Sunday Morning Book Thread 03-22-2020: Self-Quarantine Edition

20200322 book pic 01.jpg
Social Distancing Level: Master

Good morning to all you 'rons, 'ettes, lurkers, and lurkettes, wine moms, frat bros, crétins sans pantalon (who are technically breaking the rules), hermits, shut-ins, recluses, introverts, and other survivors of the WuFlu. Welcome once again to the stately, prestigious, internationally acclaimed and high-class Sunday Morning Book Thread, a weekly compendium of reviews, observations, snark, witty repartee, hilarious bon mots, and a continuing conversation on books, reading, spending way too much money on books, writing books, and publishing books by escaped oafs and oafettes who follow words with their fingers and whose lips move as they read. Unlike other AoSHQ comment threads, the Sunday Morning Book Thread is so hoity-toity, pants are required. Even if it's these pants, and if there's anybody who should be self-quarantining, it's this guy.



It Pays To Increase Your Word Power®

Crooked Hillary
Slow Joe
Lyin' Ted
Little Marco
Crazy Bernie
Little Rocket Man
Chinese Virus (oops, this one is actually correct)



20200322 book pic 02.jpg
Book Dress



In the Year of the Plague:

I had forgotten about this classic plague book last week, The Decameron, by Giovanni Boccaccio:

The Decameron, subtitled Prince Galehaut, and sometimes nicknamed l'Umana commedia ("the Human comedy"), is a collection of novellas by the 14th-century Italian author Giovanni Boccaccio (1313–1375). The book is structured as a frame story containing 100 tales told by a group of seven young women and three young men sheltering in a secluded villa just outside Florence to escape the Black Death, which was afflicting the city. Boccaccio probably conceived of The Decameron after the epidemic of 1348, and completed it by 1353. The various tales of love in The Decameron range from the erotic to the tragic. Tales of wit, practical jokes, and life lessons contribute to the mosaic. In addition to its literary value and widespread influence (for example on Chaucer's Canterbury Tales), it provides a document of life at the time. Written in the vernacular of the Florentine language, it is considered a masterpiece of classical early Italian prose.

Two translations are available on Project Gutenberg, one by Payne and one by Rigg (Vol 1. and Vol. 2). I have no idea which one is considered better, or if they're just different.

And speaking of collections of stories you can get for free, here is one that was just released, inspired by the Chinese virus panic:

This is a 100% free book and you download it from bookfunnel, not Amazon. They will even e-mail the file to you, if you prefer, so you can side-load it onto your device. A number of indie authors are represented in this anthology.



Who Dis:

who dis 20200322.jpg
(hint: no, it's not her)

Last week's 'who dis' was Natalie Cole, daughter of Nat 'King' Cole.



Moron Recommendations

7 Just burned through Chris Bohjasion's "The Flight Attendant," a terrific thriller. Quite well written.

Got it via my Libby Digital library app and read it on my Kindle.


Posted by: Les Kinetic at March 15, 2020 09:06 AM (+fPHo)

She sits on a throne of lies:

Cassandra Bowden is no stranger to hungover mornings. She's a binge drinker, her job with the airline making it easy to find adventure, and the occasional blackouts seem to be inevitable. She lives with them, and the accompanying self-loathing. When she awakes in a Dubai hotel room, she tries to piece the previous night back together, counting the minutes until she has to catch her crew shuttle to the airport. She quietly slides out of bed, careful not to aggravate her already pounding head, and looks at the man she spent the night with. She sees his dark hair. His utter stillness. And blood, a slick, still wet pool on the crisp white sheets. Afraid to call the police - she's a single woman alone in a hotel room far from home - Cassie begins to lie. She lies as she joins the other flight attendants and pilots in the van. She lies on the way to Paris as she works the first class cabin. She lies to the FBI agents in New York who meet her at the gate. Soon it's too late to come clean-or face the truth about what really happened back in Dubai. Could she have killed him? If not, who did?

That's the trouble with lying: you can hardly ever lie just once. You usually have to tell another lie to account for the holes you created by telling the original lie, and then an additional lie to cover up the second lie, etc., and you just keep getting deeper and deeper. Oh, and then you have to remember all of the lies you told so you don't slip up and contradict yourself.

It seems to me that most episodes of I Love Lucy were based on this phenomenon.

Anyway, The Flight Attendant is available on Kindle for $9.99, and the paperback for less.

Bohjalian is also the author of The Guestroom, a story about the wrong kind of bachelor party:

When Kristin Chapman agrees to let her husband, Richard, host his brother's bachelor party, she expects a certain amount of debauchery. She takes their young daughter to Manhattan for the evening, leaving her Westchester home to the men and their hired entertainment. What she does not expect is that the entertainment—two scared young women brought there by force—will kill their captors and drive off into the night.

Now that's what I call girl power.

___________

12 This week I'm reading Kane & Abel by Jeffrey Archer. A friend said it was the best book she ever read, so there's that.

Posted by: SandyCheeks at March 15, 2020 09:08 AM (u1+n/)

William Lowell Kane and Abel Rosnovski, one the son of a Boston millionaire, the other a penniless polish immigrant-born on the same day near the turn of the century on opposite sides of the world-are brought together by fate and the quest of a dream. Two men - ambitious, powerful, ruthless - are locked in a relentless struggle to build an empire, fueled by their all-consuming hatred. Over sixty years and three generations, through war, marriage, fortune, and disaster, Kane and Abel battle for the success and triumph that only one man can have...

Sibling rivalry? What's that?

Kane and Abel is the first novel in a trilogy. The second in the series is The Prodigal Daughter and the third is Shall We Tell the President?

Archer has written a crap ton of other books, too numerous to mention.

___________

25 I've just started reading Oil and Marble, an historical novel by Stephanie Storey. By 'just started', I mean the first two pages. So far so good. It's about the relationship and rivalry between Leonardo Da Vinci and Michaelangelo.

Posted by: grammie winger at March 15, 2020 09:14 AM (lwiT4)

Amazon lists this novel as a "#1 Best Seller" which could mean "the top selling book about a couple of Renaissance poofs", but when I checked, the category is actually 'Renaissance Art':

From 1501 to 1505, Leonardo da Vinci and Michelangelo Buonarroti both lived and worked in Florence. Leonardo was a charming, handsome fifty year-old at the peak of his career. Michelangelo was a temperamental sculptor in his mid-twenties, desperate to make a name for himself.

Michelangelo is a virtual unknown when he returns to Florence and wins the commission to carve what will become one of the most famous sculptures of all time: David...

Meanwhile, Leonardo's life is falling apart: he loses the hoped-for David commission; he can't seem to finish any project; he is obsessed with his ungainly flying machine; he almost dies in war; his engineering designs disastrously fail...

Oil and Marble is the story of their nearly forgotten rivalry.

Oil and Marble: A Novel of Leonardo and Michelangelo is the debut novel of author Stephanie Storey. Her second novel, the historical thriller Raphael, Painter in Rome is due out on April 7th, but is available for pre-order now.

Incidentally, the #2 best-selling book in the 'Renaissance Art' Category is Leonardo's Notebooks: Writing and Art of the Great Master, a collection of da Vinci's intricately detailed artistic and intellectual pursuits, and highlights the classic pieces of art he produced in connection with his writings. And right now, it's only $2.99 on Kindle. Not a bad deal.


___________


I picked up The Good Shepherd this week because it was only $0.99. Perhaps it's a promotional thing because the movie version is coming out soon.

And while I was there, I noticed I could pay $0.99 for The Age of Fighting Sail: The Story of the Naval War of 1812:

No one has been so well equipped as C. S. Forester to dramatize the sea battles of the War of 1812, to characterize the heroes more skillfully, or to comprehend more shrewdly the world unrest that made it possible for an infant republic to embarrass a great nation rich in one hundred years of sea triumphs.

Well, this is the war wherein the British Army sacked and burned Washington DC and sent the president (and Mrs. Madison) scurrying away, so I'm not sure who was the most embarrassed here.

___________


So that's all for this week. As always, book thread tips, suggestions, bribes, insults, threats, ugly pants pics and moron library submissions may be sent to OregonMuse, Proprietor, AoSHQ Book Thread, at the book thread e-mail address: aoshqbookthread, followed by the 'at' sign, and then 'G' mail, and then dot cee oh emm.

What have you all been reading this week? Hopefully something good, because, as you all know, life is too short to be reading lousy books.




calvinvirus 01.jpg

Posted by: OregonMuse at 09:00 AM




Comments

(Jump to bottom of page)

1 Please keep virus comments to a minimum. This is, after all, a book thread.

If you want to talk about it, then head down to the previous thread.

Posted by: CharlieBrown'sDildo at March 22, 2020 08:55 AM (dLLD6)

2 “This is indeed a queer river,” said Bromosel, as the water lapped at his thighs.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at March 22, 2020 09:00 AM (Dc2NZ)

3 hiya

Posted by: JT at March 22, 2020 09:01 AM (arJlL)

4 Still working on the re-read of the Recluse series by Modesitt. and unlike the first time I read it I am trying to do it in chronological order rather than published order. Currently on Book 5.


This gives all of the books in chronological order.


https://tinyurl.com/yx66xbw6


Posted by: Vic at March 22, 2020 09:01 AM (mpXpK)

5 I claim first! CBD used his COB-fu!

Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at March 22, 2020 09:01 AM (Dc2NZ)

6 Tolle Lege
Sad my trip to the used book store was fruitless, guess there always is ebooks to get.

Posted by: Skip at March 22, 2020 09:01 AM (ZCEU2)

7 Jennifer Jones

Posted by: Tommy at March 22, 2020 09:02 AM (rpxSz)

8 off tommy sock

Posted by: Tommy at March 22, 2020 09:03 AM (rpxSz)

9 Fittingly, my reading during Plague Week was the second in a sub-series of John Ringo’s zombiad, “River of Night” by Ringo and Mike Massa. It follows “Valley of Shadows”.

Our dauntless Aussie hero Tom Smith ran security at a major New York bank and is in charge of getting the survivors to one of many safe sites along the east coast. His group has battled their way out of New York and is heading down to the retreat in Tennessee. They have to deal with enemy factions, clogged roads, and hordes of the undead.

My favorite character is the irrepressible Specialist Cathe “Astro” Astroga, who jots down an ever-expanding list of rules for the zombie apocalypse, a sort of “Skippy’s List”:

https://tinyurl.com/wdudoug

My favorite: 28: “Remember LV-426!” is not an authorized battle cry. (I personally disagree.)

(You don’t know about Skippy’s List?!)

http://skippyslist.com/list/

Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at March 22, 2020 09:03 AM (Dc2NZ)

10 can't pull this tommy sock off

help

Posted by: REDACTED at March 22, 2020 09:04 AM (rpxSz)

11 Crooked Hillary
Slow Joe
Lyin' Ted
Little Marco
Crazy Bernie
Little Rocket Man
Chinese Virus (oops, this one is actually correct)
________

Alll but the 3rd and the last are quite correct.

Posted by: Eeyore at March 22, 2020 09:04 AM (ZbwAu)

12 as my tommy said

Jennifer Jones

reading "Since you went away"

a movie she was in

Posted by: REDACTED at March 22, 2020 09:06 AM (rpxSz)

13 Morticia Adams?

Posted by: BignJames at March 22, 2020 09:06 AM (X/Pw5)

14 Calvin and Hobbes. Miss that.

Posted by: t-bird at March 22, 2020 09:06 AM (gHCnG)

15 The Good Shepherd is pretty good : H M S Ulysses is way better

Posted by: jaytrain at March 22, 2020 09:07 AM (eh3OZ)

16 I noticed that the last two - Weds and Fri - of the Ape's Who Dis?'s were suggested on last weeks book thread. Is this a trend?

Posted by: Eeyore at March 22, 2020 09:08 AM (ZbwAu)

17 Booken morgen horden!

Posted by: vmom 2020 at March 22, 2020 09:09 AM (G546f)

18 I saw a thing where the NYC public library is letting anyone with a library card,not just an NYC lib card, access their digital collection
Haven't tried yet

Posted by: vmom 2020 at March 22, 2020 09:10 AM (G546f)

19 Those pants are fine. I would wear them to share my wisdom on the internet.

Posted by: ggreg at March 22, 2020 09:10 AM (Tnijr)

20
g'mornin', book-ish 'rons

Posted by: AltonJackson
and remember that we are not descended from fearful men
at March 22, 2020 09:10 AM (nbj1Q)

21 "Outside of a dog, a book is man's best friend.

Inside of a dog, it's too dark to read."


- Grouch Marx, who still keeps us well-entertained in these uncertain times.

Posted by: BackwardsBoy - #CancelChina at March 22, 2020 09:11 AM (HaL55)

22 Good morning, Bookies! What are the odds we'll read lots more books this next week?

Posted by: RI Red at March 22, 2020 09:11 AM (p/KmR)

23 I finished Ford Madox Ford's The Good Soldier.

I was wrong about the twist at the end, but it was still a decent read. It took me a bit to get my brain used to processing Victorian-era pacing and description, at which point I enjoyed it more. It's weird how that works.

Anyhow, I told me wife about it and she remarked that it sounded like nasty people doing nasty things to one another, which is arguably true. There's no one in the story I'd actually want to be friends with.

However, I get the reputation it has because it is a really well-designed narrative that keeps turning back on itself and surprising you. It also busted open taboos for the era - namely that the upper crust was doing a lot of bed-hopping behind the scenes and not really bothered by it.

By the time Waugh started writing about this in the 30s, it was out in the open, but Ford was writing when people still kept up appearances.

Anyhow, an interesting read that a certain type will enjoy and others will intensely dislike.

Posted by: Ace-Endorsed Author A.H. Lloyd at March 22, 2020 09:12 AM (cfSRQ)

24 Of course it's Jennifer Jones

Posted by: CN at March 22, 2020 09:12 AM (ONvIw)

25 Point of order: them ain't pants.

Posted by: BignJames at March 22, 2020 09:13 AM (X/Pw5)

26 Well, this is the war wherein the British Army sacked and burned Washington DC
________

And we never thanked them. Can we get Boris to try it again?

The War of 1812 is complicated. We certainly shocked the Brits with the frigate victories, coming after 19 years of their beating everyone. OTOH, there's really no doubt that our 3 big frigates were much more powerful ships.

To my mind, the two lake battles (Erie and Champlain) are much the most impressive of our naval victories.

Posted by: Eeyore at March 22, 2020 09:13 AM (ZbwAu)

27 AKA as Mrs. David O Selznick

a good way to make sure in a lot of movies

Posted by: REDACTED at March 22, 2020 09:13 AM (rpxSz)

28 cant seem to focus on reading. trying not to panic.

Posted by: rhennigantx at March 22, 2020 09:13 AM (JFO2v)

29 Chicken pox and mumps are forgotten rites of passage.

Posted by: Bandersnatch at March 22, 2020 09:14 AM (gd9RK)

30 I picked up a copy of The Splendid and the Vile by Erik Larson. He previously wrote Thunderstruck and Issac's Storm. This one is about Churchill in the first weeks after he became prime minister, and reinstalled the fighting spirit in Britain. Hopefully this one will be as good as his previous books.

Posted by: Vashta Nerada at March 22, 2020 09:14 AM (2+2yZ)

31


I am beyond tired of this Soviet Union world. Stand in line to wait for good, but don't stand too close to the other comrade, one per comrade because of hoarding, got to go to stores at off hours to find things if they have them

Posted by: TheQuietMan at March 22, 2020 09:14 AM (sTjkh)

32 On the Kindle I read Cyberian Affair by Mark A. Pryor. In this thriller, cyber warfare between Russia and the U. S. becomes deadly. Both hacking and action scenes are well-written, however I thought the ending was rather abrupt. I'll try to read more from this author.

After reading many favorable reviews here over the years, I requested that my county library purchase The Forever War by Joe Haldeman; which they did. After reading it, I can see why it is considered a sci-fi war classic along with Starship Trooper. It's not only a story about a thousand-year war, but it's a commentary about the Vietnam War. Haldeman is a Vietnam veteran and was awarded the Purple Heart.

I also read Unholy Alliance: Radical Islam and the American Left by David Horowitz. This is a history of the left supporting Islamic terrorists in their joint goal of bringing the U. S. to her knees. It also gives the reader an understanding of how the left thinks and why they think what they do. An interesting book.

Posted by: Zoltan at March 22, 2020 09:14 AM (3ugDL)

33 Did gggggggreg actually write something sensible, or was that a mild ball peen ban hammering?

Posted by: RI Red at March 22, 2020 09:15 AM (p/KmR)

34 Those pants? Dude apparently got into his mommy's box of Carboardeaux and started playing in her closet. She's gonna be pissed when she gets home...

Posted by: BackwardsBoy - #CancelChina at March 22, 2020 09:15 AM (HaL55)

35 I'm going to re-read Albert Camus' The Plague.

I read it in college, and it struck me that looking at how people are panicking in the midst of an unseen peril now, I think the parallels between the 1940s and now would be startling.

Posted by: Darrell Harris at March 22, 2020 09:15 AM (m2EfB)

36 As Corny as it may sound. I'm reading the Bible-- Again. I now realize how much of it just "entered and left" with no lasting impression. It is important to understand the OLD and NEW testaments are linked, and, in surprising ways.
Try reading Psalms 22. Is THIS a peek into the "Lost Years" of the youth of Jesus???

Posted by: rld with coffee at March 22, 2020 09:16 AM (7uZmJ)

37 Hey OM, did you get my email this week? Would have come from an address starting with "deepfried..."

Posted by: Long-time Commenter, First-time Reader at March 22, 2020 09:16 AM (Nu6Gg)

38 As to The Decameron , I would go with the Norton Critical Edition , the translation by Mark Musa. He neatly splits the difference between accurate and elegant

Posted by: jaytrain at March 22, 2020 09:18 AM (eh3OZ)

39 This is indeed a queer river, said Bromosel, as the water lapped at his thighs.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at March 22, 2020 09:00 AM (Dc2NZ)

Where did you get this? TBOTR?

Posted by: Commissar Hrothgar at March 22, 2020 09:20 AM (BiNEL)

40 I continued my China reading jag.
I finished China: A History, by John Keay. It covers the entirety of Chinese history, and is quite readable and entertaining. Recommended.
I'm now reading Mao: The Unknown Story, by Jung Chang. It is also quite readable. I'm only 100 pages in, and Mao is weaseling his way into positions of power in the CCP. The real takeaway is what a total toolbag the man was. Lazy, duplicitous, entitled, a shameless lickspittle to those who could help him, and an absolute sadist, he was the whole package. He may be the only man in history to make Stalin look good by comparison.

Posted by: pep at March 22, 2020 09:20 AM (T6t7i)

41 I got a lot read this week, not because of Pandemic mania, after all I'm retired, but just one of those odd coinkydinces. Anyway I'll split them up in multiple comments. The first was The Enchanter, a long oxymoronic short story by Nabokov that wasn't released until after he croaked. Part of the reason it wasn't contemporarily released was that he wrote it in a flurry of activity preceding moving to the US from Paris when everything was in turmoil and papers were scattered all over the fucking place. Another reason is that I don't think it's that good. It's very well written, of course, with typical Nabokovian wordplay so that's not an issue. The problem is that it's an early version of Lolita although far too accented on the pervyness without the multiple characters developed to make the readers think "maybe I shouldn't feel so guilty about reading this". I think it was more creepy and flat than Volodya intended. Still worth reading, particularly for a completist, but not in the A list.

Posted by: Captain Hate at March 22, 2020 09:20 AM (y7DUB)

42 Good morning fellow Book Threadists. I hope everyone had an isolated but enjoyable week of reading.

Posted by: JTB at March 22, 2020 09:21 AM (7EjX1)

43 This week I read The Poisoned Chocolates Murder, by Anthony Berkeley. It is a bit odd and interesting. 6 amateurs - that is, not cops, though including a lawyer - offer in succession their solutions to a murder. Each refutes the previous one.

It's a clear influence on (a) John Dickson Carr's The 9 Wrong Answers, and (b) Asimov's Black Widowers' stories.

Also read Carr's Bride of Newgate. Not recommended, one of his weakest. Aside from not buying the heroine, I have a big problem with the fact that the murder just isn't impossible, and is not even emphasized much; more relegated to a minor detail. And its actual solution is discovered by chance. (Though I think we are to understand that one character has figured it out before then.)

For another writer, that might be OK, but Carr is virtually synonymous with locked room problems. He's universally recognized as the master of them. Since this is a relatively late work, it's a bit of a disappointment.

OTOH, since this is Mrs Eeyore's birthday weekend, all diets are suspended, and I could read Nero Wolfe without pain.

Posted by: Eeyore at March 22, 2020 09:22 AM (ZbwAu)

44 I finished reading "Two Years Before The Mast" by Richard H. Dana, Jr. A really good book. In 1834 after a bout of measles Dana left Harvard for over two years as a common sailor on two merchant ships hoping it would restore his health. It did. Published in 1840 his book was the first to chronicle the life of a common sailor. As part of the hide collecting trade he sailed from Boston to California and back to Boston, both via Cape Horn.

His second rounding of Cape Horn, which was in the winter, was sheer misery. One experience he writes about is common to all sailors: "for we had been so long together that we had heard each other's stories told over and over again, till we had them by heart; each one knew the whole history of each of the others, and we were fairly and literally talked out."

He returned to Harvard, became a lawyer, was an expert on maritime law, an anti-slavery advocate, and a founding member of the Free Soil Party. In his concluding chapter he summarizes ways to improve a sailor's life. A little over 100 years later Richard McKenna, called the "sailor's Homer", would write similar thoughts.

Included in the book is his essay "Twenty-four Years After" which chronicles his return to California in 1859. At times his observations are a bit melancholic. I think if he saw today's California he'd weep.

Posted by: Jake Holenhead at March 22, 2020 09:22 AM (P1GvV)

45
To my mind, the two lake battles (Erie and Champlain) are much the most impressive of our naval victories.

Posted by: Eeyore at March 22, 2020 09:13 AM


there's a really cool museum in Put-In-Bay, Ohio dedicated to our naval battles on the great lakes

Posted by: AltonJackson
and remember that we are not descended from fearful men
at March 22, 2020 09:22 AM (nbj1Q)

46 So was Nabokov a perv?

Posted by: vmom 2020 at March 22, 2020 09:23 AM (G546f)

47 Words I don't usually say, I dig that dress.

Posted by: no good deed at March 22, 2020 09:24 AM (MmFTx)

48 I just started reading The Great Influenza by John M. Berry - it's about the 1918 Spanish Flu. It begins by setting the stage for medical science in the US and globally. It's completely engrossing!

Posted by: Muad'dib at March 22, 2020 09:24 AM (/bKbU)

49 The War of 1812 is complicated. We certainly shocked the Brits with the
frigate victories, coming after 19 years of their beating everyone.
OTOH, there's really no doubt that our 3 big frigates were much more
powerful ships.


If you're interested in this topic, you'll like Six Frigates, by Ian Toll, which is an excellent history of the early American navy. They really did shock the Brits, who assumed we were incapable of competing with the RN.

Posted by: pep at March 22, 2020 09:24 AM (T6t7i)

50 I finished the Iron Dragon trilogy, by Robert Kroese. A crew of 23rd century human spacers, at war with a hostile alien race on the verge of wiping out humanity, accidentally travel back in time and crash land in 9th century Norway. To save humanity's future, they must ally with some Vikings and build a spacecraft, essentially reinventing all the 20th century technology that made the Gemini program possible. Kroese really puts his characters through the wringer. Oh, and some of the hostile aliens also crash on Earth, and they bioengineer a deadly flu strain and unleash a pandemic in Western Europe.

Posted by: DIY Daddio at March 22, 2020 09:25 AM (RJscS)

51 Book Dress:

It's a bodice ripper.

Posted by: NaCly Dog at March 22, 2020 09:25 AM (u82oZ)

52 Related to books: for our weekly Friday night movies, my friend and I are tackling the complete North and South miniserieses. (Miniserii?)

So we finished Book 1 and are now on Book 2. Lots of great characters and acting and they really try to get the details right. Kirstie Alley literally chewing on scenery is tremendous.

Anyhow, that got me to dust off Battles and Leaders and read some of the articles.

For those who don't know, just about every famous quote or writing people use in the Civil War histories came from Battles and Leaders, which was an anthology of articles run 20 years after the war by Century Magazine.

This was where the first debates started to rage as the veterans had it out in the pages of a very widely read magazine. The controversies over Gettysburg, Jeff Davis' leadership, etc., really got going.

It's not something you can read straight through (I tried!) because it's very uneven, but it's awesome to pull down a volume and pick out an article.

One very cool thing about it is that the topics are all over the place, so you get very detailed looks at otherwise obscure topics in overlooked parts of the war.

Yesterday I read a piece about Twiggs' surrender in Texas. For those who don't know, the bulk of the US Army in 1860 was stationed in Texas, keeping an eye on Indians and Mexico. The commander of that department was David Twiggs, who was a southern sympathizer.

In fact, he was a traitor in every sense. Instead of gathering his forces for mutual protection and pressure Texas to stay in the Union, he immediately began negotiations for surrendering his posts.

Washington got wind of this and sent out a replacement, so Twiggs accelerated his timeline and by the time the new commander was in place, Twiggs had surrendered his forces.

He then resigned his commission and was made a Confederate general. He died shortly thereafter.

This kind of crap was not unique and it puts a big blot on claims of "Southern Honor" regarding secession.

I can understand being conflicted between state and nation given the time. But to continue to wear the uniform while working to undermine your oath only to resign when the task is done and accept a *promotion* in the new military is vile.

Posted by: Ace-Endorsed Author A.H. Lloyd at March 22, 2020 09:25 AM (cfSRQ)

53 36 As Corny as it may sound. I'm reading the Bible-- Again. I now realize how much of it just "entered and left" with no lasting impression. It is important to understand the OLD and NEW testaments are linked, and, in surprising ways.
Try reading Psalms 22. Is THIS a peek into the "Lost Years" of the youth of Jesus???
Posted by: rld with coffee at March 22, 2020 09:16 AM (7uZmJ)
_______

The new ignorance of the Bible is why people today often think Christ's words from The Cross somehow refute Christianity.

Posted by: Eeyore at March 22, 2020 09:25 AM (ZbwAu)

54 And as to The Good Shepherd , back the day , when a fellow traveled for business that was how one killed the hours of down time/boredom on the plane and in the transit lounge . No in flight movies no laptops but plenty to read / And the best airport bookstores were in the anglosphere . I got started on the Flashmans from a book store/ newsstand in the airport in Cal-Gary . And the Hornblowers were a staple . back before the O'Brien Aubrey/Maturin things . Back when reading was a past time and not a chore

Posted by: jaytrain at March 22, 2020 09:25 AM (eh3OZ)

55 The who dis gal looks like she is sitting in the same reading nook as Orson Welles.

Posted by: no good deed at March 22, 2020 09:26 AM (MmFTx)

56 This week I read a compilation of Louis L'amour short stories: From the Listening Hills. I like LL because he writes in a very workman-like way, like it was a daily job. The downside is that it gives all of his fiction a sameness, be it Western or other. But it's comfortable and familiar, so I enjoy it on occasion.

Posted by: Long-time Commenter, First-time Reader at March 22, 2020 09:26 AM (Nu6Gg)

57 I think I'm going to start reading Mark Gimenez's 3rd book, The Perk, to pass the time this week. His first book, The Color Of Law, was outstanding. The Dallas setting also made it interesting to me. (Not my hometown, but I've spent a lot of time in metro Dallas.) His second book, The Abduction, was kind of disappointing - almost a rip off of Harlan Cohen in many respects. If the 3rd book doesn't disappoint, I'll keep plowing through his books. I do enjoy how he captures the essence of white collar Texas.

Posted by: Buck Throckmorton at March 22, 2020 09:26 AM (d9Cw3)

58 WTF is wrong with men's clothes designers? They just piss off male models (ever see one wearing pants here smile?) and gain my contempt.


Champs, look at Cary Grant.

Posted by: NaCly Dog at March 22, 2020 09:27 AM (u82oZ)

59 A today only Kindle Daily Deal is "A Hobbit, a Wardrobe, and a Great War: How J.R.R. Tolkien and C.S. Lewis Rediscovered Faith, Friendship, and Heroism in the Cataclysm of 1914-1918" by Joseph Loconte. $1.99

I've mentioned this book before. It discusses the conditions, especially cultural, that made WW I such a horrific matter and the problems that derived from the war. This is the background that, by contrast, shows CS Lewis and Tolkien for the giants of faith and philosophy they were.

It's only a little over 200 pages but I found it to be interesting.

Posted by: JTB at March 22, 2020 09:27 AM (7EjX1)

60 44 I finished reading "Two Years Before The Mast" by Richard H. Dana, Jr..... Published in 1840 his book was the first to chronicle the life of a common sailor.
Posted by: Jake Holenhead at March 22, 2020 09:22 AM (P1GvV)
______

Actually, Jack Nastyface (William Robinson) beat him by a few years. But Dana is good.

Posted by: Eeyore at March 22, 2020 09:29 AM (ZbwAu)

61 Even if it's these pants, and if there's anybody who should be self-quarantining, it's this guy.

That pasty, shaven-headed homunculus looks like he's been rifling through Nita Naldi's closet.

Posted by: Mary Poppins' Practically Perfect Piercing at March 22, 2020 09:29 AM (2JVJo)

62 58
WTF is wrong with men's clothes designers? They just piss off male
models (ever see one wearing pants here smile?) and gain my contempt.


I think it's more a political and cultural FU than anything else. Have you ever seen a man actually wearing this sort of nonsense?

Posted by: pep at March 22, 2020 09:29 AM (T6t7i)

63 Haven't been reading much lately, we moved a few months ago and getting some 5000 books re-organized has been a real chore. However, I did read Six Modern Myths: Challenging Christian Faith by Philip J. Sampson. This particular copy was published in 2000 (there seems to be revised edition published in 2001). The author examines various secular attacks against Christianity and examines each in order to show the distortions and half-truths. For example, the "persecution" of Galileo is based on a fable created by anti-Catholic Church compilers of the 18th C. French encyclopedia. Some of the information was already familiar to me, but I was unaware of the neo-paganism roots of the Environmentalist movement.

Not a particularly lengthy work but a bit dry. It definitely reads like an academic thesis. That said, a worthwhile book and rat a spot on the bookshelf with other religious-themed books. Rating = 4.1/5.0

Posted by: Retired Buckeye Cop is now an engineer at March 22, 2020 09:29 AM (00fXp)

64 Peeks in -

Oops! Back in a sec. Retrieving pants.

Posted by: Tonypete at March 22, 2020 09:29 AM (Y4EXg)

65 I claim first! CBD used his COB-fu!

Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at March 22, 2020 09:01 AM (Dc2NZ)

Prima Nocta Mattina!

Posted by: CharlieBrown'sDildo at March 22, 2020 09:30 AM (dLLD6)

66 Good morning, all!
Spent week at somewhat social distance - and working on projects in the garden, and at the house, which necessitated several trips to Lowes' and Home Depot. Both of which joints were jumping. I suspect a lot of people having to spend time at home are turning to little home-renovation projects.
In the interests of those stuck at home reading books - I put my three lengthiest books on sale in the Kindle version: The Adelsverein Trilogy, and the Luna City Compendium #1 and #2 are all on sale at Amazon for half the regular price. I don't want to risk a turn in the barrel by posting the direct links, but if you are interested, go to my author page on Amazon - Celia Hayes, and look for the Kindle versions of those three books.

Posted by: Sgt. Mom at March 22, 2020 09:30 AM (xnmPy)

67 Have two library books I'm rationing slowly, since it's closed:

"The Roosevelt Myth" (John T. Flynn) FDR was a real p.o.s.

"Churchill's bomb", not started yet.

Posted by: getting the cabin fever banned back togethrt at March 22, 2020 09:31 AM (2Oer5)

68 It really bothers me that the creature in the 'these pants' section is using MY valuable oxygen. And that goes double for whatever designed and created that abomination. The 'these pants' examples can be silly, amusing, or off-putting. Today's qualifies as disturbing and disgusting.

Posted by: JTB at March 22, 2020 09:31 AM (7EjX1)

69 you'll like Six Frigates, by Ian Toll, which is an
excellent history of the early American navy.

Posted by: pep at March 22, 2020 09:24 AM (T6t7i)

Seconded! Really interesting book. I especially enjoyed the construction details....

Posted by: CharlieBrown'sDildo at March 22, 2020 09:32 AM (dLLD6)

70 I should add that Bruce Catton has a neat counterfactual regarding Twiggs.

You see, Col. Robert E. Lee was also in Texas and some in the War Department figured he should be appointed in place of Twiggs immediately. However, Scott wanted Lee recalled to take over the entire Army, so Lee came back to Washington, was offered the high command and declined.

The rest is history.

But what if Lee had been ordered to take over the Dept. of Texas? Catton argues that he'd have immediately mobilized his command and aggressively defended US property against Texas, which had not yet voted to secede. There was a strong pro-Union movement there, and with a large federal military contingent under a pre-eminent leader, maybe Texas would have stayed loyal.

Recall that Virginia was still in the Union, so if secessionists in Texas had tried a rising, Lee would absolutely have put them down.

With that example, maybe no civil war? Or a smaller confederacy with Lee leading federal forces. Interesting to think about.

Posted by: Ace-Endorsed Author A.H. Lloyd at March 22, 2020 09:32 AM (cfSRQ)

71 Eeek. Those aren't even pants. He looks like he stole Morticia Adams' nightie. And her boots.

Posted by: bluebell at March 22, 2020 09:33 AM (/669Q)

72 49 The War of 1812 is complicated. We certainly shocked the Brits with the
frigate victories, coming after 19 years of their beating everyone.
OTOH, there's really no doubt that our 3 big frigates were much more
powerful ships.


If you're interested in this topic, you'll like Six Frigates, by Ian Toll, which is an excellent history of the early American navy. They really did shock the Brits, who assumed we were incapable of competing with the RN.

Posted by: pep at March 22, 2020 09:24 AM (T6t7i)
______

Yes, got it. A present from the Mrs. The 3 superstar frigates were the 44's, United States, President, and of course, Constitution. Nothing the Brits had could match them. They did reluctantly build a few big ones that showed up late. But ships like that were very expensive.

Oddly, the President is the one that lacked a big win, and was in fact captured. Yet she was probably the the best of the 3, on account of her speed. United States was reputedly sluggish.

Strictly I've given up naval history for Lent. But today is Sunday - a feast day even in Lent, plus that really means only reading; I'm free to talk about it.

Posted by: Eeyore at March 22, 2020 09:33 AM (ZbwAu)

73 28: I'm doing other stuff too, reorganizing my supplies a bit, donating a few to friends and family.
But I did read some of the Fulton Sheen book before rereading some Aristophanes.

I have a copy of a book called Poets, Princes, and Private Citizens that discusses the politics of various literary works from Jane Austen to Jack London. It included a chapter (essay) on Aristophanes, so I couldn't resist as I liked his work back in college

As for Fulton, the book is of course prescient and well done, but having no background in Catholic theologians, I had a certain amount of research to do as I read and will undoubtedly continue to research and read. I was unaware of some of the early aspects of the USSR and it's deliberate destruction of the traditional family, so it was amazing to see the similarities between commies in the early 20th century and the ones here today. For example, I was surprised by the early focus on abortion and the abandonment of children

Sheen's book requires, for me anyway, a lot of extra work, but it's been worth it. As with any book of this nature, I have needed to take breaks to find something lighter before sleep

Posted by: CN at March 22, 2020 09:34 AM (ONvIw)

74 46 So was Nabokov a perv?

I actually suspect not. When he goes blue in "Lolita" and "Pale Fire" he's parodying the literary and university establishments of his time. He's calling out his colleagues , publishing "edgy" material and covering for it, as pervs.

Posted by: boulder t'hobo at March 22, 2020 09:35 AM (ykYG2)

75 Tom Sharpe did the same in 'The Great Pursuit' but HE EXPLAINED HOW IT WAS FUNNY.

Posted by: boulder t'hobo at March 22, 2020 09:36 AM (ykYG2)

76 who dis : Jane Wyman

Posted by: runner at March 22, 2020 09:36 AM (zr5Kq)

77 Lieberry girl sure seems fetching.

Those pants. That "fella" ain't going to work dressed like that is he?

Who Dis......don't know but she can scratch my back with those nails of her's any day.

Posted by: Hairyback Guy at March 22, 2020 09:36 AM (Z+IKu)

78 Q couple of weeks ago someone suggested "Sword Woman", a collection of Robert E. Howard non-Conan stories. They are superb. Howard had an uncanny ability to bring the reader into the atmosphere and action of his stories, no matter how esoteric.

I have all the Conan and Kull stories and a good selection of Howard's other works. This one adds a lot of enjoyment.

Posted by: JTB at March 22, 2020 09:37 AM (7EjX1)

79 The new ignorance of the Bible is why people today often think Christ's words from The Cross somehow refute Christianity.
Posted by: Eeyore at March 22, 2020 09:25

I think it many cases it's not mere ignorance, but outright avoidance.
"As it was in the days of Noah, so will it be at the coming of the Son of Man. "

Posted by: rld with coffee at March 22, 2020 09:37 AM (7uZmJ)

80 CN, I love reading Fulton Sheen. He will frequently insert a touch of humor which i appreciate. I always feel uplifted reading his words.

You might enjoy seeing a video of him speaking. He was captivating.

Posted by: bluebell at March 22, 2020 09:39 AM (/669Q)

81 It's a bodice ripper.
Posted by: NaCly Dog



*********


Harlequin Precautions - a limerick

"Dear Paolo!" sighed the small town goddess
"We dare not let anyone spot us!
We can have an affair
Just don't muss my hair
And for heaven's sake, don't rip my bodice!"

Posted by: Muldoon at March 22, 2020 09:39 AM (m45I2)

82 So, one of my many, many faults is that I have a habit of picking up a book, quickly riffling through it and then buying it, only to find when I get home that I don't really care for it at all.

Which is what happened yesterday when I bought the new book Hitler's First Hundred Days, which, coincidentally, is also the hundredth book I now have about the Third Reich.

It is a study not just of how Hitler quickly maneuvered von Papen, Hugenberg and others out of the way to solidify Nazi control of Germany, but also how quickly opportunists, band-wagoneers and the frightened rushed to "get right" with the new regime.

My problem - and I've only begun the book - is that it's a bad balance between pop history and solid, meaty information, so far as I can see. I can't really go beyond that other than to say that the writer's style irritates me. Still, I have bought it and in my library it will stay.

https://tinyurl.com/vodmbpx

Posted by: Mary Poppins' Practically Perfect Piercing at March 22, 2020 09:39 AM (2JVJo)

83 74
46 So was Nabokov a perv?



I actually suspect not. When he goes blue in "Lolita" and "Pale
Fire" he's parodying the literary and university establishments of his
time. He's calling out his colleagues , publishing "edgy" material and covering for it, as pervs.

Posted by: boulder t'hobo at March 22, 2020 09:35 AM (ykYG2)

---
My father is a huge Nabokov fan and when I asked to borrow Lolita, he noted that it's not what you think. He didn't give anything away, but just said to watch for misdirection and pay attention to the dogs.

He was right, of course. Nabokov is going to town and was so good, contemporary critics thought it was non-fiction because of the forward.

Posted by: Ace-Endorsed Author A.H. Lloyd at March 22, 2020 09:40 AM (cfSRQ)

84 Top hunnert.

Posted by: eleven at March 22, 2020 09:40 AM (Qf83p)

85 You might enjoy seeing a video of him speaking. He was captivating.

Posted by: bluebell at March 22, 2020 09:39 AM (/669Q)

Thanks, I'll check youtube. The book is heavy duty as you might guess and its descriptions of life in the USSR are depressing at a minimum.

Posted by: CN at March 22, 2020 09:40 AM (ONvIw)

86 The exploits of the frigates of the young U.S. Navy was one of the few highlights of the War of 1812 from the American perspective. The performance of the American ground forces was generally pretty execrable for the first year of the war. One of the curious features of the sailing navies was how they rated there warships: our 44 gun frigates were closer to a British 60 gun ship of the line because carronades (large bore, short-barreled artillery) were not counted for the rating and we Americans packed a bunch of extra corronades on our frigates. By the end of the war, the British navy instructed their frigate captains to not engage the American frigates one-on-one.

Posted by: Retired Buckeye Cop is now an engineer at March 22, 2020 09:41 AM (00fXp)

87 7 Jennifer Jones

Posted by: Tommy at March 22, 2020 09:02 AM (rpxSz)


Early winner.

Posted by: OregonMuse, AoSHQ Thought Leader, Pants Monitor & Social Distancing Professional at March 22, 2020 09:41 AM (FbBpr)

88 63 ...However, I did read Six Modern Myths: Challenging Christian Faith by Philip J. Sampson. This particular copy was published in 2000 (there seems to be revised edition published in 2001). The author examines various secular attacks against Christianity and examines each in order to show the distortions and half-truths. For example, the "persecution" of Galileo is based on a fable created by anti-Catholic Church compilers of the 18th C. French encyclopedia. ...
Rating = 4.1/5.0
Posted by: Retired Buckeye Cop is now an engineer at March 22, 2020 09:29 AM (00fXp)
________

The Flat Earth myth has been a particular bugaboo of mine for ages. It has a lot to do with my conservatism. Even as a kid, I knew better; Morison's Admiral of the Ocean Sea was always on dad's bookshelf, and he demolishes it. And he was well known. But still they persisted.

If you want to read a lot on the Galileo myth, try this:
https://tinyurl.com/vlcaku2

Posted by: Eeyore at March 22, 2020 09:42 AM (ZbwAu)

89 Good morning, OMuse. I don't know how you found that top picture, but it's perfect.

Posted by: bluebell at March 22, 2020 09:43 AM (/669Q)

90 Posted by: OregonMuse, AoSHQ Thought Leader, Pants Monitor & Social Distancing Professional at March 22, 2020 09:41 AM (FbBpr)

Who was the "not her" you thought we'd see?

Posted by: CN at March 22, 2020 09:43 AM (ONvIw)

91 I finished reading a very good book I helped encourage the writer to put down on paper. But I first read it online in the Europa (think GDW big, big wargames) use-group.

FredStories: The Memoirs of Friedrich G. Helfferich as Told Online.

We were discussing WWII in the Europa use group when Fred spoke up. He was a Signal Corp Oberleutnant and Hauptmann in the 26th Panzer Division. He told us his WWII stories, which were fascinating. He would give us the map and hex designation of where the stories happened. He was on the Russian Front behind the lines, and in the bitter Italian Campaign until the end of the war.

He wrote these for us, and we, and especially I, encouraged him to write them up. A year before he died, he expanded his stories to a fill life's biography.

Fred was in a very well-placed German Family. If his father had lived, he could have been the rational German Leader. But he died in a train accident before Hitler's rise to power.

He frankly discusses what he saw and did in Germany before the war, during the war, and then his eventual migration to a well-respected Penn State University Professor in Chemical Engineering.

His take on post war America is extremely interesting. He comes across as quite a singular character, with keen insights. Recommended, if this is your thing, or even if it was close. The book is better as a sum of his life, and unexpectedly fun to read. I was surprised by how much I got from the book.

Posted by: NaCly Dog at March 22, 2020 09:43 AM (u82oZ)

92 Breakout at Stalingrad by Heinrich Gerlach

The story of how this book became written and published is almost as interesting as the novel itself. Gerlach was a lieutenant assigned to the intelligence section of a Panzer division surrounded at Stalingrad. He fought to the bitter dnd, was wounded in the head and captured, and spent years as a captive of the Soviets. While a prisoner, he wrote this book in secret using whatever materials he could find. Eventually the Soviets discovered and confiscated the book. And eventually he was repatriated to East Germany when he agreed to act as an informer. Eventually he escaped to the west. Once there he attempted to recreate his novel even using a hypnotist in an attempt to remember details. The resulting novel, The Forsaken Army, was published in 1957 and sold well although it was believed to be a mere shadow of the original. In 2012, the original confiscated manuscript was found by a German literature researcher 20 years after Gerlach's death. This is that manuscript.

I'm half way through and the book is quite good, although very depressing. So far, there has been little combat, just
fear, hunger, cold , and dying hope. The book thus far is mostly about individual soldiers' finding a way to cope with the unthinkable. The Nazis do not come off well. Foreshadowing the final weeks of the war to come in two and a half years, the high command presents fantasy plans staffed by imaginary soldiers and armed with imaginary weapons which will, once and for all, crush the Soviets and win the war.

The characters are believable and interesting. One, a corporal driver, had had a complete break with his communist parents when he became a Nazi believing that Hitler would institute true socialism as the very name of the party promised. Another true believer Christian Nazi thinks he is fighting for the peace and liberation of Russia and Europe. He is shocked when his good and moral friend openly hopes for their defeat because a world in which Hitler wins would be unbearable. Worse, he proves it.

I could quibble about the title selected by the translator. The Breakout in question, as unconvincingly explained by the translator, is the breakthrough when the Russians finally breach the German defenses. Also, I'm like a nerd and would have appreciated more detail than just a "tank", "airplane", or "gun". But these are minor issues and I am quite enjoying the book.

Posted by: Anonosaurus Wrecks, Tyrannosaur Wrangler at March 22, 2020 09:44 AM (+y/Ru)

93 Mmmmm. . .Morticia Addams in a nightgown.

https://tinyurl.com/rdyrhtc

Posted by: Mary Poppins' Practically Perfect Piercing at March 22, 2020 09:44 AM (2JVJo)

94 Who was the "not her" you thought we'd see?



Claudette Colbert ?

Posted by: runner at March 22, 2020 09:44 AM (zr5Kq)

95 Alll but the 3rd and the last are quite correct.

Posted by: Eeyore at March 22, 2020 09:04 AM (ZbwAu)

#3 Should have been Lyin' Ryan, and thus would have been correct

Posted by: Commissar Hrothgar at March 22, 2020 09:44 AM (BiNEL)

96 16 I noticed that the last two - Weds and Fri - of the Ape's Who Dis?'s were suggested on last weeks book thread. Is this a trend?
Posted by: Eeyore at March 22, 2020 09:08 AM (ZbwAu


Not necessarily. But I am keen to pick up 'who dis' suggestions wherever I can find them.

Posted by: OregonMuse, AoSHQ Thought Leader, Pants Monitor & Social Distancing Professional at March 22, 2020 09:45 AM (FbBpr)

97 I think it many cases it's not mere ignorance, but outright avoidance.

"As it was in the days of Noah, so will it be at the coming of the Son of Man. "

Posted by: rld with coffee at March 22, 2020 09:37 AM (7uZmJ)

---
Yes, one has to blot out a lot of it to do the whole "progressive Christian" thing.

I remember the Anglican hierarchy resisting the call for a "re-baptism" to honor transgenders. They made a statement that it was contrary to tradition and scripture, the shouting continued and they said "Yeah, okay."

Posted by: Ace-Endorsed Author A.H. Lloyd at March 22, 2020 09:45 AM (cfSRQ)

98 Attn author AH Lloyd: It's true that Texas had a significant population of pro-Union citizens. Gov Sam Houston resigned his office rather than take the oath of allegiance to the Confederacy. The German-Texans on Texas' southwestern frontier were strongly pro-Union and took up arms for the confederacy. In Comfort, TX there is a German language monument "Treue Der Union" to local Germans killed by Confederates at The Battle of the Nueces. The Germans were traveling to Mexico to escape Texas and join the Union army.

Posted by: Buck Throckmorton at March 22, 2020 09:45 AM (d9Cw3)

99 Who was the "not her" you thought we'd see?
Posted by: CN at March 22, 2020 09:43 AM (ONvIw)


My guess? Vivian Leigh.

Posted by: Mary Poppins' Practically Perfect Piercing at March 22, 2020 09:46 AM (2JVJo)

100 Excuse me, I meant to say that German Texans took up arms *against* the Confederacy.

Posted by: Buck Throckmorton at March 22, 2020 09:48 AM (d9Cw3)

101 37 Hey OM, did you get my email this week? Would have come from an address starting with "deepfried..."
Posted by: Long-time Commenter, First-time Reader at March 22, 2020 09:16 AM (Nu6Gg)


I don't recall seeing it. What address did you send it to?

Posted by: OregonMuse, AoSHQ Thought Leader, Pants Monitor & Social Distancing Professional at March 22, 2020 09:48 AM (FbBpr)

102 ''as my tommy said

Jennifer Jones

reading "Since you went away"

a movie she was in''

It's a wonderful movie too.

Posted by: Tuna at March 22, 2020 09:49 AM (gLRfa)

103 I'm reading "Plot It Yourself", one of the later Nero Wolfe stories. 1930s or 1950s, Rex Stout always comes through.

Posted by: JTB at March 22, 2020 09:49 AM (7EjX1)

104 Downloaded the Corona book and added to my Kindle. Quite easy, unlike many other places. Thank you for that.

Posted by: Txdino at March 22, 2020 09:49 AM (MwFzD)

105 I remember the Anglican hierarchy resisting the call for a "re-baptism" to honor transgenders. They made a statement that it was contrary to tradition and scripture, the shouting continued and they said "Yeah, okay."
Posted by: Ace-Endorsed Author A.H. Lloyd at March 22, 2020 09:45 AM (cfSRQ)

Sadly, many groups are catering to this delusion. It's horrible and pervasive. One of the things I'm doing with the grandsons involves the author/illustrator Mo Willems and consists of daily art videos. So far so good, but I have been watching them carefully after I discovered that his only child decided she was a he. He's kept politics out of his work, but you can't be too careful.

Posted by: CN at March 22, 2020 09:49 AM (ONvIw)

106 Has anyone ever done a study how reading glasses get so dirty so fast ?

Posted by: JT at March 22, 2020 09:49 AM (arJlL)

107 I believe better examples of Antonamasia would be things like Cankles, President Cock-Curious, OrangeManBad, and even The Ewok.

Posted by: t-bird at March 22, 2020 09:50 AM (dBiBP)

108 39 This is indeed a queer river, said Bromosel, as the water lapped at his thighs.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at March 22, 2020 09:00 AM (Dc2NZ)


One of my favorite lines in the book.

Posted by: OregonMuse, AoSHQ Thought Leader, Pants Monitor & Social Distancing Professional at March 22, 2020 09:50 AM (FbBpr)

109 98
Attn author AH Lloyd: It's true that Texas had a significant population
of pro-Union citizens. Gov Sam Houston resigned his office rather than
take the oath of allegiance to the Confederacy. The German-Texans on
Texas' southwestern frontier were strongly pro-Union and took up arms
for the confederacy. In Comfort, TX there is a German language monument
"Treue Der Union" to local Germans killed by Confederates at The Battle
of the Nueces. The Germans were traveling to Mexico to escape Texas and
join the Union army.

Posted by: Buck Throckmorton at March 22, 2020 09:45 AM (d9Cw3)

---
Yes, the article in Battles and Leaders points all of this out, and notes that if the Dept. of Texas hadn't been commanded by a traitor, these pro-union forces could have been armed as volunteers and incorporated into US forces.

The author claims that Twiggs knew this, and also knew the vote on secession was coming up so by removing the threat of US forces, he would demoralize the Unionists, encourage the secessionists and turn over substantial amounts of arms and war material to the rebels.

Posted by: Ace-Endorsed Author A.H. Lloyd at March 22, 2020 09:50 AM (cfSRQ)

110 Has anyone ever done a study how reading glasses get so dirty so fast ?
Posted by: JT at March 22, 2020 09:49 AM (arJlL)
------

Wow, you're wearing reading glasses? You must be old!

Posted by: bluebell, wearing her progressive lenses at March 22, 2020 09:51 AM (/669Q)

111 My guess? Vivian Leigh.
Posted by: Mary Poppins' Practically Perfect Piercing at March 22, 2020 09:46 AM (2JVJo)

Due to the face and the book, I thought Jones, but the "not her" made me think maybe it was Shirley, but it looked nothing like her!

Posted by: CN at March 22, 2020 09:52 AM (ONvIw)

112 ''Chicken pox and mumps are forgotten rites of passage.''

I had them all. Measles, mumps, rubella, chicken pox. Thank goodness for vaccines. Anti vac people are nuts.

Posted by: Tuna at March 22, 2020 09:52 AM (gLRfa)

113 Wow, you're wearing reading glasses? You must be old!
Posted by: bluebell, wearing her progressive lenses

LOL !

Hiya Bluebell !

Posted by: JT at March 22, 2020 09:53 AM (arJlL)

114 Recovering from open heart surgery, I was smart enough to stockpile books and small projects to keep me busy. Just finished "Unbroken", by Laura Hildebrand. It tells the true story of Louis Zamparini, a track star that competed in the 1936 Berlin games. During the war years, he was a crew member on a B-24, ditched in the Pacific, was captured by the horrid, inhuman Japs. The post war years, dealing with PTSD, alcoholism, and finally redemption was to me, at least as interesting as the war years. Well written, by the author of "Seabiscuit", well all I have to say, is that we dont make Americans like that anymore. If we do, you sure as hell dont hear it from the commie media. Half way through "Seabiscuit", both highly recommended. Jason J P.S .the Tucson VA is one of the most professional, competently run hospitals I have ever seen, and I have worked in healthcare for over 25 years. Thanks to the surgeons, staff, nursing and all involved.

Posted by: jasonj at March 22, 2020 09:53 AM (qSQLQ)

115 105 I remember the Anglican hierarchy resisting the call for a "re-baptism" to honor transgenders. They made a statement that it was contrary to tradition and scripture, the shouting continued and they said "Yeah, okay."
Posted by: Ace-Endorsed Author A.H. Lloyd at March 22, 2020 09:45 AM (cfSRQ)

Sadly, many groups are catering to this delusion. It's horrible and pervasive. One of the things I'm doing with the grandsons involves the author/illustrator Mo Willems and consists of daily art videos. So far so good, but I have been watching them carefully after I discovered that his only child decided she was a he. He's kept politics out of his work, but you can't be too careful.
Posted by: CN at March 22, 2020 09:49 AM

To quote my 14 year old --"Dad, what do these idiots NOT understand about Biology?"

Posted by: rld with coffee at March 22, 2020 09:53 AM (7uZmJ)

116 86 The exploits of the frigates of the young U.S. Navy was one of the few highlights of the War of 1812 from the American perspective. The performance of the American ground forces was generally pretty execrable for the first year of the war. One of the curious features of the sailing navies was how they rated there warships: our 44 gun frigates were closer to a British 60 gun ship of the line because carronades (large bore, short-barreled artillery) were not counted for the rating and we Americans packed a bunch of extra corronades on our frigates. By the end of the war, the British navy instructed their frigate captains to not engage the American frigates one-on-one.
Posted by: Retired Buckeye Cop is now an engineer at March 22, 2020 09:41 AM (00fXp)
________

There's also the fact that our 44s were armed with 24 pdrs as their heaviest long guns, while almost all the RN's had 18s (except razees). And those which weren't, were mostly armed with 12s and even 9 pdrs. The rule against engaging was explicitly directed to 18 pdr frigates.

Our frigates also had wide spar decks (open, sort of a gallery along the sides, to work the sails, but not a full deck). Unlike the British and European frigates, these were wide enough for heavy carronades. Like 32 pdrs, which were serious sh*t at the time.

And the hulls were as strong as a 64s would normally be. But again, they were very expensive to operate and maintain. Sort of like the Alaska class CBs of WWII.

Posted by: Eeyore at March 22, 2020 09:54 AM (ZbwAu)

117 I had them all. Measles, mumps, rubella, chicken pox. Thank goodness for vaccines. Anti vac people are nuts.
Posted by: Tuna at March 22, 2020 09:52 AM (gLRfa)

Yep. I had a foreign adult patient show up with chicken pox and I was the only one who easily recognized it. I'm glad for that though, means we rarely see it, and gave me bragging rights for a couple weeks as we organized staff to remove people who had not had the disease or the shot from the unit.

Posted by: CN at March 22, 2020 09:55 AM (ONvIw)

118 Hiya, JT!

Posted by: bluebell at March 22, 2020 09:55 AM (/669Q)

119 Morning, bookish Hordelings!
My latest acquisition is The Medieval Warrior, by Martin Dougherty. It's supposed to be research for my latest series, a Witcher-esque fantasy, but at the moment, I'm mostly looking at the illustrations.

I've also be alternating between Dilbert and Calvin and Hobbes for light reading. Calvin is that kid that every laughs at, but no one wants a kid like that. Watterson was a genius at capturing all the silly little details of kid-dom.

Posted by: right wing yankee at March 22, 2020 09:55 AM (zlzYb)

120 FYI
When I was a kid rubella was called the German measles which is probably considered racist now.

Posted by: Tuna at March 22, 2020 09:56 AM (gLRfa)

121 Uh, that would be 'everyone laughs at'. More coffee!

Posted by: right wing yankee at March 22, 2020 09:57 AM (zlzYb)

122 Ahoy, bookfagz!

Posted by: Insomniac - Ex Cineribus Resurgo at March 22, 2020 09:57 AM (NWiLs)

123 "Take care of your body as if you were going to live forever; and take care of your soul as if you were going to die tomorrow. "

-Saint Augustine

Mass can be found online in many more places today. Avail yourself of that opportunity.

That is all. God Bless.

Posted by: Hesco Gypsy, staring from 457 meters at March 22, 2020 09:57 AM (S4MNs)

124 91
Posted by: NaCly Dog at March 22, 2020 09:43 AM (u82oZ)
________

I used to be deeply into Europa. Finally gave up when it became clear the naval rules would never be satisfactory.

Still, IMO, GDW was the master company. The big Operation Crusader may be unplayable, but it's a true work of art. Frank Chadwick's designs usually were.

Posted by: Eeyore at March 22, 2020 09:57 AM (ZbwAu)

125 Yep. I had a foreign adult patient show up with chicken pox and I was the only one who easily recognized it. I'm glad for that though, means we rarely see it, and gave me bragging rights for a couple weeks as we organized staff to remove people who had not had the disease or the shot from the unit.
Posted by: CN at March 22, 2020 09:55 AM (ONvIw)

I'm amazed at the Cali docs who recognized bubonic plague
They must be really old.

Posted by: vmom 2020 at March 22, 2020 09:57 AM (G546f)

126 119: I feel that a bit of light, or at least not depressing, reading helps me sleep at night. Usually, I can sleep after a nice read of anything, but less so the past few weeks. I'm also pushing viewing toward comedy. I don't watch much TV, but my husband does, and then he complains of poor sleep. Swapping death and despair films for Herriot has helped him a lot

Posted by: CN at March 22, 2020 09:59 AM (ONvIw)

127 I picked up a copy of The Splendid and the Vile by Erik Larson.

-
I've been very tempted by that book.

Posted by: Anonosaurus Wrecks, Tyrannosaur Wrangler at March 22, 2020 09:59 AM (+y/Ru)

128 Good Sunday morning, horde!

This morning I finished Imperium, by Ryszard Kapuscinski, which you know I've been reading for the last three weeks. Lots to reflect on, and I am grateful for satellite mapping. Very cool to be able to read about a place, find it on google earth, and explore around a little bit. No wonder it took three weeks to read it!

I usually agree that it's a stupid time to be alive, but there are bright spots--like having that kind of information at my fingertips.

Posted by: April at March 22, 2020 09:59 AM (OX9vb)

129 The Flat Earth myth has been a particular bugaboo of mine for ages. .... Even as a kid, I knew better; Morison's Admiral of the Ocean Sea was always on dad's bookshelf, and he demolishes it. And he was well known. But still they persisted.
...
Posted by: Eeyore at March 22, 2020 09:42 AM (ZbwAu)


Yep, I've got Morison's book. Educated people knew that the Earth was curved (I seem to recall that reading that the ancient Greeks thought the Earth was a cylinder with the radius oriented North-to-South). It was more a debate about the diameter of the Earth. Columbus is rather a tragic figure and does not deserve the calumnies heaped upon him by the Leftists: he was a product of his time and the Lefties are upset that Europeans stopped human sacrifice and brought Christianity rather than slavery to the "New World."

Only dolts and the intellectually dishonest dispute that the institution of slavery is millennia-old.

Posted by: Retired Buckeye Cop is now an engineer at March 22, 2020 09:59 AM (00fXp)

130 44 Dana Point, California, is named for him and has a statue on the barrier island/park that protects the harbor.

Posted by: Caesar North of the Rubicon at March 22, 2020 10:00 AM (jK8Z7)

131 Another vote for "Six Frigates" by Ian Toll. It is a fascinating read if you have any interest in the period or the navy.

Posted by: JTB at March 22, 2020 10:00 AM (7EjX1)

132 96 16 I noticed that the last two - Weds and Fri - of the Ape's Who Dis?'s were suggested on last weeks book thread. Is this a trend?
Posted by: Eeyore at March 22, 2020 09:08 AM (ZbwAu

Not necessarily. But I am keen to pick up 'who dis' suggestions wherever I can find them.
Posted by: OregonMuse, AoSHQ Thought Leader, Pants Monitor & Social Distancing Professional at March 22, 2020 09:45 AM (FbBpr)
________

I think that, with Louise Brooks, you've now covered my entire fantasy team. I always pick Louise as #2, after Hedy. From there on, it varies with my mood.

Posted by: Eeyore at March 22, 2020 10:00 AM (ZbwAu)

133 99 Who was the "not her" you thought we'd see?
Posted by: CN at March 22, 2020 09:43 AM (ONvIw)

My guess? Vivian Leigh.
Posted by: Mary Poppins' Practically Perfect Piercing at March 22, 2020 09:46 AM (2JVJo)


I was riffing on the 'Joan Collins!' running gag that the 'who dis' seems to have generated.

Posted by: OregonMuse, AoSHQ Thought Leader, Pants Monitor & Social Distancing Professional at March 22, 2020 10:02 AM (FbBpr)

134 The Age of Fighting Sail is a very good read. Even better, it has stories and detail you won't have on The War of 1812 unless you are already a connoisseur.

I recently finished The Red Orchestra by Gilles Perreault from 1967. Slow at first and not sure how much later scholarship updated the understanding of what happened, but the first hand accounts that he got are gripping. It was even unsettling to read accounts of German treatment of Communist spies and realize again how exceptionally evil Hitler and the Nazis were.

Posted by: MKoepf at March 22, 2020 10:02 AM (DfSI5)

135 97
Yes, one has to blot out a lot of it to do the whole "progressive Christian" thing.

I remember the Anglican hierarchy resisting the call for a "re-baptism" to honor transgenders. They made a statement that it was contrary to tradition and scripture, the shouting continued and they said "Yeah, okay."
Posted by: Ace-Endorsed Author A.H. Lloyd at March 22, 2020 09:45 AM (cfSRQ)
_______

I wasted most of my adult life trying to defend Anglicanism. The hierarchy has virtually never been worth a barrel of warm piss, with a very few honorable exceptions. There is a long history of "this is the last straw" cases, going well before Newman.

Posted by: Eeyore at March 22, 2020 10:03 AM (ZbwAu)

136 I'm amazed at the Cali docs who recognized bubonic plague
They must be really old.
Posted by: vmom 2020

They couldn't have done it without their reading glasses !

Posted by: JT at March 22, 2020 10:04 AM (arJlL)

137 A little humor for the morning...

Dangerous Job:
https://preview.tinyurl.com/szcnog5

Dangerous Predator:
https://preview.tinyurl.com/uvrbxrx

Posted by: Slapweasel at March 22, 2020 10:04 AM (Ckg4U)

138 Who dis looks like Liz Taylor

Posted by: Roy at March 22, 2020 10:05 AM (ABjxW)

139 I'm amazed at the Cali docs who recognized bubonic plague
They must be really old.
Posted by: vmom 2020 at March 22, 2020 09:57 AM (G546f)

Ha! I worked in a hospital that was 100% psychiatry and addiction. Nobody expected any infectious disease brilliance or even adequacy. We screened out anyone who had a contagious illness, but ERs are quick to push psychotic patients out the door. I am glad to be gone as psych facilities have none of the equipment needed for wuflu.

I suspect they are upping the screening game to avoid having to retransfer patients.

On Topic: I got out the old Childcraft volumes I had tucked away to read to the grandsons. It's amazing how little of substance is available these days.

And this touches back to Sheen's comments about lack of personal responsibility. Kids books focus overwhelmingly on the group and it's responsibility to its members.

Posted by: CN at March 22, 2020 10:06 AM (ONvIw)

140 I was riffing on the 'Joan Collins!' running gag that the 'who dis' seems to have generated.
Posted by: OregonMuse, AoSHQ Thought Leader, Pants Monitor & Social Distancing Professional at March 22, 2020 10:02 AM (FbBpr)

Thanks.

Posted by: CN at March 22, 2020 10:06 AM (ONvIw)

141

I like my Book Girls 9 foot tall and my Coffee Gals small and Perked,bring me my Comics an a sammich sexy librarian.

Posted by: saf at March 22, 2020 10:06 AM (5IHGB)

142 114 Recovering from open heart surgery, I was smart enough to stockpile
books and small projects to keep me busy. Just finished "Unbroken", by
Laura Hildebrand.
Posted by: jasonj at March 22, 2020 09:53 AM (qSQLQ)--------------
So glad that you're on the mend, Jason. Hillenbrand is truly a gifted writer and her own story is as inspiring as that of her subjects. She wrote her books while largely confined to her home due to Chronic Fatigue Syndrome. I believe she wrote an essay about her experience, but hope that she writes an autobiography some day.

Posted by: Hoplite Housewife at March 22, 2020 10:07 AM (XXNQ+)

143 Slap! *waves*

Posted by: Insomniac - Ex Cineribus Resurgo at March 22, 2020 10:07 AM (NWiLs)

144 Eeyore

You and I are well matched in our knowledge of the US Navy.

Posted by: NaCly Dog at March 22, 2020 10:08 AM (u82oZ)

145 Hard to see Who Dis? on my dumb phone. At first I thought 'Pier Angeli' but even from here could see it's not a match.

Posted by: kallisto at March 22, 2020 10:08 AM (iCUDL)

146 Good morning, horde! This past week I finished Run by Blake Crouch. It's kind of like a zombie novel but without the zombies. There is some type of "event" that happens (never fully explained) that turns people into homicidal maniacs. They are organized and broadcast the names of people to be targeted, along with their addresses, over the radio. The story centers around a family who is forced to go on the run to escape the murderous crowds.

I am currently reading No One's Home by DM Pulley. It's a standard haunted house story.

Posted by: Jordan61 at March 22, 2020 10:08 AM (6ofTb)

147 I am still reading Josephus' "The Jewish War." It's the Penguin Classic. The print is tiny. I had to break down and buy a pair of reading glasses.

Posted by: JAS at March 22, 2020 10:09 AM (2BZBZ)

148 >>I'm amazed at the Cali docs who recognized bubonic plague
They must be really old.
Posted by: vmom 2020

In a few years they can teach the next epidemic victims how to walk around saying "Unclean! Unclean!"

Posted by: Roy at March 22, 2020 10:09 AM (ABjxW)

149 Who dis?

A very young Patricia Neal?

Posted by: JAS at March 22, 2020 10:10 AM (2BZBZ)

150

Outside of a Dog, I ALSO smell ASS....................on the Subway!!!

Outside of a Planned Parenthood I smell dead babies.

Posted by: saf at March 22, 2020 10:10 AM (5IHGB)

151 Has anyone read Notes from the Underground? I'm about halfway through it. I started out hating the narrator but now I think he's just an awkward loner and kind of sad.

Posted by: Vanya at March 22, 2020 10:10 AM (ioTA8)

152 AHLloyd: The book Poet's, Princes, and Private Citizens was written by one of your kind, btw (JMC) who I remember meeting a few times back in Case Hall. His suitemate was a friend with whom I shared many an late night walk from the science library.

Posted by: CN at March 22, 2020 10:10 AM (ONvIw)

153 I've been reading the New Testament lately. Trying to refresh myself on how this whole pandemic things resolves itself.

Posted by: Roy at March 22, 2020 10:11 AM (ABjxW)

154 My father is a huge Nabokov fan and when I asked to borrow Lolita, he noted that it's not what you think. He didn't give anything away, but just said to watch for misdirection and pay attention to the dogs.

He was right, of course. Nabokov is going to town and was so good, contemporary critics thought it was non-fiction because of the forward.
Posted by: Ace-Endorsed Author A.H. Lloyd at March 22, 2020 09:40 AM (cfSRQ)


He loved to work critics. There was a Parisian emigre critic who hated his poetry, so Vlad wrote something under a fake name that he thought would appeal to him, which it did and subsequently was reviewed glowingly by the critic. Then he wrote a short story, Vasiliy Shishkov, that laid out exactly what he did. The critic was suitably impressed to point out he "was a sufficiently skillful parodist to mimic genius". Nabokov pointed out that other writers spoke well of the critic whose main passions in life were Russian poetry and French sailors.

Posted by: Captain Hate at March 22, 2020 10:11 AM (y7DUB)

155 I am still reading Josephus' "The Jewish War." It's the Penguin Classic. The print is tiny. I had to break down and buy a pair of reading glasses.
Posted by: JAS at March 22, 2020 10:09 AM (2BZBZ)

It's crazy good.

Posted by: Vanya at March 22, 2020 10:11 AM (ioTA8)

156 144 Eeyore

You and I are well matched in our knowledge of the US Navy.
Posted by: NaCly Dog at March 22, 2020 10:08 AM (u82oZ)
________

A fascination from youth. Another of the "grown up" books I always was fascinated by was Chappelle's History of the American Sailing Navy. (Alas, the inside covers were defaced - by me - because Dad let me read them when I was too young to be trusted.)

And I grew up on the water. Ripping up my knee in HS kept me out of the Navy, actually. Father was a PBY pilot in WWII, his father was on sub chasers in WWI.

And on mom's side, I am actually related to Isaac Hull. Not descended, alas (that's from his despised uncle William), but a cousin. So it was instilled in me.

Posted by: Eeyore at March 22, 2020 10:12 AM (ZbwAu)

157 Ah the good old days when no one messed with the spelling of J-E-N-N-I-F-E-R. There was a local TV type who spelled it 'Gennaphyr'. Her parents were trying WAY too hard.

Posted by: kallisto at March 22, 2020 10:13 AM (iCUDL)

158
Watched the FSSP Live Mass from Christ the King Catholic Church in Sarasota this morning. Interesting how a private Mass is subtly different from a public one.

Posted by: Hadrian the Seventh at March 22, 2020 10:13 AM (7rVsF)

159 144
Eeyore



You and I are well matched in our knowledge of the US Navy.

Posted by: NaCly Dog at March 22, 2020 10:08 AM (u82oZ)

---
Yesterday I read an article about the defense of Fort Pickens in Pensacola harbor in 1861.

It's fascinating to see how many long-term strategic decisions devolved on local lieutenants and even ordnance sergeants.

The other detail that stuck out is how repeatedly the senior leadership went for the Confederacy yet the rank and file remained loyal, even under considerable hardship.

Posted by: Ace-Endorsed Author A.H. Lloyd at March 22, 2020 10:13 AM (cfSRQ)

160 Many Universities require proof of vaccination before enrollment. Some don't. Got an outbreak in Cali.

Posted by: runner at March 22, 2020 10:13 AM (zr5Kq)

161 Ah the good old days when no one messed with the spelling of J-E-N-N-I-F-E-R. There was a local TV type who spelled it 'Gennaphyr'. Her parents were trying WAY too hard.
Posted by: kallisto

She's still on, right ?

Posted by: JT at March 22, 2020 10:14 AM (arJlL)

162 The other detail that stuck out is how repeatedly the senior leadership went for the Confederacy





The Swamp ?

Posted by: runner at March 22, 2020 10:14 AM (zr5Kq)

163 Ah the good old days when no one messed with the spelling of J-E-N-N-I-F-E-R. There was a local TV type who spelled it 'Gennaphyr'. Her parents were trying WAY too hard.
Posted by: kallisto at March 22, 2020 10:13 AM (iCUDL)


Do not take Gennaphyr™ if you are allergic to ™.

Posted by: hogmartin at March 22, 2020 10:14 AM (t+qrx)

164 Another thing that I have been doing besides reading - since I can't go out to the local pub - is go through the backlog of silent movies I have. If you're not interested, skip this post.

Yesterday I watched 1915s Children of Eve, from the Edison studio. It starred Viola Dana as "Fifty-Fifty" Mamie, a New York slum girl who lives by winning dance contests and stealing. After snatching a feather from a peddler's cart, she is forced to hide in the office of a moral reform society, where she meets a young, handsome man who helps her to drop the life she is leading and become a good, Christian woman.

The climax of the film comes in a factory fire that all references state is a callback to the Trangle Shirtwaist Company fire of 1911, where many women were trapped in the burning building and died. At this point, the reformed Mamie is inside the building, in disguise (she is now a factory inspector) and though rescued, still dies, presumably of smoke inhalation.

The twist of the film is that Mamie is actually the illegitimate daughter of the factory owner and the young man who has tried to reform her is the owner's nephew.

I liked it, though for 1915 it could be a better film. It tends to be somewhat stagy, with most of the film consisting of interior shots, and not all of them very good ones, either.

But the movie was a good one for Dana, who had a long and successful career in the silents, but was never able to transition to talkies.

Dana herself is notable for one of the more horrible stories concerning silent movies. She was married to Children director John Collins, but he died of the Spanish flu in 1918. In 1920, she was engaged to stunt flyer Ormer Locklear and happened to be on location for his film The Skywayman.

The movie's highlighted stunt - Locklear's plane spinning out of control and crashing into an oil well - was supposed to have been filmed during the day with the use of red filters to simulate night, but Locklear insisted it be filmed at night. He arranged with the ground crew to shut off the arc lights illuminating the shot when he got near the derrick, telling them that it would allow him to see where he was and pull out of the dive.

But somehow the lights never went off and a blinded Locklear slammed into the ground, dying instantly. Dana, who had seen it all, was so traumatized that she refused to fly again, and didn't for the next 25 years.

Posted by: Mary Poppins' Practically Perfect Piercing at March 22, 2020 10:14 AM (2JVJo)

165 CN @ 126-
I've found that I can't watch tv before bed and expect to fall asleep; I think it's something to do with the blue light. I also have weird(er) dreams. So, books it is! Hey, how else am I supposed to pretend to be an intellectual?

Posted by: right wing yankee at March 22, 2020 10:14 AM (zlzYb)

166 87 7 Jennifer Jones

Posted by: Tommy at March 22, 2020 09:02 AM (rpxSz)

Early winner.
Posted by: OregonMuse, AoSHQ Thought Leader, Pants Monitor & Social Distancing Professional at March 22, 2020 09

It's sad day when one's sock beats one to the punch

Posted by: REDACTED at March 22, 2020 10:16 AM (rpxSz)

167 147
I am still reading Josephus' "The Jewish War." It's the Penguin
Classic. The print is tiny. I had to break down and buy a pair of
reading glasses.

Posted by: JAS at March 22, 2020 10:09 AM (2BZBZ)
---
I need to own this.

In high school and into college I went into an ancient history reading frenzy for a while. Josephus was on my upcoming list but I turned to different matters before I got to him. I'll make a note to grab a copy.

Posted by: Ace-Endorsed Author A.H. Lloyd at March 22, 2020 10:16 AM (cfSRQ)

168 CN @ 126-
I've found that I can't watch tv before bed and expect to fall asleep; I think it's something to do with the blue light. I also have weird(er) dreams. So, books it is! Hey, how else am I supposed to pretend to be an intellectual?
Posted by: right wing yankee

The more I want to read or watch something, the faster I fall asleep !

Posted by: JT at March 22, 2020 10:16 AM (arJlL)

169
I am still reading Josephus' "The Jewish War." It's the Penguin Classic.
The print is tiny. I had to break down and buy a pair of reading
glasses.


Posted by: JAS at March 22, 2020 10:09 AM (2BZBZ)



I read that many many moons ago. Good book very interesting on the history of that time

Posted by: TheQuietMan at March 22, 2020 10:17 AM (sTjkh)

170 I was riffing on the 'Joan Collins!' running gag that the 'who dis' seems to have generated.
Posted by: OregonMuse, AoSHQ Thought Leader, Pants Monitor & Social Distancing Professional at March 22, 2020 10:02 AM (FbBpr)


Not the best picture I've ever seen of her, but - Joan Collins with a book:

https://tinyurl.com/vgsv5lq

Posted by: Mary Poppins' Practically Perfect Piercing at March 22, 2020 10:18 AM (2JVJo)

171 166 87 7 Jennifer Jones

Posted by: Tommy at March 22, 2020 09:02 AM (rpxSz)

Early winner.
Posted by: OregonMuse, AoSHQ Thought Leader, Pants Monitor & Social Distancing Professional at March 22, 2020 09

It's sad day when one's sock beats one to the punch
Posted by: REDACTED at March 22, 2020 10:16 AM (rpxSz)

Pretty amazing for a deaf, dumb and blind kid.

Posted by: Insomniac - Ex Cineribus Resurgo at March 22, 2020 10:18 AM (NWiLs)

172 The more I want to read or watch something, the faster I fall asleep !
Posted by: JT at March 22, 2020 10:16 AM (arJlL)

I wish that was my issue. I religiously keep Ulysses on the nightstand as a last resort.

Posted by: CN at March 22, 2020 10:18 AM (ONvIw)

173 Watched the FSSP Live Mass from Christ the King
Catholic Church in Sarasota this morning. Interesting how a private Mass
is subtly different from a public one.



Posted by: Hadrian the Seventh at March 22, 2020 10:13 AM (7rVsF)


I've got the live stream of St. John Cantius' 9am (central) Mass on. Multiple screens are a good thing

Posted by: TheQuietMan at March 22, 2020 10:19 AM (sTjkh)

174 Still readinglistening to "Ghost Station" by Dan Wells. It's a work of fiction about a community (joint US/West German listening post in postwar Berlin) that I am not familiar with, so I can't say if it's accurate or gets it all wrong. I like it well enough.

Posted by: hogmartin at March 22, 2020 10:19 AM (t+qrx)

175 JT - I don't know. I rarely watch TV.

Posted by: kallisto at March 22, 2020 10:19 AM (iCUDL)

176 Not the best picture I've ever seen of her, but - Joan Collins with a book:

https://tinyurl.com/vgsv5lq

She's wearing clothes !

Posted by: JT at March 22, 2020 10:20 AM (arJlL)

177 I am toying with signing up for the two free months of kindle unlimited, largely to take advantage of amazon

Posted by: CN at March 22, 2020 10:20 AM (ONvIw)

178 Just finished the second book in Anne Cleeland's Acton and Doyle Scotland Yard series: Murder in Retribution. Completely hooked. Fascinating story line. Unpredictable. I've been reading til 1 in the morning and then trying to figure out where the story is going while I fall asleep. To me, the mark of great story telling. A great big thank you to whoever on the blog turned me on to this author.

Posted by: Sharon(willow's apprentice) at March 22, 2020 10:21 AM (QzF6i)

179 152
AHLloyd: The book Poet's, Princes, and Private Citizens was written by
one of your kind, btw (JMC) who I remember meeting a few times back in
Case Hall. His suitemate was a friend with whom I shared many an late
night walk from the science library.

Posted by: CN at March 22, 2020 10:10 AM (ONvIw)

---
Interesting.

I was demoralized to get an email from alma mater highlighting not its strict standards but the fact that just about everyone graduates.

Uh, no.

When I was there, we highlighted how half of the JMC freshman class flunked/dropped out because it was so tough. I remember the first session of the mandatory Policy class where we did the "look to your left, look to your right, half of you will be gone a year from now."

It was cool.

Now it's a daycare. Sad.

Posted by: Ace-Endorsed Author A.H. Lloyd at March 22, 2020 10:21 AM (cfSRQ)

180 Finished "The Last Picture Show" bu McMurtry this week. A very enjoyable read. Now half way through "Gringoes" by Portis. Portis always make you laugh. This is the last of his five published books that I have read. I'm going to miss Portis after this one.

Posted by: Puddin Head at March 22, 2020 10:21 AM (QZCjk)

181 Ah the good old days when no one messed with the spelling of J-E-N-N-I-F-E-R. There was a local TV type who spelled it 'Gennaphyr'. Her parents were trying WAY too hard.
Posted by: kallisto at March 22, 2020 10:13 AM (iCUDL)


Get bent.

Posted by: Gennifer Flowers at March 22, 2020 10:21 AM (2JVJo)

182 Reading (very slowly) Personal Memoirs of Ulysses S. Grant. On Kindletot's recommendation from way back. SOrt of started it and put it down, because...stuff. Now hopefully will finish. Can't wait to get to the parts about The Rebellion ! He starts his preface with "Man proposes and God disposes". Always good to remember.

Posted by: runner at March 22, 2020 10:22 AM (zr5Kq)

183 Since we are retired, and my wife is disabled, "social distancing" is just normal life for us. About 15 years ago, for (her) health reasons, I just had to lay down the law that hosting - and her cooking for - dinner parties was just over. She hated that, because she always loved it so. But she worked herself to death to do it.

Right now, I'm waiting for her to wake up again. She went back to bed. Need more pampering.

To combine two interests, I suspect I've told this before, but:

Early in our marriage, we adopted a rule about buying books. Each would get a comparable-cost one to balance. In a used bookstore, I came across Jellicoe's Crisis of the Naval War. But it was well over our agreed limit. I'm trying to figure how to swing it, when she walks up, holding two books, and with a pleading look on her face. "I know it's too much, but can I please have these?"

It was Julia Child's two volumes on French cooking, and annotated by a previous owner. Of course I said "Sure, but can I get this?"

So I got the Jellicoe the meals, and brownie points for being a sweet husband.

Sometimes life is good.

Posted by: Eeyore at March 22, 2020 10:22 AM (ZbwAu)

184 JT - I don't know. I rarely watch TV.
Posted by: kallisto

I watch the morning news sometimes, Barney Miller reruns, some judge shows and Green Acres when I can.

Posted by: JT at March 22, 2020 10:23 AM (arJlL)

185 Just finished rereading the Andromeda Strain. Seemed appropriate.

Posted by: RedMindBlueState at March 22, 2020 10:23 AM (dkvcO)

186
I've got the live stream of St. John Cantius' 9am (central) Mass on. Multiple screens are a good thing
Posted by: TheQuietMan at March 22, 2020 10:19 AM (sTjkh)


No, I didn't get dressed and didn't stand or kneel (there are no rubrics for the faithful anyway), but I got my missal out and gave it my undivided attention all the way through the Leonine prayers at the end. I thought it was the least I could do.

Posted by: Hadrian the Seventh at March 22, 2020 10:23 AM (7rVsF)

187 Posted by: runner at March 22, 2020 10:22 AM (zr5Kq)

It's a great read. Sherman's memoirs are good as well.

Posted by: Vanya at March 22, 2020 10:23 AM (ioTA8)

188 Ah the good old days when no one messed with the spelling of
J-E-N-N-I-F-E-R. There was a local TV type who spelled it 'Gennaphyr'.
Her parents were trying WAY too hard.

Posted by: kallisto at March 22, 2020 10:13 AM (iCUDL)



Jennifer Juniper


Posted by: TheQuietMan at March 22, 2020 10:25 AM (sTjkh)

189 I am still reading Josephus' "The Jewish War." It's the Penguin
Classic. The print is tiny. I had to break down and buy a pair of
reading glasses.

Posted by: JAS at March 22, 2020 10:09 AM (2BZBZ)
---
I need to own this.

In high school and into college I went into an ancient history reading frenzy for a while. Josephus was on my upcoming list but I turned to different matters before I got to him. I'll make a note to grab a copy.
Posted by: Ace-Endorsed Author A.H. Lloyd at March 22, 2020 10:16 AM (cfSRQ)


A Penguin I am slowly going through is Procopius' The Secret History, which is a behind-the-scenes account of the murders, poisonings and sexual shenanigans in the Byzantine court of Justinian and Theodora. Well written, especially since Procopius would have been executed had the empress known he was writing it.

Posted by: Gennifer Flowers at March 22, 2020 10:25 AM (2JVJo)

190 Damned sock.

Posted by: Mary Poppins' Practically Perfect Piercing at March 22, 2020 10:25 AM (2JVJo)

191 I feel a nap coming on.......

Posted by: JT at March 22, 2020 10:27 AM (arJlL)

192 Is Dr. Tony Fauci a fraud? France, Belgium and China are all successfully administering hydroxychloroquine and seeing huge reductions in their caseloads, and this Washington bureaucrat (and Hillary Clinton fanboy) is dragging his feet and doing all he can to slow down the administration of this drug in the U.S.

God help us.

https://www.americanthinker.com/articles/2020/03/fda_must_approve_hydroxychloroquine_now.html

Posted by: Joe Biden at March 22, 2020 10:27 AM (VDbGO)

193 29 Chicken pox and mumps are forgotten rites of passage.
Posted by: Bandersnatch at March 22, 2020 09:14 AM (gd9RK)


You will not forget about them when you get them the second time.
Acyclovere to the rescue.

Posted by: Cicero Kaboom! Omega Kid, O-Positive at March 22, 2020 10:27 AM (Vy7tf)

194 75 Tom Sharpe did the same in 'The Great Pursuit' but HE EXPLAINED HOW IT WAS FUNNY.

Posted by: boulder t'hobo at March 22, 2020 09:36 AM (ykYG2)



What a great run of comic novels, he had!

There was no one funnier in the English language (or any other?), when he was writing.

He's a bit like an rather mean PG Wodehouse or even nastier Evelyn Waugh. And yet, through it all an elegant writer.

Sidenote: He's a huge influence on my writing.

My favorite novels by him include:

"Vintage Stuff"
"The Throwback"
"Wilt" (and the Wilt series)
"Ancestral Vices"

"Wilt" is a good place to start with him if you wish to be eased in.

"Vintage Stuff" is a riot, esp if you've read novels like "Rogue Male".

"The Throwback" is barrel-proof Sharpe, strong-stuff indeed and hilarious.

And no, you are unlikely to like any of the characters. So if that's one of your Good Book Metrics...Beware!

Posted by: naturalfake at March 22, 2020 10:27 AM (z0XD8)

195 Another anecdote, this one mixing ancient history and wargames.

My worst subjects were always foreign languages; they are a complete mystery to me. I simply cannot imagine what it would be like to be bilingual. I bailed out of French into Latin, in despair.

Well, one time in college (where language was still required for a degree), one of my roommates got a wargame on the Battle of Alesia. Interested, I started reading up on it, including of course Caesar's Gallic Wars.

Come the final, the sight reading was - not the Aeneid, as expected, but Caesar's account of the battle.

Posted by: Eeyore at March 22, 2020 10:29 AM (ZbwAu)

196 The Swamp ?

Posted by: runner at March 22, 2020 10:14 AM (zr5Kq)

---
Very much part of the elite.

If you think about it, the southern planter class were the globalists of their time. They operated an entirely export-based economy that depended on low tariff imports to balance trade. They literally used slaves to keep labor costs low.

Now compare the upstart Republicans. What were their planks in 1860?

Tariffs to protect American industry
Limiting immigration to boost worker wages
Stopping the expansion of slavery into the territories
Infrastructure improvements, like railroads

Looks pretty familiar to me. For 'limit slavery' one could say "limit importation of below-market laborers with no legal protections."

I know a lot of libertarianish people try to paint Lincoln as a took of Northeastern Money, but those folks were invested in slavery as well. It was the small farmers, shopkeepers, mechanics and factory start-ups that supported the Republicans.

Since the officer corps was often tied to the planter class (which fancied themselves aristocrats), that's why so many deserted.


Posted by: Ace-Endorsed Author A.H. Lloyd at March 22, 2020 10:29 AM (cfSRQ)

197 192 Is Dr. Tony Fauci a fraud? France, Belgium and China are all successfully administering hydroxychloroquine and seeing huge reductions in their caseloads, and this Washington bureaucrat (and Hillary Clinton fanboy) is dragging his feet and doing all he can to slow down the administration of this drug in the U.S.

God help us.

https://tinyurl.com/hydroxychloroquine

-----------------------
As with all Deep State Actors you have to figure out who is his Sugar Daddy after he leaves office. Publishing companies are the conduit for payoffs from Corporate Kings. One of the many benefits to globalists for owning the Church of Manhattan Media.

Posted by: Puddin Head at March 22, 2020 10:29 AM (QZCjk)

198 Jeez, there go the margins (and my ability to read the thread on my phone).

Posted by: Jordan61 at March 22, 2020 10:29 AM (6ofTb)

199

@192

Thanks for blowing the margins, Joe.

Posted by: teej at March 22, 2020 10:30 AM (Jvty4)

200 Think Trump is being sabotaged by Dr. Tony Fauci.

Posted by: Sam Adams at March 22, 2020 10:30 AM (VDbGO)

201 Ah the good old days when no one messed with the spelling of
J-E-N-N-I-F-E-R. There was a local TV type who spelled it 'Gennaphyr'.
Her parents were trying WAY too hard.

Posted by: kallisto at March 22, 2020 10:13 AM (iCUDL)



Jennifer Juniper


Posted by: TheQuietMan at March 22, 2020 10:25 AM (sTjkh)


Brother Juniper

https://tinyurl.com/wbq2to2

Posted by: Mary Poppins' Practically Perfect Piercing at March 22, 2020 10:30 AM (2JVJo)

202 Been doing a lot of garden prep this week....not much else to do outside the house. Was planning on making a trek to Home Depot to buy some plants but only 27 degrees this morning and snow predicted tomorrow. What should I do?

Posted by: Sharon(willow's apprentice) at March 22, 2020 10:30 AM (QzF6i)

203 Did I just blow the margins?

Posted by: Mary Poppins' Practically Perfect Piercing at March 22, 2020 10:30 AM (2JVJo)

204 Getting 505 errors. Something about the server. Anybody else getting them

Posted by: Tuna at March 22, 2020 10:30 AM (gLRfa)

205 Anne Cleeland is an.ette

Posted by: vmom 2020 at March 22, 2020 10:31 AM (G546f)

206
When I was there, we highlighted how half of the JMC freshman class flunked/dropped out because it was so tough. I remember the first session of the mandatory Policy class where we did the "look to your left, look to your right, half of you will be gone a year from now."

It was cool.

Now it's a daycare. Sad.
Posted by: Ace-Endorsed Author A.H. Lloyd at March 22, 2020 10:21 AM (cfSRQ)

I remember people dropping out of JMC and heading for poli-sci or social work. My roommate was one of the ones who headed to a social work program and then spent her whole career at the SSA.

Some of the people from JMC at Case were interesting, others were pompous reds, but altogether I had a nice two years at Case and I attribute some of that to JMC. When I was there, they did some productions of classic plays and they were fun to see as one knew some of the actors. Having a library in the dorm was convenient as were the classrooms on the third floor.

Their current Dean was there as a student while I was at Case, it's nice that they hire their own.

Posted by: CN at March 22, 2020 10:31 AM (ONvIw)

207 Did I just blow the margins?
Posted by: Mary Poppins' Practically Perfect Piercing at March 22, 2020 10:30 AM (2JVJo)


#192 did.

Posted by: hogmartin at March 22, 2020 10:32 AM (t+qrx)

208 I'm on my iPad. No issues.

Posted by: Sharon(willow's apprentice) at March 22, 2020 10:32 AM (QzF6i)

209 Think Trump is being sabotaged by Dr. Tony Fauci.
Posted by: Sam Adams at March 22, 2020 10:30 AM (VDbGO)


Anybody who has exhibited any admiration for Scankles needs to be shown the door, stat.

Posted by: Mary Poppins' Practically Perfect Piercing at March 22, 2020 10:32 AM (2JVJo)

210 @199, Sorry, teej, my bad.

https://tinyurl.com/vcha2rr

Posted by: Sam Adams at March 22, 2020 10:33 AM (VDbGO)

211 It's a great read. Sherman's memoirs are good as well.
Posted by: Vanya at March 22, 2020 10:23 AM (ioTA


Maybe next. I enjoys memoirs when well written. Some theorize that Gran't might have been edited by Twain himself. Some say that it is completely baseless, written and edited in Grant's own hand, etc. If so, well written for an army shlub. Just shows that education in those days was more demanding. Even at West point... I have a bunch of Americana stacked up. Two books by Chernow (yes that guy) - Washington, Jefferson. They look intimidating, but sold for pennies, could not refuse.

Posted by: runner at March 22, 2020 10:33 AM (zr5Kq)

212 You will not forget about them when you get them the second time.
Acyclovere to the rescue.
Posted by: Cicero Kaboom! Omega Kid, O-Positive at March 22, 2020 10:27 AM (Vy7tf)

I had something called pityriasis rosea, that's in the chicken pox/shingles family. It was horrible, I had it for four months. Finally knocked it out with valacyclovir.

Posted by: Jordan61 at March 22, 2020 10:33 AM (6ofTb)

213 Getting 505 errors. Something about the server. Anybody else getting them
Posted by: Tuna at March 22, 2020 10:30 AM (gLRfa)


https://httpstatuses.com/505

That's a really bizarre error to be receiving. If it's a 500 instead, look for special characters/em dashes/curly quotes.

Posted by: hogmartin at March 22, 2020 10:33 AM (t+qrx)

214 It's very cruel of you all to suggest such cool-sounding books, at a time when I have no money, am downsizing so I can move this spring, and Amazon isn't shipping non-essentials. Cruel, I tell you.

Alas, I'll just have to make a list and buy them later.

Posted by: right wing yankee at March 22, 2020 10:33 AM (zlzYb)

215 did somebody compromise the margins ??

Posted by: runner at March 22, 2020 10:34 AM (zr5Kq)

216 I knew Anne Cleeland had a secret identity. Someone on the blog mentioned she had just published the 9th book in the series. So went in search and so happy I did.

Posted by: Sharon(willow's apprentice) at March 22, 2020 10:34 AM (QzF6i)

217 Think Trump is being sabotaged by Dr. Tony Fauci.

It's weird, they're in a lose-lose situation. Do we know if coronavirus is present in the blood? I think Hollywood got a bad batch from China.

Posted by: t-bird at March 22, 2020 10:35 AM (xSo9G)

218 A Penguin I am slowly going through is Procopius' The Secret History,
which is a behind-the-scenes account of the murders, poisonings and
sexual shenanigans in the Byzantine court of Justinian and Theodora.
Well written, especially since Procopius would have been executed had
the empress known he was writing it.

Posted by: Gennifer Flowers at March 22, 2020 10:25 AM (2JVJo)

---
I loved that. Great stuff.

Speaking of wargaming and reading....

My classical history purchases were guided by West End Games' "Imperivm Romanvm II", which was the ultimate wargame of the Roman Empire.

The scenarios ran from Marius vs Sulla to Justinian. Very detailed, very cool, and each rule had a quote from a classical source to lead it off.

That became my purchase list. I would read about the period in history and set up one of the scenarios to follow along and re-create it.

A lot of my wargaming went like that - I'd buy a game because I wanted to learn about that period in history and why things went the way they did.

Posted by: Ace-Endorsed Author A.H. Lloyd at March 22, 2020 10:35 AM (cfSRQ)

219 Did I just ruin this page for everyone by not using tinyurl.com?

Posted by: Sam Adams at March 22, 2020 10:36 AM (VDbGO)

220 Puddin Head need to get intimate with tinyurl. It's not unpleasant.

Posted by: runner at March 22, 2020 10:36 AM (zr5Kq)

221 156 Eeyore,

Thanks for mentioning the Chapelle book. Just placed an order for a used copy. I'm no sailor but am fascinated by Naval history and details. These are matters I grew up hearing in Rhode Island.

Posted by: JTB at March 22, 2020 10:36 AM (7EjX1)

222 Posted by: right wing yankee at March 22, 2020 10:33 AM (zlzYb)

Me too. I usually go for free books from the Kindle owners lending library or Prime reading lists.

Posted by: Jordan61 at March 22, 2020 10:36 AM (6ofTb)

223 214 It's very cruel of you all to suggest such cool-sounding books, at a time when I have no money, am downsizing so I can move this spring, and Amazon isn't shipping non-essentials. Cruel, I tell you.

Alas, I'll just have to make a list and buy them later.
--------------------
right wing yankee - I buy most of my books at Goodwill and other thrift shops. Average price per book is 79 cents. You just have to accept what you find. Its amazing what I find - classics unread abound. I buy what I have wanted to read and feel no regrets experimenting with new writers I've never heard of. At this cost level, it is cheaper than paying late fees to the library.

Posted by: Puddin Head at March 22, 2020 10:37 AM (QZCjk)

224 My margins are just fine. Probably because I'm reading of a a monitor and not a tiny little phone screen.

Posted by: Go get one at March 22, 2020 10:37 AM (/LQkF)

225
Maybe next. I enjoys memoirs when well written.
Some theorize that Gran't might have been edited by Twain himself.
Some say that it is completely baseless, written and edited in Grant's
own hand, etc. If so, well written for an army shlub. Just shows that
education in those days was more demanding. Even at West point.
Posted by: runner at March 22, 2020 10:33 AM (zr5Kq)

---
Grant said that his purpose in going to West Point was to get a free education.

That was it. Clearly he benefited from it.

Posted by: Ace-Endorsed Author A.H. Lloyd at March 22, 2020 10:37 AM (cfSRQ)

226 199

@192

Thanks for blowing the margins, Joe.
Posted by: teej at March 22, 2020 10:30 AM (Jvty4)

And then puddin head copies and pastes the entire fucking thing. I'm not sure which is worse.

Posted by: Insomniac - Ex Cineribus Resurgo at March 22, 2020 10:37 AM (NWiLs)

227 Did I just ruin this page for everyone by not using tinyurl.com?
Posted by: Sam Adams at March 22, 2020 10:36 AM (VDbGO)


Yes. Yes, you did.

Teh Barrel awaits.

Posted by: Mary Poppins' Practically Perfect Piercing at March 22, 2020 10:38 AM (2JVJo)

228 ''Did I just ruin this page for everyone by not using tinyurl.com?''

You did. You are now required to host everyone here for cocktails this evening as penance

Posted by: Tuna at March 22, 2020 10:38 AM (gLRfa)

229 will a cob/somebody with superpowers please fix @192 ? apologies to Pudding Head, it was the dolt at 192.

Posted by: runner at March 22, 2020 10:39 AM (zr5Kq)

230 Er, Insomniac, uh, that was me with the original post. Forgot I had "Joe Biden" in the name slot. My sincere apologies.

Posted by: Sam Adams at March 22, 2020 10:39 AM (VDbGO)

231 Chicken pox and mumps are forgotten rites of passage.

Had both of them in jr high or high school. A few scars remind me of the chicken pox. I hear I'll be getting some other reminders after I turn 29.

Posted by: t-bird at March 22, 2020 10:39 AM (cfSLd)

232 after the H1N1 influenza outbreak in 2009, which triggered a nationwide shortage of masks and caused a 2 to 3year backlog orders for the N95 variety, the stockpile distributed about three-quarters of its inventory and didnt build back the supply.

Seems like someone asleep at the wheel back then did not build back to the stockpile of over 500 million mask.

someone did no thing

Posted by: rhennigantx at March 22, 2020 10:39 AM (JFO2v)

233 If so, well written for an army shlub. Just shows that education in those days was more demanding.
Posted by: runner at March 22, 2020 10:33 AM (zr5Kq)

Come on, man.

Paul Fussell and James Jones? The guy who wrote Goodbye, Darkness (can't remember his name). Steven Pressfield was in the Marines.

Posted by: Vanya at March 22, 2020 10:40 AM (ioTA8)

234 220 Puddin Head need to get intimate with tinyurl. It's not unpleasant.
-------------------
I am not tech savvy, but I was merely repasting a comment to respond to it. Yeah, isn't Tinyurl a song by Elton John?

Posted by: Puddin Head at March 22, 2020 10:40 AM (QZCjk)

235 228 ''Did I just ruin this page for everyone by not using tinyurl.com?''

You did. You are now required to host everyone here for cocktails this evening as penance
Posted by: Tuna at March 22, 2020 10:38 AM (gLRfa)

double titos on the rocks por favor

Posted by: rhennigantx at March 22, 2020 10:40 AM (JFO2v)

236 Yes, I am the dolt at 192.

Damn it.

Posted by: Sam Adams at March 22, 2020 10:40 AM (VDbGO)

237
You did. You are now required to host everyone here for cocktails this evening as penance
Posted by: Tuna at March 22, 2020 10:38 AM (gLRfa)


Penances have to be doable. No way anyone can provide sufficient drinkies for the Horde.

Posted by: Hadrian the Seventh at March 22, 2020 10:41 AM (7rVsF)

238 For any RCs interested, here's a link to the mass at my church that will be live-streamed at 11:30 AM Eastern:

https://preview.tinyurl.com/RomanCatholicMass

Posted by: IrishEi at March 22, 2020 10:41 AM (sGotD)

239 make mine a gin and tonic
it's medicinal

Posted by: vmom 2020 at March 22, 2020 10:41 AM (G546f)

240 Rhennigantx, I DO happen to have a shitload of good bourbon, good scotch, gin, Irish whisky, etc. Also a lovely looking pot roast.

Now, if someone could just bring a roll of toilet paper or two...

Posted by: Sam Adams at March 22, 2020 10:42 AM (VDbGO)

241 I'll take an Adios Motherfucker, thanks!

Posted by: Jordan61 at March 22, 2020 10:43 AM (6ofTb)

242 As with all Deep State Actors you have to figure out who is his Sugar Daddy after he leaves office. Publishing companies are the conduit for payoffs from Corporate Kings. One of the many benefits to globalists for owning the Church of Manhattan Media.

Posted by: Puddin Head at March 22, 2020 10:29 AM (QZCjk)


Fauci has got a sweet SES-1 pension and "medical care" to look forward to, in addition to the book deals, TV appearances, and Board of Director's slots on the BigPharma companies for his role in screwing us over!

Posted by: Commissar Hrothgar at March 22, 2020 10:43 AM (BiNEL)

243 Manhattan on the rocks, 2 cherries please.

Posted by: Tuna at March 22, 2020 10:43 AM (gLRfa)

244 Still reading The Splendid and the Vile, library ebook. Churchill's quirks and personality remind me a lot of PDT, but maybe just my mindset here lately.

Posted by: skywch at March 22, 2020 10:43 AM (IWvy/)

245 runner if you're in PA u don't need to worry. Gov. Wolf closed the Barrel until further notice.

Posted by: kallisto at March 22, 2020 10:44 AM (iCUDL)

246 @244 skywch, have you read Churchill's memoirs?

Posted by: Sam Adams at March 22, 2020 10:45 AM (VDbGO)

247 Posted by: Puddin Head at March 22, 2020 10:37 AM (QZCjk)

Yep; I also hit the thrift store pretty regularly. Got most of my classics there, since I prefer paper to kindle. But this 'stuck inside' bullshit is for the birds. I'm not even sure if our local Goodwill is open, or if I could persuade the cops that a book run is essential travel.

Posted by: right wing yankee at March 22, 2020 10:45 AM (zlzYb)

248 make mine a gin and tonic
it's medicinal
Posted by: vmom 2020 at March 22, 2020 10:41 AM (G546f)


I think all of us will be well medicated by the time curfew is lifted.

Posted by: runner at March 22, 2020 10:45 AM (zr5Kq)

249 245 runner if you're in PA u don't need to worry. Gov. Wolf closed the Barrel until further notice.
Posted by: kallisto at March 22, 2020 10:44 AM (iCUDL)

It pisses me off that marijuana dispensaries are exempt in NJ.

Posted by: CN at March 22, 2020 10:45 AM (ONvIw)

250 Fauci has got a sweet SES-1 pension and "medical care" to look forward to, in addition to the book deals, TV appearances, and Board of Director's slots on the BigPharma companies for his role in screwing us over!
--------------------
This was true of Comey. He still got a $15M book deal. I guess this is an advance on his legal fees. Poor McCabe only got $5M.

Posted by: Puddin Head at March 22, 2020 10:45 AM (QZCjk)

251 183 Sometimes life is good.
Posted by: Eeyore at March 22, 2020 10:22 AM (ZbwAu)

I love that story, and I don't care how often you tell it. It's sweet.

Posted by: April at March 22, 2020 10:46 AM (OX9vb)

252 runner if you're in PA u don't need to worry. Gov. Wolf closed the Barrel until further notice.
Posted by: kallisto at March 22, 2020 10:44 AM (iCUDL)


I stopped worrying about a week ago....

Posted by: runner at March 22, 2020 10:47 AM (zr5Kq)

253 Now, if someone could just bring a roll of toilet paper or two...

Posted by: Sam Adams at March 22, 2020 10:42 AM (VDbGO) [/'i]

"Give me a square, Vasily. One square only, please."

Posted by: CAPT Ramius at March 22, 2020 10:47 AM (BiNEL)

254 crap

Posted by: CAPT Ramius at March 22, 2020 10:47 AM (BiNEL)

255 247 Posted by: Puddin Head at March 22, 2020 10:37 AM (QZCjk)

Yep; I also hit the thrift store pretty regularly. Got most of my classics there, since I prefer paper to kindle. But this 'stuck inside' bullshit is for the birds. I'm not even sure if our local Goodwill is open, or if I could persuade the cops that a book run is essential travel.
-------------------
Is your local library still functioning?

With buy cheap at Thriftstores I have about four stacks of want to reads stockpiled.

Posted by: Puddin Head at March 22, 2020 10:47 AM (QZCjk)

256 194
And no, you are unlikely to like any of the characters. So if that's one of your Good Book Metrics...Beware!
Posted by: naturalfake at March 22, 2020 10:27 AM (z0XD
_______

Isn't it a question of whether the author is trying to make you like a character, or not? If so, then your dislike is a problem. But no one minds hating Iago.

I mentioned Carr's failure in The Bride of Newgate; there, the failure lies precisely in the fact that he wants you to come around to the heroine. And I didn't. this is the same reason I rate Austin's Emma lower than everyone else. I just don't like Emma, but the book needs you to. (And I don't dislike Frank Churchill enough, for that matter. He's no Wickham, that's for sure.)

And of course there is always the problem of Dickens's heroines. The only one I can stand is Estella, and that's because you're not supposed to like her. She's mean as a snake. (Agnes in Copperfield may seem above average, but IMO that's only because coming after Dora, anyone seems tolerable.)

A more complex case is Archie Goodwin. I've never liked him, not a bit. (Oddly enough, neither did John Dickson Carr). But I'm quite willing to put up with him for the sake of Wolfe's company.

I do think, BTW, this is a big part of the split opinion on Ayn Rand's novels.

Posted by: Eeyore at March 22, 2020 10:47 AM (ZbwAu)

257 t pisses me off that marijuana dispensaries are exempt in NJ.
Posted by: CN at March 22, 2020 10:45 AM (ONvIw)


same where I live. somehow made it on indispensable business list.

Posted by: runner at March 22, 2020 10:47 AM (zr5Kq)

258 I haven't but am getting interested enough to maybe do so. What did you think of them? Also have read a recent book called Winston and Franklin, about their relationship in WWII.

Posted by: skywch at March 22, 2020 10:48 AM (IWvy/)

259 Not the best picture I've ever seen of her, but - Joan Collins with a book:
https://tinyurl.com/vgsv5lq

Posted by: Mary Poppins' Practically Perfect Piercing at March 22, 2020 10:18 AM (2JVJo)


I found a better one and used it in a book thread last August:

http://ace.mu.nu/archives/who%20dis%2020190811.jpg

Posted by: OregonMuse, AoSHQ Thought Leader, Pants Monitor & Social Distancing Professional at March 22, 2020 10:48 AM (FbBpr)

260 breathes sigh of relief

Posted by: CAPT Ramius at March 22, 2020 10:48 AM (BiNEL)

261 I'll have a garlictini with a gingerroot tea chaser. Chases the virus - and the people away. Social distancing ftw!

Posted by: kallisto at March 22, 2020 10:48 AM (iCUDL)

262 OK, folks, going to make another cup of tea and try to get some writing of my own done. Hope you have a lovely day.

Posted by: Mary Poppins' Practically Perfect Piercing at March 22, 2020 10:49 AM (2JVJo)

263 I work nights, and am accustomed to doing my grocery shopping at around 2:30 a.m., after work. With all of the stores going to restricted hours, I've been forced to get up several hours early and race to the store in the desperate hope that I'll find some toilet paper.

It hasn't worked.

So, today I stayed up and raced to Walmart the second they were open.

There is still no toilet paper.

Posted by: Sam Adams at March 22, 2020 10:49 AM (VDbGO)

264 240 Rhennigantx, I DO happen to have a shitload of good bourbon, good scotch, gin, Irish whisky, etc. Also a lovely looking pot roast.

Now, if someone could just bring a roll of toilet paper or two...
Posted by: Sam Adams at March 22, 2020 10:42 AM (VDbGO)

I got 2 12 packs at Aldis yesterday.

Posted by: rhennigantx at March 22, 2020 10:49 AM (JFO2v)

265 Sam Adams 246, see 258, sorry

Posted by: skywch at March 22, 2020 10:49 AM (IWvy/)

266 libraries were the first to close here
I actually approve, since they are hobo central ABD a regular stop for seniors

Posted by: vmom 2020 at March 22, 2020 10:50 AM (G546f)

267 Speaking of the Decameron, a bunch of SF and fantasy writers have come up with a "New Decameron" project to raise money for Italian medical charities. The editor is Jo Walton, and it's got some pretty big names like Robert Silverberg, Max Gladstone, and Rosemary Kirstein. It is here:
https://www.patreon.com/projectdecameron

Posted by: Trimegistus at March 22, 2020 10:51 AM (DKCFT)

268 Paul Fussell and James Jones? The guy who wrote Goodbye, Darkness (can't remember his name). Steven Pressfield was in the Marines.
Posted by: Vanya at March 22, 2020 10:40 AM (ioTA


lol, I was trying a joke.

Posted by: runner at March 22, 2020 10:51 AM (zr5Kq)

269 It pisses me off that marijuana dispensaries are exempt in NJ.

Posted by: CN at March 22, 2020 10:45 AM (ONvIw)


They did the same in Illinois. This state is run like a mob operation

Posted by: TheQuietMan at March 22, 2020 10:51 AM (sTjkh)

270 266 libraries were the first to close here
I actually approve, since they are hobo central ABD a regular stop for seniors
Posted by: vmom 2020 at March 22, 2020 10:50 AM (G546f)

That's good planning. Our Senior Center (which I opposed building) closed fairly late in the game. It should have been first.

Posted by: CN at March 22, 2020 10:51 AM (ONvIw)

271 263, Sam, the Ancient Greeks used natural sponges tied to a stick to wipe their ass. Hell, they even hung it from their belt when they toga'd about the world. Embrace the Classics.

Posted by: Puddin Head at March 22, 2020 10:52 AM (QZCjk)

272 They did the same in Illinois. This state is run like a mob operation
Posted by: TheQuietMan at March 22, 2020 10:51 AM (sTjkh)

Illinois basically *IS* a mob operation.

Posted by: Vanya at March 22, 2020 10:52 AM (ioTA8)

273 Posted by: Trimegistus at March 22, 2020 10:51 AM (DKCFT)

Are they planning on anything to help American Medical charities?

Posted by: CN at March 22, 2020 10:52 AM (ONvIw)

274 267 Speaking of the Decameron, a bunch of SF and fantasy writers have come up with a "New Decameron" project to raise money for Italian medical charities. The editor is Jo Walton, and it's got some pretty big names like Robert Silverberg, Max Gladstone, and Rosemary Kirstein.
--------------------------
I will donate the adage: Don't Hug Chinks to prove you are virtuous.

Posted by: Puddin Head at March 22, 2020 10:53 AM (QZCjk)

275 The book dress is lovely.

Posted by: LASue at March 22, 2020 10:54 AM (LaluL)

276
2 "This is indeed a queer river," said Bromosel, as the water lapped at his thighs.
Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at March 22, 2020 09:00 AM (Dc2NZ)


Hey-oooh! One of the best quotes from one of the funniest books that I've ever read. 'Tis a shame Doug Kennedy, one of its authors, grew to dislike it. It is very dated, though, because many of the references, particularly the names, are derived from the cultural norms and touchstones of the late 50s and early 60s, so some of the humor is lost on a reader if they aren't aware of that background.

Posted by: Krebs v Carnot: Epic Battle of the Cycling Stars (TM) at March 22, 2020 10:54 AM (pNxlR)

277 271 263, Sam, the Ancient Greeks used natural sponges tied to a stick to wipe their ass. Hell, they even hung it from their belt when they toga'd about the world. Embrace the Classics.
Posted by: Puddin Head at March 22, 2020 10:52 AM (QZCjk)

do not mix up the onion and the sponge.

Posted by: rhennigantx at March 22, 2020 10:54 AM (JFO2v)

278 Sometimes life is good.

Posted by: Eeyore at March 22, 2020 10:22 AM (ZbwAu)


How many years have you been married?

Posted by: OregonMuse, AoSHQ Thought Leader, Pants Monitor & Social Distancing Professional at March 22, 2020 10:54 AM (FbBpr)

279 I just remembered - my uncle has Centerba. It's a concoction of mountain herbs, distilled. Kept the oldtimers healthy.

Posted by: kallisto at March 22, 2020 10:54 AM (iCUDL)

280 The last Goodwill store we went to had no books at all.

Is this a trend?

Posted by: Eeyore at March 22, 2020 10:54 AM (ZbwAu)

281 275 The book dress is lovely.
Posted by: LASue at March 22, 2020 10:54 AM (LaluL)


Isn't it though? I really liked it.

Posted by: OregonMuse, AoSHQ Thought Leader, Pants Monitor & Social Distancing Professional at March 22, 2020 10:54 AM (FbBpr)

282 Illinois basically *IS* a mob operation.
Posted by: Vanya at March 22, 2020 10:52 AM (ioTA

You gotta problem with dat ?

Posted by: Totally Legitimate Mob Business Owner at March 22, 2020 10:55 AM (zr5Kq)

283 Finished the Sabrina Chase Argonauts of Space trilogy which I believe someone here recommended. Great escapist fun for your quarantine entertainment. If you're lurking this morning Ms. Chase I hope you follow up with another trilogy. Lots of places to go with that story in my opinion. BTW, love, love the personalities of the AI ships, especially Rogue.

Posted by: Tuna at March 22, 2020 10:55 AM (gLRfa)

284 Hooray, Mrs. Muse just scored some TP!

It pays to shop early.

Posted by: OregonMuse, AoSHQ Thought Leader, Pants Monitor & Social Distancing Professional at March 22, 2020 10:56 AM (FbBpr)

285 278 Sometimes life is good.

Posted by: Eeyore at March 22, 2020 10:22 AM (ZbwAu)

How many years have you been married?
Posted by: OregonMuse, AoSHQ Thought Leader, Pants Monitor & Social Distancing Professional at March 22, 2020 10:54 AM (FbBpr)
______

It'll be 31 in July.

Posted by: Eeyore at March 22, 2020 10:56 AM (ZbwAu)

286 They did the same in Illinois. This state is run like a mob operation


Posted by: TheQuietMan at March 22, 2020 10:51 AM (sTjkh)

---
I respectfully dissent.

My wife has been able to drop eight other prescriptions since getting her medical MJ card. She sleeps better, has less joint pain and is able to finally eat without discomfort.

I get the antipathy to the doper crowd, but the drug does have actual pharma benefits and if we had a sane national drug policy, there wouldn't be their weird quasi-legal regimen.

What annoys me is that we still can't simply get medical-grade items through regular channels. Everything is cash-only and there are random supply fluctuations.

For the recreational users that's not a problem, but for people using the thing as it was intended - as legitimate pain management - it's really annoying.

Posted by: Ace-Endorsed Author A.H. Lloyd at March 22, 2020 10:57 AM (cfSRQ)

287
Robert Silverberg is among the living? Hmmm. I had always thought that he was one of the grand old writers in SF and I expected that he'd have passed on by now.

In truth, I do not keep tabs on authors.

Posted by: Krebs v Carnot: Epic Battle of the Cycling Stars (TM) at March 22, 2020 10:57 AM (pNxlR)

288 I just remembered - my uncle has Centerba. It's a concoction of mountain herbs, distilled. Kept the oldtimers healthy.

==

PSA:

Attention citizens, please to not experiment with oldtyme concoctions. Emergency rooms are stretched to the limit at this time.

END PSA.

Posted by: Totally Legitimate Mob Business Owner at March 22, 2020 10:57 AM (zr5Kq)

289 Local library is closed. *cries*

But, I'll be honest: I have a giant TBR pile; I just keep getting distracted by new and shiny books that I don't have yet.

Posted by: right wing yankee at March 22, 2020 10:57 AM (zlzYb)

290 well, it is Jersey...

Posted by: runner at March 22, 2020 10:58 AM (zr5Kq)

291 @265 skywch, Churchill was such a badass. His insights were profound, and perfectly on target. Reading his memoirs just for his description of Islam is well worth it. (Quoting said description in modern day England will get you thrown in prison for a hate crime.)

His descriptions of Fascism makes modern Leftists howl with rage...

"Fascism was the shadow or ugly child of Communism."

"As Fascism sprang from Communism, so Nazism developed from Fascism. Thus were set on foot those kindred movements which were destined soon to plunge the world into even more hideous strife, which none can say has ended with their destruction."

Churchill is one of my heroes. His portrait hangs over my fireplace.

Posted by: Sam Adams at March 22, 2020 10:58 AM (VDbGO)

292 Still readinglistening to "Ghost Station" by Dan Wells. It's a work of fiction about a community (joint US/West German listening post in postwar Berlin) that I am not familiar with, so I can't say if it's accurate or gets it all wrong. I like it well enough.

-
Back in the 60s, a friend of mine was an enlisted Army man assigned to intelligence in West Germany. His job was to eavesdrop on routine East German military radio traffic. He was just a worker bee drone but the Kremlin sent him and everybody else a Christmas card each year letting him know that they knew who he was.

Posted by: Anonosaurus Wrecks, Tyrannosaur Wrangler at March 22, 2020 10:59 AM (+y/Ru)

293 Mention of the Decameron reminds me of my grandparents' home. They had a guest room with built in bookshelves. In my teens, I discovered that there were a few books kept behind the others, not visible. They were Decameron, Canterbury Tales, and Tom Jones.

Of course, both WERE born in the 1890s. But I know Jane Austin was allowed to read Fielding as a girl.

Posted by: Eeyore at March 22, 2020 10:59 AM (ZbwAu)

294 right wing yankee, I use the library, a lot! Even for digital. And it's interesting that late fees seem to be a thing of the past. If I'm late, and the book is not reserved by another patron, they just auto-renew it for me.

My husband asked me this morning when Imperium is due back. I laughed and said, "when I'm dead, unless someone else wants to read it!"

Posted by: April at March 22, 2020 10:59 AM (OX9vb)

295 Fauci has got a sweet SES-1 pension and "medical care" to look forward to, in addition to the book deals, TV appearances, and Board of Director's slots on the BigPharma companies for his role in screwing us over!
--------------------
This was true of Comey. He still got a $15M book deal. I guess this is an advance on his legal fees. Poor McCabe only got $5M.
Posted by: Puddin Head at March 22, 2020 10:45 AM (QZCjk)


Fauci turns 80 this year. He's not got anything to look forward to, except the grave, and turning to dust.

In other words, this is what he does, this is who he is. He's been doing it for so long, one need not look for his nefarious purpose. A career at NIH is his life. Period.

Posted by: BurtTC at March 22, 2020 11:00 AM (hku12)

296 289 Local library is closed. *cries*

But, I'll be honest: I have a giant TBR pile; I just keep getting distracted by new and shiny books that I don't have yet.
Posted by: right wing yankee at March 22, 2020 10:57 AM (zlzYb)
______

Wasn't it just last week we had a cartoon about how that can kill you?

Posted by: Eeyore at March 22, 2020 11:01 AM (ZbwAu)

297 Recommended: A Journal of the Plague Year, by Daniel Defoe (available free on Gutenberg)


Currently reading: the SPQR series by John Maddox Roberts -- historical mysteries set at the end of the Roman Republic. I'm up to XI (I think), and the series is still holding my interest. It's interesting to contrast these with Steven Saylor's Roma Sub Rosa series, which are also mysteries set in late Republican Rome.

Posted by: Rodrigo Borgia at March 22, 2020 11:01 AM (tLWGd)

298 In Russell Hoban's "Ridley Walker," the tale is told by a young guy living in a bronze-age-like civilization, in a place he calls Inland, and it's spoken in his strangely wonderful dialect, which takes one two or three chapters to fully get on board.

It is a postapocalyptic world five or six millenia after a worldwide nuclear disaster wiped out most all civilization.

The story of the past and how people recovered from it, is told via traveling punch-and-judy puppet shows, along with song and dance.

The people live in communal villages called "forms," (farms), and are wary of agents of the oppressive regime headed by a man with the title "Pry Mincer."

In the myths told of long long ago, the people made war using "the littl shyning man," (nuclear bombs).

What will our followers be calling Wuhan in five or six millennial? Kung flu has the right cachet, no?

Posted by: Les Kinetic at March 22, 2020 11:01 AM (+fPHo)

299 When will the social distancing be over?

My wife REALLY wants back in the house.

Posted by: Cicero Kaboom! Omega Kid, O-Positive at March 22, 2020 11:01 AM (Vy7tf)

300 288. haha, I grew up on Centerba. It was too strong for the kiddos, so mom drizzled it on our ice cream.

Posted by: kallisto at March 22, 2020 11:03 AM (iCUDL)

301 Back in the 60s, a friend of mine was an enlisted Army man assigned to intelligence in West Germany. His job was to eavesdrop on routine East German military radio traffic. He was just a worker bee drone but the Kremlin sent him and everybody else a Christmas card each year letting him know that they knew who he was.
Posted by: Anonosaurus Wrecks, Tyrannosaur Wrangler at March 22, 2020 10:59 AM (+y/Ru)


The simplest summation of everything I've read on Soviet era spying, and the American response to it is, the Soviets were pros and we were amateurs.

They ran circles around us. Including lots of infiltration.

Posted by: BurtTC at March 22, 2020 11:03 AM (hku12)

302 I picked up a big bag of books from the library right before this thing hit. Whew, that was a close call because now they're closed.

I'm reading a true crime paperback called Forgive Me, Father about a priest, Father Gerald Robinson, who murdered Sister Margaret Ann Pahl at a hospital in Toledo in 1980. Took the police 24 years to solve it. The killing had ritualistic Satanic overtones.

Posted by: JuJuBee, just generally being shamey at March 22, 2020 11:03 AM (COzlW)

303 Back from Walmart. They were reasonably well-stocked, and not crowded. Not the horror show I'd been led to believe. (Well, no *more* of a horror show than usual.)

Been reading Robert B. Parker's Silent Night, his Spenser Christmas novel. Apparently it was unfinished when he died, and his long-time literary agent Helen Brann took over and completed it. It's not bad, but not anywhere near Parker's great works of the '70s and '80s, and Brann's prose is serviceable, nothing more.

Also I finished Elizabeth Strout's Olive, Again, her follow-up to the novel Olive Kitteridge. Olive herself is a hard character to like, but she is pretty interesting to read about. This book is a collection of vignettes about people who live in and around Olive's Crosby, Maine, and whose lives intersect with hers.

Strout has an odd tendency to tell us more than we need to know, for instance some gross details about a childbirth and later the 84-year-old Olive's experience with incontinence. Not sure we need that. But her prose is quite good and clear.

Posted by: Wolfus Aurelius at March 22, 2020 11:03 AM (rpbg1)

304 Fauci turns 80 this year. He's not got anything to look forward to, except the grave, and turning to dust.

The little guy behind Trump sometimes is 80?! That's incredible. I wonder if some athletes, like LeBron, are given the same stuff our anti-aging elites are on.

Posted by: t-bird at March 22, 2020 11:04 AM (Ibwur)

305
280 The last Goodwill store we went to had no books at all.

Is this a trend?
Posted by: Eeyore at March 22, 2020 10:54 AM (ZbwAu


For many years now, the two used book sales to which we have donated books have rigorously refused textbooks, learning computer programming texts and other more "difficult" technical texts. Lacking those in their sales selection, accordingly, we have patronized those sales less and less.

Posted by: Krebs v Carnot: Epic Battle of the Cycling Stars (TM) at March 22, 2020 11:04 AM (pNxlR)

306 37 Hey OM, did you get my email this week? Would have come from an address starting with "deepfried..."
Posted by: Long-time Commenter, First-time Reader at March 22, 2020 09:16 AM (Nu6Gg)


I now see your e-mail. If you sent it earlier this week, I'm sorry I missed it.

Posted by: OregonMuse, AoSHQ Thought Leader, Pants Monitor & Social Distancing Professional at March 22, 2020 11:05 AM (FbBpr)

307

The latest bit of stupidity being spread by the MFM is white supremacists are trying to use corona virus as a bioweapon against law enforcement and non white people according to the world's most reliable source Yahoo news that claims it comes from a DHS weekly intelligence brief.

Posted by: TheQuietMan at March 22, 2020 11:05 AM (sTjkh)

308
The simplest summation of everything I've read
on Soviet era spying, and the American response to it is, the Soviets
were pros and we were amateurs.



They ran circles around us. Including lots of infiltration.

Posted by: BurtTC at March 22, 2020 11:03 AM (hku12)

---
They were awesome about spying, bad at analyzing and terrible at everything else (except mass graves).

They basically repeated the same pattern of the czars, relying on a ruthless secret police, massive prison/internal exile system and constant spying to maintain control.

Instead of, you know, governing well.

Posted by: Ace-Endorsed Author A.H. Lloyd at March 22, 2020 11:06 AM (cfSRQ)

309 > Robert Silverberg is among the living? Hmmm. I had always thought that he was one of the grand old writers in SF and I expected that he'd have passed on by now.

He's part of the wave that came up in the '50s, so he's about a generation younger than Clarke, Asimov, Heinlein, Pohl, etc. (all of whom are gone now, of course).

Silverberg is 85, so he's no spring chicken, either.

Heinlein would be 112, if he were still alive. Asimov would have turned 100 this year. Clarke would be 102. Pohl died in 2013 at the age of 93.




Posted by: Rodrigo Borgia at March 22, 2020 11:07 AM (tLWGd)

310 305
280 The last Goodwill store we went to had no books at all.

Is this a trend?
Posted by: Eeyore at March 22, 2020 10:54 AM (ZbwAu
------------------------
Not here. I keep running into a Persian/Arab (?) who scans the books available and buys from a list or formula. He must be associated with a reselling business. Fortunately, he doesn't seem interested in the books that I am. Haven't figured out what his target group is.

Posted by: Puddin Head at March 22, 2020 11:08 AM (QZCjk)

311 Fauci turns 80 this year. He's not got anything to look forward to, except the grave, and turning to dust.
------------------------
The little guy behind Trump sometimes is 80?! That's incredible. I wonder if some athletes, like LeBron, are given the same stuff our anti-aging elites are on.
Posted by: t-bird at March 22, 2020 11:04 AM (Ibwur)


Who knows what kinds of bugs they've cooked up. He probably has a stem cell shake every morning.

Posted by: BurtTC at March 22, 2020 11:08 AM (hku12)

312 I'm not sure if anyone has posted this yet, but Norm McDonald is doing this guerilla-like podcast called "Quarantine!" and this happened:

"Yeah, we're gonna all have to eat more healthily now. You know what I'm gonna give up? Bat. But you know what's helping? The Impossible Bat. "

OMG - LMAO.

Posted by: Gem at March 22, 2020 11:08 AM (65i3Q)

313 How many years have you been married?
Posted by: OregonMuse, AoSHQ Thought Leader, Pants Monitor Social Distancing Professional at March 22, 2020 10:54 AM (FbBpr)
______

It'll be 31 in July.
Posted by: Eeyore at March 22, 2020 10:56 AM (ZbwAu)


Rookie! Mrs. Muse and I will be having our 35th anniversary in May!

Posted by: OregonMuse, AoSHQ Thought Leader, Pants Monitor & Social Distancing Professional at March 22, 2020 11:09 AM (FbBpr)

314 And no, you are unlikely to like any of the characters. So if that's one of your Good Book Metrics...Beware!
Posted by: naturalfake at March 22, 2020 10:27 AM (z0XD
_______

Isn't it a question of whether the author is trying to make you like a character, or not? If so, then your dislike is a problem. But no one minds hating Iago.

I mentioned Carr's failure in The Bride of Newgate; there, the failure lies precisely in the fact that he wants you to come around to the heroine. And I didn't. this is the same reason I rate Austin's Emma lower than everyone else. I just don't like Emma, but the book needs you to. (And I don't dislike Frank Churchill enough, for that matter. He's no Wickham, that's for sure.)

And of course there is always the problem of Dickens's heroines. The only one I can stand is Estella, and that's because you're not supposed to like her. She's mean as a snake. (Agnes in Copperfield may seem above average, but IMO that's only because coming after Dora, anyone seems tolerable.)

A more complex case is Archie Goodwin. I've never liked him, not a bit. (Oddly enough, neither did John Dickson Carr). But I'm quite willing to put up with him for the sake of Wolfe's company.

I do think, BTW, this is a big part of the split opinion on Ayn Rand's novels.
Posted by: Eeyore at March 22, 2020 10:47 AM (ZbwAu)



Valid point.

However, a lot of writing today, and readership involves a static, likable character, who may have some challenges but never really changes in any way.

I believe this need to have a "likable" character is pushed mostly from the left. Thus, we see a lot of virtue signalling about a "good" likeable character because they recycle plastic bottles or some such thing. That thinking leads to "woke" culture/novelss/movies.

This is especially a problem with the static characters in series fiction.

IMO far better to have an imperfect or unlikeable character who changes through his/her experiences in the story.

Older fiction likes Dickens, Austen, etc were willing to have, for lack of a better word, "unlikeable" characters because that's more the nature of life and human behavior.

Instead of a "goody twoshoes" no matter how manly, etc traipsing through an adventure being essentially unchanged by it all.

Just my opinion, but it's the reason I find myself reading older writers and novels more and more.

Posted by: naturalfake at March 22, 2020 11:09 AM (z0XD8)

315 When will the social distancing be over?

My wife REALLY wants back in the house.

Posted by: Cicero Kaboom! Omega Kid, O-Positive at March 22, 2020 11:01 AM (Vy7tf)

You bad.

Posted by: BignJames at March 22, 2020 11:09 AM (X/Pw5)

316 Here in Dallas the Walmarts I've been to look like Venezuela.

Posted by: Sam Adams at March 22, 2020 11:10 AM (VDbGO)

317 They were awesome about spying, bad at analyzing and terrible at everything else (except mass graves).

They
basically repeated the same pattern of the czars, relying on a ruthless
secret police, massive prison/internal exile system and constant spying
to maintain control.

Instead of, you know, governing well.


Posted by: Ace-Endorsed Author A.H. Lloyd at March 22, 2020 11:06 AM (cfSRQ)


Deep State: You have a problem with that, comrade?

Posted by: TheQuietMan at March 22, 2020 11:10 AM (sTjkh)

318 For those interested, there's a pretty good 50's movie starring Joan Fontaine and Louis Jourdan based on several of the Decameron stories. Also Shakespeare's "All's Well That Ends Well" is based on one of those stories.

Posted by: Tuna at March 22, 2020 11:10 AM (gLRfa)

319 I am reading The Commitments by Roddy Doyle, having seen the movie first.
The novel is good. In fact I may look up more books by Doyle. However, I prefer the movie.
One often hears about people loving a book but being disappointed by the movie.
Does the same pattern hold when people see the movie first.

Posted by: Northernlurker, still lurking after all these years at March 22, 2020 11:11 AM (Uu+Jp)

320 Good morning Hordemates!
Calvin at his best!!!

Posted by: Diogenes at March 22, 2020 11:11 AM (axyOa)

321 Robert Silverberg is among the living? Hmmm. I had always thought that he was one of the grand old writers in SF and I expected that he'd have passed on by now.

In truth, I do not keep tabs on authors.
Posted by: Krebs v Carnot: Epic Battle of the Cycling Stars (TM) at March 22, 2020


*
*

Siliverberg started his career in the Fifties, evolved into a more literary (but still readable) author in the Seventies, fell silent for a few years, but came back again. I don't recall the title, but recently I read one of his novellas set in a kind of Hell which is much like the climate here in NO -- i.e., perfect for Hell -- and which features real-life people, now dead, interacting. HP Lovecraft meets Robert E. Howard, for instance, and Queen Elizabeth I is there still practicing politics, and more.

Posted by: Wolfus Aurelius at March 22, 2020 11:11 AM (rpbg1)

322 Ah..forgot.

In the case of Sharp though, he's more writing a ship of fools comedy.

So, lots of fools, and unpleasant characters to drive the comedy.

Posted by: naturalfake at March 22, 2020 11:11 AM (z0XD8)

323 > Haven't figured out what his target group is.

Likely he's checking how much a used copy is selling for on Amazon and/or Powells.

There are a lot of people doing that these days.

Posted by: Rodrigo Borgia at March 22, 2020 11:11 AM (tLWGd)

324 Oh, and in that Silverberg novella about Hell, Howard meets Gilgamesh the Sumerian hero, and realizes he is the true embodiment of Conan the Barbarian. Cool stuff.

Posted by: Wolfus Aurelius at March 22, 2020 11:12 AM (rpbg1)

325 They
basically repeated the same pattern of the czars, relying on a ruthless
secret police, massive prison/internal exile system and constant spying
to maintain control.

Instead of, you know, governing well.

Posted by: Ace-Endorsed Author A.H. Lloyd at March 22, 2020 11:06 AM (cfSRQ)

Deep State: You have a problem with that, comrade?
Posted by: TheQuietMan at March 22, 2020 11:10 AM (sTjkh)

In politics as in life, people repeat the behaviors they know. Sometimes they do this almost reflexively. "The way we've always done it" is hard to shake.

Posted by: CN at March 22, 2020 11:12 AM (ONvIw)

326 I'm not sure if anyone has posted this yet, but Norm McDonald is doing this guerilla-like podcast called "Quarantine!" and this happened:

"Yeah, we're gonna all have to eat more healthily now. You know what I'm gonna give up? Bat. But you know what's helping? The Impossible Bat. "

OMG - LMAO.
Posted by: Gem at March 22, 2020 11:08 AM (65i3Q)


Generations from now there will be a Norm MacDonald Institute, and the people of that age will wonder how it is we had him here, in our very own lifetimes, and somehow missed his genius.

Posted by: BurtTC at March 22, 2020 11:12 AM (hku12)

327 ''Rookie! Mrs. Muse and I will be having our 35th anniversary in May! ''

Beat you! 49 this October.

Posted by: Tuna at March 22, 2020 11:13 AM (gLRfa)

328 Rookie! Mrs. Muse and I will be having our 35th anniversary in May!


I would be married 33 years if I were still married. Apparently I'm hard to get along with.

Posted by: Bandersnatch at March 22, 2020 11:13 AM (gd9RK)

329 They were awesome about spying, bad at analyzing and terrible at everything else (except mass graves).



==

They analyzed it through the prism of own experience - marxism-leninism. They were not great believers in resilience of capitalism, market system, and property in general. "The west is rotting and about to fall." They were looking for signs. But I would disagree with" bad at analyzing", Soviets were able to block and stir trouble for the West at every point of engagement in the world - Africa, Europe the Americas. Unfortunately for them, capitalism and market system they so did not believe in was needed to support their appetites. Instead they had a central planning behemoth and toilet paper shortages.

Posted by: runner at March 22, 2020 11:13 AM (zr5Kq)

330 Here in Dallas the Walmarts I've been to look like Venezuela.
Posted by: Sam Adams at March 22, 2020


*
*

That's what I expected, but not today.

Posted by: Wolfus Aurelius at March 22, 2020 11:14 AM (rpbg1)

331 Pedaled up to the corner store plaza to observe the panic up close. Didn't get off the bike, just pedaled slowly back and forth along the front lane.

Walmart parking lot (this one is a supercenter) almost full, but strangely, few going in from the lot, and even fewer coming out. It's like they are holding a church service inside or something.

I'll bet that like it's been for days, people are just crowded around the paper aisle, hoping to add to their 120-day supply they've got at home.

Stupid fookers.

The few coming out had remarkably small hoards in their bags and carts. Like day-shopping or something.

I just downloaded the free sample of Defoe's "A Journal of the Plague Years."

Posted by: Les Kinetic at March 22, 2020 11:14 AM (+fPHo)

332 313 How many years have you been married?
Posted by: OregonMuse, AoSHQ Thought Leader, Pants Monitor Social Distancing Professional at March 22, 2020 10:54 AM (FbBpr)
______

It'll be 31 in July.
Posted by: Eeyore at March 22, 2020 10:56 AM (ZbwAu)

Rookie! Mrs. Muse and I will be having our 35th anniversary in May!
Posted by: OregonMuse, AoSHQ Thought Leader, Pants Monitor & Social Distancing Professional at March 22, 2020 11:09 AM (FbBpr)
_____

Hell, we didn't even meet until 1987. Exactly one year later we got engaged. (Needless to say, she's the one who noticed that.)

Posted by: Eeyore at March 22, 2020 11:14 AM (ZbwAu)

333 Are me and Y-Dice the only people on this blog under 40?

Posted by: Vanya at March 22, 2020 11:14 AM (ioTA8)

334 > "Yeah, we're gonna all have to eat more healthily now. You know what I'm gonna give up? Bat. But you know what's helping? The Impossible Bat. "

"I Can't Believe It's Not Bat"

Posted by: Rodrigo Borgia at March 22, 2020 11:14 AM (tLWGd)

335 In truth, I do not keep tabs on authors.

Posted by: Krebs v Carnot: Epic Battle of the Cycling Stars (TM) at March 22, 2020 10:57 AM (pNxlR)

---
I guess I would, if any of the ones I liked were still alive.

Posted by: Ace-Endorsed Author A.H. Lloyd at March 22, 2020 11:14 AM (cfSRQ)

336 318. Thanks for that reco.

Posted by: kallisto at March 22, 2020 11:15 AM (iCUDL)

337 Been reading Neil Peart's book "masked rider" which is about a cycling tour he went on in west Africa. I don't think he was amused. I wouldn't be after reading what he described. Damn, he's fucking nuts.

Posted by: Berserker-Dragonheads Division at March 22, 2020 11:15 AM (9Om/r)

338 "It seems to me that most episodes of I Love Lucy were based on this phenomenon."

I was maybe 5 or 6 when Lucy started broadcasting.

Yeah, the original broadcasts.

I couldn't STAND that show. She, and the people around her, were so stupid.

Posted by: Mr. Trashbag, Shoggoth and Eater Of Toes at March 22, 2020 11:16 AM (T09ml)

339 Are me and Y-Dice the only people on this blog under 40?
Posted by: Vanya at March 22, 2020 11:14 AM (ioTA


I think Broseidon and maybe Harry Paratestes, if they're still around. Not sure.

Posted by: hogmartin at March 22, 2020 11:16 AM (t+qrx)

340 skywch, I responded to you @291.

Posted by: Sam Adams at March 22, 2020 11:16 AM (VDbGO)

341 "I Can't Believe It's Not Bat"


Remember the 70s when times were tough and we had to eat Bat Helper?

Posted by: Bandersnatch at March 22, 2020 11:16 AM (gd9RK)

342 "These pants" look more like "this negligee". And when did Bradley Manning become a model?

Posted by: Alberta Oil Peon at March 22, 2020 11:16 AM (miJU3)

343 Are me and Y-Dice the only people on this blog under 40?

Posted by: Vanya at March 22, 2020 11:14 AM (ioTA

maybe

Posted by: BignJames at March 22, 2020 11:16 AM (X/Pw5)

344 337: fucking nuts, yes. but, he was brilliant.

Posted by: chavez the hugo at March 22, 2020 11:17 AM (KP5rU)

345 " Churchill was such a badass"

I watched a show on Churchill last night. In 1940, some British socialist lefty nitwit complained about his "impetuous nature".

Posted by: ggreg at March 22, 2020 11:17 AM (Tnijr)

346 They analyzed it through the prism of own experience
- marxism-leninism. They were not great believers in resilience of
capitalism, market system, and property in general. "The west is rotting
and about to fall." They were looking for signs. But I would disagree
with" bad at analyzing", Soviets were able to block and stir trouble
for the West at every point of engagement in the world - Africa, Europe
the Americas. Unfortunately for them, capitalism and market system they
so did not believe in was needed to support their appetites. Instead
they had a central planning behemoth and toilet paper shortages.

Posted by: runner at March 22, 2020 11:13 AM (zr5Kq)

---
Yes, but it's really easy to spread rumors and lies. People do it by accident with bad jokes.

What takes actual skill is keeping toilet paper on the shelves (so to speak).

The Russians (and the Chinese) excel at getting secrets and spreading lies to the gullible, but that's inferior to the hard work of running a functional society.

Which is why I'm beginning to wonder if this is the end of Communism in China. Even after the plague passes, the US will be shutting down a lot of factories there. Who will want to leave their industry and medical systems hostage to Chinese good will?

Posted by: Ace-Endorsed Author A.H. Lloyd at March 22, 2020 11:18 AM (cfSRQ)

347 God fucking dammit. I just lost a long fucking comment and some of you dicknoses refuse to use tinyurl.

Posted by: Captain Hate at March 22, 2020 11:18 AM (y7DUB)

348 Posted by: right wing yankee at March 22, 2020 10:14 AM
Actually hear lots of sleep specialists say light in your eyes keeps you awake, avoid at night and go for it in morning. A ebook will keep you awake whereas a paper book will help you sleep.
When I wake up in middled of the night have broke myself of putting on tablet and showing up here, well mostly anyway.

Posted by: Skip at March 22, 2020 11:18 AM (ZCEU2)

349 Mrs D and I are looking at 46 years in May.

But we met in high school.
And I only feel barely over 29.


PS. And when I met her Mrs D could wear pants like the horse babe in yesterday's fishing thread.
Now thems some pants!

Posted by: Diogenes at March 22, 2020 11:18 AM (axyOa)

350 Pedaled up to the corner store plaza to observe the panic up close. Didn't get off the bike, just pedaled slowly back and forth along the front lane.

Walmart parking lot (this one is a supercenter) almost full, but strangely, few going in from the lot, and even fewer coming out. It's like they are holding a church service inside or something.

I'll bet that like it's been for days, people are just crowded around the paper aisle, hoping to add to their 120-day supply they've got at home.

Stupid fookers.

The few coming out had remarkably small hoards in their bags and carts. Like day-shopping or something.

I just downloaded the free sample of Defoe's "A Journal of the Plague Years."
Posted by: Les Kinetic at March 22, 2020 11:14 AM (+fPHo)


Who knew Dawn of the Dead would be a documentary.

Posted by: BurtTC at March 22, 2020 11:18 AM (hku12)

351 > Remember the 70s when times were tough and we had to eat Bat Helper?

The rich kids got fresh bat.

We had to make do with reconstituted packets of non-fat dry bat.

Posted by: Rodrigo Borgia at March 22, 2020 11:18 AM (tLWGd)

352 Our government is now on the direct path to inciting riots.

Saying they are considering 10-12 weeks of lockdown

All over FAKE science, a fucking computer model

Posted by: RoyalOil, Vicroy Canadian Territories at March 22, 2020 11:18 AM (vPKfA)

353 Are me and Y-Dice the only people on this blog under 40?
Posted by: Vanya at March 22, 2020 11:14 AM (ioTA


I am a 79 yo male philatelist from Sheboygan. I like dogs, rocking chairs, and shooting sparrows.

Posted by: runner at March 22, 2020 11:18 AM (zr5Kq)

354 Deep State: You have a problem with that, comrade?

Posted by: TheQuietMan at March 22, 2020 11:10 AM (sTjkh)


I wish I could make a joke about that, I had one but it was too depressing to post!

Posted by: Commissar Hrothgar at March 22, 2020 11:19 AM (BiNEL)

355 Remember the 70s when times were tough and we had to eat Bat Helper?

Posted by: Bandersnatch at March 22, 2020 11:16 AM (gd9RK)

---
Tofubat

NeerBat

Posted by: Ace-Endorsed Author A.H. Lloyd at March 22, 2020 11:19 AM (cfSRQ)

356 Are me and Y-Dice the only people on this blog under 40?
Posted by: Vanya at March 22, 2020 11:14 AM


In Neptunian years, no.

Posted by: Duncanthrax at March 22, 2020 11:20 AM (DMUuz)

357 ''The few coming out had remarkably small hoards in their bags and carts. Like day-shopping or something.''

I think people are settling down and realizing that this be The U.S.of A and we aren't about to run out of food anytime soon.

Posted by: Tuna at March 22, 2020 11:20 AM (gLRfa)

358 343
Are me and Y-Dice the only people on this blog under 40?



Posted by: Vanya at March 22, 2020 11:14 AM (ioTA



maybe

Posted by: BignJames at March 22, 2020 11:16 AM (X/Pw5)

---
The average age here is 29.

Posted by: Ace-Endorsed Author A.H. Lloyd at March 22, 2020 11:20 AM (cfSRQ)

359 Are me and Y-Dice the only people on this blog under 40?

Definitely qdpsteve, Hikaru/Allie, and there's a shitload of us who are only 29.

Posted by: t-bird at March 22, 2020 11:20 AM (Ry8mf)

360 Posted by: Ace-Endorsed Author A.H. Lloyd at March 22, 2020 11:19 AM (cfSRQ)

White, two green stripes, 'BAT' in black stencil letters on the side.

Posted by: Vanya at March 22, 2020 11:21 AM (ioTA8)

361 Instead
they had a central planning behemoth and toilet paper shortages.

Posted by: runner at March 22, 2020 11:13 AM (zr5Kq)

Don't you just love it when a plan comes together!

Posted by: Commissar Hrothgar at March 22, 2020 11:21 AM (BiNEL)

362 The average age here is 29.


Mean, median, and mode.

Posted by: Bandersnatch at March 22, 2020 11:22 AM (gd9RK)

363 I always try to stay in shape, work out, eat right.

That is why Bat Lite is for me......tastes great, less filling.

And the women just love my new, slim figure.

Posted by: Hairyback Guy at March 22, 2020 11:22 AM (Z+IKu)

364 Remember the 70s when times were tough and we had to eat Bat Helper?

The rich kids got fresh bat.

We had to make do with reconstituted packets of non-fat dry bat.

Posted by: Rodrigo Borgia at March 22, 2020 11:18 AM (tLWGd)

I liked Fruit Bat on my Kaboom.

Posted by: BignJames at March 22, 2020 11:22 AM (X/Pw5)

365 OT, Powerline has their Sunday Morning Coming Down post up which has some great blues pieces linked.

https://tinyurl.com/ubbav4t

Posted by: DR.WTF at March 22, 2020 11:22 AM (aS1PU)

366 White, two green stripes, 'BAT' in black stencil letters on the side.

Posted by: Vanya at March 22, 2020 11:21 AM (ioTA

---
Ah, the generic bat.

My problem is the pricing is so high. We use the artificial bat extract. Costs half as much and pretty much tastes the same: batty.

Posted by: Ace-Endorsed Author A.H. Lloyd at March 22, 2020 11:23 AM (cfSRQ)

367 339 Are me and Y-Dice the only people on this blog under 40?
Posted by: Vanya at March 22, 2020 11:14 AM (ioTA

I'm not that much over 40... But not for long...

Posted by: Insomniac - Ex Cineribus Resurgo at March 22, 2020 11:23 AM (NWiLs)

368 ''Remember the 70s when times were tough and we had to eat Bat Helper? ''

Fondly remember Shake 'n Bake for those creatures of the night. Easy peasy.

Posted by: Tuna at March 22, 2020 11:23 AM (gLRfa)

369 ''Remember the 70s when times were tough and we had to eat Bat Helper? ''

Fondly remember Shake 'n Bake for those creatures of the night. Easy peasy.
Posted by: Tuna at March 22, 2020 11:23 AM (gLRfa)


And I helped!

Posted by: hogmartin at March 22, 2020 11:23 AM (t+qrx)

370
Which is why I'm beginning to wonder if this is the end of Communism in China. Even after the plague passes, the US will be shutting down a lot of factories there. Who will want to leave their industry and medical systems hostage to Chinese good will?
Posted by: Ace-Endorsed Author A.H. Lloyd at March 22, 2020 11:18 AM (cfSRQ)

Medical supplies might cut back, but after this is all done manufacturers will still like cheap labor and still won't care about the costs. I suspect customers will pay lip service to domestic production as they have in the past, but low prices are very tempting.

The other ugly possibility is that manufacturers will pull a Northern Italy and import Chinese or other foreign labor (Romney/Lee?) and use that as a fig leaf. The goods will say "Made in USA" and technically they will be, but Wuhan or Mumbai will still get direct flights.

Posted by: CN at March 22, 2020 11:23 AM (ONvIw)

371 fucking nuts, yes. but, he was brilliant.

Posted by: chavez the hugo at March 22, 2020 11:17 AM (KP5rU)

Totally. I'm guessing you read that book too? He had balls that clank.

Posted by: Berserker-Dragonheads Division at March 22, 2020 11:24 AM (9Om/r)

372 Coumo is trying to position himself as the democrat nominee. He has the ability to badmouth Demented Joe going into the convention and to be the "reasonable centrist" that the democrats are looking for.

Posted by: jwest at March 22, 2020 11:24 AM (mrrpT)

373 I've already trademarked "I Can't Believe It's Not Bat"

Posted by: JackStraw at March 22, 2020 11:24 AM (ZLI7S)

374 Bat-A-Roni the Wuhan China Treat!

Posted by: Count de Monet at March 22, 2020 11:24 AM (dQ1sa)

375 ''The average age here is 29. ''

Using common core math.

Posted by: Tuna at March 22, 2020 11:24 AM (gLRfa)

376 Just got an e-coupon for "Dr. Praeger's Vegan Bat."

Posted by: Ace-Endorsed Author A.H. Lloyd at March 22, 2020 11:24 AM (cfSRQ)

377 ''Bat-A-Roni the Wuhan China Treat!''

Bwahahaha

Posted by: Tuna at March 22, 2020 11:24 AM (gLRfa)

378 I don't recall seeing it. What address did you send it to?

aoshqbookthread at gee, ma-il

Posted by: Long-time Commenter, First-time Reader at March 22, 2020 11:25 AM (Nu6Gg)

379 "I Can't Believe It's Not Bat"


Remember the 70s when times were tough and we had to eat Bat Helper?
Posted by: Bandersnatch at March 22, 2020


*
*

I remember the generic bat, with the black word on the white label.

Posted by: Wolfus Aurelius at March 22, 2020 11:25 AM (rpbg1)

380 Ah, the generic bat.

My problem is the pricing is so high. We use the artificial bat extract. Costs half as much and pretty much tastes the same: batty.
Posted by: Ace-Endorsed Author A.H. Lloyd at March 22, 2020 11:23 AM (cfSRQ)

Why don't they just farm the damn things if they're so important?

Posted by: CN at March 22, 2020 11:25 AM (ONvIw)

381 376 Just got an e-coupon for "Dr. Praeger's Vegan Bat."

Posted by: Ace-Endorsed Author A.H. Lloyd at March 22, 2020 11:24 AM (cfSRQ)

Batfu. TM

Posted by: Insomniac - Ex Cineribus Resurgo at March 22, 2020 11:25 AM (NWiLs)

382 The salad bar has imitation bat. I think it's just rat meat.

Posted by: Vanya at March 22, 2020 11:26 AM (ioTA8)

383 How soon before we get a Oscar Mayer BatMobile going city to city to promote healthy eating and proper bat presentation?

Can't wait!

Posted by: Hairyback Guy at March 22, 2020 11:26 AM (Z+IKu)

384 Why don't they just farm the damn things if they're so important?

Posted by: CN at March 22, 2020 11:25 AM (ONvIw)

---
Animal rights activists.

All bats have to be free-rage, wild-caught.

Posted by: Ace-Endorsed Author A.H. Lloyd at March 22, 2020 11:26 AM (cfSRQ)

385 My husband spent about a month in China for his university department, and said the food was routinely atrocious. He came back much thinner, and this is not a man who had any need or desire to lose the weight.

Posted by: CN at March 22, 2020 11:26 AM (ONvIw)

386 Ava Gardner.

Posted by: FoodWaterAmmo at March 22, 2020 11:26 AM (LXxM7)

387 371: i did. i enjoy reading the exploits of neal. i'm jealous and at the same time, amazed. like you said, balls.

Posted by: chavez the hugo at March 22, 2020 11:27 AM (KP5rU)

388 314
....
Valid point.

However, a lot of writing today, and readership involves a static, likable character, who may have some challenges but never really changes in any way.

I believe this need to have a "likable" character is pushed mostly from the left. Thus, we see a lot of virtue signalling about a "good" likeable character because they recycle plastic bottles or some such thing. That thinking leads to "woke" culture/novelss/movies.

This is especially a problem with the static characters in series fiction.

IMO far better to have an imperfect or unlikeable character who changes through his/her experiences in the story.

Older fiction likes Dickens, Austen, etc were willing to have, for lack of a better word, "unlikeable" characters because that's more the nature of life and human behavior.

Instead of a "goody twoshoes" no matter how manly, etc traipsing through an adventure being essentially unchanged by it all.

Just my opinion, but it's the reason I find myself reading older writers and novels more and more.
Posted by: naturalfake at March 22, 2020 11:09 AM (z0XD
_______

Well, sort of. In some cases, an unchanging likeable hero can work in series fiction; eg, in Wodehouse. But of course you're right about those who are set up for our admiration, and fail.

I cited the Carr because I'm a big fan. In fact, there's another one of his where he pulls of exactly what he doesn't in Bride; the heroine is quite dislikeable at the start, but then wins you over.

But while I don't doubt that modern leftist novels fail here a lot, I have to grant that there are many I've read - I'm a mystery buff - where it happens, not by pinkos. E.g., can anyone like Philo Vance?

And of course the same problem exists in reverse. Sometimes the villains are just overdone. But I think that in both cases a lot depends on just what kind of a story it is. It does no harm that Grimesby Roylotte in The Speckled Band is irredeemable. But I recall that C S Lewis mentioned how either Bronte would have destroyed Mansfield Park by making the Crawfords into horrible monsters.

But frankly, one of my recent resolutions was to just give up on fiction by living authors. Michael Gilbert and Patrick O'Brien were the last. But I don't WANT to enter a world I know. (I am going through some mysteries I've picked up over the years and never gotten to, and I'm not checking if they fit this rule.)

Posted by: Eeyore at March 22, 2020 11:27 AM (ZbwAu)

389 Our government is now on the direct path to inciting riots.



Saying they are considering 10-12 weeks of lockdown



All over FAKE science, a fucking computer model

Posted by: RoyalOil, Vicroy Canadian Territories at March 22, 2020 11:18 AM (vPKfA)

I think people by me are already giving the finger to the whole mess. People were riding quads and dirt bikes on the streets yesterday, there were hot rods, harleys, the whole deal. People seemed to be saying fuck ya all, we're going to have a good time.

Posted by: Berserker-Dragonheads Division at March 22, 2020 11:27 AM (9Om/r)

390 ''Remember the 70s when times were tough and we had to eat Bat Helper? ''

Fondly remember Shake 'n Bake for those creatures of the night. Easy peasy.
Posted by: Tuna at March 22, 2020 11:23 AM (gLRfa)

And I helped!''

You remembered. LOL. That little girl had, in my opinion, an unattractive fake southern accent.

Posted by: Tuna at March 22, 2020 11:27 AM (gLRfa)

391 Yes, but it's really easy to spread rumors and lies. People do it by accident with bad jokes.

What takes actual skill is keeping toilet paper on the shelves (so to speak).

The Russians (and the Chinese) excel at getting secrets and spreading lies to the gullible, but that's inferior to the hard work of running a functional society.

Which is why I'm beginning to wonder if this is the end of Communism in China. Even after the plague passes, the US will be shutting down a lot of factories there. Who will want to leave their industry and medical systems hostage to Chinese good will?
Posted by: Ace-Endorsed Author A.H. Lloyd at March 22, 2020 11:18 AM (cfSRQ)

Now we are talking about three things- spying, making use of spying, and running a functioning society. Were they good at spying - yes. Using that information, analyzing - yes, to an extent. Running functioning society - no. Theirs, just as Chinese, humit was and I contend still is very good.

As far as CHina not surviving this "incident" - at the moment I see is as 50/50. It all depend on whether it will be forgive /forget or on we won't be fooled again.

Posted by: runner at March 22, 2020 11:27 AM (zr5Kq)

392 Animal rights activists.

All bats have to be free-rage, wild-caught.
Posted by: Ace-Endorsed Author A.H. Lloyd at March 22, 2020 11:26 AM (cfSRQ)

Like they have any successful rights activists in China.. screw China

Posted by: CN at March 22, 2020 11:27 AM (ONvIw)

393 Bat-A-Roni the Wuhan China Treat!
Posted by: Count de Monet at March 22, 2020 11:24 AM (dQ1sa)

*Looks skeptical*

Ancient Chinese secret, eh?

Posted by: BurtTC at March 22, 2020 11:27 AM (hku12)

394 My husband spent about a month in China for his university department, and said the food was routinely atrocious. He came back much thinner, and this is not a man who had any need or desire to lose the weight.
Posted by: CN at March 22, 2020


*
*

No wonder the Chinese students are so slim!

Posted by: Wolfus Aurelius at March 22, 2020 11:28 AM (rpbg1)

395 Underwood Deviled Bat

Posted by: Count de Monet at March 22, 2020 11:28 AM (dQ1sa)

396 372 Coumo is trying to position himself as the democrat nominee. He has the ability to badmouth Demented Joe going into the convention and to be the "reasonable centrist" that the democrats are looking for.
---------------------------
Unfortunately Coumo would be an improvement on Biden. Yeah, he's mobbed up but who isn't in the Dem Party?

Posted by: Puddin Head at March 22, 2020 11:28 AM (QZCjk)

397 I know a lot of libertarianish people try to paint
Lincoln as a took of Northeastern Money, but those folks were invested
in slavery as well. It was the small farmers, shopkeepers, mechanics and
factory start-ups that supported the Republicans.

Since the officer corps was often tied to the planter class (which fancied themselves aristocrats), that's why so many deserted.
Posted by: Ace-Endorsed Author A.H. Lloyd at March 22, 2020 10:29 AM (cfSRQ)


Lincoln gets criticism from Rothbard as being a "railroad lawyer" but politics has always been about money, and railroads and steel were about big money.
And all the national politics were in some way sockpuppets of the the banking, steel and railroad interest.

I got about 1/4 into Murray Rothbard's A History of Banking and Money in the United States, and my dad asked to read it instead.

It is notable in being, in hardcopy, the size and weight of my college chemistry textbook, but is actually very interesting.
In Rothbard's view, Andrew Jackson was a very great man.

Posted by: Kindltot at March 22, 2020 11:29 AM (6rS3m)

398 This book blog has taken a very strange turn.

Posted by: sharon(willow's apprentice) at March 22, 2020 11:29 AM (QzF6i)

399 Bat-futaa is Corona-chans sifekick?

Posted by: Anna Puma at March 22, 2020 11:29 AM (g0Lwl)

400 i did. i enjoy reading the exploits of neal. i'm jealous and at the same time, amazed. like you said, balls.

Posted by: chavez the hugo at March 22, 2020 11:27 AM (KP5rU)

Yeah I would have burned down some of those "hotels" he stayed at as a gift to humanity. lol

Posted by: Berserker-Dragonheads Division at March 22, 2020 11:29 AM (9Om/r)

401 This book blog has taken a very strange turn.
Posted by: sharon(willow's apprentice) at March 22, 2020 11:29 AM (QzF6i)

Well, some of the people here are a little batty.

Posted by: Vanya at March 22, 2020 11:30 AM (ioTA8)

402 349 Mrs D and I are looking at 46 years in May.

But we met in high school.
And I only feel barely over 29.

Posted by: Diogenes at March 22, 2020 11:18 AM (axyOa)

That's sweet. Mr Jordan61 and I met in high school as well. We got married when I was almost 20, and he was 21. We'll be married 29 years in May.

Posted by: Jordan61 at March 22, 2020 11:30 AM (6ofTb)

403 The decoupling from China will hit all the right people hardest. Can't wait to watch College tuitions start to tumble.

Posted by: Puddin Head at March 22, 2020 11:30 AM (QZCjk)

404 Josephus's history of the Jewish War is good, but it suffers from the problem that Judea at the time had a dire lack of proper names. About a third of the Judeans are named Joseph, and the rest are named John. No surnames, either.

Posted by: Trimegistus at March 22, 2020 11:31 AM (DKCFT)

405
No wonder the Chinese students are so slim!
Posted by: Wolfus Aurelius at March 22, 2020 11:28 AM (rpbg1)

He expected wonderful cuisine, even as a guest of a university, he was repulsed. So maybe it was too authentic. I don't know many who went their recreationally, but I have never heard it ranked as a culinary paradise. I've heard nice things about Thailand's food though.

Posted by: CN at March 22, 2020 11:31 AM (ONvIw)

406 How soon before we get a Oscar Mayer BatMobile going city to city to promote healthy eating and proper bat presentation?

Can't wait!
Posted by: Hairyback Guy at March 22, 2020 11:26 AM (Z+IKu)


Oh I wish I was an Oscar Mayer batwing, cuz everyone would be in love with meeee!

Posted by: BurtTC at March 22, 2020 11:31 AM (hku12)

407 401
This book blog has taken a very strange turn.

Posted by: sharon(willow's apprentice) at March 22, 2020 11:29 AM (QzF6i)



Well, some of the people here are a little batty.

Posted by: Vanya at March 22, 2020 11:30 AM (ioTA

+++++++
Some?

Posted by: sharon(willow's apprentice) at March 22, 2020 11:33 AM (QzF6i)

408 Two all bat patties special sauce lettuce cheese pickles on a sesame seed bun!

Posted by: Bandersnatch at March 22, 2020 11:33 AM (gd9RK)

409 E.g., can anyone like Philo Vance? . . .


Posted by: Eeyore at March 22, 2020


*
*

Indeed. I read the first 4 novels in the series when I was about 14, and much more accepting of wordy writers and peculiar writing habits than I am now. And even I gave up. As Ogden Nash said, "Philo Vance/ Needs a kick in the pance."

Ellery Queen the character started out as a Vance clone, but the mysteries were much more involved and brilliant, and then the authors evolved Ellery away from that into a much more likable character -- one who made mistakes, and sometimes people died because of those mistakes. And he acknowledged that, and grew up because of it.

Posted by: Wolfus Aurelius at March 22, 2020 11:33 AM (rpbg1)

410 "Unfortunately Coumo would be an improvement on Biden. Yeah, he's mobbed up but who isn't in the Dem Party?"
Posted by: Puddin Head at March 22, 2020 11:28 AM (QZCjk


They're watching Trump's numbers going up with his press conference every day. Coumo is trying to balance the scales and sound like he's the best crisis leader.

Actually, he's doing a good job.

Trump's head of FEMA did a terrible job on the morning shows, not having any numbers on anything. Time to put this guy in isolation and send someone with a bit more confidence out to talk to the press.

Posted by: jwest at March 22, 2020 11:33 AM (mrrpT)

411 Silly rabbit, bats are for kids!

Posted by: BurtTC at March 22, 2020 11:33 AM (hku12)

412 400: i would start reading one of neal's books, and couldn't stop until the last page. he defined shithole.

Posted by: chavez the hugo at March 22, 2020 11:33 AM (KP5rU)

413 onions, I left out onions

Posted by: Bandersnatch at March 22, 2020 11:34 AM (gd9RK)

414 You know, I've actually seen the Oscar Meyer Wienermobile twice in my life. Same deal with Col Sanders. I'm a somebody.

Posted by: Puddin Head at March 22, 2020 11:34 AM (QZCjk)

415 372 Coumo is trying to position himself as the democrat nominee. He has the ability to badmouth Demented Joe going into the convention and to be the "reasonable centrist" that the democrats are looking for.

Posted by: jwest at March 22, 2020 11:24 AM (mrrpT)
________

But he did say something nice about Trump's handling of the crisis. That didn't work for Chris Christie.

Posted by: Eeyore at March 22, 2020 11:34 AM (ZbwAu)

416 Even kids with Wuhan Flu love batwing!

Posted by: Count de Monet at March 22, 2020 11:34 AM (dQ1sa)

417 I now see your e-mail. If you sent it earlier this week, I'm sorry I missed it./

Friday, I think. No worries.

Posted by: Long-time Commenter, First-time Reader at March 22, 2020 11:34 AM (Nu6Gg)

418 I read "Hoodwinked" by Jack Cashill. $2 on Kindle.

Basically, he demolishes the ideas and heroes of the 20th century left. Recommended.

Posted by: BeckoningChasm at March 22, 2020 11:34 AM (l9m7l)

419 M and Mbats... melts in your mouth, not in your lungs!

Posted by: BurtTC at March 22, 2020 11:35 AM (hku12)

420 he decoupling from China will hit all the right people hardest. Can't wait to watch College tuitions start to tumble.

===


Scam of a century, get in on F-1 (fully supported and sponsored by major Universities in cahoots with najor corporations), then OPT, then H1B, then Green Card. Voila !

Posted by: runner at March 22, 2020 11:35 AM (zr5Kq)

421 Pancakes this morning. Slathered, of course, in Mrs Bat-erworth's

Posted by: Hands at March 22, 2020 11:35 AM (786Ro)

422 You know, I've actually seen the Oscar Meyer Wienermobile twice in my life.

I saw an L.L. Bean Bootmobile.

Posted by: Bandersnatch at March 22, 2020 11:35 AM (gd9RK)

423 Szechwan batwings?

Posted by: Anna Puma at March 22, 2020 11:35 AM (g0Lwl)

424 You could serve Chicken Schnitzel shaped like a bat. Or you could serve Schnitzel Bat. Choices.

Posted by: Puddin Head at March 22, 2020 11:36 AM (QZCjk)

425 Give it to Mikey, he hates everything.

Posted by: JackStraw at March 22, 2020 11:36 AM (ZLI7S)

426 I've been reading an autobiography, "Take the Long Way Home," by Susan Lydon. A close friend recommended it, & it's far, far from my usual reading fare... so that's cool.

A Vassar grad, who is a fine writer, pisses her life away & becomes a heroin junkie, prostitute & thief. Then she recovers.

I admired the skillful storytelling. But I hated the woman. She's self-absorbed; narcissistic; hurt lots of others.

I had the impression that her editor told her, "You need to go back & sprinkle some 'acceptance of responsibility' in here from time to time." And she says, "OK, I forgot."

It's nice to read something rather far removed from the last book I read... a bio of Caesar Augustus. Talk about a change of pace!

Posted by: mnw at March 22, 2020 11:36 AM (Cssks)

427 "...because what is hamburger, chopped steak? No, it's chopped bat!"

Posted by: A-1 Bat Sauce at March 22, 2020 11:36 AM (CDGwz)

428 But he did say something nice about Trump's handling of the crisis. That didn't work for Chris Christie.
Posted by: Eeyore at March 22, 2020 11:34 AM (ZbwAu)


That's calculated so that he appears to be the "reasonable, work-across-the-aisle" guy. As I said, he's playing it perfectly and I'm sure his numbers are going through the roof.

Posted by: jwest at March 22, 2020 11:37 AM (mrrpT)

429 422 You know, I've actually seen the Oscar Meyer Wienermobile twice in my life.

I saw an L.L. Bean Bootmobile.
-----------------
Is that a real thing? Cereally.

Posted by: Puddin Head at March 22, 2020 11:37 AM (QZCjk)

430 I read "Hoodwinked" by Jack Cashill. $2 on Kindle.

Basically, he demolishes the ideas and heroes of the 20th century left. Recommended.
Posted by: BeckoningChasm at March 22, 2020 11:34 AM (l9m7l)


Seconded. Read his Flight 800, a look at the Deep State in action.

I started reading Diana West's "The Red Thread," and it's basically a compilation of blog posts. Sort of a who's who among the connected and collected anti-Trumpers. Just started it, but it's promising so far.

Posted by: BurtTC at March 22, 2020 11:37 AM (hku12)

431 Some Universities need to close forever.

Posted by: runner at March 22, 2020 11:37 AM (zr5Kq)

432 You know, I've actually seen the Oscar Meyer Wienermobile twice in my life.

And how did that make you feel...?

Posted by: Dr. Sigmund Freud at March 22, 2020 11:37 AM (CDGwz)

433 The secret ingredient is... BAT!

Posted by: Chairman Kaga at March 22, 2020 11:37 AM (ioTA8)

434 Maybe next. I enjoys memoirs when well written.
Some theorize that Gran't might have been edited by Twain himself. Some
say that it is completely baseless, written and edited in Grant's own
hand, etc. If so, well written for an army shlub. Just shows that
education in those days was more demanding. Even at West point... [ . . . ]
Posted by: runner at March 22, 2020 10:33 AM (zr5Kq)

two things: Twain was from the San Fransisco newspaper tradition where editors did lots of editing (so Twain would have been in the best place to do intensive editing for language and stringing the narrative together, and I do find a similar "flavor" to the writing), however Grant was not some schlub, he was a man who wrote lots and lots and lots of very detailed reports starting as a 2LT in the Quartermaster corps, through General, to President.

Three things will make you an excellent technical writer: good examples to draw from, lots of practice, and being verbally drawn and quartered for being unclear.

Posted by: Kindltot at March 22, 2020 11:38 AM (6rS3m)

435 narf

Posted by: Kindltot at March 22, 2020 11:38 AM (6rS3m)

436 Planning dinner - Gonna go sit across from the park and wait for someone to run over a skwerl. bbl

Posted by: Cicero Kaboom! Omega Kid, O-Positive at March 22, 2020 11:38 AM (Vy7tf)

437 I've been reading Love In the Time of Corona. Wait, what?

Posted by: Nancy Pelosi at March 22, 2020 11:38 AM (COzlW)

438 That cartoon made me grin. I think my mom is making the same face after me being home for a week.

Also, youse guys got bat? I got what the bat left behind. But hey, it's rich in phosphates, so my clothes were self cleaning.

*yeah yeah, I know, here comes 'you had clothes???'*

Posted by: GnuBreed at March 22, 2020 11:38 AM (Z4rgH)

439 I saw an L.L. Bean Bootmobile.
-----------------
Is that a real thing? Cereally.



It is. I posted the pic on FB and somebody said there are two, one is in Red Sox colors. The one I saw was on a highway and looked like a regulation Bean Boot.

Posted by: Bandersnatch at March 22, 2020 11:39 AM (gd9RK)

440 432 You know, I've actually seen the Oscar Meyer Wienermobile twice in my life.

And how did that make you feel...?
---------------------
Tumescent - but not in a gay sort of way.

Posted by: Puddin Head at March 22, 2020 11:39 AM (QZCjk)

441 the batmobile contained actual bat.

Posted by: chavez the hugo at March 22, 2020 11:39 AM (KP5rU)

442 > You know, I've actually seen the Oscar Meyer Wienermobile twice in my life.

And how did that make you feel...?
Posted by: Dr. Sigmund Freud at March 22, 2020 11:37 AM (CDGwz)


(obligatory)

https://stoatnet.org/c5wienermobile.jpg

Posted by: hogmartin at March 22, 2020 11:39 AM (t+qrx)

443 Lincoln gets criticism from Rothbard as being a
"railroad lawyer" but politics has always been about money, and
railroads and steel were about big money.
And all the national politics were in some way sockpuppets of the the banking, steel and railroad interest.


Posted by: Kindltot at March 22, 2020 11:29 AM (6rS3m)

---
Of course, but the question is what is also in the *national* interest?

Railroads make money but that's because they move people and goods at affordable prices.

Domestic steel is essential for national security.

What does slave-provided cotton exports get you? How does being dependent on foreign sources for machinery and textiles strengthen the nation?

There will always be "moneyed interests" not matter what system is used.

My point is that the southern aristocrats were globalists whereas Lincoln was a nationalist.

Posted by: Ace-Endorsed Author A.H. Lloyd at March 22, 2020 11:40 AM (cfSRQ)

444 Barbecued pulled bat sandwich. Red or mustard based sauce? Choices, choices...

Posted by: Tuna at March 22, 2020 11:40 AM (gLRfa)

445 Just started the Robert B. Parker 'Spenser' series.

Very reminiscent of Chandler, Hammett...and Nero Wolfe, oddly enough.

Spenser is a mix of Hammett toughness and Chandler poetry and philosophy....and wisecracks. So much wisecracking I almost want him to shut up sometimes myself.

The Nero Wolfe aspect is in how Parker really sets the series in Boston. Just inhabits it, wearing it like a garment. It is very much a product of the time and place the stories are set.

The Mysteries aren't twisty whodunnits. It's more 'howdunnits', as the crooks are pretty obvious each time, it's just getting the proof that's the hard part.

They're good though, I recommend them. Amazon had the first book on sale, the rest are the publisher gouge price of $8 a pop. Still...worse things to buy. I think I spent about $399 yesterday on ammo and red dot sights.

Posted by: Mark Andrew Edwards at March 22, 2020 11:40 AM (d1uFV)

446 439 I saw an L.L. Bean Bootmobile.
-----------------
Is that a real thing? Cereally.


It is. I posted the pic on FB and somebody said there are two, one is in Red Sox colors. The one I saw was on a highway and looked like a regulation Bean Boot.
----------------------
Dam. I've always wanted a pair of those boots but never got any. Do you think the Bootmobile drives south of PA?

Posted by: Puddin Head at March 22, 2020 11:40 AM (QZCjk)

447 We've secretly replaced President Xi's live bat tea with Fo-Zhu's freeze dried bat crystals. Let's see if he notices.

Posted by: Hands at March 22, 2020 11:41 AM (786Ro)

448 378 I don't recall seeing it. What address did you send it to?
aoshqbookthread at gee, ma-il
Posted by: Long-time Commenter, First-time Reader at March 22, 2020 11:25 AM (Nu6Gg)


Now I see it.

Posted by: OregonMuse, AoSHQ Thought Leader, Pants Monitor & Social Distancing Professional at March 22, 2020 11:42 AM (FbBpr)

449 *margins still look too wide ....

Posted by: runner at March 22, 2020 11:42 AM (zr5Kq)

450 Batman's secret identity, finally revealed!

https://tinyurl.com/wk5fqtv

Posted by: BurtTC at March 22, 2020 11:42 AM (hku12)

451 I just saw a new eating utensil. It's a fork on one end and a split handle on the other such that it can be used as chopsticks. Perfect for eating bat chilli.

Posted by: Anonosaurus Wrecks, Tyrannosaur Wrangler at March 22, 2020 11:43 AM (+y/Ru)

452 447
We've secretly replaced President Xi's live bat tea with Fo-Zhu's freeze dried bat crystals. Let's see if he notices.

Posted by: Hands at March 22, 2020 11:41 AM (786Ro)

---
That's funny, my husband never has a second bat at home...

Posted by: Concerned Housewife at March 22, 2020 11:43 AM (cfSRQ)

453 The margins are blown some here

Posted by: Skip at March 22, 2020 11:43 AM (ZCEU2)

454 And I helped!''

You remembered. LOL. That little girl had, in my opinion, an unattractive fake southern accent.
Posted by: Tuna at March 22, 2020 11:27 AM (gLRfa)


Paula Deen. The early years.

Posted by: Diogenes at March 22, 2020 11:44 AM (axyOa)

455 Here. The Bean Bootmobile. As seen on Rt. 84 in CT.

https://bit.ly/3dm3EPG

Posted by: Bandersnatch at March 22, 2020 11:44 AM (gd9RK)

456 Looks like I picked the wrong week to quit bat.

Posted by: Vanya at March 22, 2020 11:44 AM (ioTA8)

457 I get an earlier start on the Book Thread today because church services have been suspended by the bishop's order. The pastor will conduct today's service by Livestream.

Could have joined the thread earlier, but I chose to read some of what Sefton provided last week.

Other than that, I've begun another read-through of Jim Starlin's comics series "Dreadstar," which I haven't touched in more than a decade. It still holds up, although the scenes involving computer printouts show how far technology has come since the 1980s. Sure doesn't seem that long ago.

I also reread "Blaze of Glory," a John Ostrander miniseries featuring Marvel's Western heroes. It's Ostrander; that guarantees quality.

I had planned to start one book, but as usual I switched gears and began a different one, "Treasure Island." Yes, I've never read it through. Started it in grade school but never got past the concept of the "black spot."

Why did I pick it after all these years? Thank the Muppets. My family has been binging on Muppet films, and "Muppet Treasure Island" was last night's choice.

Posted by: Weak Geek at March 22, 2020 11:44 AM (u/nim)

458 Winston Churchill, Britain's Teddy Roosevelt.

Posted by: Anonosaurus Wrecks, Tyrannosaur Wrangler at March 22, 2020 11:44 AM (+y/Ru)

459 Recommend Rats Lice and History by hans zinsser. History of typhus written as a biography. LOL

Posted by: Mr. Barky at March 22, 2020 11:45 AM (PYVV9)

460 Just started the Robert B. Parker 'Spenser' series.

Very reminiscent of Chandler, Hammett...and Nero Wolfe, oddly enough.

Spenser is a mix of Hammett toughness and Chandler poetry and philosophy....and wisecracks. So much wisecracking I almost want him to shut up sometimes myself.

The Nero Wolfe aspect is in how Parker really sets the series in Boston. Just inhabits it, wearing it like a garment. It is very much a product of the time and place the stories are set.

The Mysteries aren't twisty whodunnits. It's more 'howdunnits', as the crooks are pretty obvious each time, it's just getting the proof that's the hard part.

They're good though, I recommend them. Amazon had the first book on sale, the rest are the publisher gouge price of $8 a pop. Still...worse things to buy. I think I spent about $399 yesterday on ammo and red dot sights.
Posted by: Mark Andrew Edwards at March 22, 2020


*
*

Parker was a disciple of Chandler; I think he did his dissertation on Chandler's work. Yes, Spenser is a smart-mouth, but it works for me.

And the character does evolve and grow during the series. The first leap away from the typical private eye hero takes place in book 2, when he meets the woman who will become his long-time love, Susan Silverman. Then he meets up again with Hawk, the self-described leg breaker who is like his dark self. So Parker ends up having two characters who embody the twin sides of Spenser's nature, the gentle intellectual and the tough ex-boxer and "scuffler."

Posted by: Wolfus Aurelius at March 22, 2020 11:45 AM (rpbg1)

461 The Turkey Bat is tolerable, EggBatters barely, but I draw the line at Soy Bat.

Posted by: cool breeze at March 22, 2020 11:45 AM (UGKMd)

462 Sam Adams @ 291, was away for awhile; thanks for your comments on Churchill! My British-born g'parents liked him very much and I can remember when he died; my dad told me about him, I was little. Will check out the memoirs.

Posted by: skywch at March 22, 2020 11:46 AM (IWvy/)

463 Anyway, like I was sayin', bat is the fruit of the cave. You can barbecue it, boil it, broil it, bake it, sautee it. Dey's uh, bat-kabobs, bat creole, bat gumbo. Pan fried, deep fried, stir-fried. There's pineapple bat, lemon bat, coconut bat, pepper bat, bat soup, bat stew, bat salad, bat and potatoes, bat burger, bat sandwich. That - that's about it.

Posted by: Insomniac - Ex Cineribus Resurgo at March 22, 2020 11:46 AM (NWiLs)

464 409 E.g., can anyone like Philo Vance? . . .


Posted by: Eeyore at March 22, 2020

*
*

Indeed. I read the first 4 novels in the series when I was about 14, and much more accepting of wordy writers and peculiar writing habits than I am now. And even I gave up. As Ogden Nash said, "Philo Vance/ Needs a kick in the pance."

Ellery Queen the character started out as a Vance clone, but the mysteries were much more involved and brilliant, and then the authors evolved Ellery away from that into a much more likable character -- one who made mistakes, and sometimes people died because of those mistakes. And he acknowledged that, and grew up because of it.
Posted by: Wolfus Aurelius at March 22, 2020 11:33 AM (rpbg1)
_______

Agreed. And, once again, so did John Dickson Carr, about both Vance and Queen. He did grant Vance points for "taking pains", and said that was what made the atmosphere in The Greene Murder Case so effective.

Much of my current mystery reading was triggered by Carr's essay "The Grandest Game in the World", on the subject. It was supposed to be an intro to a "10 great detective novels" he was to put out, but which never made it.

While not always, I do tend to agree with him most of the time. So I just picked some of his recommendations, and ordered. He did err in picking Strong Poison instead of The Nine Tailors for Sayers. (The point you make about Queen can also be made about Lord Peter.)

Posted by: Eeyore at March 22, 2020 11:46 AM (ZbwAu)

465 On my tablet the comment block is 2/3 of the posted comment blocks. Downstairs its 7/8

Posted by: Skip at March 22, 2020 11:46 AM (ZCEU2)

466 You know, I've actually seen the Oscar Meyer Wienermobile twice in my life.

There was a funny Dave Barry column years ago about how he got to actually drive the Oscar Meyer Weinermobile. So what does he do? He decides the best thing is to embarrass the crap out of his 12-year-old son by picking him up after school in it.

Hilarity ensued.

Posted by: OregonMuse, AoSHQ Thought Leader, Pants Monitor & Social Distancing Professional at March 22, 2020 11:46 AM (FbBpr)

467 A lot of my wargaming went like that - I'd buy a game because I wanted to learn about that period in history and why things went the way they did.
Posted by: Ace-Endorsed Author A.H. Lloyd at March 22, 2020 10:35 AM (cfSRQ)


Seems like there are quite a few wargamers in the Horde. I have heard of wargames described as "paper time machines." If properly designed, a wargame let's the player experience some of the challenges facing opposing generals and gain some insight.

Posted by: Retired Buckeye Cop is now an engineer at March 22, 2020 11:46 AM (00fXp)

468 413 onions, I left out onions
Posted by: Bandersnatch at March 22, 2020 11:34 AM (gd9RK)
______

Well, that means it's a bad pound cake.

(OK this is books, not cartoons, and that's from Bullwinkle.)

Posted by: Eeyore at March 22, 2020 11:47 AM (ZbwAu)

469 sotto voce
We've replaced these restaurant guests' regular bat with Folger's crystals. Let's see if they notice.

Posted by: Insomniac - Ex Cineribus Resurgo at March 22, 2020 11:47 AM (NWiLs)

470 "Bat- The Other White Meat"

Posted by: The American Bat Producers Council at March 22, 2020 11:48 AM (IMdOQ)

471 ''There was a funny Dave Barry column years ago about how he got to actually drive the Oscar Meyer Weinermobile. So what does he do? He decides the best thing is to embarrass the crap out of his 12-year-old son by picking him up after school in it.

Hilarity ensued.''

I remember that one.

Posted by: Tuna at March 22, 2020 11:48 AM (gLRfa)

472 You're storing BAT next to RAW FUCKING BEEF!

Posted by: Gordon Ramsey at March 22, 2020 11:48 AM (ioTA8)

473 463 Anyway, like I was sayin', bat is the fruit of the cave. You can barbecue it, boil it, broil it, bake it, sautee it. Dey's uh, bat-kabobs, bat creole, bat gumbo. Pan fried, deep fried, stir-fried. There's pineapple bat, lemon bat, coconut bat, pepper bat, bat soup, bat stew, bat salad, bat and potatoes, bat burger, bat sandwich. That - that's about it.
Posted by: Insomniac - Ex Cineribus Resurgo at March 22, 2020 11:46 AM (NWiLs)


Well, there's eggs and bat, eggs, sausange, and bat, ham, eggs, and bat, bat, bat, eggs and bat, bat bat, bat, and bat...

Posted by: OregonMuse, AoSHQ Thought Leader, Pants Monitor & Social Distancing Professional at March 22, 2020 11:49 AM (FbBpr)

474 472 You're storing BAT next to RAW FUCKING BEEF!
Posted by: Gordon Ramsey at March 22, 2020 11:48 AM (ioTA


Where's the BAT SAUCE?!

Posted by: Insomniac - Ex Cineribus Resurgo at March 22, 2020 11:49 AM (NWiLs)

475 Oh I wish I was a Wuhan virus plague bat
That is what I'd truly like to be
Cause if I was a Wuhan virus plague bat
Everyone would get sick over me

Posted by: JackStraw at March 22, 2020 11:49 AM (ZLI7S)

476 Agreed. And, once again, so did John Dickson Carr, about both Vance and Queen. He did grant Vance points for "taking pains", and said that was what made the atmosphere in The Greene Murder Case so effective.

Much of my current mystery reading was triggered by Carr's essay "The Grandest Game in the World", on the subject. It was supposed to be an intro to a "10 great detective novels" he was to put out, but which never made it.

While not always, I do tend to agree with him most of the time. So I just picked some of his recommendations, and ordered. He did err in picking Strong Poison instead of The Nine Tailors for Sayers. (The point you make about Queen can also be made about Lord Peter.)
Posted by: Eeyore at March 22, 2020


*
*

I have a copy of that essay by Carr, in its appearance in an EQ "Best of" collection from 1963. I read it when I had never encountered Queen or Carr, and it led me to them. EQ as editor said there was a middle section of the essay where Carr listed his reasons for picking each of his ten. I wonder if that ever became available?

Posted by: Wolfus Aurelius at March 22, 2020 11:49 AM (rpbg1)

477 I've been reading a collection of Leigh Brackett short stories, "The Coming of the Terrans." It's mostly stories set on Mars about tough guys from Earth encountering weird ancient stuff on Mars. Great stories.

But I'm a little melancholy because the collection is organized by date -- the year each story takes place in is listed. The first is the far-future year of 1998, there's one set in 2016, and I think it goes up to 2030 or so.

Forget the stupid flying cars. I want my tramp rocket freighters and sin-drenched Martian lowland cities!

Posted by: Trimegistus at March 22, 2020 11:50 AM (DKCFT)

478 Posted by: Gordon Ramsey at March 22, 2020 11:48 AM (ioTA


I knew that was going to be a Gordon Ramsey sock. Well played.

Posted by: Bandersnatch at March 22, 2020 11:50 AM (gd9RK)

479 For Thanksgiving, Turduckinbat.

Posted by: Anonosaurus Wrecks, Tyrannosaur Wrangler at March 22, 2020 11:50 AM (+y/Ru)

480 Would now be a bad time to introduce bat tartare to the American palette?

Posted by: t-bird at March 22, 2020 11:51 AM (IMdOQ)

481 Passed the Oscar Myer hotdog vehicle on I-95 down Virginia or North Carolina some years ago

Posted by: Skip at March 22, 2020 11:51 AM (ZCEU2)

482 Beer-battered bat

Posted by: Insomniac - Ex Cineribus Resurgo at March 22, 2020 11:51 AM (NWiLs)

483 Nine Tailors may well be Sayers's best novel, but it's barely a mystery story at all. Her best mystery novel is probably Have His Carcase.

Posted by: Trimegistus at March 22, 2020 11:51 AM (DKCFT)

484 Parker was a disciple of Chandler; I think he did his dissertation on Chandler's work. Yes, Spenser is a smart-mouth, but it works for me.

And the character does evolve and grow during the series. The first leap away from the typical private eye hero takes place in book 2, when he meets the woman who will become his long-time love, Susan Silverman. Then he meets up again with Hawk, the self-described leg breaker who is like his dark self. So Parker ends up having two characters who embody the twin sides of Spenser's nature, the gentle intellectual and the tough ex-boxer and "scuffler."
Posted by: Wolfus Aurelius at March 22, 2020 11:45 AM (rpbg1)

I'm not a bit surprised that he wrote on Chandler. His glove prints are all over Spenser.

I got to also add, if you like food and cooking, there are a lot of recipes too. Some of the meals Spenser makes sound delicious.

I haven't gotten to the 'Hawk' introduction yet, I'm working my way through the series in order. It was really clear that Silverman was 'the one'. And yeah, kind of an odd choice of having him meet 'the one' in book 2. He was definitely getting it wet a lot in book 1.

Good characters too, everyone (except Spenser) feel like real people in the Boston area.

Posted by: Mark Andrew Edwards at March 22, 2020 11:52 AM (d1uFV)

485 more bat, gargoyle!

Posted by: chavez the hugo at March 22, 2020 11:52 AM (KP5rU)

486 My people used the whole bat.

Posted by: Elizabeth Warren at March 22, 2020 11:52 AM (gd9RK)

487 Would now be a bad time to introduce bat tartare to the American palette?
Posted by: t-bird at March 22, 2020


*
*

Legend has it that the Mongols tenderized their bat by putting it between the horse's back and the saddle, then riding all day. Yum. . . .

Posted by: Wolfus Aurelius at March 22, 2020 11:52 AM (rpbg1)

488 Are me and Y-Dice the only people on this blog under 40?
Posted by: Vanya at March 22, 2020 11:14 AM (ioTA

I think Broseidon and maybe Harry Paratestes, if they're still around. Not sure.
Posted by: hogmartin
-----
Some of us were under 40 when we started coming here...

Posted by: lin-duh at March 22, 2020 11:52 AM (UUBmN)

489 bats in a blanket.

Posted by: chavez the hugo at March 22, 2020 11:52 AM (KP5rU)

490 The Calvin doc isn't wearing PPE and is touching his face.

Posted by: West at March 22, 2020 11:53 AM (jqZBS)

491 Just went to Joanne fabrics on-line for 'make your own mask tutorial'
Fussy and full of jargon and not very helpful.

Posted by: Downcast at March 22, 2020 11:54 AM (xgpfE)

492 New product idea: Bat On A Stick.

Posted by: West at March 22, 2020 11:55 AM (jqZBS)

493 I haven't gotten to the 'Hawk' introduction yet, I'm working my way through the series in order. It was really clear that Silverman was 'the one'. And yeah, kind of an odd choice of having him meet 'the one' in book 2. He was definitely getting it wet a lot in book 1.

Good characters too, everyone (except Spenser) feel like real people in the Boston area.
Posted by: Mark Andrew Edwards at March 22, 2020


*
*

I've always wondered about that. Did Parker intend for Spenser to be a ladies' man, and then an editor said, "Hey, what about if you made him a one-woman man?" Or was it Parker's own idea after the first novel came out and he started work on God Save the Child, the second book?

Posted by: Wolfus Aurelius at March 22, 2020 11:55 AM (rpbg1)

494 Sorry, sharon, it's late in the thread and the horde is chasing squirrels, now....er, bats.

Posted by: April at March 22, 2020 11:55 AM (OX9vb)

495 Are me and Y-Dice the only people on this blog under 40?
Posted by: Vanya at March 22, 2020 11:14 AM (ioTA

I self identify as under 40

Posted by: vmom 2020 at March 22, 2020 11:55 AM (G546f)

496 China is right. Bat flu began in America when Jeff Dahmer ate Batman.

Posted by: Anonosaurus Wrecks, Tyrannosaur Wrangler at March 22, 2020 11:55 AM (+y/Ru)

497 ''Recommend Rats Lice and History by hans zinsser. History of typhus written as a biography. LOL''

Stephen Tatty's "'The Illustrious Dead" is an excellent read. Those in Napoleon's army that weren't killed in Russia were killed by typhus on the way home.

Posted by: Tuna at March 22, 2020 11:55 AM (gLRfa)

498 "Batolive...it cleans while it smooths and moisturizes..."

"Doesn't it dry out your hands?"

"You're soaking in it!"

Posted by: Boswell at March 22, 2020 11:56 AM (32YRo)

499 And, not to sound like a fag, but I love you guys....all those bat jokes....love it

Posted by: Mark Andrew Edwards at March 22, 2020 11:56 AM (d1uFV)

500 494 Sorry, sharon, it's late in the thread and the horde is chasing squirrels, now....er, bats.
Posted by: April at March 22, 2020 11:55 AM (OX9vb)

We can compromise and talk about Rocky the flying squirrel.

Posted by: Insomniac - Ex Cineribus Resurgo at March 22, 2020 11:56 AM (NWiLs)

501 Trimegistus, just put a hold on Nine Tailors ebook at library, thanks! The description sounds like it's right up my alley ( or street, as the Brits say)

Posted by: skywch at March 22, 2020 11:56 AM (IWvy/)

502 Good characters too, everyone (except Spenser) feel like real people in the Boston area.
Posted by: Mark Andrew Edwards at March 22, 2020


*
*

Spenser was kind of a fish out of water in Boston. He grew up in Wyoming, we're told later in the series; raised by his father and two uncles. They all cooked -- "If you didn't cook, you didn't eat," he says -- and so he finds it perfectly normal to cook interesting meals.

Posted by: Wolfus Aurelius at March 22, 2020 11:56 AM (rpbg1)

503 491 Just went to Joanne fabrics on-line for 'make your own mask tutorial'
Fussy and full of jargon and not very helpful.
Posted by: Downcast at March 22, 2020 11:54 AM (xgpfE)

Just do like a cowboy or a bandit and tie a bandanna over your face. I mean, really, does Jo-Ann have N95 rated fabric or somethin'?

Posted by: April at March 22, 2020 11:56 AM (OX9vb)

504 455 Here. The Bean Bootmobile. As seen on Rt. 84 in CT.

https://bit.ly/3dm3EPG
-----------------------
Sweet.

Posted by: Puddin Head at March 22, 2020 11:57 AM (QZCjk)

505 321 I don't recall the title, but recently I read one of his novellas set in a kind of Hell which is much like the climate here in NO -- i.e., perfect for Hell -- and which features real-life people, now dead, interacting. HP Lovecraft meets Robert E. Howard, for instance, and Queen Elizabeth I is there still practicing politics, and more.

That sounds a lot like Philip Jose Farmer's Riverworld series. I read a couple when I was a teenager and can't decide if I liked them.

Posted by: Bruno, a lurk story at March 22, 2020 11:57 AM (6qtm/)

506 ''Sorry, sharon, it's late in the thread and the horde is chasing squirrels, now....er, bats.''

The horde is like a dog with a bone. Just can't let go.

Posted by: Tuna at March 22, 2020 11:57 AM (gLRfa)

507 You want Bat Mignon
You'll settle for Boil-n-Bat
You'll get Batboyardee...

Posted by: Boswell at March 22, 2020 11:57 AM (32YRo)

508 bat scratch fever. catch it!

Posted by: chavez the hugo at March 22, 2020 11:57 AM (KP5rU)

509 Finished "Cod: A Biography of the Fish that Changed the World" by Mark Kurlansky this week.

It's a fascinating look at fishing and fishermen, fisherman of Europe heading west to the cod banks off the coasts of north America, and the subsequent strip mining of the cod banks and eventual closure to fishing back in the early 1990's.

It also contains old and historical recipes collected from various sources. Old recipes are always interesting for their vernacular and how much knowledge of cooking is assumed by the author. Also, the way cooking changed once it moved from the hearth of a fireplace to a stove and oven setup.

Posted by: Boots at March 22, 2020 11:58 AM (oGBso)

510 467 A lot of my wargaming went like that - I'd buy a game because I wanted to learn about that period in history and why things went the way they did.
Posted by: Ace-Endorsed Author A.H. Lloyd at March 22, 2020 10:35 AM (cfSRQ)

Seems like there are quite a few wargamers in the Horde. I have heard of wargames described as "paper time machines." If properly designed, a wargame let's the player experience some of the challenges facing opposing generals and gain some insight.

Posted by: Retired Buckeye Cop is now an engineer at March 22, 2020 11:46 AM (00fXp)
_________

Yes, I subscribed to S&T until the miserable Oil War. I wasn't alone. It failed miserably. And they actually tried the excuse that the notion was "too frightening" for people to like it. Yes, people who play wargames, including nukes. Frightened by oil prices. That sounds logical.

SPI did some good stuff, but it was too much of a machine. I have a friend who knows David Isby, and says that the problem was they wouldn't take extra time in development, if that was needed.

In contrast, GDW took over a year beyond the announced date, to actually publish Merita Merkur.

The last time I played FTF was in the 90s, at a local wargame store. A friend (same one as above) finally decided to settle arguments about Beda Fomm. (He won, on the last turn.) But we were the only ones doing wargames. Everyone else was playing orcs and trolls.

Posted by: Eeyore at March 22, 2020 11:58 AM (ZbwAu)

511 Where's the bat?

Posted by: Old Lady from Wendy's commercial at March 22, 2020 11:58 AM (Z+IKu)

512 Jesus Cuomo does not shut up

Posted by: Nevergiveup at March 22, 2020 11:59 AM (nRk/c)

513 In the cauldron boil and bake
Eye of newt and toe of frog
Wool of bat and tongue of dog

Witches are Chinese assets CONFIRMED

Posted by: Vanya at March 22, 2020 11:59 AM (ioTA8)

514 I don't recall the title, but recently I read one of his novellas set in a kind of Hell which is much like the climate here in NO -- i.e., perfect for Hell -- and which features real-life people, now dead, interacting. HP Lovecraft meets Robert E. Howard, for instance, and Queen Elizabeth I is there still practicing politics, and more.

That sounds a lot like Philip Jose Farmer's Riverworld series. I read a couple when I was a teenager and can't decide if I liked them.
Posted by: Bruno, a lurk story at March 22, 2020


*
*

Possibly Silverberg was inspired by Farmer's series. The novella I read is much more recent, the 1980s or -90s, than is Riverworld or its sequels.

Posted by: Wolfus Aurelius at March 22, 2020 11:59 AM (rpbg1)

515 Some of us were under 40 when we started coming here...

Posted by: lin-duh at March 22, 2020 11:52 AM (UUBmN)

I was! Just barely though.

Posted by: Jordan61 at March 22, 2020 11:59 AM (6ofTb)

516 I've always wondered about that. Did Parker intend for Spenser to be a ladies' man, and then an editor said, "Hey, what about if you made him a one-woman man?" Or was it Parker's own idea after the first novel came out and he started work on God Save the Child, the second book?
Posted by: Wolfus Aurelius at March 22, 2020 11:55 AM (rpbg1)

It didn't feel editorial to me. And it's not like Spenser's eye has stopped noticing other women. But he describes a really good 'love at first sight' description of Silverman.

My gut tells me it has something to do with probably meeting his own wife. Borrowed from life.

Posted by: Mark Andrew Edwards at March 22, 2020 11:59 AM (d1uFV)

517 445 Just started the Robert B. Parker 'Spenser' series.
==

is that what the Spenser movie on Netflix is based on?
it's an ok.movie - seemed like a pilot for a series

Posted by: vmom 2020 at March 22, 2020 11:59 AM (G546f)

518
I saw an L.L. Bean Bootmobile.

Quick Robin! To the Bootmobile!

Posted by: Bootman at March 22, 2020 12:00 PM (aKsyK)

519 Thursday our power went out (snowstorm) so no horde and no WFH via internet all afternoon. So I read AnnaPumas Yuriko a real girl. We have several horde authors, folks needing to pass time should stock their kindles with horde authors at this time.

Christopher Taylor. I enjoyed all 3 of his books I read. .
Anna Puma. I've read 3 of her novels, all were fun.
MPPP.

pro or at least semi pro authors with multiple novels to explore
Sabrina Chase.
A.H. Loyd
Sarah Hoyte

We have many others as well. These are the ones that were on the top of my head. Apologies if this is a re or re-repeat. I don't make much time to read lately so haven not been following the book threads.

Posted by: PaleRider is simply irredeemable at March 22, 2020 12:00 PM (T9Hmo)

520 476
I have a copy of that essay by Carr, in its appearance in an EQ "Best of" collection from 1963. I read it when I had never encountered Queen or Carr, and it led me to them. EQ as editor said there was a middle section of the essay where Carr listed his reasons for picking each of his ten. I wonder if that ever became available?
Posted by: Wolfus Aurelius at March 22, 2020 11:49 AM (rpbg1)
_______

It's in a collection The Door To Doom. Currently in print.

Posted by: Eeyore at March 22, 2020 12:01 PM (ZbwAu)

521 Bander, you left out the onion.

Posted by: creeper at March 22, 2020 12:01 PM (XxJt1)

522 Now you can make Bat-on-a-Stik at home, bringing back those fond memories of old-school carnival midways*.



*Bearded Woman and Fish Baby for illustrative purposes only. Not included with purchase.



Posted by: Rodrigo Borgia at March 22, 2020 12:01 PM (tLWGd)

523 Finished "Cod: A Biography of the Fish that Changed the World" by Mark Kurlansky this week.


I love that book, I've read it several times.

I was really disappointed in his "Salt", which was trying to do the same thing. Salt is so ubiquitous that there is no limiting factor and he just told salt anecdotes from everywhere.

Posted by: Bandersnatch at March 22, 2020 12:02 PM (gd9RK)

524 Just started the Robert B. Parker 'Spenser' series.
==

is that what the Spenser movie on Netflix is based on?
it's an ok.movie - seemed like a pilot for a series
Posted by: vmom 2020 at March 22, 2020


*
*

I don't know about that one. Who plays Spenser, Susan, and Hawk?

There was a 1985-1988 TV series called Spenser: For Hire on ABC, with Robert Urich as Spenser, Barbara Stock as Susan, and Avery Brooks of Deep Space Nine as Hawk. Very good casting, and Parker wrote at least one script for the show.

Posted by: Wolfus Aurelius at March 22, 2020 12:02 PM (rpbg1)

525 Who's up for some batatouille?

Posted by: Insomniac - Ex Cineribus Resurgo at March 22, 2020 12:02 PM (NWiLs)

526 This book blog has taken a very strange turn.
Posted by: sharon(willow's apprentice) at March 22, 2020 11:29 AM (QzF6i)


the strangest turn is bat shwarma. Gotta turn those bats on a spit in the shwarma roaster for quite a while


(oh, and my calico cat types:
batjmskjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjj jj1kkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkk52525252 5252525252525252525252525 2525252525252525252525252 5252525252525252525252525 2525252525252525252525252 52525252525252525252525252 5252525252525252525252525 25252525252525252525252525 252525252525252525252525 252525252525252525252525 25252525252525252525252525 2525252525252525252525252 5252525252525252525252525 252525252525252525252525252ki411111111111111


Thought you would all be entertained as she was - spaces added to avoid blowing the margins)

Posted by: Kindltot at March 22, 2020 12:02 PM (6rS3m)

527 Wish Amazon would move up the new Bosch installments. Could use some new entertainment. Love every single actor in that series. Character actors all.

Posted by: Tuna at March 22, 2020 12:03 PM (gLRfa)

528 I have a copy of that essay by Carr, in its appearance in an EQ "Best of" collection from 1963. I read it when I had never encountered Queen or Carr, and it led me to them. EQ as editor said there was a middle section of the essay where Carr listed his reasons for picking each of his ten. I wonder if that ever became available?
Posted by: Wolfus Aurelius at March 22, 2020 11:49 AM (rpbg1)
_______

It's in a collection The Door To Doom. Currently in print.
Posted by: Eeyore at March 22, 2020


*
*

Wow! I'll have to get that. E-book, or paper copy?

Posted by: Wolfus Aurelius at March 22, 2020 12:03 PM (rpbg1)

529 517 445 Just started the Robert B. Parker 'Spenser' series.
==

is that what the Spenser movie on Netflix is based on?
it's an ok.movie - seemed like a pilot for a series
Posted by: vmom 2020 at March 22, 2020 11:59 AM (G546f)

There was a Spenser tv series back in the 80's that's better (though I haven't seen the Netflix version). Robert Ulrich and the guy who played Commander Sisco on Star Trek is Hawk.

Posted by: Mark Andrew Edwards at March 22, 2020 12:03 PM (d1uFV)

530 58 "Champs, look at Cary Grant."

Somebody tell him...

Ps. The Good Shepard is a grueling book that describes a grueling battle, and the only chick in it is a faithless bitch. What struck me was the mental geometrical gymnastics the Captain was supposed to do in his head to drop an explosive charge on a submarine!

Posted by: Ray Van Dune at March 22, 2020 12:03 PM (bj454)

531 > Jesus Cuomo does not shut up

There's a Jesus Cuomo, too? Mario had a second Latina wife, or just a legitimized byblow from the maid?


Posted by: Rodrigo Borgia at March 22, 2020 12:03 PM (tLWGd)

532 Bander, you left out the onion.


Scroll down. I corrected myself.

Posted by: Bandersnatch at March 22, 2020 12:03 PM (gd9RK)

533 Now you can make Bat-on-a-Stik at home, bringing back those fond memories of old-school carnival midways*.



*Bearded Woman and Fish Baby for illustrative purposes only. Not included with purchase.


Posted by: Rodrigo Borgia at March 22, 2020 12:01 PM (tLWGd)


I recall the grade school fairs. There was always a bat walk. All the moms would bake a batcake. Mom hated it cause if I won, I'd pick her batcake.

Posted by: Diogenes at March 22, 2020 12:04 PM (axyOa)

534 ''Robert Urich as Spenser,''

Died too soon. Liked him in everything he was in.

Posted by: Tuna at March 22, 2020 12:04 PM (gLRfa)

535 483 Nine Tailors may well be Sayers's best novel, but it's barely a mystery story at all. Her best mystery novel is probably Have His Carcase.
Posted by: Trimegistus at March 22, 2020 11:51 AM (DKCFT)
_____

I take your point. In that respect, Nine Tailors resembles The Hound of the Baskervilles. It's the setting that really dominates.

But there is a mystery, after all. And reading it I did know where the key was, but couldn't break it without dropping it to study bell ringing.

Posted by: Eeyore at March 22, 2020 12:04 PM (ZbwAu)

536 My first girlfriend used to tease her hair with a bat-tail comb. . . .

Posted by: Wolfus Aurelius at March 22, 2020 12:05 PM (rpbg1)

537 (oh, and my calico cat types:
batjmskjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjj jj1kkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkk52525252 5252525252525252525252525 2525252525252525252525252 5252525252525252525252525 2525252525252525252525252 52525252525252525252525252 5252525252525252525252525 25252525252525252525252525 252525252525252525252525 252525252525252525252525 25252525252525252525252525 2525252525252525252525252 5252525252525252525252525 252525252525252525252525252ki411111111111111

Posted by: Kindltot at March 22, 2020 12:02 PM (6rS3m)

A valid point, but I think the human compulsion to belong is more of a factor here. A person subconsciously aligns themselves with the organization and its goals, thereby transferring (in their minds) the ultimate responsibility for their actions away from themselves.

Posted by: Vanya at March 22, 2020 12:05 PM (ioTA8)

538 536 My first girlfriend used to tease her hair with a bat-tail comb. . . .
Posted by: Wolfus Aurelius at March 22, 2020 12:05 PM (rpbg1)

LOL, RATtail

Posted by: CN at March 22, 2020 12:05 PM (ONvIw)

539 How many aspiring politicians have embarrassed themselves eating Corn Bat at the Iowa State Fair?

Posted by: Bandersnatch at March 22, 2020 12:05 PM (gd9RK)

540 I don't know why but I'm getting user 500 errors all over the fucking place. Have fun talking about bats.

Posted by: Captain Hate at March 22, 2020 12:05 PM (y7DUB)

541 ''Robert Urich as Spenser,''

Died too soon. Liked him in everything he was in.
Posted by: Tuna at March 22, 2020


*
*

He is still my mental image of Spenser, though I've read that Parker himself wanted Joe Mantegna (who has played Spenser in a couple of TV movies). Hawk is such an outsized character that I originally thought, "Nobody could pull that role off," but Avery Brooks did. No other actor has come close.

Posted by: Wolfus Aurelius at March 22, 2020 12:06 PM (rpbg1)

542 Died too soon. Liked him in everything he was in.


Really? I hear he's the record holder for number of TV series, something like nine, many of which were short lived.

Posted by: Mr. Peebles at March 22, 2020 12:06 PM (oVJmc)

543 LOL, RATtail

Posted by: CN at March 22, 2020 12:05 PM (ONvIw)

beat me to it

Posted by: phoenixgirl at March 22, 2020 12:06 PM (0O7c5)

544 523 I was really disappointed in his "Salt", which was trying to do the same thing. Salt is so ubiquitous that there is no limiting factor and he just told salt anecdotes from everywhere.

Posted by: Bandersnatch at March 22, 2020 12:02 PM (gd9RK)

I read about half of "Salt," at which point it seemed to me like it was turning into a (repetitive) book about cod. I got bored and abandoned it.

Posted by: April at March 22, 2020 12:07 PM (OX9vb)

545 > How many aspiring politicians have embarrassed themselves eating Corn Bat at the Iowa State Fair?

John Kerry: asked for bleu cheese on his, ate it with a knife and fork and a glass of merlot.
Obama: asked if the bat could be substituted with dog.

Posted by: Rodrigo Borgia at March 22, 2020 12:07 PM (tLWGd)

546
Back from a constitutional with the delightful and athletic Mrs naturalfake.

Lessee what's up thread.

Posted by: naturalfake at March 22, 2020 12:08 PM (z0XD8)

547 Here is a book AOC doesn't need.

Overthinking
How to Stop Overthinking and Rewire Your Brain, Improve Your Life, Build Mental Toughness and be Yourself.
By: William Mind

Posted by: Anonosaurus Wrecks, Tyrannosaur Wrangler at March 22, 2020 12:08 PM (+y/Ru)

548 And Busman's Honeymoon gets less and less plausible every time I read it. I've taken to just skipping the detective parts because the murder method is so silly.

Finding out that it was originally a stage play does explain why everybody keeps showing up in Peter and Harriet's living room.

Posted by: Trimegistus at March 22, 2020 12:09 PM (DKCFT)

549 John Kerry: asked for bleu cheese on his, ate it with a knife and fork and a glass of merlot.
Obama: asked if the bat could be substituted with dog.
Posted by: Rodrigo Borgia at March 22, 2020 12:07 PM (tLWGd)

Willard Romney: took one bite for the cameraman, then immediately spit it out and washed his mouth out.

Posted by: Vanya at March 22, 2020 12:09 PM (ioTA8)

550 I was really disappointed in his "Salt", which was trying to do the same thing. Salt is so ubiquitous that there is no limiting factor and he just told salt anecdotes from everywhere.

Posted by: Bandersnatch at March 22, 2020 12:02 PM (gd9RK)

----------------------------

I bought the 2 books together (Salt and Cod) but chose Salt to read first. It was interesting but about two thirds of the way through I just skimmed it to say I'd finished it. Made me wonder if Cod was the same way but thankfully Cod is a shorter book with a focus.

I also have his book about the Basques which I will be starting this week. The Basque country is an interesting area of Europe, their language is unrelated to any other known language and very old.



Posted by: Boots at March 22, 2020 12:09 PM (oGBso)

551 ''Lessee what's up thread. ''

Bats, bats and more bats and for dessert..bats.

Posted by: Tuna at March 22, 2020 12:09 PM (gLRfa)

552 In WWII, there were severe coffee shortages. Many substitutes appeared on the market, such as "Postum" and "Chock full o' Bats".



Posted by: Rodrigo Borgia at March 22, 2020 12:09 PM (tLWGd)

553 Antono Masia was great as Zorro. I hear tell kids can watch it on the teevee now. Don't have to go to the movie theater. Can watch it from the comfort of your front parlor.

Posted by: Joe Biden at March 22, 2020 12:09 PM (COzlW)

554 509 Finished "Cod: A Biography of the Fish that Changed the World" by Mark Kurlansky this week.

Posted by: Boots at March 22, 2020 11:58 AM (oGBso)


Prolly should've subtitled that book 'Cod Almighty'.

Posted by: OregonMuse, AoSHQ Thought Leader, Pants Monitor & Social Distancing Professional at March 22, 2020 12:09 PM (FbBpr)

555 512 Jesus Cuomo does not shut up
Posted by: Nevergiveup at March 22, 2020 11:59 AM (nRk/c)


---------

True, but he does a great job on the hedges.

Posted by: Cicero (@cicero) at March 22, 2020 12:10 PM (XVuno)

556 528 I have a copy of that essay by Carr, in its appearance in an EQ "Best of" collection from 1963. I read it when I had never encountered Queen or Carr, and it led me to them. EQ as editor said there was a middle section of the essay where Carr listed his reasons for picking each of his ten. I wonder if that ever became available?
Posted by: Wolfus Aurelius at March 22, 2020 11:49 AM (rpbg1)
_______

It's in a collection The Door To Doom. Currently in print.
Posted by: Eeyore at March 22, 2020

*
*

Wow! I'll have to get that. E-book, or paper copy?
Posted by: Wolfus Aurelius at March 22, 2020 12:03 PM (rpbg1)
_______

Mine is paper. It's mostly early Bencolin stories.

I cannot read ebooks; too long reading on a computer always gives me a headache. (One has kicked in now.) But Amazon has it, if you want to give them $. I don't. We use B&N, or others. (Naval and Military is of course a big one for me.)

Posted by: Eeyore at March 22, 2020 12:11 PM (ZbwAu)

557 Prolly should've subtitled that book 'Cod Almighty'.
Posted by: OregonMuse, AoSHQ Thought Leader, Pants Monitor & Social Distancing Professional at March 22, 2020 12:09 PM (FbBpr)

As the German crusaders used to cry, "Cod Mit Uns!"

Posted by: Vanya at March 22, 2020 12:11 PM (ioTA8)

558 I just went through 2 ATMs to make $340.00 in cash. FYI.

Posted by: Brave Sir Robin at March 22, 2020 12:13 PM (7Fj9P)

559 Say, where kin ahh git me wunna them bat huntin' licenses?

Posted by: Jean Francois Kerry, (D)umbass at March 22, 2020 12:13 PM (XVuno)

560 Speaking of sock names, my all time favorite here can some years ago in an Ace post on a movie. Some troll under the name erg was getting a new one ripped, in the comments, by Ace himself (along with many hordesters).

Well, then came two successive comments:

"Do you think erg has moments of clarity when he realizes he's f*cking the toaster?"

Followed by:

"I wish."
- erg's Toaster.

Posted by: Eeyore at March 22, 2020 12:13 PM (ZbwAu)

561 Jell-O Bat Pudding.....mmmmm..mmmm...mmm

Posted by: Bill Cosby, Rapist at March 22, 2020 12:13 PM (Z+IKu)

562 I just went through 2 ATMs to make $340.00 in cash. FYI.
Posted by: Brave Sir Robin at March 22, 2020 12:13 PM (7Fj9P)

Torch or crowbar?

Posted by: Vanya at March 22, 2020 12:14 PM (ioTA8)

563 458 Winston Churchill, Britain's Teddy Roosevelt.

I want one of those "guys playing cards" paintings,
with Sherman, Grant, TR, Churchill, and Halsey.
..Chesty Puller at the bar mixing drinks.

Only Churchill is bare-headed.
All others have their signature hat.

Posted by: retropox at March 22, 2020 12:14 PM (b5Ssc)

564 NYC Mayor: If Trump doesn't act, 'people will die who could have lived otherwise'


Does acting include going to the gym with your body guards?

Posted by: TheQuietMan at March 22, 2020 12:14 PM (onP/l)

565 I remember erg -- and his whole stable of transparent pseudonyms. Probably leading an Antifa cell in Portland now.

Posted by: Trimegistus at March 22, 2020 12:15 PM (DKCFT)

566 Finished A People's Tragedy about the Russian Revolution. It was pretty good at the end showing how a series of strokes by Lenin was key to Stalin taking over since Lenin didn't trust him. It also gave a good summary of the human wreckage by the Revolution. Ultimately the book covered too much in too much detail to be what I consider ideally narrated history. But I learned a lot from it and it was worth the effort.

Posted by: Captain Hate at March 22, 2020 12:15 PM (y7DUB)

567 I just went through 2 ATMs to make $340.00 in cash.


Phrasing.

Posted by: Mr. Peebles at March 22, 2020 12:16 PM (oVJmc)

568 Cuomo's been a cross between Dr. Phil and Depak Chopra with his tough love and slide presentations on Practicing Kindness and Compassion.

Posted by: JuJuBee at March 22, 2020 12:16 PM (COzlW)

569 Nood

Posted by: oldraceral at March 22, 2020 12:16 PM (l/jsU)

570 Since this is The Book Thread; I am interested in opinions about Eric Larson's work; I just finished "Thunderstruck" and loved it. Wife read "In the Garden of Beasts" and loved that. Apparently "Devil in the White City" is pretty graphic/horrific, but I love his writing. Any thoughts?

Posted by: Brave Sir Robin at March 22, 2020 12:16 PM (7Fj9P)

571 564
NYC Mayor: If Trump doesn't act, 'people will die who could have lived otherwise'

Posted by: TheQuietMan at March 22, 2020 12:14 PM (onP/l)

WTF more does he think Trump should be doing?!

Posted by: Jordan61 at March 22, 2020 12:16 PM (6ofTb)

572 564 NYC Mayor: If Trump doesn't act, 'people will die who could have lived otherwise'


Does acting include going to the gym with your body guards?
Posted by: TheQuietMan at March 22, 2020 12:14 PM (onP/l)

This from the administration who waited too long to prepare and who decided against the purchase of emergency vents back in 2016. Blame Howard Zucker, BiBlasio, you POS

Posted by: CN at March 22, 2020 12:17 PM (ONvIw)

573 NYC Mayor: If Trump doesn't act, 'people will die who could have lived otherwise'


Will Christopher Reeve walk again?

Posted by: Mr. Peebles at March 22, 2020 12:17 PM (oVJmc)

574 Brave sir Robin, the Dead Wake one about Lusitania is very good IMO.

Posted by: skywch at March 22, 2020 12:17 PM (IWvy/)

575 Posted by: Brave Sir Robin at March 22, 2020 12:16 PM (7Fj9P)

Devil in the White City is great. I tried to read both Thunderstruck and Garden of the Beats and lost interest in them.

Posted by: Vanya at March 22, 2020 12:18 PM (ioTA8)

576
WTF more does he think Trump should be doing?!
Posted by: Jordan61 at March 22, 2020 12:16 PM (6ofTb)

Confiscating other states' supplies

Posted by: CN at March 22, 2020 12:18 PM (ONvIw)

577 571 564
NYC Mayor: If Trump doesn't act, 'people will die who could have lived otherwise'

Posted by: TheQuietMan at March 22, 2020 12:14 PM (onP/l)

WTF more does he think Trump should be doing?!


Posted by: Jordan61 at March 22, 2020 12:16 PM (6ofTb)
-------------------

Chicago's mayor has taken the same approach...waa waa waa why isn't OrangeManBad doing my job for me?

Posted by: Boots at March 22, 2020 12:19 PM (oGBso)

578 Any morons love John D. MacDonald Travis McGee book series?

Posted by: Puddin Head at March 22, 2020 12:19 PM (QZCjk)

579 Bat Tomago

Posted by: Guy who relates everything to a Zappa song at March 22, 2020 12:20 PM (Tnijr)

580 Instead of buying more vents Zucker developed a triage plan (death panel).

Posted by: CN at March 22, 2020 12:20 PM (ONvIw)

581 Just went to Joanne fabrics on-line for 'make your own mask tutorial'
Fussy and full of jargon and not very helpful.
Posted by: Downcast at March 22, 2020 11:54 AM (xgpfE)
-------

If you're really looking for one, there's one on Youtube that's good. Hang on and I'll find it for you.

Posted by: bluebell at March 22, 2020 12:20 PM (/669Q)

582 Some of us were under 40 when we started coming here...

I was under 30 when I started coming here, I'm pretty sure.

Posted by: Long-time Commenter, First-time Reader at March 22, 2020 12:20 PM (Nu6Gg)

583 576
WTF more does he think Trump should be doing?!
Posted by: Jordan61 at March 22, 2020 12:16 PM (6ofTb)
-----------------
Pretty sure resigning it way up there.

Posted by: Puddin Head at March 22, 2020 12:20 PM (QZCjk)

584 Mayor Bill's top aides are furious with him. He dragged carloads of his minions to the gym with him. They were not happy to be exposed to the Corona Cooties the peons were coughing and sneezing out.

Posted by: JuJuBee at March 22, 2020 12:20 PM (COzlW)

585 582 Some of us were under 40 when we started coming here...

I was under 30 when I started coming here, I'm pretty sure.
---------------------
I've remained 29 for some time.

Posted by: Puddin Head at March 22, 2020 12:21 PM (QZCjk)

586 Trimegistus, just put a hold on Nine Tailors ebook
at library, thanks! The description sounds like it's right up my alley (
or street, as the Brits say)
Posted by: skywch at March 22, 2020 11:56 AM (IWvy/)


Nine Tailors is OK, but I preferred Murder Must Advertise (Lord Peter is surprisingly good at writing up advertising copy - no Harriet Vane) and Busman's Honeymoon (Lord Peter gets married and buys his own estate with a dead body in it)

Posted by: Kindltot at March 22, 2020 12:21 PM (6rS3m)

587 Here's a nice editorial about N's deliberate choices.
Fuck DiBlasio

https://tinyurl.com/rkg93h2

Posted by: CN at March 22, 2020 12:22 PM (ONvIw)

588 578 Any morons love John D. MacDonald Travis McGee book series?
Posted by: Puddin Head at March 22, 2020 12:19 PM (QZCjk)
_______

Not I. To me, he fits the earlier point about heroes you're supposed to like, but can't. He seems too full of himself.

For the most part, I think it's a mistake for the detective to be the narrator. If it's first person, the narrator should be someone else, as in Dupin, Holmes, and Wolfe.

Posted by: Eeyore at March 22, 2020 12:22 PM (ZbwAu)

589 If you're really looking for one, there's one on Youtube that's good. Hang on and I'll find it for you.
Posted by: bluebell at March 22, 2020 12:20 PM (/669Q)

I'm glad I have elastic for this...fabric ties suck

Posted by: CN at March 22, 2020 12:22 PM (ONvIw)

590 Here you go, Downcast. This is just one that came up on my feed, but I see there are a ton of videos on this, some of which claim to be N95 types. Dunno about that.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZpQEsEGiX5Y

Posted by: bluebell at March 22, 2020 12:23 PM (/669Q)

591 Also finished part one of Nabokov's biography covering the Russian years by Brian Boyd. Actually it was at least as much the Berlin and Paris years. Even though it wasn't an "official biography", whatever that means, the family gave Boyd access to everything and seem to have liked him. It was well written and mainly only talked about things pertinent to his work. It ends with him and his family finally getting out of Paris and heading for the US; just days later his apartment building was destroyed by a German bomb. His brother died in a concentration camp.

Posted by: Captain Hate at March 22, 2020 12:23 PM (y7DUB)

592 All bats have to be free-rage, wild-caught.
Posted by: Ace-Endorsed Author A.H. Lloyd

++++

I never eat eggs from free-range chickens.

They're runny.

Posted by: Mr. Trashbag, Shoggoth and Eater Of Toes at March 22, 2020 12:27 PM (T09ml)

593 The Democrats' position seems to be "Trump is incompetent and also he needs to do more." It reminds me of the old Borscht Belt joke about "the food is terrible and the portions are too small."

Posted by: Trimegistus at March 22, 2020 12:27 PM (DKCFT)

594 367
I'm not that much over 40... But not for long...
Posted by: Insomniac - Ex Cineribus Resurgo at March 22, 2020 11:23 AM (NWiLs)
----------------------------------------
No, no, no!
You are not "not much over 40."
You are "close to 40."

No need to say on which side, eh?

Posted by: Margarita DeVille at March 22, 2020 12:28 PM (M/9m0)

595
Yes, I subscribed to ST until the miserable
Oil War. I wasn't alone. It failed miserably. And they actually tried
the excuse that the notion was "too frightening" for people to like it.
Yes, people who play wargames, including nukes. Frightened by oil
prices. That sounds logical.



SPI did some good stuff, but it was too much of a machine. I have a
friend who knows David Isby, and says that the problem was they wouldn't
take extra time in development, if that was needed.



In contrast, GDW took over a year beyond the announced date, to actually publish Merita Merkur.



The last time I played FTF was in the 90s, at a local wargame
store. A friend (same one as above) finally decided to settle arguments
about Beda Fomm. (He won, on the last turn.) But we were the only ones
doing wargames. Everyone else was playing orcs and trolls.

Posted by: Eeyore at March 22, 2020 11:58 AM (ZbwAu)

---
Magazine games were always hit or miss.

I bought ST at the store because a subscription was beyond my means. Plus, the game topic had to interest me.

I also read Fire and Movement, again when the cover interested me.

I don't remember Oil War. I owned a copy of Arabian Nightmare in 1990 but it was so full of micro detail that I quickly lost interest.

I'd say the zenith of my interest in high-detail gaming was college. Since then, I've gravitated to more basic modeling since the detail doesn't really improve the quality of the simulation, it merely complicates it.

Posted by: Ace-Endorsed Author A.H. Lloyd at March 22, 2020 12:28 PM (cfSRQ)

596 I'm sure its already been noted, but Jennifer Jones and the book of the movie she was in, Since You Went Away. The UToob app Old Movies (free) will take you there.

Posted by: Texican ette at March 22, 2020 12:29 PM (gou4q)

597 Been doing a lot of garden prep this week....not much else to do outside the house. Was planning on making a trek to Home Depot to buy some plants but only 27 degrees this morning and snow predicted tomorrow. What should I do?
Posted by: Sharon(willow's apprentice)

Hold off on buying plants !

Posted by: JT at March 22, 2020 12:29 PM (arJlL)

598 Underwood Deviled Bat
Posted by: Count de Monet at March 22, 2020 11:28 AM (dQ1sa)

Chef Bat Ar We?

Posted by: Alberta Oil Peon at March 22, 2020 12:30 PM (miJU3)

599 One of my kids is getting interested in Warhammer 40K, which has reawakened some of my old wargaming interest. I've been trying to teach him Real Tactics instead of Game Tactics. (The magic words are "interlocking fields of fire" and "artillery support.")

Posted by: Trimegistus at March 22, 2020 12:31 PM (DKCFT)

600 SPI did some good stuff, but it was too much of a machine. I have a friend who knows David Isby, and says that the problem was they wouldn't take extra time in development, if that was needed.

In contrast, GDW took over a year beyond the announced date, to actually publish Merita Merkur.

...But we were the only ones doing wargames. Everyone else was playing orcs and trolls.
Posted by: Eeyore at March 22, 2020 11:58 AM (ZbwAu)


Yep, agree about the lack of development with some of the SPI games. But the pressure to crank out a game every 2 months created a self-imposed limitation. GMT has settled upon a better plan with their C3i magazine since it only comes out once-a-year, contains 1 small game and extra counters and errata for previous games.

One of the young physicists I work with is wargamer but has primarily played solitaire. Once I get my game room completed and the craziness from the Chinese Bat Soup Fever ends, I plan to get some game time in.

Posted by: Retired Buckeye Cop is now an engineer at March 22, 2020 12:32 PM (00fXp)

601 Jim never has more than one bat at home ....

Posted by: JackStraw at March 22, 2020 12:36 PM (ZLI7S)

602 I want to recommend a novel by Michael Crichton that was published after his death. Its called Dragon Teeth and it is about the old west and a pair of rival paleontologists. Othniel Charles Marsh and Edwin Drinker Cope both contributed significantly to the discovery and understanding of dinosaurs in North America just as the science was really beginning to blossom.

This was one of Crichton's first books but idiot publishers rejected it repeatedly so he put it on the shelf and wrote other stuff. Now, they found it and published it and its great stuff.

Posted by: Christopher R Taylor at March 22, 2020 12:38 PM (KZzsI)

603 Here in Dallas the Walmarts I've been to look like Venezuela.
Posted by: Sam Adams

The people are skinny ?

Posted by: JT at March 22, 2020 12:38 PM (arJlL)

604 Any morons love John D. MacDonald Travis McGee book series?

I like them okay but not enough to go out and find any. I know he's really popular but it just never really engaged for me.

A mystery author I do highly recommend (other than the classics Chandler and Hammet, and the current Loren D Estleman) is Joe Gores. Sadly he's dead so no more books are coming out, but his stuff is great and very accurate to the life of a private detective.

Posted by: Christopher R Taylor at March 22, 2020 12:41 PM (KZzsI)

605 Those "pants" --

y'know that scene in Fifth Element where Willis opens his door and there's a guy with a gun and a mirror on his hat, and Willis takes the gun from him, smirks, and laughs, "Nice hat."

When I see that scowling guy in a dress all I can think is saying "Nice boots" in that way.

Okay, actually, my first thought was what gals I might enjoy seeing wear that ... lingerie.

Posted by: mindful webworker
Strict New Panic Schedule
at March 22, 2020 12:42 PM (Sr48m)

606 Also working my way through _The Dragon Lensman_ by David Kyle. It's an authorized sequel to the Lensman books by Doc Smith.

Good points: Kyle does a great job of capturing Smith's style.

Bad points: Kyle does a great job of capturing Smith's style.

Posted by: Trimegistus at March 22, 2020 12:47 PM (DKCFT)

607 ...But we were the only ones doing wargames. Everyone else was playing orcs and trolls.

Avalon Hill put out a ton of stuff but I think they shut down some time late 80s or early 90s. You can get their games on computer though, Tabletop Simulator has a bunch of AH games. Its not quite the same as sitting down with little chits and tokens and a board, but its a lot quicker and easier to set up.

Posted by: Christopher R Taylor at March 22, 2020 12:47 PM (KZzsI)

608 Thursday our power went out (snowstorm) so no horde and no WFH via internet all afternoon. So I read AnnaPumas Yuriko a real girl. We have several horde authors, folks needing to pass time should stock their kindles with horde authors at this time.

Christopher Taylor. I enjoyed all 3 of his books I read. .
Anna Puma. I've read 3 of her novels, all were fun.
MPPP.

pro or at least semi pro authors with multiple novels to explore
Sabrina Chase.
A.H. Loyd
Sarah Hoyte

We have many others as well. These are the ones that were on the top of my head. Apologies if this is a re or re-repeat. I don't make much time to read lately so haven not been following the book threads.
Posted by: PaleRider is simply irredeemable at March 22, 2020 12:00 PM (T9Hmo)

You know maybe a Horde-sourced anthology of novels and short stories by the writers among the Horde? Sort of a literary counterpart to the Deplorable Cookbook? I would buy something like that, as long as it were available in hard copy or as a downloadable pdf. I don't do kindle-y stuff.

Posted by: Alberta Oil Peon at March 22, 2020 12:48 PM (miJU3)

609 599
One of my kids is getting interested in Warhammer 40K, which has
reawakened some of my old wargaming interest. I've been trying to teach
him Real Tactics instead of Game Tactics. (The magic words are
"interlocking fields of fire" and "artillery support.")

Posted by: Trimegistus at March 22, 2020 12:31 PM (DKCFT)

---
I play 2nd ed. 40k, from the 90s. The rules are pretty easy to find and the game has a lot more tactical detail.

The newer editions are a bit more abstract.

I have a set of medieval/fantasy rules if that's an area of interest. Can use with any figures and make up your own rules if you don't like the army lists I provide. Link in my nic.

Posted by: Ace-Endorsed Author A.H. Lloyd at March 22, 2020 12:48 PM (cfSRQ)

610 Thanks for the kind words, Tuna! I enjoyed coming up with the AI ship personalities in Argonauts of Space. A lot. Since my day job is in the software industry that series has a lot of in-jokes for coders and computer geeks. Who knows, there could be more in that world!
Now for a future project, does anyone have recommendations for good *early* Chinese history books? Half the fun of doing alternate timelines is picking the point where the timeline deviates, and I've got a project fermenting in my hindbrain at the moment....

Posted by: Sabrina Chase at March 22, 2020 12:51 PM (exg7Q)

611 That's the trouble with lying: you can hardly ever lie just once.
----------

Thus the problem that most Dem politicians have. They have now reached the point at which they cannot make a single utterance that does not directly contradict some assertion that they have made previously.

People with a sense of morality, or even simple personal character and integrity would be ashamed of themselves. But the Left are bereft of either. Hypocrisy in the futherance of their goals is no vice, but an acceptable tool.

Their fellow-travelers inf the 'press' are equally culpable.

Posted by: Mike Hammer, etc., etc. at March 22, 2020 12:51 PM (plu6+)

612 Hi Horde,

Just checking in. I haven't read much lately that is worth discussing. Hopefully, that will change soon. I hope you all are having better luck than me. Stay well!

Violet

Posted by: Violet at March 22, 2020 12:51 PM (9ppMC)

613 There was a 1985-1988 TV series called Spenser: For Hire on ABC

I read and used to own all the Spenser books Parker wrote. Times got tight and I sold them all but they were enjoyable reads. He got extremely formulaic though to the point that I learned to skip every other chapter which I knew would be Spenser cooking something and talking to Susan, a character I despised.

The TV show had thankfully less Susan and she was marginally less annoying.

Posted by: Christopher R Taylor at March 22, 2020 12:52 PM (KZzsI)

614 Any morons love John D. MacDonald Travis McGee book series?
Posted by: Puddin Head

Yep !

And the Spencer novels !

Good stuff !

Posted by: JT at March 22, 2020 12:53 PM (arJlL)

615 We have several horde authors, folks needing to pass time should stock their kindles with horde authors at this time.

I recommend this to everyone. Amazon is having a huge sale right now, pretty much all their print books have had prices slashed (mine are around 60% off, for example). Ebooks are a great way to pass the time, and you will be doing your horde buddies a solid.

Plus, dang if these aren't good books too.

Posted by: Christopher R Taylor at March 22, 2020 12:54 PM (KZzsI)

616 Are me and Y-Dice the only people on this blog under 40?
Posted by: Vanya at March 22, 2020 11:14 AM

Mentally and personality-wise I am still the same as when 25yo.

Any physical actions seem the same to me, but outside observers say that I seem to be slowing down. I blame a localized time warp for their observations.

Posted by: Headless Body of Agnew at March 22, 2020 12:55 PM (e1mEI)

617 A mystery author I do highly recommend (other than the classics Chandler and Hammet, and the current Loren D Estleman) is Joe Gores. Sadly he's dead so no more books are coming out, but his stuff is great and very accurate to the life of a private detective.
Posted by: Christopher R Taylor

He's good too .

Posted by: JT at March 22, 2020 12:56 PM (arJlL)

618 Re the comments above about Ulysses S. Grant's writing skills, one thing I remember from Bruce Catton's biography of Grant was a discussion of how one of Grant's strengths as a commander was that he wrote very clear orders. Catton cites testimony from several of Grant's subordinates during the Civil War that when you got a written order from General Grant you always knew exactly what he wanted you to do.

Posted by: John F. MacMichael at March 22, 2020 12:57 PM (9AOND)

619 I'm coming up on my mid-Fifties, but I think I'm actually in better shape than I was when I was half my present age. I'm definitely stronger, though I'd be willing to admit my reactions may have slowed.

Posted by: Trimegistus at March 22, 2020 12:59 PM (DKCFT)

620 ''Lessee what's up thread. ''

Bats, bats and more bats and for dessert..bats.
Posted by: Tuna at March 22, 2020 12:09 PM (gLRfa)



So...a little of this, a little of bat.


Posted by: naturalfake at March 22, 2020 12:59 PM (z0XD8)

621 This is bat country.

Posted by: Dr. Raoul Duke at March 22, 2020 01:00 PM (DKCFT)

622 618
Re the comments above about Ulysses S. Grant's writing skills, one thing
I remember from Bruce Catton's biography of Grant was a discussion of
how one of Grant's strengths as a commander was that he wrote very clear
orders. Catton cites testimony from several of Grant's subordinates
during the Civil War that when you got a written order from General
Grant you always knew exactly what he wanted you to do.

Posted by: John F. MacMichael at March 22, 2020 12:57 PM (9AOND)

---
Battles and Leaders showcases a lot of different writing styles. Grant was unassuming and didn't embellish his work. A lot of his contemporaries were much harder to read. PGT Beauregard is insufferably pompous.

Posted by: Ace-Endorsed Author A.H. Lloyd at March 22, 2020 01:01 PM (cfSRQ)

623 I've gotten involved in local history in the town I live in (western New England). It's a little startling to realize this place was more than a century old when the American Revolution started.

There's a whole chunk of American history that has been more or less forgotten. Nowadays it's "Columbus, Pilgrims, Paul Revere" with nothing in between.

It wasn't always thus: if you read Steven Vincent Benet's short story "The Devil and Daniel Webster" several of the great historical villains serving on the Devil's jury were pre-Revolutionary figures.

Posted by: Trimegistus at March 22, 2020 01:04 PM (DKCFT)

624 Where do you people find these incredible weird photos/pics?

Regarding books....I have three in my queue:

"Witness" by Whitaker Chambers (re-reading second half)
"From Under the Rubble" essays by various Russian dissidents of USSR
"The Socialist Phenomenon" by Shafarevich (socialism goes back way further than Marx)

Since I read "The Cruel Sea" last year (enjoyed it but it had sad parts), I'll give "The Good Shepard" a try, although I'm sure the captain will be a trans vegan pacifist in the movie with Tom Hanks.

Thanks for these recommendations. That Calvin and Hobbes cartoon really hits home. How did my two parents and us four kids and a dog ever survive in that 4/2 house that is now worth 2 million bucks? We did not do it without scars. :-)

Posted by: Sapwolf at March 22, 2020 01:05 PM (nuv3n)

625 I read Dragon's Teeth. It was a pleasant surprise. Very different from his previous books I had read. Especially interesting because it is based on true story.

Posted by: sharon(willow's apprentice) at March 22, 2020 01:05 PM (QzF6i)

626 I wonder if people are doing more reading these two weeks -- or is it all just porn and shooters?

Posted by: Trimegistus at March 22, 2020 01:09 PM (DKCFT)

627 Latest Audiobooks:
The Gene - Mukherjee

Current Dead Tree:
Steam Titans - Fowler

Both recommended.

And of course on the latter point, if you've never read John Malcolm Brinnin's 'The Sway of the Grand Saloon', do so now.

Posted by: JEM at March 22, 2020 01:11 PM (8erNz)

628 Okay, gonna venture out in the world and visit Home Depot. Thanks Horde. I love the book thread.I love to read and being able to share with like ionded folks is a rare pleasure. No substitute for sex but still......

Posted by: sharon(willow's apprentice) at March 22, 2020 01:12 PM (QzF6i)

629 ''Thanks for the kind words, Tuna! I enjoyed coming up with the AI ship personalities in Argonauts of Space. A lot''

You're welcome. I think Rogue could have its own series. A little comedy perhaps?

Posted by: Tuna at March 22, 2020 01:14 PM (gLRfa)

630 Okay, gonna venture out in the world and visit Home Depot.

Yesterday Home Depot around here (SF Peninsula) was pretty busy, but I had something to return and went back at 630, having not earlier noticed the sign on the door that they were closing at 6PM 7 days a week until further notice.

Posted by: JEM at March 22, 2020 01:15 PM (8erNz)

631 I read Dragon's Teeth. It was a pleasant surprise. Very different from his previous books I had read.

Yeah it wasn't so much sci fi as a very interesting dramatization of a forgotten and fascinating period in science and history. From all I've read its very accurate in its portrayal of the two men and their antics

James Madison is under 29 from what I understand as well. I suspect a few of the ettes are but are hiding from view

Posted by: Christopher R Taylor at March 22, 2020 01:16 PM (KZzsI)

632 This week continued the Moron-recommended 'Paris in the Terror', Loomis, which I had put aside for a bit. If you'd like a preview of what 'The Resistance' has in mind, give it a read, it's worth the time.

Finished off 'Operation Overflight'. One can argue that Powers had a powerful self-interest in writing the book, but the facts remain that he became something of a convenient scapegoat for intelligence/political community, and was not accorded the respect that he deserved, except somewhat surreptitiously.

The guy really got beaten up, except by those who had a deep, ground-level understanding of him, and what had actually happened.

What continued to run through my mind as I read the book, was that the Intelligence community had failed, and I use that word advisedly, to discern the capabilities of the Soviet missile defense system.

They sent Powers out on a mission that was doomed, without realizing it, but it was Powers (and the U.S.) who paid the price.
-----

Also reading the Moron-recommended ''The Search for Cosmic Justice', Sowell. A book that should be required reading for every knee-jerk SJW. Sowell intellectually and factually cuts through the psychology/mindset that insists on focusing on 'fairness', 'justice', and 'equity', without regard to the ineffectiveness of such efforts, and more importantly, the social costs
---
As mentioned during the week, I've started re-reading 'All Things Bright and Beautiful', Herriot. This is my bedtime read, and relieves the preoccupation with current real-time preoccupations.

I had forgotten how funny Herriot can be. The great thing about Herriot is that his writings are memoirs, they are real. He transports one to a time not so long ago as to be foreign, and paints a wonderful picture of Yorkshire between the wars.

Herriot is one of those people to whom humor comes naturally. It just sort spills out of his pen while recounting his experiences. His books read a bit like a Wodehouse novel, except, the experiences are/were real.

Posted by: Mike Hammer, etc., etc. at March 22, 2020 01:19 PM (plu6+)

633 Yikes. Marginpaloosa!

Posted by: Mike Hammer, etc., etc. at March 22, 2020 01:20 PM (plu6+)

634 Book reccommendation: Above Suspicion by Helen MacInnes (publishecd 1941). Newlywed Oxbridge prof and his wife are asked by a college friend who is in government to make some visits in the summer of 1939 to a few specific people in a few specific places in France and Germany. The friend chose them to check out a spy network just before hostilities begin because they are "above suspicion." Good story, very tense in a places, and published before anyone knew how it would turn out.

Posted by: PubliusII at March 22, 2020 01:23 PM (NCsa7)

635 Crichton was always pretty good at historical fiction. He wrote The Great Train Robbery, too.

Posted by: Trimegistus at March 22, 2020 01:25 PM (DKCFT)

636 '' I wonder if people are doing more reading these two weeks -- or is it all just porn and shooters?''

Al escapist lit: fantasy, sci-fi, paranormal urban stuff. Nothing that taxes the little gray cells.

Posted by: Tuna at March 22, 2020 01:27 PM (gLRfa)

637 I loved Great Train Robbery. They made a movie of it with Sean Connery that was okay but it missed the feel of the book and skipped a lot of good stuff to stick a romance in.

Posted by: Christopher R Taylor at March 22, 2020 01:28 PM (KZzsI)

638 Are me and Y-Dice the only people on this blog under 40?
Posted by: Vanya at March 22, 2020 11:14 AM (ioTA

I think Broseidon and maybe Harry Paratestes, if they're still around. Not sure.
Posted by: hogmartin
-----
Some of us were under 40 when we started coming here...


I'm under 40. I started coming here when I was in my 20s, actually.

Posted by: Grey Fox at March 22, 2020 01:40 PM (nBq51)

639 Is margin blower #197, Puddin Head at March 22, 2020 10:29 AM?

Posted by: mindful webworker
Strict New Panic Schedule
at March 22, 2020 01:40 PM (Sr48m)

640 I was in my 30s when I first came here but that was back in the thick of the Paul Anka integrity kick

Posted by: Christopher R Taylor at March 22, 2020 01:43 PM (KZzsI)

641 The Sway of the Grand Saloon:

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B000PY9SXG

I'll link this one rather than the other Amazon listing which appears to be some kind of B&N reprint, get the original hardcover.

As I wander to my shelf, and pull out my copy* it's just short of 600 pages including index and bibliography.

*shelved oddly between Richard Harding Davis' True Soldiers of Fortune and Joe Studwell's The China Dream, the latter perhaps being somewhat timely again right now. My bookshelves USED to be organized. Much to my wife's despair I like hardcovers.

Posted by: JEM at March 22, 2020 02:14 PM (8erNz)

642 Not much into vampire novels per se, but I picked up Vampires of Michigan by AH Lloyd and read it. Highly recommend the book- engaging characters, sharp plot and and ending. Some other authors would have padded another 100 pages of extra stuff into the book, but it was refreshing to have a streamlined plot and content in this one.

Posted by: Charlotte at March 22, 2020 02:37 PM (Aj6Tl)

643 Golf clap to All Hail Eris in the early comments for citing National Lampoon's Lord of the Rings parody!

Posted by: PaddyBeaner at March 22, 2020 03:04 PM (5Mmke)

644 Those aren't pants. And I'm not real sure that's a guy.

Posted by: GGE of the Moron Horde, NC Chapter at March 22, 2020 03:12 PM (ZXnzo)

645 565 I remember erg -- and his whole stable of transparent pseudonyms. Probably leading an Antifa cell in Portland now.
Posted by: Trimegistus at March 22, 2020 12:15 PM (DKCFT)


Erg (nee 'ergastularius') was a left-wing troll who hung around here for years. I think he was in love with ace, don't know why, maybe he thought he could turn him over to the dark side. I think ace didn't conform to the crude stereotype of conservaties he believed they could only be, i.e. a tobacco-chewin', country-music-lovin', 3-toothed sister-humpin' redneck, and that intrigued him.

And erg had a variety of pseudonyms, but no matter what name he used, you always knew it was him. We had fun batting him around.

Eventually erg grew tired of mooning over ace and disappeared. It was shortly after ace tricked him into royally beclowning himself on one of his movie review threads.

Posted by: OregonMuse, AoSHQ Thought Leader, Pants Monitor & Social Distancing Professional at March 22, 2020 03:15 PM (FbBpr)

646 622 "Battles and Leaders showcases a lot of different writing styles. Grant was unassuming and didn't embellish his work."

Very true. One of my favorite passages from Grant's "Memoirs" illustrates this; he had been fighting for months to take Vicksburg and gotten nowhere. Now he had decided to risk his army on a high stakes gamble. Grant had ordered his gunboats to steam down river, running the Confederate batteries at Vicksburg by night. His troops had marched south on the west side of the river. When they met below Vicksburg the boats ferried his forces across the river to the Vicksburg side. This put him in enemy dominated territory with only the most tenuous of supply lines. Sherman thought he was crazy to attempt it. Grant's reaction to getting his troops across the river was this:

"When this was effected I felt a degree of relief scarcely ever equalled since. Vicksburg was not yet taken it is true, nor were its defenders demoralized by any of our previous moves. I was now in the enemy's country , with a vast river and the stronghold of Vicksburg between me and my base of supplies. But I was on dry ground on the same side of the river with the enemy. All the campaigns, labors, hardships and exposures from the month of December previous to this time that had been made and endured, were for the accomplishment of this one object."

I think this passage shows something of the simple, stark vision Grant applied to war. No bloviation about death or glory, no preening himself as a military genius; just "...I was on dry ground on the same side of the river with the enemy."

By the way, Mr. Lloyd, since your posts here have well demonstrated that you are very knowledgable about military history in general and the Civil War in particular, I am sure you did not need the paragraph above setting out the historical context for the quote. However, I felt it made the quote a little easier to understand.

Posted by: John F. MacMichael at March 22, 2020 06:32 PM (9AOND)

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