the Farseer Trilogy. A bit under 800 pages, a satisfying conclusion to the story. Plan to check out more of her work.

Posted by: waelse1 at September 21, 2014 12:58 PM (67tvE)

106 JTB I tried that starter recipe, wound up with a mess in the fridge before I gave up! I can cook most things but usually if it involves yeast there is a problem

Posted by: FCF at September 21, 2014 01:02 PM (kejii)

107 29
Mike Banzet showed up in a thread last week? Which one, the book thread, or a different one?

Posted by: OregonMuse at September 21, 2014 11:01 AM (yRdR4)



I've seen a number of comments by him here and there, not just one or two. He may be a regular lurker, if only an occasional commenter.

Posted by: rickl at September 21, 2014 01:02 PM (sdi6R)

108 I don't remember what thread it was on, but within the last couple of weeks he expressed his frustration at how Obama has thrown away all our gains in Iraq. It was more heartwrenching than angry.

Posted by: rickl at September 21, 2014 01:05 PM (sdi6R)

109 A long term reading plan is to start the Patrick O'brian sea stories. I grew up on an island and always loved historical naval and sailing books, even if we didn't have a boat. Something to be accomplished over several years.

Posted by: JTB at September 21, 2014 12:37 PM (FvdPb)


O'Brian is excellent. Another series you might enjoy (if you haven't read them already) is C.S. Forester's Hornblower books, which trace the career of the main character from midshipman to admiral. The first one in the series, Mr. Midshipman Hornblower was originally a group of short stories published in The Saturday Evening Post; the rest were written as novels (with all that means for character development and flow of the narrative). Like O'Brian, they are rightly regarded as classics of naval literature.

If you have seen the AE Hornblower series, you should be aware that they did a very bad job at translating the books to the screen, and not let them dissuade you from reading the books. The only other adaptation (and it is an excellent one) is a 1951 movie starring Gregory Peck, which I highly recommend. Again, not 100% faithful to the text, but the departures are much more in the spirit of the original works.

Posted by: CQD at September 21, 2014 01:15 PM (gZMDg)

110 FCF Sorry you had trouble. My cooking skills, especially baking, are limited so I can't tell what happened. I am careful to follow the recipe amounts/proportions and haven't had a problem in fifty batches. I expected to have more than my share of disasters and haven't yet, which is why I am happy with the book.

I wonder if the issue can be addressed in the food thread. Folks there are sure to know more than me.

Posted by: JTB at September 21, 2014 01:17 PM (FvdPb)

111 I feel bad that I am not reading true classics or
good history books. Maybe when the gloom of winter sets in I will find
the discipline.

Posted by: Hrothgar at September 21, 2014 11:41 AM (o3MSL)



Yeah...me too...or maybe I'll just get back into my schoolwork like I should be right now...

Posted by: GGE of the Moron Horde, NC Chapter at September 21, 2014 01:21 PM (6fyGz)

112 CQD I read the entire Hornblower series as a teenager and loved them. Never saw more than a few minutes of the recent TV series but always expect the books to be better, even if the show is OK in itself.

To my delight, there have been several books the last ten years or so about the formation of the American navy for the Revolutionary War and early American periods. Fascinating stuff.

And I FINALLY read the unabridged "Moby Dick" just a few years ago. I had read portions back in school but not the whole thing. I believe it takes a mature reader to fully appreciate it.

Posted by: JTB at September 21, 2014 01:41 PM (FvdPb)

113 As for self help books I recommend God Is My Broker, by Christopher Buckley. It is a parody, of course, incorporating the 7 1/2 Laws of Spiritual and Financial Growth. Law Seven is "The only way to get rich from a self help book is to write one."

Law Seven and a Half is "Except for this one."

Posted by: Steve Skubinna at September 21, 2014 02:17 PM (1EJIj)

114 Posted by: aussie at September 21, 2014 11:42 AM (EGwwB)

Does your library have an AudioBook copy? That'd probably be easiest.

I have a Kindle Fire and had to load a 3rd-party app called CoolReader to get Text To Speech. It has a Gutenberg books tie-in called Good Reads (something like that) that recognizes a lot of public domain books. I don't know how the process would be different in Australia but, given that it doesn't seem to recognize Gutenberg Australia, I suspect that it does work differently there.

Posted by: Polliwog the 'Ette at September 21, 2014 02:34 PM (GDulk)

115 Rolf, are you around??

I was wondering if you had found Young Miss Rolf new things to read.

Posted by: Tammy al-Thor at September 21, 2014 02:40 PM (T8j45)

116 Posted by: Tammy al-Thor at September 21, 2014 12:09 PM (T8j45)

Not an idiot unless I am too. I happen to know they're different because they were both commenting on a thread somewhere and MiketheMoose's background is different (which I was glad he alluded to because I almost responded to him as MikeB).

Doing pretty well. Officially "in business" and not missing the snow or insanity that Colorado has been experiencing lately. How are you doing lately?

Posted by: Polliwog the 'Ette at September 21, 2014 02:40 PM (GDulk)

117 Posted by: JTB at September 21, 2014 01:41 PM (FvdPb)

There is also a nautical series by Alexander Kent that I found to be pretty good reading.

https://tinyurl.com/pb6cr36

Posted by: Hrothgar at September 21, 2014 02:44 PM (o3MSL)

118 I can also recommend the Alexander Kent books, in moderation. His real name was (IIRC) Douglas Reeman, under which he wrote naval historical fiction set in the 20th Century. A problem with Kent/Reeman is his excessive angst, or at least the Gawdawful emotional baggage he loads his characters with. Hamlet has nothing on the typical Kent protagonist when it comes to brooding and self doubt.

So read Kent/Reeman, but vary it with more upbeat historical fiction like Bernard Cornwell or George MacDonald Fraser.

Posted by: Steve Skubinna at September 21, 2014 02:53 PM (1EJIj)

119 I have the first Alexander Kent/Bolitho book in the 'to be read' stack. If I like it, the local library has all of them. Yay!

Also, learned that James L. Nelson, who has written some excellent nonfiction about the navy during the Revolution, has a series of fiction books during that period. As a bonus, the first one apparently involves my home area in Rhode Island. Another one for the waiting to read pile,

Posted by: JTB at September 21, 2014 03:05 PM (FvdPb)

120 Speaking of old editions about history... Jacob Abbott wrote a "Makers of History" series in the late 1800's. Covered everyone from Romulus to King Richard. Excellent pre-P.C. history for the reader looking for general knowledge of such people as Cleopatra, Nero and Julius Caesar (to name a few).

All are free on Kindle so if you order through this site, Ace will not be burdened with additional income to report to the IRS.

Posted by: anchovy at September 21, 2014 03:31 PM (uqz54)

121 The only AoSHQ thread that is so hoity-toity, pants are required.

Scots Wha Hae!


Nae!

*Puts on kilt*

Posted by: The Kilded Hat at September 21, 2014 03:47 PM (lN8KC)

122 Interesting to talk about both the Portuguese and Lovecraft together. Back in his day (and before that the 19th century), the Portuguese were the lowest of the low in New England.

Just read his works and you'll find disparaging remarks and outright racism against the Portuguese.

Want to guess how he describes a not-so-human woman in "Dagon"? As Portuguese.

Posted by: The Kilded Hat at September 21, 2014 03:51 PM (lN8KC)

123 Have not tried the artisan recipe, but I finally have making bread down. I bake once a week and I make a single large loaf. The key is using a levain or starter. I made mine using the pineapple juice wild yeast started found online. (You use fresh ground wheat with just pineapple juice added the first three days, then start adding water to flour. The PH makes it easier for the wild yeast to grow.).

The night before, I take my starter out of the fridge, add water and bread flour. Next day, I set aside my next batch of starter, add more water if needed and add salt and whole wheat flour. I mix it in my Kitchen Aid for five minutes, until I have a nice ball on the dough hook. Let it rise at least an hour and a half, then punch down and put into a Dutch oven. Let it rise at least another hour. I don't add oil to the dough but I do heavily oil the bowl and the Dutch oven. I heat the oven to 450 degrees. Sprinkle some water on top of the dough, put on the lid and let it bake covered for 15 minutes. Then drop the temperature to 400 degrees and bake uncovered for another 45 minutes or so.

I sometimes add 12 grain cereal to this, but you could certainly add Caraway seeds. To keep this on topic, the Brother Juniper bread books uses the method a lot. I like the idea of refrigerated dough, and used to have a roll recipe from my mother in law that was refrigerated overnight. But it doesn't work well for me.

Posted by: Notsothoreau at September 21, 2014 05:51 PM (Lqy/e)

124 Can anyone recommend a history of the 30 years war that isn't tainted with political correctness?

Posted by: whitehall at September 21, 2014 08:15 PM (k876Y)

125 Okay, not what you meant, but Schiller (yes, that one) wrote a history of the 30 Years' War that is available as a free download for the Kindle.

Schiller, was somewhat ambivalent about Gustavus Adolphus but had a major man crush on Wallenstein.

Anyway it is a fun read.

Posted by: Steve Skubinna at September 22, 2014 03:49 PM (1EJIj)

(Jump to top of page)






Processing 0.02, elapsed 0.024 seconds.
15 queries taking 0.0092 seconds, 134 records returned.
Page size 103 kb.
Powered by Minx 0.8 beta.



MuNuvians
MeeNuvians
Polls! Polls! Polls!
Frequently Asked Questions
The (Almost) Complete Paul Anka Integrity Kick
Top Top Tens
Greatest Hitjobs

The Ace of Spades HQ Sex-for-Money Skankathon
A D&D Guide to the Democratic Candidates
Margaret Cho: Just Not Funny
More Margaret Cho Abuse
Margaret Cho: Still Not Funny
Iraqi Prisoner Claims He Was Raped... By Woman
Wonkette Announces "Morning Zoo" Format
John Kerry's "Plan" Causes Surrender of Moqtada al-Sadr's Militia
World Muslim Leaders Apologize for Nick Berg's Beheading
Michael Moore Goes on Lunchtime Manhattan Death-Spree
Milestone: Oliver Willis Posts 400th "Fake News Article" Referencing Britney Spears
Liberal Economists Rue a "New Decade of Greed"
Artificial Insouciance: Maureen Dowd's Word Processor Revolts Against Her Numbing Imbecility
Intelligence Officials Eye Blogs for Tips
They Done Found Us Out, Cletus: Intrepid Internet Detective Figures Out Our Master Plan
Shock: Josh Marshall Almost Mentions Sarin Discovery in Iraq
Leather-Clad Biker Freaks Terrorize Australian Town
When Clinton Was President, Torture Was Cool
What Wonkette Means When She Explains What Tina Brown Means
Wonkette's Stand-Up Act
Wankette HQ Gay-Rumors Du Jour
Here's What's Bugging Me: Goose and Slider
My Own Micah Wright Style Confession of Dishonesty
Outraged "Conservatives" React to the FMA
An On-Line Impression of Dennis Miller Having Sex with a Kodiak Bear
The Story the Rightwing Media Refuses to Report!
Our Lunch with David "Glengarry Glen Ross" Mamet
The House of Love: Paul Krugman
A Michael Moore Mystery (TM)
The Dowd-O-Matic!
Liberal Consistency and Other Myths
Kepler's Laws of Liberal Media Bias
John Kerry-- The Splunge! Candidate
"Divisive" Politics & "Attacks on Patriotism" (very long)
The Donkey ("The Raven" parody)
News/Chat