Saturday Gardening and Puttering Thread 3/28/20 [KT]

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Hello, gardeners, putterers, and dreamers! How is everybody doing? Getting an opportunity to spend some time outdoors? Or maybe to bring something from outdoors indoors? Keena sent the following:

Visited a dear friend today and came back with some of her Protea. They're really quite striking and being from South Africa, they are perfect in SoCal. Why don't I have them in my garden? Next project is to add a few!

So exotic! And they last a long time cut.

Thinking about a road trip in the future?

Sorry for any goofs, I'm a first-timer at this. The picture is a Panamint Five-Spot I saw outside Room Canyon in Death Valley National Park earlier in March. There wasn't a super bloom this year, but there were still plenty of pretty flowers. Thanks for the great pictures and commentary you post every week! Call me anonymous for now.

No goofs! Beautiful!

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The Edible Garden

Gordon in Minnesota sends the following:

Hey

Okay, I did start these guys a little early. But that is looking like a good decision as we are warm ending the winter.

These grow lights also are supposed to encourage budding. I would say they have. The tomato is a Garden Gem from Florida State U, and the pepper are arbol (taller) and Twilight, both from New Mexico State's Chile Pepper Institute.

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I am dreaming of future meals. The light set-up sounds good.

Need a job? Openings for asparagus harvesting in Switzerland, until June. They love white asparagus there. They hill it up under sandy soil. Look at those tools. They say that the pay is pretty good.

Have you ever had white asparagus?

The Swiss will also eat it green. Recipe.

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Critters

From Larro, some RV companions:

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Later, he sent this:

I went to help brother out in the country down 65 miles southwest, and this had just happened early Sunday morning.

You can't tell by this pic, but calf had been up and nursing. I guess it was worn out.
It was 50's and drizzle, everything saturated from several inches of rain in previous days, and life goes on and on. Yep, it's spring here; notice the green. Most hayfields are past 6-7" and coming on quick! All the tanks are full!

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And a return visitor this week:

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Gardens of The Horde

AZ tries to grow a garden sent in some great photos and information:

I finally got my raised beds built and filled; small are 2x2x2 ft and the large are 6x4x2 ft. The city of Tempe collects 'green waste' and composts it, then they charge $20 (for residents) for a pickup load full. They filled the back of a Silverado with a dump truck and I had to flatten the load and 'distribute' some back to their yard so I didn't leave a trail to my house. The receipt said 1.8 ton and I believe it.

I added garden soil (Lowes and Home Depot were 1 cent different and I used more than I thought I would need (multiple trips to both).

The bags were heavy and I wish I had counted the number of wheel barrow trips.

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Looks great!

Transplanted: 3 different tomatoes, Zucchini, straight yellow squash, basil, marigold, 2 artichokes, and swiss chard. Planted from seed: bunch onions, 5 different carrots (one seed pack with 5 different carrots), 4 and 10 ft sunflowers, and pickle bushes. I have since discovered that swiss chard turns bitter when temps get over 70; so, I'll be yanking 2 of the 4 plants and putting in some beets and spaghetti squash.

Do any of our other desert gardeners have tips on veggie choices? I think of the coast when I think of artichokes. And I'm thinking "baby beets" there, too.

Penstemon in the front yard:

Penstemon reseed them selves this year looks like a bumper crop.

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Penstemon parryi at base of Organ Pipe Cactus
---
I look forward to the Garden Thread each Saturday.

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I love that photo.

If you would like to send information and/or photos for the Saturday Gardening Thread, the address is:

ktinthegarden
at g mail dot com

Include your nic unless you want to remain a lurker.

Posted by: Open Blogger at 12:59 PM




Comments

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1 Good afternoon Greenthumbs

Posted by: Skip at March 28, 2020 01:04 PM (ZCEU2)

2 A few daffodils punching up in the Chicago area. Torrential rain last night and more on the radar right now.

The red-winged blackbirds have been back for about a month--their birdsong and the cardinal birdsong are my favorites. I'm on a first name basis with a blackbird named Miles.

Posted by: Big Fat Meanie at March 28, 2020 01:06 PM (DY3v8)

3 Oh how I miss gardening in northern Az. Great growing season you lucky person.

Posted by: S.Lynn at March 28, 2020 01:06 PM (bBBKm)

4 Panamint Five Spot. Nature is amazing.

Posted by: MikeM at March 28, 2020 01:07 PM (/8TQP)

5 Dutifully called them
Been playing with composte veggies that start growing, been doijng this every year without 1 success. But since have a mini greenhouse moving them into that. Well have 2 onions 1 which does seem to be growing well and a celery. Planted lots of seeds, lettuce, spinach and dill so see if can get some starts early. Going to try beans next.

Posted by: Skip at March 28, 2020 01:08 PM (ZCEU2)

6 I'll bet the current Epidemic of Stupid drives more people toward fruit and vegetable gardening. Then when things get slightly less stupid they'll let the crop rot on the vine.

Posted by: Big Fat Meanie at March 28, 2020 01:10 PM (DY3v8)

7 Some day lilys are starting to poke through the dirt this week around here.

Posted by: Joe Biden at March 28, 2020 01:11 PM (B95HO)

8 Off stupid sock

Posted by: jsg at March 28, 2020 01:11 PM (B95HO)

9 They could be daffodils now that they've been mentioned.

Orange and yellow.

Posted by: jsg at March 28, 2020 01:14 PM (B95HO)

10 There used to be a Panamint Mine. I think it's nice that there is a Panamint Five-Spot. There is also a Panamint Nectarine. Zingy.

Posted by: KT at March 28, 2020 01:15 PM (BVQ+1)

11 Putting out some Mason bee tubes today as the feral ones have started on the cherry blossoms.

I'll put my cocoons out in a couple more weeks when the maple trees bloom.

Somehow we managed to be a Mason bee supplier for a localish Master Gardener program. They sell them to support their program. Last year we donated over 700 bees. Due to clean living and being a Moron our bees have very few mites or wasp parasites.

Posted by: Beartooth at March 28, 2020 01:15 PM (y0S2P)

12 Red winged blackbird (I looked it up).

Posted by: runner at March 28, 2020 01:16 PM (zr5Kq)

13 Wife has me looking for cannjng jar lids, not sure why as nothing new here to jar, but nevertheless haven't seen them in the store, not sure seasonal thing or all bought up in the Apocalypse.

Posted by: Skip at March 28, 2020 01:17 PM (ZCEU2)

14 You guys are seeing psychedelic frigid pink tomato plants too, right? It's not just my mescaline kicking in?

Got myself a grow light and seed starters and planted a bunch of black flowers for my Goth garden. They are already sprouting!

I have hollyhocks, columbines, peony poppies, penny blacks, sweet william dyanthus, pansies, violas, black cherry peppers, and green rudbeckia with black centers. I will buy black petunias at our nursery if it opens back up.

This will be a very Metal little garden.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at March 28, 2020 01:18 PM (Dc2NZ)

15 Near here, there is a Blossom Trail in the spring. In Switzerland, there is a Vegetable Path, where you can view asparagus farms.

Posted by: KT at March 28, 2020 01:20 PM (BVQ+1)

16 The protea remind me of fabric patterns ('50s or '60s) on curtains and melamine dinnerware. I know flower-patterned interor design isn't big anymore, but nature does a great job of form and color. The Panamint Five-Spot would make a great color palette, too,

AZ tries to grow a garden, that is really impressive! I hope your garden pays you back tenfold for your hard work.

Posted by: NaughtyPine at March 28, 2020 01:20 PM (/+bwe)

17 I love the red-winged blackbird! A few years ago I was devastated to hear of the mysterious RWB kill: flocks of them dropped right out of the sky, dead. I think it was in the midwest. Terrible.

Posted by: kallisto at March 28, 2020 01:21 PM (QvAgz)

18
Skip,
We've been getting them at Tractor Supply, just cause they've been the cheapest last coupla years.
If you don't have jars, don't forget not all glass jars can be used for pressure canning.
EVERYTHING works for pickles, though.

Posted by: MarkY at March 28, 2020 01:22 PM (7M6jj)

19 Due to clean living and being a Moron our bees have very few mites or wasp parasites.
Posted by: Beartooth at March 28, 2020 01:15 PM

Moron bees? Do they buzz over thoraxes instead of bewbs?

Posted by: NaughtyPine at March 28, 2020 01:23 PM (/+bwe)

20 Lots of redwing blackbirds at my parks, Kallisto. I love them too, they are the lone wolves of the bird world.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at March 28, 2020 01:24 PM (Dc2NZ)

21 The Panamint 5 spot reminds me of Rose of Sharon.

Posted by: kallisto at March 28, 2020 01:25 PM (QvAgz)

22 Lowe's garden section and the local garden store were PACKED with Coronafugitives today.

Posted by: deplorable unperson - sanitized for your protection at March 28, 2020 01:27 PM (mw1Wz)

23 Wife has the jars, looking for wide mouth. Possibly looking to jar homemade soup as she is becoming a prepper sort of.

Posted by: Skip at March 28, 2020 01:28 PM (ZCEU2)

24 Glorious day here in NW IL, between thunderstorms, anyway.

Migration is full swing. The property is filled with bird-song: Song Sparrows, Chipping Sparrows, Robins, Fox Sparrows, Kinglets, Red-wings, etc.

The crocus are in full bloom, the daffodils ready to bloom and the rhubarb has emerged and is growing quickly.

I so love these precious spring days. No bugs, lotsa beauty!

Posted by: lizabth at March 28, 2020 01:28 PM (L3Rsz)

25 Tulips are budding.

I love daffodils but for some reason they don't want to bloom for me. Neighbors grow them just fine. Wonder if I'm planting at the wrong depth.

Posted by: Emmie at March 28, 2020 01:30 PM (ouBhA)

26 So that's where they get the fillings for a bag of dicks!

Bloomberg: "ya put a dick in the ground and up they grow"!

Posted by: getting the banned back together making funny smelling pee at March 28, 2020 01:31 PM (uDbL4)

27 Skip,
Hardware stores. Really good grocery stores, but you're out of season probably.

Posted by: MarkY at March 28, 2020 01:31 PM (7M6jj)

28 20. One of them kept me company when I was recuperating last year. It was at a park about a mile from my house, has a big pond. I used to sit on the bench waterside to watch RWB do his thing in the tall reeds. Now that park is mobbed with SIPers escaping their house. I hope the crowd doesn't scare him away for good.

Posted by: kallisto at March 28, 2020 01:32 PM (QvAgz)

29
https://tinyurl.com/r4nczhp
Tractor Supply

Posted by: MarkY at March 28, 2020 01:33 PM (7M6jj)

30 Have had a few Bluebirds pass through, but none have stayed to nest. I built some Bluebird houses years ago. Bluebirds are my favorite.

Posted by: Ronster at March 28, 2020 01:33 PM (l3qby)

31
If I recall, a white asparagus farm was used as a set for a low budget horror movie, "The Terrible Secret of Morningwood Cemetary."

Posted by: Semi-Literate Thug at March 28, 2020 01:34 PM (t5m5e)

32 All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at March 28, 2020 01:18 PM
A Goth garden!
Love penny blacks!
Have some black hollyhocks.

Posted by: KT at March 28, 2020 01:34 PM (BVQ+1)

33 Kind of cold here this morning for California at the end of March. Seemed like a good morning for cattle and red-winged blackbirds.

Posted by: KT at March 28, 2020 01:35 PM (BVQ+1)

34 Cursed is the ground because of you; through painful toil you will eat food from it all the days of your life. It will produce thorns and thistles for you, and you will eat the plants of the field. By the sweat of your brow you will eat your food until you return to the ground, since from it you were taken; for dust you are and to dust you will return. -- Genesis 3:17-19

Posted by: Insomniac - Ex Cineribus Resurgo at March 28, 2020 01:36 PM (NWiLs)

35
https://tinyurl.com/tyosqg2 True Value
https://tinyurl.com/sclsd5j Westlake

In other words, most chain hardwares, too.

Posted by: MarkY at March 28, 2020 01:37 PM (7M6jj)

36 Bluebirds are so gorgeous. I've never put out nesting boxes, since I have a pretty large House Sparrow flock. They'd probably just attack the Bluebirds for the boxes. I'm none too fond of House Sparrows.

Posted by: lizabth at March 28, 2020 01:37 PM (L3Rsz)

37 Here in NJ, my roses are all leafing up nicely, my perennials seem to have survived and the latest additions, the limelight hydrangeas are also producing new leaves. Peonies are pushing through the soil and I should have a great bloom on my lilacs ( I am glad I cut the heads off nice and early).
Now all I need is for garden stores to be classified as "essential", as they are to my peace of mind.

Posted by: CN at March 28, 2020 01:38 PM (ONvIw)

38 Waiting to see what a "pickle bush" is.

Posted by: KT at March 28, 2020 01:38 PM (BVQ+1)

39 The Protea are absolutely gorgeous, btw.

Posted by: CN at March 28, 2020 01:39 PM (ONvIw)

40 38: Are they a form of cactus?

Posted by: CN at March 28, 2020 01:39 PM (ONvIw)

41 Wonder if hardware stores are open here, maybe with the 1 customer at a time but no idea.

Posted by: Skip at March 28, 2020 01:39 PM (ZCEU2)

42 Hey AZ, I have not found my Swiss Chard to get bitter here I am up in Cave Creek, I have some plants that are 3 years old. I harvest from them year round, I do however grow them in the shade so perhaps that is the difference. I have put in Cucumbers about 5 different kinds, zucchini, peppers lots and lots of peppers, tomatoes, tomatillos, melons a few different varieties, eggplant, basil, lettuces many varieties, beets, so much will grow in the spring here. Keep at it, you will find what works for you.

Posted by: WeeKreek Farm Girl at March 28, 2020 01:40 PM (Eeh1E)

43
Skip,
Both the two I just posted say they're open.
I haven't seen anything closed here except barbershops... of the things I ordinarily go to.

Posted by: MarkY at March 28, 2020 01:43 PM (7M6jj)

44 38 Waiting to see what a "pickle bush" is.
Posted by: KT at March 28, 2020 01:38 PM (BVQ+1)

Sounds like something you shouldn't look up on Urban Dictionary.

Posted by: Insomniac - Ex Cineribus Resurgo at March 28, 2020 01:43 PM (NWiLs)

45 It's about time to start checking for asparagus on our property. Usually the deer get to the stalks before I do.

Posted by: Emmie at March 28, 2020 01:43 PM (ouBhA)

46 Great pics!

Currently, old garden shed is being disassembled by moi. I didn't want to tear it apart, because it's metal and the last thing I want is a bunch of sharp metal pieces laying around for our dogs to get into.

Yard itself, about the only thing of note is the Locust Purple Jade which is trying to bloom again this year. We shall see.

i cut three of our crape myrtles "down to the studs" based on what a gardener did down the street. I figure he knows something, because that particular yard is always immaculate with gorgeous flowers year around.

Well, time to grab a bit to eat then back to taking out and then hauling away the old shed, in anticipation of a the new one showing up.

Posted by: blake - semi lurker in marginal standing
at March 28, 2020 01:45 PM (WEBkv)

47 WeeKreek Farm Girl at March 28, 2020 01:40 PM
I have to grow cucumbers on a trellis here in the Central Valley of California and there are still only a few that don't get bitter in summer, with careful watering. Had one friend who grew them in the shade of a tree.

Posted by: KT at March 28, 2020 01:46 PM (BVQ+1)

48
I haven't tried to grow anything in recent years. We have a couple of raised bed enclosures. Guess I'll prepare them and see what I can do. I'm partial to growing things that people can eat.

Posted by: Semi-Literate Thug at March 28, 2020 01:46 PM (t5m5e)

49 37. You have limelight hydrangeas! Love them. Hardware stores are essential in PA, the big box stores have live plants. I hope Murphy allowed you guys at least that much.

Posted by: kallisto at March 28, 2020 01:46 PM (QvAgz)

50 Miles the blackbird said the mass die off was caused when they realized that Spy Magazine went out of circulation.

Posted by: Big Fat Meanie at March 28, 2020 01:46 PM (DY3v8)

51 The state of chaos, also known as NJ, has closed little kiddie parks in residential neighborhoods and every other thing they can think of.

Posted by: CN at March 28, 2020 01:47 PM (ONvIw)

52
near twenty years ago wife and i went to northern Italy for a few weeks. somewhere between Trentino and Bolzano was a small town that had a restaurant that was recommended highly.

we each ordered a sampler of asparagus five ways. each version was beyond my expectation. i ordered a second plate.

the white asparagus may have been the best.

Posted by: krusty at March 28, 2020 01:49 PM (0S7ZP)

53 Clearing out the tomato planters I discovered my new poppy was better at playing fetch then I had thought.

As I cleared an area and moved on she would fetch the weed and put it back where I had pulled it from.

When I turned around and saw what she had done she wagged her tail and barked proudly.

Could not get mad at her but I did leave her inside when I went back to bag all the weeds.

Posted by: Big V Caffeinated at March 28, 2020 01:49 PM (XEC2p)

54 41 - yes Skip they are life-sustaining, in DE too.

Posted by: kallisto at March 28, 2020 01:49 PM (QvAgz)

55
Big V Caffeinated

Good story!

Posted by: MarkY at March 28, 2020 01:50 PM (7M6jj)

56 49 37. You have limelight hydrangeas! Love them. Hardware stores are essential in PA, the big box stores have live plants. I hope Murphy allowed you guys at least that much.
Posted by: kallisto at March 28, 2020 01:46 PM (QvAgz)

Apparently Murphy caved and will be allowing garden stores as soon as they can put the plants outside. Yay! I want to get the grandsons busy on a garden.

I do love these hydrangeas. The limelights were not as popular as the little limes last year, so I had to do some real hunting to get them. They're lovely on their own, and they can't be beat for dried hydrangeas.

Posted by: CN at March 28, 2020 01:51 PM (ONvIw)

57 CN at March 28, 2020 01:39 PM
Nope. They are not cacti. They are in their own family. Most are from south of the Limpopo river in Africa. They are related to Leucosperum and Leucadendron, which also have exotic flowers. Also related to Grevilleas.


Posted by: KT at March 28, 2020 01:52 PM (BVQ+1)

58 Chili de Arbol aka 'death in the green skin'!

I made my cousin a burrito one evening while we were fishing behind the house. He did say that he wanted it 'hot'. I chopped up two Arbols and put three whole ones in it. He ate the burrito and was nearly crawling on the riverbank ready to scoop up a mouth full of mud to dull the pain! Good times.

Last night I started my peppers that take an unusually long time to emerge - Aji, hot Filipino Bastards, Chiltepin, Scorpion Tail, and a heatless variety of Habanero called 'Roulette' that everyone just loved last year. Oh, and Alfrey's Red Peter, which I think reminds me of pepperoncini after they are pickled, and have plenty of heat. I am trying my best to delay transplanting tomato and peppers until june first like last year, but man, I get anxious here in N. Indiana.

Posted by: Cicero Kaboom! Kid. at March 28, 2020 01:54 PM (Vy7tf)

59 Howdy from WeaselAcres! Just put down 150# of grass seed on the road, and need about 150# more. Now for some rain!

Posted by: Weasel at March 28, 2020 01:54 PM (MHB69)

60 57: Thanks

Posted by: CN at March 28, 2020 01:55 PM (ONvIw)

61 The Protea reminds me of the Voynich manuscript, somehow.

Posted by: Kindltot at March 28, 2020 01:57 PM (6rS3m)

62 59 Howdy from WeaselAcres! Just put down 150# of grass seed on the road, and need about 150# more. Now for some rain!
Posted by: Weasel at March 28, 2020 01:54 PM (MHB69)

Sounds good. I reseeded the lawn this week, but am hoping to dig up a good chunk of it for more ornamental shrub beds and an expanded vegetable garden. The grandsons are home from school until may, so planting and nurturing is on the agenda along with a nice supply of wire to keep the deer away (although I wish I could shoot a couple of those, gift the neighbors with meat, an upholsterer friend with the skins, and use the blood for the roses)

Posted by: CN at March 28, 2020 02:00 PM (ONvIw)

63 White asparagus is delicious! Especially with a light hollandaise sauce. Mmmmm!!!

Posted by: Diogenes at March 28, 2020 02:00 PM (axyOa)

64 Been pouring down here all day

Posted by: Skip at March 28, 2020 02:01 PM (ZCEU2)

65 Not too much to report yet. We had to do the first mowing this week which is a bit early. But it has been an unusually mild winter. The baby trees, dogwood and crepe myrtle, are showing buds along with the lilac.

(I have high hopes for the lilac this year. I love going into the yard on a soft, moist spring morning while the lilac scent pervades the yard.)

Posted by: JTB at March 28, 2020 02:02 PM (7EjX1)

66 We usually have a bunch of Red Wing Blackbirds by this time of year, and so far haven't seen or heard one. I'm concerned. Hope they start arriving soon.

Posted by: Nan at March 28, 2020 02:03 PM (hUBV8)

67 Jesus, come on Mr President, I love ya, but salute The Comfort and let her go.

Posted by: Nevergiveup at March 28, 2020 02:04 PM (85Gof)

68 Wife has me looking for cannjng jar lids, not sure
why as nothing new here to jar, but nevertheless haven't seen them in
the store, not sure seasonal thing or all bought up in the Apocalypse.
Posted by: Skip at March 28, 2020 01:17 PM (ZCEU2)


I remember in the Carter years Mom was unable to get canning lids because there was a panic, so I always buy ahead. When I go to the store I pick up a box or two, mostly to bring the purchase up to an even round number.
I don't notice the difference much, and they are good for a year in a drawer

I also have a theory that I should only can in small mouth jars because the lids are cheaper and it can be an issue to get two sizes of jars.
I doubt that will ever happen, though.

keep an eye out for jars and lids in yard sales for the next five years by the way. Lotsa people are prepping for the alpacalypse and may decide they need the space more than a box of empty jars.

Posted by: Kindltot at March 28, 2020 02:05 PM (6rS3m)

69 (I have high hopes for the lilac this year. I love going into the yard on a soft, moist spring morning while the lilac scent pervades the yard.)
Posted by: JTB at March 28, 2020 02:02 PM (7EjX1)

It is a wonderful scent. I used to have some broom plants whose fragrance complemented the lilacs, but after reading about their toxicity, I removed them and gave them to a friend who has no little ones playing in the yard.

Posted by: CN at March 28, 2020 02:05 PM (ONvIw)

70 62 59 Howdy from WeaselAcres! Just put down 150# of grass seed on the road, and need about 150# more. Now for some rain!
Posted by: Weasel at March 28, 2020 01:54 PM (MHB69)

Sounds good. I reseeded the lawn this week, but am hoping to dig up a good chunk of it for more ornamental shrub beds and an expanded vegetable garden. The grandsons are home from school until may, so planting and nurturing is on the agenda along with a nice supply of wire to keep the deer away (although I wish I could shoot a couple of those, gift the neighbors with meat, an upholsterer friend with the skins, and use the blood for the roses)
Posted by: CN at March 28, 2020 02:00 PM (ONvIw)
--------
After I put down the seed, I shot some video for the gun thread tomorrow. Now I need to figure out how to edit and splice!

Posted by: Weasel at March 28, 2020 02:05 PM (MHB69)

71 62 59 Howdy from WeaselAcres! Just put down 150# of grass seed on the road, and need about 150# more. Now for some rain!
Posted by: Weasel at March 28, 2020 01:54 PM (MHB69)

Sounds good. I reseeded the lawn this week, but am hoping to dig up a good chunk of it for more ornamental shrub beds and an expanded vegetable garden. The grandsons are home from school until may, so planting and nurturing is on the agenda along with a nice supply of wire to keep the deer away (although I wish I could shoot a couple of those, gift the neighbors with meat, an upholsterer friend with the skins, and use the blood for the roses)
Posted by: CN at March 28, 2020 02:00 PM (ONvIw)


I put down $100 worth of grass seed in my front yard last week.

Only to have a torrential rain wash it all away that night.


Posted by: Ladyl at March 28, 2020 02:06 PM (TdMsT)

72 I enjoy seeing plants from exotic locales like the Protea. Also hearing what those from warmer U.S. climes are planting. When Shanks wrote about the almond blossoms in Cali, I wanted to go to Longwood Gardens to paint some. But the Gardens closed, u no y.

Posted by: kallisto at March 28, 2020 02:06 PM (QvAgz)

73 Put in my garden today - risk taker but Good Friday is so late this year - 30 corn plants, 6 tomatoes, 4 cukes, 10 peppers, 2 okra, 2 watermelon and 2 cantaloupe. We will see how it goes

Posted by: rammajamma at March 28, 2020 02:07 PM (SwWMX)

74 Amazon is selling canning lids if you use their service. I have not seen them locally yet, usually by late may for strawberry time.

Posted by: CN at March 28, 2020 02:08 PM (ONvIw)

75 I put down $100 worth of grass seed in my front yard last week.

Only to have a torrential rain wash it all away that night.

Posted by: Ladyl at March 28, 2020 02:06 PM (TdMsT)

Damn! I've been lucky with a more steady drizzle.

Posted by: CN at March 28, 2020 02:08 PM (ONvIw)

76
I put down $100 worth of grass seed in my front yard last week.

Only to have a torrential rain wash it all away that night.


Posted by: Ladyl at March 28, 2020 02:06 PM (TdMsT)
------
Aw, Man! Bummer, but it happens.

Posted by: Weasel at March 28, 2020 02:09 PM (MHB69)

77 34 Cursed is the ground because of you; through painful toil you will eat food from it all the days of your life. It will produce thorns and thistles for you, and you will eat the plants of the field. By the sweat of your brow you will eat your food until you return to the ground, since from it you were taken; for dust you are and to dust you will return. -- Genesis 3:17-19
Posted by: Insomniac - Ex Cineribus Resurgo at March 28, 2020 01:36 PM (NWiLs)


Yeah.

Me too, Insom.

Posted by: Ladyl at March 28, 2020 02:10 PM (TdMsT)

78 The irises that I spaced out a couple years ago are looking good. If nature or I water them should have some blooms in May. I have been pecking away at pruning some on the Russian Olives and Elm trees. Just trying to keep them alive for the shade. This morning I managed to give myself a mild burn on my wrist burning some of the branches I cut down last week. I'm not yet bit by any garden for food desire. Last year I skipped even doing a few zucchini or taters. I'll probably try to plant a few of the squash because that payoff is pretty good vs what the groceries want. But maybe even for that I'll try to just get to a farmers market.

Posted by: PaleRider is simply irredeemable at March 28, 2020 02:11 PM (K78+l)

79 13 ... "Wife has me looking for cannjng jar lids"

Skip, The Food Lion here had Mason jar lids the other day. Also, if you have a GOOD old style hardware store, they often have the lids and other canning parts.

Posted by: JTB at March 28, 2020 02:11 PM (7EjX1)

80 Comfort moving

Posted by: Nevergiveup at March 28, 2020 02:11 PM (85Gof)

81 Bluebirds are my favorite bird and I have seen a few here already, which makes me happy. I do like red-winged blackbirds, although the only place I see them around here is a park where my girls used to play soccer. They would sit on the cattails (the birds, not my girls). I had never seen them before and thought they were beautiful.

Posted by: bluebell at March 28, 2020 02:13 PM (/669Q)

82 Posted by: Insomniac - Ex Cineribus Resurgo at March 28, 2020 01:36 PM (NWiLs)


Yeah.

Me too, Insom.
Posted by: Ladyl at March 28, 2020 02:10 PM (TdMsT)

This is sort of my weekly gardening thread tradition, but you seem uncharacteristically down. Lack of tennis getting to you?

Posted by: Insomniac - Ex Cineribus Resurgo at March 28, 2020 02:14 PM (NWiLs)

83 I mentioned a couple of weeks ago that my Christmas cactus (which is really more of a Thanksgiving cactus) had a ton of buds on it, for some reason. The first one has now bloomed. I think there are 13 or 14 buds on it in all.

This is the plant I couldn't get to bloom for years until I started leaving it out on the deck all summer and totally ignoring it. If it rained, it got watered, if we had a drought, it didn't get watered. It seemed to like that treatment.

No idea why it's doing what it's doing now, however.

Posted by: bluebell at March 28, 2020 02:15 PM (/669Q)

84 I was burning branches in our burn barrel and brushed my wrist on the rim or on the grate I use over the top if anyone is wondering how its possible to get a wee burn burning brush.

Posted by: PaleRider is simply irredeemable at March 28, 2020 02:17 PM (K78+l)

85 Worked in the vegetable garden with Mrs f'd this morning. Seems we have a difference of opinion on how some things should be done. She finally gave in though and said "do whatever you want to do".


Posted by: f'd at March 28, 2020 02:18 PM (Tnijr)

86 So there's an emergency stay at home except for "essential" activities order in my county. Of course, air travel and using public transit is A-OK. Jesus, people are stupid.

Posted by: Insomniac - Ex Cineribus Resurgo at March 28, 2020 02:19 PM (NWiLs)

87 It is still too cold and wet to plant, and I am waiting on the farmers' markets to open up. But the garden is tilled and I have seeds starting in trays on the back porch.

I dug a trench and planted my seed potatoes today. The taters never do much for me but I will get half a bucket in a good year, and I actually like seeing the plants at the edge of the garden.

Last year I dug the potatoes up and left them in a plastic bucket in the dark corner of the kitchen, and used out of it all winter. Always sort through the finger sized ones to get the larger ones underneath, and in the end I had a bunch of tiny wilted potatoes in the bucket.
About a month ago I tried digging into it again, and found out they had put out roots and the whole bottom of the bucket was a mat of fine potato roots, apparently there was enough dirt and moisture to start the roots growing.

It is cool for potatoes here, and I am on clayey soil, so I prefer to plant yellow potatoes, they grow them here on clay and they do well. They are tasty too, but a touch waxy.
I had some sprouting russets from a bag I got from the store, so I put those in at the end of the row.

I am going to try to score some steer manure to make the next covering when the sprouts start popping up, and keep hilling up as they grow.
In the end I expect to have a low berm of potatoes and a channel to run water down to soak them when I get done. I find this works best for me for what I want to do in potatoes.
Granted, as I said, I don't get a lot of potatoes for my effort, so in a way it is just an excuse to play with trenches and water, like I were a 10 YO again.


I had potatoes left over, so I poked them into the compost pile, and I will see if they grow. Already I have a squash popping up out of it.

Posted by: Kindltot at March 28, 2020 02:20 PM (6rS3m)

88 When I was working in The Kingdom, it became quite clear that the only important issue with gardening is water. The Crown Prince at that time was getting a cutting of alfalfa every 18 days. Wheel irrigation and lots of sunlight. No homo.

Posted by: The Charlie Daniels of the Torque Wrench at March 28, 2020 02:21 PM (6H0QF)

89 85 Worked in the vegetable garden with Mrs f'd this morning. Seems we have a difference of opinion on how some things should be done. She finally gave in though and said "do whatever you want to do".


Posted by: f'd at March 28, 2020 02:18 PM (Tnijr)

Ohhhh that's bad, just FYI.

Posted by: Jordan61 at March 28, 2020 02:22 PM (KCuNN)

90 86:ublic transit is a source of the problem for many on NYC. Rather than run less populated trains they (and NJT) cut the schedule and filled them right back up.

Posted by: CN at March 28, 2020 02:22 PM (ONvIw)

91 About 9 years ago, the landscaper had to wait several months to get one of those protea plants for the re-do of my parents' yard. They were very rare - I'd never seen one before. The people walking by the house would always stop and ask "what's t his?", the little girls next door would ask if they could snip one to take.

Now? Think I saw them outside a drugstore, along with the daisies and other common little plants. That's how fast some things change.

Posted by: rhomboid at March 28, 2020 02:22 PM (El6T/)

92 81
Bluebirds are my favorite bird and I have seen a few here already, which
makes me happy. I do like red-winged blackbirds, although the only
place I see them around here is a park where my girls used to play
soccer. They would sit on the cattails (the birds, not my girls). I
had never seen them before and thought they were beautiful.





Posted by: bluebell at March 28, 2020 02:13 PM (/669Q)
We have a few bluebirds around us in seacoast NH. Lots of woodpeckers too. All have been visiting the suet feeders we have out.This morning we had what I think was a gyrfalcon looking for breakfast. Perched on a tall tree in a grove of trees behind my property.

Posted by: Our Country is Screwed at March 28, 2020 02:23 PM (D3cJf)

93 85 Worked in the vegetable garden with Mrs f'd this morning. Seems we have a difference of opinion on how some things should be done. She finally gave in though and said "do whatever you want to do".

Posted by: f'd at March 28, 2020 02:18 PM (Tnijr)

You do understand this is WomanSpeak meaning you will be punished for doing it your own way even though she said to do so. By the way, go ahead and do it your way and don't knuckle under.

Posted by: Insomniac - Ex Cineribus Resurgo at March 28, 2020 02:24 PM (NWiLs)

94 Kindltot, check on your local farmers' markets to see their opening days. They may have changed. The one I go to has postponed the opening to April 23 instead of mid-March.

I really hope they can open then. Besides the fact that I like buying my veggies there, I have been going so long (decades) that I know all the farmers and fear for their livelihoods.

Posted by: bluebell at March 28, 2020 02:24 PM (/669Q)

95 nice garden az

Posted by: phoenixgirl at March 28, 2020 02:27 PM (0O7c5)

96 The big RWB die-off occurred in Arkansas in 2011. Thousands of birds died, just fell from the sky. Official cause: blunt force trauma. (Huh?) NJ more recently experienced a smaller kill of hundreds. Very disturbing. I think I'll go clean my house to take my mind off it and cheer me up.

Posted by: kallisto at March 28, 2020 02:27 PM (QvAgz)

97 I've lived at the same place for thirty five years, a heavily wooded, very secluded and natural spot.

I was thinking the other day about the invasives and plant pathogens that have come through since the mid-80s.

Bittersweet vine
Ailanthus tree
Russian Olive
mile a minute vine, or tear thumb
Wineberry
Japanese stilt-grass
Marmorated stink bug
Emerald ash borer, a real tragedy, I've lost dozens of giant trees
and the latest, Spotted Lantern Fly

Quite a collection for such a short period of time, and indicative of the speed in which invasives are coming in.

Posted by: Jinx the Cat at March 28, 2020 02:27 PM (FTlwv)

98 97: I hate those wine berry plants.

Posted by: CN at March 28, 2020 02:29 PM (ONvIw)

99 It might be a slight increase in a prepper mentality as a reaction to coronavirus restrictions. But I've noticed Youtube has some new videos aimed at first time veggie gardeners. A common theme is the (insert number) crops most likely to produce.

Once this panic is over, I hope some of the desire for greater self reliance will remain, especially for younger folks. I don't really expect that but I can hope.

Posted by: JTB at March 28, 2020 02:30 PM (7EjX1)

100 Jinx, have they actually seen Spotted Lantern Fly out your way? I remember last year they put out the pest version of an APB out on it, but I don't know if any have been seen here yet.

Posted by: bluebell at March 28, 2020 02:30 PM (/669Q)

101 asparagus recipe:

warm a dinner plate

lightly steam asparagus spears, the more slender the better

as soon as they begin to get tender, remove from pan, place on warm plate, sprinkle with shaved paramecium or paramecium/asagio cheese and cover with pan lid.

dump water, then add butter and garlic.

saute until the garlic is happy, then add an equal volume of lemon juice.

bring to a boil, then lift lid and pour over the asparagus.

serve with thin sliced rare grilled tri tip, garlic toast and pinquito beans, along with a hearty West-side Paso Robles zinfandel.

(Oppolo, Hunt Cellars, Grey Wolf, Zin Alley, etc)

you're welcome.

Posted by: redc1c4, ONT Rx Tech at March 28, 2020 02:31 PM (vwf8z)

102 99: I hope so too. I was pleasantly surprised that my kids started building a wuflu stash before the crunch came.

Posted by: CN at March 28, 2020 02:31 PM (ONvIw)

103
This is sort of my weekly gardening thread tradition, but you seem uncharacteristically down. Lack of tennis getting to you?
Posted by: Insomniac - Ex Cineribus Resurgo at March 28, 2020 02:14 PM (NWiLs)


I played so much tennis this week, I'm exhausted!

I'm not used to being home this much, though. The kids and grandlovies are Face Timing everyday, so it helps.

How are you doing with the isolation?

Posted by: Ladyl at March 28, 2020 02:32 PM (TdMsT)

104 Good Lord
I'm bored

Posted by: Insomniac - Ex Cineribus Resurgo at March 28, 2020 02:32 PM (NWiLs)

105 38 Waiting to see what a "pickle bush" is.
Posted by: KT at March 28, 2020 01:38 PM (BVQ+1)

--
I am too! I'll submit some pictures when I find out.

---
WeeKreek Farm Girl

Thank you for the hints! Your garden pictures are beautiful!

Posted by: AZ deplorably isolated at March 28, 2020 02:33 PM (kp35W)

106 Big thunderstorm almost here.

Posted by: Ladyl at March 28, 2020 02:34 PM (TdMsT)

107 Bluebell they are just to the north, in Maryland and even closer to the west in Winchester/Frederick Co.

I included them on the list because they will be here imminently, and by all accounts, very destructive.

Posted by: Jinx the Cat at March 28, 2020 02:35 PM (FTlwv)

108 Emmie, about 6 inches deep for daffodils.

Posted by: Jewells45 at March 28, 2020 02:37 PM (dUJdY)

109 "By the way, go ahead and do it your way and don't knuckle under."


Well it's like this. Every year we have a garden and she has been in charge, and some of the plants failed. That has been blamed on various things, but I kept my mouth shut. This year though I bought the plants and seeds and did most of the work so we are going to try things my way. I am not ignorant in the ways of agriculture, having spent plenty of time helping my PaPa (grandfather) in his garden as a youth. If it doesn't work out this year, it's on me.

Posted by: f'd at March 28, 2020 02:37 PM (Tnijr)

110 Good Lord
I'm bored


I know. Me too.

Posted by: Jewells45 at March 28, 2020 02:37 PM (dUJdY)

111 I played so much tennis this week, I'm exhausted!

I'm not used to being home this much, though. The kids and grandlovies are Face Timing everyday, so it helps.

How are you doing with the isolation?
Posted by: Ladyl at March 28, 2020 02:32 PM (TdMsT)

Oh, good for you! Exercise really helps.

This is one of those odd times where having lots of practice being reclusive pays off. I'm used to being by myself the overwhelming majority of the time so it's not as bad as it could be. I'm keeping up with exercise and other usual distractions, though I chafe at the stupidity going on all around.

Posted by: Insomniac - Ex Cineribus Resurgo at March 28, 2020 02:38 PM (NWiLs)

112 110 Good Lord
I'm bored

I know. Me too.
Posted by: Jewells45 at March 28, 2020 02:37 PM (dUJdY)

Ugh. Me three.

Posted by: Jordan61 at March 28, 2020 02:38 PM (KCuNN)

113 We still have garlic coming up from last year. Don't have to do anything for that stuff to grow.

Posted by: f'd at March 28, 2020 02:39 PM (Tnijr)

114 Jinx, I'm glad they're not out there yet. I hope they never get there.

Are you feeling well enough that you can get out to enjoy your wildflowers?

Posted by: bluebell at March 28, 2020 02:39 PM (/669Q)

115 110 Good Lord
I'm bored

I know. Me too.
Posted by: Jewells45 at March 28, 2020 02:37 PM (dUJdY)

Points off for not following suit in rhyming couplet.

Posted by: Insomniac - Ex Cineribus Resurgo at March 28, 2020 02:39 PM (NWiLs)

116 I have told this story before, but I will again.

They grow asparagus up around Hermiston and Pendleton, and one year I went up there in the spring and saw them harvesting it.

Up there, the asparagus fields look like fallow fields because the crop is all underground, and the harvesting crews are about 7-15 farmworkers who basically course across it in a line walking side-by-side. They are looking for the small crowns popping up out of the dirt, and they use a harvesting knife that looks like a long-handled serrated v-notched spatula to take the stalk off underground, and then they put it in a tray or a bag, depending. They guys are paid by the pound and there is often a dispute with the growers if the asparagus is picked in the morning and weighed in the afternoon after it has had a chance to loose some of the water weight as it shrivels a bit.

Anyhow, the pickers would be shambling in a line abreast, across what looked like a wasteland, bundled up in worn and tattered clothing, looking like a band of tailgaters of the apocalypse looking for the next barbecue .

That vision has stuck with me for years.

Posted by: Kindltot at March 28, 2020 02:39 PM (6rS3m)

117 So--

My mature dogwood tree at the corner of the front of my house has died. The cause is trenching for underground drainage the cut the roots right next to the trunk of the tree.

I need to have it cut down and replaced. But with what?

It's a small area, facing north, on the east side.

Another dogwood?

Small magnolia?

Serviceberry?

Narrow cylindrical evergreen?

Posted by: Ladyl at March 28, 2020 02:40 PM (TdMsT)

118 From Idaho's Treasure Valley, Boise area: In anticipation of Gov. Brad Little's stay-at-home order, we went out on Sunday to buy grass seed and thyme seeds at the Home Depot (hadn't found English thyme plants, and my one plant had died this winter). Then we went to our favorite nursery, and bought this year's orchard starters - apples Golden Delicious, Cortland, and Golden Russet. Got the trees planted this week. (Monday we got my snow tires off - they were pretty useless this past winter.)

The stay-at-home order came Wed., but hardware stores can stay open, so on Thursday, while doing my now-just-weekly grocery run, I hit Home Depot and grabbed 2 Roma tomato plants. We got next to zero Romas last year, didn't can any, so we want to have an overabundance of them this year. The tomato and pepper starts are doing OK. And if we end up with too many, we can always dig more holes or give them to friends.

Husband's worked on filling in the trench we dug last fall, when we put a barrier strip in around the wild rose hedge/windbreak. I've started tearing up patches of dead lawn sod, so we can put compost and grass seed in those spots.

The blue hyacinths behind my kitchen window have decided they're done, but the white ones are hanging on. Today, the blue ones out front are starting to spread out their flowers - the whites will come on later.

The tiny yellow crocus I potted have been pretty, but I think they're on their downhill leg now. The Johnny Jump-Ups by the shed, though, are going like crazy - always nice to see those cheery little yellow and purple faces.

I've been holding off on planting the first outdoor crops, watching the 14-day forecast continue to show freezing nighttime temperatures - but I think this week might be when to start things. We'll have to carry water to anything we plant, though.

I really hope to be able to tell you next week that our new riding mower arrived... might be the week after, though.

Everybody remember - we are strong.
We are rough 'n' tough *Americans*!
We can improvise, adapt, overcome.
We can build over, build under, build around.
We will make plans to endure - then we will make plans to be greater than before!

Posted by: Pat* at March 28, 2020 02:42 PM (2pX/F)

119 Ladyl, if the dogwood did well there I would just replace it with another dogwood (pink, but that's just me). I think they are so lovely and you need to have the right conditions for them, which it seems you do.

Posted by: bluebell at March 28, 2020 02:42 PM (/669Q)

120
this is slowly morphing into a food thread...

i recently found a dozen ducks very fresh.
steamed a couple bunches of fine looking spears to almost done then sauteed in butter for two minutes. plated them. in same pan another knob of butter and sunnied side upped four duck eggs. eggs on the aparagus with enough of the butter that browned, plenty of black pepper and finished with plenty of grated parmesan.

Posted by: krusty at March 28, 2020 02:43 PM (0S7ZP)

121 ladyl, might I suggest a Nannyberry. The bunches of dark berries attract flocks of bluebirds just before Christmas. The flowers are not unattractive, either. Just a suggestion

Posted by: Jinx the Cat at March 28, 2020 02:43 PM (FTlwv)

122 I only have one more project and that's cleaning out the dead blue sage. Not a big area so I may do that tomorrow. The hostas are poking up. I wish I had planted some daffodils or tulips last fall. The cactus is beginning to come back to life but lots of weeds have invaded it and there is no way you can weed out a cactus.

Posted by: Jewells45 at March 28, 2020 02:44 PM (dUJdY)

123
This is one of those odd times where having lots of practice being reclusive pays off. I'm used to being by myself the overwhelming majority of the time so it's not as bad as it could be. I'm keeping up with exercise and other usual distractions, though I chafe at the stupidity going on all around.
Posted by: Insomniac - Ex Cineribus Resurgo at March 28, 2020 02:38 PM (NWiLs)


I've given a lot of thought to how I will go forward if the worst (politically and economically) happens.



Posted by: Ladyl at March 28, 2020 02:44 PM (TdMsT)

124 Dogwoods have a way of coming back. You will think they are completely dead and then they start putting out leaves again. We have one down by the driveway that I was supposed to cut down last year, but it came back and is thriving now.

Posted by: f'd at March 28, 2020 02:45 PM (Tnijr)

125 Nood up!

Posted by: Fox2! at March 28, 2020 02:45 PM (qyH+l)

126 bluebell, I have walked around a bit every day, but still can't make it down to the creek....better every day, though.

Posted by: Jinx the Cat at March 28, 2020 02:45 PM (FTlwv)

127 Glad you're getting better, Jinx. And I hope you continue to do so, and I hope your wife stays well.

I know you tested negative for the CV crud, but I really wonder, since false negatives are running 25% . . .

Posted by: bluebell at March 28, 2020 02:47 PM (/669Q)

128 LadyL, I do love serviceberries but the wild ones seem to get big and sprawly.

You make me interested in getting some for when i try to replace some trees.

Posted by: Kindltot at March 28, 2020 02:47 PM (6rS3m)

129 My mature dogwood tree at the corner of the front of my house has died.

As to trees and shrubs, Mom used to say: "It's not dead until it's been dead for 2 years."

But if the tree is truly dead, my vote is for another Dogwood.

Posted by: JQ at March 28, 2020 02:53 PM (whOIk)

130 Red winged blackbird (I looked it up).
Posted by: runner

That's a tri-colored blackbird; because of the white.

A true redwing only has red.

Posted by: JT at March 28, 2020 02:55 PM (arJlL)

131 97: I hate those wine berry plants.
Posted by: CN

I hate Illinois nazis.

Posted by: JT at March 28, 2020 02:57 PM (arJlL)

132 Asparagus is not only loved by the Swiss. The Germans are obsessed with it. The month of May in Germany is called "Spargelzeit" for "Asparagus time". Asparagus is everywhere!!!

Must be a Teutonic thing.

Posted by: RobertM at March 28, 2020 02:58 PM (lEqw+)

133 Cursed is the ground because of you; through painful toil you will eat food from it all the days of your life. It will produce thorns and thistles for you, and you will eat the plants of the field. By the sweat of your brow you will eat your food until you return to the ground, since from it you were taken; for dust you are and to dust you will return. -- Genesis 3:17-19
Posted by: Insomniac - Ex Cineribus Resurgo at March 28, 2020 01:36 PM (NWiLs)


Hiya Mr. Happiness !

Posted by: JT at March 28, 2020 03:00 PM (arJlL)

134 Cheer up Ladyl !

Wanna dance ?

Posted by: JT at March 28, 2020 03:01 PM (arJlL)

135 130 no, it is a Red-winged Blackbird.

https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Red-winged_Blackbird

Posted by: RobertM at March 28, 2020 03:01 PM (lEqw+)

136 I bought some flower seeds and peas stringbeans and radishes.

Still a little too early to plant.

Posted by: JT at March 28, 2020 03:02 PM (arJlL)

137 Those look like giant bread mold spores.

Posted by: 370H55V at March 28, 2020 03:56 PM (WusEB)

138 117 So--

My mature dogwood tree at the corner of the front of my house has died. The cause is trenching for underground drainage the cut the roots right next to the trunk of the tree.

I need to have it cut down and replaced. But with what?

It's a small area, facing north, on the east side.

Another dogwood?

Small magnolia?

Serviceberry?

Narrow cylindrical evergreen?

Posted by: Ladyl at March 28, 2020 02:40 PM (TdMsT)

Serviceberry has beautiful white flowers, though short-lived. Song birds will go koo-koo for the ripe berries, which are edible and like a mellow blueberry. Your location would work for Eastern Redbud if you are not too far south.

Posted by: Cicero Kaboom! Kid. at March 28, 2020 04:26 PM (Vy7tf)

139 Ladyl at March 28, 2020 02:40 PM
Consider checking for trees that don't have aggressive roots.

What region are you in?

Posted by: KT at March 28, 2020 04:40 PM (BVQ+1)

140 370H55V at March 28, 2020 03:56 PM

Sounds like you have some experience with a microscope.

Posted by: KT at March 28, 2020 04:40 PM (BVQ+1)

141 Peas have sprouted, yay! They do fine in large containers on the deck.

Begonia tubers are sprouting nicely too. They'll remain indoors for another month or so.

Cold and rainy today, so w*rking on indoor chores, but it's so nice to look out the window at colorful daffodils, hyacinths, fruit trees in bloom.

Posted by: JQ at March 28, 2020 04:41 PM (whOIk)

142 The more I look at those Protea, the more I think they also look like Coronavirus diagrams they keep showing on tv! This quarantine is doing me no good!

Posted by: keena at March 28, 2020 05:50 PM (yIcXd)

143 Kindletot, be careful of any animal manure. I use to get wonderful horse barn sweepings from a riding school, but there is this chemical that farmers put on pastures called Grazon. It kills the broadleafs (everything in your garden is a broadleaf). The problem with Grazon is that it goes straight through the cows and horses, and their poop is now toxic to your plants. Their leaves will curl up and any fruit is stunted and tiny. It can wreck a tree also.

The thing is, your source may not know that the pasture he's using has had it applied. Or, in my case, the school owner might only feed organic hay, but if a horse had some grass from a treated field yesterday, then arrived at the school today, well, one turd poisons a whole bed. I had to dig all the soil out of one of mine and replace it with clean soil.

As for those seeds, I have seen some displays in stores with the veggie seeds well picked over, but the flower seeds are untouched.

Posted by: Gordon at March 28, 2020 08:52 PM (aa9hc)

144 The "protea" pictured is actually a leucadendron, known as a pincushion, and there are many varieties. It's part of the Protea family. Leucospermums have got sort of "finger tips" to the leaves, unlike the protea or leucadendron, which is also part of the protea family but which has sort of knobby cones instead of flowers. The proper proteas have trumpet shaped flowers, sometimes quite large.

The Proteaceae grow mainly along the Cape coast of South Africa, and I'm right on the eastern end of the natural distribution of the King protea, Protea cynaroides. They grow wild on the slopes just outside Grahamstown.

If you try growing this family, be aware that they put out spreading fine roots just below the soil, and if you disturb these by weeding or tilling, your plant will probably die.

Posted by: Jake-ZA at March 28, 2020 09:41 PM (mSpgx)

145 Oops - silly me - leucospermums are pincushions, leucadendrons are the knobby ones!

Posted by: Jake-ZA at March 28, 2020 09:44 PM (mSpgx)

146 Just checking back in before gardening. Jake-ZA, you sent me on a quest for leucadendrons.

Not a bad way to spend the early morning. Because of the rains, the mosquitoes are awake and alive. When the sun dries the harden a bit, it'll be safe to go out.

Posted by: NaughtyPine at March 29, 2020 09:28 AM (/+bwe)

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