Saturday Gardening and Puttering Thread, Travel Edition

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Magnolia, Drayton Hall

How is everybody doing? Safe from fires and floods? Today, we visit a Civil War site and some American farmland, and see a few critters.

Drayton Hall is famous for (being near) the Angel Oak, among other features.

Drayton Hall, a historic site of the National Trust for Historic Preservation, begun in 1738 by John Drayton, stands today in contrast to many house museums, as it is preserved in "its state of survival and the purity of its condition" without modern amenities--plumbing or central air and heating--as it was received from the seventh-generation Drayton owners. During the decades leading to the secession of South Carolina in 1860, Charles Drayton, third-generation owner of Drayton Hall, warned his son Charles, in 1833, of "the great Slave question" stirring in Europe "Already...though secret anxiety clouds our Atmosphere," it will "transfer a great bearing on these United States." This letter seves as an eerie foreshadowing of the abolitionist movement in the decades that followed.

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At the dawn of the new Confederacy, the Draytons of Drayton Hall followed their native state in secession. James S. Drayton, fourth-generation joint-owner of Drayton Hall, penned these words as the smoke of Fort Sumter cleared: "Your country now calls you, arm! Arm to the teeth...Up Carolinians, Up! Up! Don't slumber no more, drive your oppressors from the true Republican Shore!" Similar words heard from countless Southern-born sons enlisting into Confederate armies, James enlisted into a company of South Carolina artillery defending Charleston. James' younger brother, Thomas M. Drayton, moved west with the continued expansion of "King Cotton" in 1859, and enlisted into a company of Texas calvary. Before Thomas joined in May of 1862, he wrote their youngest brother, Dr. John Drayton, fourth generation joint-owner, "If you go, go with a bold heart and do what you can, fight like the Devil, and if you are to be shot let it be in the front and not in back. It's no disgrace to die on the battlefield and if it so pleases God that you are to be in the number of those whose blood is to be shed for Their Country, you shed it in a Glorious Cause, but kill every Devil of a Yankee you can." John chose not to take up arms, but served as a surgeon caring for enslaved workmen that constructed earthern fortifications used to defend Charleston. Serving as a surgeon enabled John to reside at Drayton Hall until 1865. In February 1865, the Federal forces under the command of General Schimmelfennig moved into Charleston area along the Ashley River. John feared the arrival of Federal forces and fled, as did many other Ashley River planters. During the time of Federal occupation, all but four plantation homes were burned along the river.

Drayton Hall, being the only preserved home surviving today, was possibly saved by smallpox quarantine flags, plausibly posted as part of John's service as a surgeon. In your travels to South Carolina and its Lowcountry, it is likely that you will hear other legends surrounding the survival of Drayton Hall during those closing months of the Civil War. Come to Drayton Hall to hear this story and countless others in America's oldest preserved plantation house open to the public.

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Other plants growing in the Angel Oak

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Monarch at Drayton Hall

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Eastern Swallowtail at Drayton Hall

Last Week

Dartist wants some suggestions:

I kind of like the various forms of rockcress AKA Aubretia:

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Hardy Iceplant and some of the sedums are nice.

And there's creeping phlox and candytuft, too.

Any more ideas?

American Farmland

Eastern Washington State

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Potato Blossoms

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Canola Blossoms

Critters

From Illiniwek's farm:

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KILder.jpg

A sentinel at an ancient Mexican temple

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Have you done any gardening today? Encountered any critters?

Hope our lizard found its way out of the living room.


Take a Walk

Drainage ditches, somewhere in Utah

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If you would like to send information and/or photos for the Saturday Gardening Thread, the address is:

ktinthegarden
at that g mail dot com place

Include the nic by which you wish to be known when you comment at AoSHQ,
unless you want to remain a lurker.

Posted by: K.T. at 01:25 PM




Comments

(Jump to bottom of page)

1 Good afternoon Greenthumbs

Posted by: Skip at July 17, 2021 12:26 PM (Cxk7w)

2 My garden is nothing but weeds and death.

That is my contribution for the day.

Posted by: Dave in Fla (5p7BC) at July 17, 2021 12:28 PM (5p7BC)

3 Glad I don't have dragons in my garden
But then no ripening tomatoes either.
Getting mostly yellow squash which yesterday grilled diced rolled in olive oil and grated up basil, they were good.

Posted by: Skip at July 17, 2021 12:29 PM (Cxk7w)

4 Great bit of history. Thank you for sharing.

Posted by: Mrs. JTB at July 17, 2021 12:29 PM (7EjX1)

5 The blue bird might be a Bunting

Posted by: Skip at July 17, 2021 12:30 PM (Cxk7w)

6 Tomato plants are still alive with yellow buds and a few small tomatoes. The two tomatoes that were reddening gave up the ghost.

Posted by: Mrs. JTB at July 17, 2021 12:33 PM (7EjX1)

7 Critters -- I've seen more toads than usual this year. This is good news because I believe they help control snails.

I pestered one little guy -- insisted on catching him and picking him up. He was relieved when I put him back down.

Posted by: Emmie at July 17, 2021 12:33 PM (Hrwnm)

8 From last week, haven't seen 1 honeybee yet here,
only butterflies every day. For years a farm but a quarter mile away had hives, no idea if active but they are just not to be seen.

Posted by: Skip at July 17, 2021 12:33 PM (Cxk7w)

9 That tree trunk is huge!

I saw a 300 year old tree at an herb farm in Maryland, its trunk was also monstrous.

Posted by: kallisto at July 17, 2021 12:35 PM (DJFLF)

10 I think the toad I accidentally sprayed with ant spray came into the hall last week. Perhaps he wanted another shower. Pretty hot outside.

He didn't pee on me when I picked him up this time.

Posted by: KT at July 17, 2021 12:36 PM (BVQ+1)

11 I've seen more toads than usual this year. This is good news because I believe they help control snails.

They also eat ants

Posted by: kallisto at July 17, 2021 12:37 PM (DJFLF)

12 10 I think the toad I accidentally sprayed with ant spray came into the hall last week. Perhaps he wanted another shower. Pretty hot outside.

He didn't pee on me when I picked him up this time.
Posted by: KT at July 17, 2021 12:36 PM (BVQ+1)


I'm glad he seems to have shaken off the ant spray.

Posted by: Emmie at July 17, 2021 12:37 PM (Hrwnm)

13 Skip at July 17, 2021 12:33 PM

Are there trees or outbuildings around that might accomodate honeybees? Butterflies are limited in the range of plants they pollinate. What about native bees?

Posted by: KT at July 17, 2021 12:38 PM (BVQ+1)

14 They also eat ants
Posted by: kallisto at July 17, 2021 12:37 PM (DJFLF


He's welcome to 'em.

Posted by: Emmie at July 17, 2021 12:38 PM (Hrwnm)

15 I had a weird premonition that someone was going to yank the sunflower I had planted in an outdoor pot in a public location. I just shook it out of my head, because I thought I was being paranoid.

This a.m. I went to examine the plantings to see how they're faring in this monstrous heat wave, and sure enough, one sunflower plant was missing. It was a tall seedling. Either someone mistook it for a weed, or they were just malicious pigs.

Posted by: kallisto at July 17, 2021 12:40 PM (DJFLF)

16 Those Washington farms are massive and have some massive equipment. Same around here. Sometimes we don't realize the scope of agriculture in the USA.

Posted by: KT at July 17, 2021 12:40 PM (BVQ+1)

17 Gardening Thread: Weed it and Reap

Posted by: ghost of hallelujah (sJHOI) at July 17, 2021 12:41 PM (sJHOI)

18 The field potatoes in blossom is pretty, whenever I encounter "Canola Blossoms" they are known as 'weeds'.
Speaking of weeds the summer monsoon is active now and I note I have lots of little green sprouts... aka 'weeds'. I'll be busy getting ahead of them this week.

8 Javalinas spent the night bathing in the birdbath and rooting through the Tea Rose's roots. The next night they ate all the mesquite pods.
Next year I'll pick or rake up the mesquite before the javalina get them.

Posted by: AZ deplorable moron at July 17, 2021 12:42 PM (FlMNJ)

19 That magnolia is gorgeous.

My veggie garden is about done. I've got a yellow squash that needs to get a bit bigger, but the tomatoes are finished. I thought I would try overwintering my pepper plants this year, but I've decided to try it next year. So I'm pulling the pepper plants out as soon as I harvest that squash.

I'll be canning tomatoes today and dehydrating peppers tonight.

Posted by: G. Gnome, Barefoot & Broke Redneck Queen at July 17, 2021 12:43 PM (OQcPl)

20 G. Gnome, Barefoot & Broke Redneck Queen at July 17, 2021 12:43 PM

Wow. Seems early to start thinking about overwintering peppers. Let us know how it turns out.

Posted by: KT at July 17, 2021 12:44 PM (BVQ+1)

21 AZ deplorable moron at July 17, 2021 12:42 PM

Those Javelinas sound like a pain.

Posted by: KT at July 17, 2021 12:46 PM (BVQ+1)

22 Mrs. JTB at July 17, 2021 12:33 PM

Good luck with the tomatoes that are in blossom.

Posted by: KT at July 17, 2021 12:48 PM (BVQ+1)

23 Certainly lots of spaces bees could be, sheds, trees.

Posted by: Skip at July 17, 2021 12:48 PM (Cxk7w)

24 hiya

Posted by: JT at July 17, 2021 12:50 PM (arJlL)

25 Those Javelinas sound like a pain.
Posted by: KT

Completely true, broke a vase opened a bag of garden soil and last week dumped the bottom 2" of bird seed and spread it around while eating some of it (even if there were 2 that were using mom as a feedbag before they meandered on).

Posted by: AZ deplorable moron at July 17, 2021 12:51 PM (FlMNJ)

26 17 Gardening Thread: Weed it and Reap
Posted by: ghost of hallelujah (sJHOI) at July 17, 2021 12:41 PM (sJHOI


I did a display window ad painting for a gardening business. Someone commented that we should not have Bible verses in our advertising.

Uh...it's a poker reference. Lay down the winning hand and say "Read 'em and weep."

Posted by: Emmie at July 17, 2021 12:51 PM (Hrwnm)

27 Uh...it's a poker reference. Lay down the winning hand and say "Read 'em and weep."
Posted by: Emmie

LOL.
File this under "So you think you know your Bible"!

Posted by: AZ deplorable moron at July 17, 2021 12:53 PM (FlMNJ)

28 There have been a lot more bumble bees than honey bees around here. Soybeans are blooming, and I'd like to hear bees buzzing to help pollination, but it is very quiet out there.

I love those sprawling old oaks that seem common down south. City Park in New Orleans has a lot of them, as well as Audubon Park, and many old plantations. Some were probably "witnessed" the civil war?

cheers to the growers ...

Posted by: illiniwek at July 17, 2021 12:54 PM (Cus5s)

29 can you eat javelina

Posted by: ghost of hallelujah (sJHOI) at July 17, 2021 12:54 PM (sJHOI)

30 Love the pics of the Angel Oak. My grandparents lived on Johns Island in S.C. Often after dinner we would take a walk to the Angel Oak. Many wonderful memories there.

Posted by: Peacerose at July 17, 2021 12:56 PM (O0eXF)

31 can you eat javelina
Posted by: ghost of hallelujah

Yes, from what I have read:
They are herbivores (will eat dead birds if they find them, I read less than 1% of their diet).
You have to be careful when skinning as they have glands on their lower back that are rank and will make the meat rank. So no hair or skin can touch the meat.
And the meat is quite lean.

They are a game animal in AZ so you can only take 1 a year per person. sigh.

Posted by: AZ deplorable moron at July 17, 2021 12:59 PM (FlMNJ)

32 Bob's Burgers Next door business name

Clothes before Hose
Garden Attire

Posted by: Just a side note at July 17, 2021 01:00 PM (2DOZq)

33 I know who did it, but don't have any photo evidence, but I had 20 5ft tall Nellie Stevens Hollies sprayed with herbicide last month. It was one end of a long hedge. Sheriff's Dept has a report as does the State Ag Lab, but the perps can sit in their lawn chairs and smirk when I drive by.

It is really sad to look at as the bushes die.

I wonder if they think what replaces the hollies will be more attractive?

Posted by: Jinx the Cat at July 17, 2021 01:03 PM (FT70t)

34 Afternoon, all.

FYI, the Angel Oak is not at Drayton Hall. It's located on John's Island, off Bohicket Road on the way to Kiawah Island.

And it's magnificent.

Posted by: Jane D'Oh #Impeach Foady Six! at July 17, 2021 01:06 PM (ptqGC)

Posted by: dartist at July 17, 2021 01:07 PM (+ya+t)

36 Thanks so much for taking the time to give me suggestions KT!

Posted by: dartist at July 17, 2021 01:08 PM (+ya+t)

37 LOL.
File this under "So you think you know your Bible"!
Posted by: AZ deplorable moron at July 17, 2021 12:53 PM (FlMNJ


On the other hand, "scum of the earth" is a biblical expression. I'd have to look it up to recall the details.

Posted by: Emmie at July 17, 2021 01:08 PM (Hrwnm)

38 Bought a Ryobi 4 stroke gas trimmer which just tried this morning, I like it. Seems quieter though I wear ear protection, and like if you let off the throttle the string head stops.

Posted by: Skip at July 17, 2021 01:10 PM (Cxk7w)

39 Our figs have ripened. It's a race to get to them before the birds.

An eight point buck was nibbling on an azalea yesterday and I couldn't run him off. Then, I opened the front door in time to see a young red fox trotting down the driveway with what appeared to be a marsh rat in it's jaws.

Nature.

Posted by: Jane D'Oh #Impeach Foady Six! at July 17, 2021 01:11 PM (ptqGC)

40 Working on polyurethane on bathroom window and parts, so keep rotating and coating the next part. Have a park bench that the wood needs to be refinished, so that's next on the too do list.

Posted by: Skip at July 17, 2021 01:13 PM (Cxk7w)

41 1 Cor 4:13 "scum of the world" in NASB version.

Posted by: Emmie at July 17, 2021 01:14 PM (Hrwnm)

42 It is really sad to look at as the bushes die.

I wonder if they think what replaces the hollies will be more attractive?
Posted by: Jinx the Cat at July 17, 2021 01:03 PM (FT70t


Why does someone hate your hollies?

Posted by: Emmie at July 17, 2021 01:15 PM (Hrwnm)

43 the trees remind me of Evangeline Park in NOLA

My oldest sis, who I fucking hate, went to Tulane and when I was 14, I spent a whole summer in NOLA schooling black kids in basketball

was kinda fun

Posted by: REDACTED at July 17, 2021 01:18 PM (Rs1Q4)

44 I have harvested 4 zucchinis. The plants are just starting to produce more so I'll probably have lots of grated zucchini in the freezer. The taters I planted are green and overflowing their rusted out water tank planters, but I won't be shocked if I end up with lots of tops and hardly any taters. We shall see in a couple of months. My neighbor's garden is looking quite good. She has quite a few tomatoes starting. Maybe she will have some excess and sell dad a few. He likes garden ripe 'maters but they never ripened for mom until Sept so I have just not even tried to mess with them. I only plant a few easy things once in a while as a reassurance to myself that I can grow some food if things go so haywire that I can't just buy veggies. We have great plenty of bee weed, aka as Navajo spinich and dock weed so I'd have a huge surplus of leafy green stuff if things got dire.

Posted by: PaleRider is simply Irredeemable at July 17, 2021 01:18 PM (twXjx)

45 If Drayton Hall is your kind of thing then you absolutely need to try and get to Madison Ga and see the homes.

Especially the Christmas tour of homes.

The town the Union army did not burn to the ground on the March to the Sea.

Posted by: weirdflunky at July 17, 2021 01:18 PM (cknjq)

46 Why does someone hate your hollies?
Posted by: Emmie

They don't like to look at them, I suppose.

Posted by: Jinx the Cat at July 17, 2021 01:20 PM (FT70t)

47 Why does someone hate your hollies?
Posted by: Emmie


They're not your buddie's hollies !

Posted by: JT at July 17, 2021 01:26 PM (arJlL)

48 well, over the last ten 15 years, I have planted and divided my hostas to about 8K plants

now I am trying, with some sucess, to grow them from the many seed pods I have.

what is weird is that the hostas that come up from, say, a guacamole hosta do not look like a guacamole hosta

will report back

Posted by: REDACTED at July 17, 2021 01:26 PM (Rs1Q4)

49 42 It is really sad to look at as the bushes die.

the bushies can't die off fast enough for me

Posted by: REDACTED at July 17, 2021 01:27 PM (Rs1Q4)

50 I read hollies and translated to hollyhocks, which would be bad enough to vandalize and then read bushes dying and went "oh yeah, holly bushes" And its hard to imagine why someone would want to kill a holly hedge. I'd be inclined to put up industrial chainlink with the angled barbwire topping in response, don't know that I'd act on the vindictive inclination, especially if city or HOA had rules prohibiting that kind of fencing but I'd definitely at least daydream about it.

Posted by: PaleRider is simply Irredeemable at July 17, 2021 01:27 PM (twXjx)

51
We visited Drayton Hall several times when I lived in SC. The Charleston area had a lot of nice places to visit.

Left the state before Hugo smacked it around. Our neighbor raised azaleas for sale and had dozens of varieties on his property growing among the pine trees thereon. Hugo made short work of the pine trees and they, in turn, made short work of the azaleas. That was a real shame.

Posted by: Krebs v Carnot: Epic Battle of the Cycling Stars (TM) at July 17, 2021 01:29 PM (+2sc/)

52 Angel Oak is NOT at Drayton Hall. It is out on John's Island. Drayton Hall is on the Ashley, SEVERAL miles away, on Ashley River Road.

Posted by: Lee Also at July 17, 2021 01:29 PM (CxqhF)

53 We visited Drayton Hall several times when I lived in SC. The Charleston area had a lot of nice places to visit.

Left the state before Hugo smacked it around. Our neighbor raised azaleas for sale and had dozens of varieties on his property growing among the pine trees thereon. Hugo made short work of the pine trees and they, in turn, made short work of the azaleas. That was a real shame.
Posted by: Krebs v Carnot: Epic Battle of the Cycling Stars (TM) at July 17, 2021 01:29 PM (+2sc/)

I lived there with my parents. They moved there the July before Hugo came. Me & my dad drove around downtown the day after the hurricane, pretty crazy.

Posted by: ghost of hallelujah (sJHOI) at July 17, 2021 01:31 PM (sJHOI)

54 Jane D'Oh #Impeach Foady Six! at July 17, 2021 01:06 PM

Thanks!

Posted by: KT at July 17, 2021 01:32 PM (BVQ+1)

55 PaleRider, are you coming to the Morondezvous?

Posted by: Emmie at July 17, 2021 01:33 PM (Hrwnm)

56 There is a place with like a 20 acre lot a couple miles down the road from me that has that barbwire topped chainlink but with faux brick columns around the posts and the privacy fence material behind the chain link so it is not super ugly. Still every time I drive by it I thing "why? are you a drug dealer, or doing illegal dog fighting or something?"

Posted by: PaleRider is simply Irredeemable at July 17, 2021 01:33 PM (twXjx)

57 I own 3 sides of the perps house and yard, including the frontage. Wire fences can be 8' in an ag zone, and then I've been advised by the Sheriff to put up security cameras. Shawshank will be the look I strive for. I don't have to look at it, my house is half a mile away.

The dead bushes will remain in place, too.

I hope John Law can pin a felony destruction of property rap on them.

Posted by: Jinx the Cat at July 17, 2021 01:33 PM (FT70t)

58
what is weird is that the hostas that come up from, say, a guacamole hosta do not look like a guacamole hosta

will report back
Posted by: REDACTED


If the guacamole hosta is a hybrid, any offspring raised from its seeds will not resemble the parent.

We have Rose of Sharon trees in one bed that have flowers of at least a dozen different looks. All are the offspring from the single plant that we put there over a dozen years ago.

Posted by: Krebs v Carnot: Epic Battle of the Cycling Stars (TM) at July 17, 2021 01:33 PM (+2sc/)

59 55. Not sure, but I think that I do have that date open.

Posted by: PaleRider is simply Irredeemable at July 17, 2021 01:33 PM (twXjx)

60 Calling all morons who might be near the Denver area on Aug. 21 --

We are finally holding our (usually) annual Colorado Morondezvous! See the sidebar and email WestminsterDogShow for details.

Posted by: Emmie at July 17, 2021 01:35 PM (Hrwnm)

61 PaleRider, it would be great to see you!

Posted by: Emmie at July 17, 2021 01:36 PM (Hrwnm)

62 Off to go feed the equines.
57. Sounds like a good counter to me. Make em regret their stupid mean spirited act.

Posted by: PaleRider is simply Irredeemable at July 17, 2021 01:37 PM (twXjx)

63 Jane D'Oh #Impeach Foady Six! at July 17, 2021 01:11 PM

Any chance you can net the branches with the figs on them?

Posted by: KT at July 17, 2021 01:37 PM (BVQ+1)

64 We have Rose of Sharon trees in one bed that have flowers of at least a dozen different looks. All are the offspring from the single plant that we put there over a dozen years ago.
---------------
My dad used to love growing them from dried pods. I think one year he had 50 plants growing. They're free!

Posted by: dartist at July 17, 2021 01:38 PM (+ya+t)

65 PaleRider is simply Irredeemable at July 17, 2021 01:18 PM

Can you add some light soil or mulch around the stems of your tater plants?

Posted by: KT at July 17, 2021 01:38 PM (BVQ+1)

66 dartist at July 17, 2021 01:38 PM

Yes, Rose of Sharon is prolific (except for the seedless ones). And tends to cross-pollinate to produce different looks in its offspring.

Posted by: KT at July 17, 2021 01:40 PM (BVQ+1)

67 Seems like a lot of South Carolina morons. I grew up in Lexington

Posted by: blaster at July 17, 2021 01:42 PM (4q7lA)

68 >>> The blue bird might be a Bunting

Yes, looks an indigo bunting. We had a male showing up at our feeders around dusk in May last year. This year he is less shy, but not a daily visitor.

Posted by: fluffy at July 17, 2021 01:44 PM (UnQlg)

69 My dad used to love growing them from dried pods. I think one year he had 50 plants growing. They're free!
Posted by: dartist at July 17, 2021 01:38 PM (+ya+t)

I have plant trailer, one that has graduated shelving, it was free cause it needed some work, which I have preformed

I aleady sell campwwod, popple and pine, at $7 for 8-10 pieces.

I uaually put out about a couple of dozen bundles and it's gone before noon

hostas around here go for $20 bucks for a gallon plant

so I was thinking

Posted by: REDACTED at July 17, 2021 01:47 PM (Rs1Q4)

70 so I was thinking
--------------
They're easy to grow. Just don't get shot pilfering seeds from neighbors, lol.

Posted by: dartist at July 17, 2021 01:52 PM (+ya+t)

71 Thank you for the Gardening Thread KT!

Posted by: AZ deplorable moron at July 17, 2021 01:55 PM (FlMNJ)

72 If anyone is interested, the lizard is a Spiny Tailed Iguana native to Mexico, and now parts of southwestern Florida.

Posted by: Tony Litwin at July 17, 2021 01:57 PM (oxYDO)

73 From Idaho's Treasure Valley, Boise area: I've become tired of the clipped style I've been using to beat the character limitations in these posts. So I'm just going to go back to my older style, and if my writing bores anyone, they're free to skip to shorter posts.

Work that got done this week: Husband is always spraying something. There's broadleaf poison and "kill everything" poison. We've got crabgrass, spurge, and various generic dandelion-like weeds, not to mention the goatheads we've been trying to eradicate.
Husband is also in charge of the irrigation system. He had to work on 3 heads this week. (I hesitate to think how many separate sprayer heads there are, given that we have 20-plus irrigation zones on the controller!)
I finished flipping the already-made compost from bin to bin, and started working on mixing the newest grass with saved leaves. Husband de-thatched the lawn this spring, and I didn't have time to mix that much grass in all at once, so we have a cage of just grass that I need to keep working on mixing up.
Today we started edging the lawn with a power sprayer and a shovel, in preparation for a hoped-for driveway re-sealing project.
(post #1)

Posted by: Pat* at July 17, 2021 01:58 PM (2pX/F)

74 Moved about 20 or so hostas from the back forested area to the flower beds out front. The next day my aching body kindly reminded me that I'm not really 29.

Posted by: Duke Lowell at July 17, 2021 01:59 PM (kTF2Z)

75 Have i encountered any critters in my garden?
Once.
A snake.
About ten years ago.
The garden is overgrown now...but weeds deserve their place too.

Posted by: Diogenes at July 17, 2021 02:01 PM (axyOa)

76 Encounter any critters have i?

9 inches of rain in less than three weeks.

Humidity in the 90% range

Temps in the upper 80's.

Mosquito is a type of critter, amiright?

Posted by: Cicero Kaboom! Kid at July 17, 2021 02:02 PM (n/szn)

77 Those Washington farms are massive and have some massive equipment. Same around here. Sometimes we don't realize the scope of agriculture in the USA.
Posted by: KT at July 17, 2021 12:40 PM (BVQ+1)


I have a great picture of a wheat combine working next to the road I was on in eastern Washington. The sky was so blue it hurt to look upward. The sun was beaming. Wheat was flying into the bin and bits of chaff fluttered in the air like specks of gold. It was awesome.

Posted by: Diogenes at July 17, 2021 02:06 PM (axyOa)

78 From Boise area: The weather's been quite hot. We don't usually stay at 95-105 F for weeks on end, but it seems like we will this year. The air is hazy, though I haven't *smelled* the wildfire smoke.

In other work, we trimmed a few tree limbs and started making the "spring burn-pile" in our paddock. I added soil to some potato bags.

I harvested the remaining carrots this week, though I left the few that were flowering, hoping they'll attract butterflies. I definitely planted less than last year. It was still too many - I made a note to plant one variety per year, and to stagger the planting times more.
It's lavender-cutting season. The harvest will be much less than last year because parts of the 2 plants died back.
I've been harvesting yellow straightneck squash and zucchini. Once again, we planted too many of each. We do have a "zoodler", so we've tried beef stroganoff, and spaghetti sauce, over shredded zucchini.

Tomatoes haven't started yet, though we can see the green fruits forming. I spotted a green bean that's almost big enough, so my morning harvest checks will now have to include green bean plants.
(post #2)

Posted by: Pat* at July 17, 2021 02:11 PM (2pX/F)

79 Maybe 3-4 hours left of mowing in this nice cool East Texas weather. I'll mow some more and finish tomorrow.
I built a ramp for my Evel Knievel out of free scrap material from the job. Can't wait to test it out.

Posted by: TwentytwoLR at July 17, 2021 02:12 PM (uSctU)

80 Had a couple of deer hanging around. This isn't really deer country. I've shooed them off 3 times.

Posted by: Ronster at July 17, 2021 02:13 PM (GtgT+)

81 For some reason my yellow squash plant has apparently croaked. It did fine for a month or so, producing a squash or two about every 5-7 days. Then, a week ago the squash just looked sickly and round. Not long like they should have been.

Posted by: Martini Farmer at July 17, 2021 02:15 PM (BFigT)

82 79 Maybe 3-4 hours left of mowing in this nice cool East Texas weather. I'll mow some more and finish tomorrow.
I built a ramp for my Evel Knievel out of free scrap material from the job. Can't wait to test it out.
Posted by: TwentytwoLR at July 17, 2021 02:12 PM (uSctU)

I grew up in east TX

it was a wonderful dream

Posted by: REDACTED at July 17, 2021 02:15 PM (Rs1Q4)

83 Just found some 2.5 qt daylillies and purple coneflowers on sale. I guess I'll be doing some digging here shortly.

Posted by: CrotchetyOldJarhead at July 17, 2021 02:16 PM (TAyES)

84 80 Had a couple of deer hanging around. This isn't really deer country. I've shooed them off 3 times.
Posted by: Ronster at July 17, 2021 02:13 PM (GtgT+)

when it gets dark, go out and pee in your yard

deer hate it

Posted by: REDACTED at July 17, 2021 02:17 PM (Rs1Q4)

85 Picked the first tomato. It wasn't quite ripe, but didn't want the birds pecking at it.

Posted by: Ronster at July 17, 2021 02:17 PM (GtgT+)

86 Thanks for the reports, Pat*

Posted by: KT at July 17, 2021 02:18 PM (BVQ+1)

87 85 Picked the first tomato. It wasn't quite ripe, but didn't want the birds pecking at it.
Posted by: Ronster at July 17, 2021 02:17 PM (GtgT+)

when it gets dark

pee on your tomatoes

birds hate it

Posted by: REDACTED at July 17, 2021 02:18 PM (Rs1Q4)

88 I've been to Drayton Hall and the docent giving the tour, a young lady with a recent degree in archeology, kept using the term "enslaved persons" instead of slaves. I asked her about it and she said it was deliberate, to emphasize the humanity of those persons. I thought to myself, and to emphasize that someone enslaved them. Then I told her, "It's early spring. In a few weeks my family will get together and have a large dinner where we teach our kids about our family. The first thing we teach them is, "We were slaves to Pharoah in Egypt.""

For what it's worth, Drayton Hall became the center of a large family business that operated 45 plantations. The Draytons were up to their ears in slavery.

Still, there's a display there with an excerpt from one of the Drayton masters diary, describing the death of his manservant butler and how his cook contracted pleurisy staying up all night watching the butler's body on the "cooling board." From his words it was clear that the man loved both of those people.

Posted by: Johann Amadeus Metesky at July 17, 2021 02:18 PM (VHk4v)

89 Martini Farmer at July 17, 2021 02:15 PM

Might be a virus.

Posted by: KT at July 17, 2021 02:19 PM (BVQ+1)

90 Wild lettuce weeds are doing great. I know, pee on them.

Posted by: Ronster at July 17, 2021 02:21 PM (GtgT+)

91 From Boise area: About my flowers:
The large red/yellow daylily clump behind the garage is about halfway through its blooming. The 2 clumps of a smaller, gold variety out front seem to have quit for the year.
The clump of mixed red penstemon and fireweed by the shed continues to bloom. Husband has spotted a hummingbird, just once - they used to hang around the penstemon all the time - I wish they'd show up more this year...
The ever-faithful Johnny Jump-Up pansies are at their low point - they have very few blooms, the flowers are pale rather than vibrant, and they've mostly gone to seed.
The hollyhocks are over 6 feet tall. The bees (whatever species they each may be) seem quite happy about their flowers. I'll definitely be saving some seed from each of the colors (medium pink, and a deep red). I should grab some seeds from the yellow columbine while I'm at it. (I would have preferred red, or blue, but these came in the hummingbird-attracting mix from Territorial Seed Co.)

Oh, and there are surprise strawberries growing under the lilac row! - obviously from bird-transferred seeds. I'm placing their runners so they'll spread along the lilac row.
(post #3/end)

Posted by: Pat* at July 17, 2021 02:23 PM (2pX/F)

92 I grew up in east TX

it was a wonderful dream
Posted by: REDACTED at July 17, 2021 02:15 PM (Rs1Q4
.

What did you like about it, Redacted?

Posted by: Emmie at July 17, 2021 02:24 PM (Hrwnm)

93 Love the story about Drayton Hall and the pictures of the Angel Oak. Another couple of destination to put on my road trip list. There are also some magnificent live oaks down in Wilmington NC, particularly at Airlie Gardens- lots of Spanish moss too!

Posted by: Moonbeam at July 17, 2021 02:24 PM (qe5CM)

94 I had a small rose of Sharon plant in a large pot that I had for years but it didn't make it through the weeklong freeze here. I tried to propagate some cuttings from the original plant at my in-laws house but they didn't take...

Posted by: lin-duh at July 17, 2021 02:25 PM (UUBmN)

95 Saw 2 fawns with spots still this week, didn't see their mom but maybe just ahead as they went off the road side into the trees. Luckily I don't see any damage though know there is a herd around.

Posted by: Skip at July 17, 2021 02:25 PM (Cxk7w)

96 Hi, Lin-duh!

Posted by: Emmie at July 17, 2021 02:26 PM (Hrwnm)

97 Hey Emile!

Posted by: lin-duh at July 17, 2021 02:27 PM (UUBmN)

98 Emmie

Posted by: lin-duh at July 17, 2021 02:28 PM (UUBmN)

99 I visited the Edison museum in Ft. Myers, FL back in 89 and when I saw the giant tree I immediately thought of one very similar at the Edison museum. I looked it up to make sure. That was a banyan tree. Very impressive. The whole park was interesting to walk through.
Love the magnolia.

Posted by: AlmostYuman at July 17, 2021 02:28 PM (9zD97)

100 PET NOOD IS UP

Posted by: Skip guy who says NOOD at July 17, 2021 02:29 PM (Cxk7w)

101 95- 95 Saw 2 fawns with spots still this week, didn't see their mom but maybe just ahead as they went off the road side into the trees. Luckily I don't see any damage though know there is a herd around.
Posted by: Skip at July 17, 2021 02:25 PM

Dang- so did I just last Sunday! Two beautifully speckled babies with no parents in sight. It took me by surprise because because it was late morning. I used to seeing deer around late afternoon/sunset.

Posted by: Moonbeam at July 17, 2021 02:31 PM (qe5CM)

102 Pretty sure in Hawaii a banyan tree that is a acre in size

Posted by: Skip at July 17, 2021 02:31 PM (Cxk7w)

103 Pat, your garden sounds vivacious!

Posted by: Emmie at July 17, 2021 02:31 PM (Hrwnm)

104 Ha! There are so many deer and fawns around, we have names for the fawns: Primo, Hoppy, PeeWee, and Blackie. Blackie is a melanistic deer, far more common in central Texas than most places.

Posted by: Art Rondelet of Malmsey at July 17, 2021 03:05 PM (fTtFy)

105 I have whitefly all over my mint and insecticidal soap isn't cutting it. Any ideas?

Posted by: keena at July 17, 2021 03:25 PM (RiTnx)

106 I have whitefly all over my mint and insecticidal soap isn't cutting it. Any ideas?

Burn the mint! j/k, sort of...

If you don't want to use a stronger insecticide, cut the mint down to the ground. It'll grow back quickly enough, and you can perhaps stay ahead of the flies next time with your soap spray.

Posted by: JQ, a hick in the sticks at July 17, 2021 04:30 PM (dB4Iz)

107 Here in Moncks Corner, SC (outside of Charleston), reporting the following:

1. In May planted a variety of tomatoes, squash and cucumbers.
2. Current status - tomatoes are doing awesome. Lost one plant to bacterial wilt, but strict and heartless yanking it out of the ground has saved other plants. Romas, Early Girls, Chadwick Cherry, Cherry 100s, and Purple Cherokee have been fantastic. Best in the last couple of years.

Cucumbers are big fail. Some form of fungus has wiped out the leaves.

Yellow squash. For the first time ever, no squash borer has gotten into the stems. CROP ROTATION BABY!!

No new buds on any plants for August harvest. Just too damn hot.

Posted by: The Guy at July 17, 2021 05:07 PM (4cEdi)

108 Tomatoes and peppers haven't set any new fruit for 3 weeks-- flowers just dessicated in the heat and breeze.

*sigh*

Maybe next year...

Posted by: JQ, a hick in the sticks at July 17, 2021 10:26 PM (dB4Iz)

109 The Guy at July 17, 2021 05:07 PM

Thanks for the report!

Posted by: KT at July 18, 2021 08:30 AM (BVQ+1)

110 Johann Amadeus Metesky at July 17, 2021 02:18 PM

Thanks for the detailed story. Puts things in perspective.

Posted by: KT at July 18, 2021 08:34 AM (BVQ+1)

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