Sunday Morning Book Thread 03-08-2020

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Riggs Memorial Library, Georgetown University


Good morning to all you 'rons, 'ettes, lurkers, and lurkettes, wine moms, frat bros, crétins sans pantalon (who are technically breaking the rules), flakes, dillatantes, fly-by-nights, and other unstable people. Welcome once again to the stately, prestigious, internationally acclaimed and high-class Sunday Morning Book Thread, a weekly compendium of reviews, observations, snark, witty repartee, hilarious bon mots, and a continuing conversation on books, reading, spending way too much money on books, writing books, and publishing books by escaped oafs and oafettes who follow words with their fingers and whose lips move as they read. Unlike other AoSHQ comment threads, the Sunday Morning Book Thread is so hoity-toity, pants are required. Even if it's these pants, which looke something you'd see in a live-action reboot of some bad anime. And thanks to all of you morons who e-mailed me pics of, or sent me links to, these pants.



Pic Note:

I did not know that cast iron libraries were a thing:

From 1891 to 1970, the University's main library was the Riggs Memorial Library, located in the south tower of Healy Hall. The Library had been financed by E. Francis Riggs of the Washington banking firm as a memorial to his late father and to his brother who had attended Georgetown...Today, Riggs, one of the few remaining cast iron libraries in the country, is used as a reception space and continues to serve its original purpose of housing books.



It Pays To Increase Your Word Power®

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Usage: In this video from 2016, Joe Biden is clearly not suffering from dysphasia:




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Free Book on Religious Liberty Jurisprudence

I thought this sounds like it might be of some interest:

For anyone interested in the fate of religious freedom in America, Religious Liberty: Core Court Cases may be the most important guide to contemporary controversies over religion in the public square a nonspecialist can own. At least the price is right; the text of the 244-page book is also available free on the internet, in keeping with the civic education mission of the publisher, the Ashbrook Center. Nonetheless, many readers will prefer the inexpensive paperback, as they may prefer to spare themselves the cost of replacing a destroyed computer or cell phone, which is likely to come after reading some of the court’s opinions.

The direct link the downloadable pdf file is here.

By selecting a diverse array of opinions on religion and the law, we at the Ashbrook Center produced a book that encourages non-specialist readers to examine the legal strife surrounding issues such as the constitutionality of “under God” in the pledge of allegiance or a prayer recited before a football game at a public school, whether a law may violate the conscience of a religious business owner, or whether a cross may be erected on public land...The texts in our book permit the reader to explore how the courts as interpreters of laws and our fundamental law, the Constitution, have come to such conclusions, which seem so contrary to common sense.

This is just a part of the yuuge collection of primary source documents available at TeachingAmericanHistory.org.

Which is still a work in progress:

When complete, the series will be comprehensive and authoritative, with texts from America’s presidents, labor leaders, farmers, philosophers, industrialists, politicians, workers, explorers, religious leaders, judges, soldiers; its slaveholders and abolitionists; its expansionists and isolationists; its reformers and stand-patters; its strict and broad constructionists; its hard-eyed realists and visionary utopians – all united in their commitment to equality and liberty, yet so often divided by their different understandings of these most fundamental American ideas.

Content is grouped by 'Government', 'Religion', 'Reform Movements', and more.

There's also 50 Core Documents, all grouped into one place. Disappointed that they did not include the original Articles of Confederation. But that document is available elsewhere, for example, here.

There's a lifetime of reading at these links.



Who Dis:

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Last week's 'who dis' was actress Sarah Rafferty from the TV series Suits.



They Don't Publish Books Like This Any More:

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Moron Recommendations

Now this sounds like an interesting story:

18 I read "I Am A Man: Chief Standing Bear's Journey For Justice" by Joe Starita. Every now and then a man comes along who to those in power is unreasonable, the monkey in the wrench, the fly in the ointment. In 1879 that man was Ma-chu-nah-zah, or Standing Bear. He was a chief of the Ponca Tribe of Nebraska.

In 1877 the government forcibly removed the 700 Ponca to Indian Territory from lands granted them by the 1865 Ft. Laramie Treaty. Unfortunately the 1868 Ft. Laramie Treaty with the Sioux "mistakenly" included the Ponca lands in that treaty. The Sioux, who hated the Ponca, were more than happy to have them removed. Thus began the Ponca's 600 mile trail of tears. The irony is the Ponca were living just as the government wanted Indians to live and were as self-sufficient as anyone at that time could be.

January 1879 Standing Bear had had enough of their new home and the Indian agents. A third of the tribe was dead including his son, most were sick, and the government had not kept it's promises. So Standing Bear and 26 others headed north. Two months later near Omaha they were arrested by Brig. Gen. George Crook. Thomas Tibbles, an Omaha newspaper editor, was tipped off about the arrest and would write stories about the Ponca's troubles and was given the idea to sue the federal government. The landmark federal trial of Standing Bear vs Crook began in April 1879. He won his case. Before the trial Indians were not considered "persons" according to the law. After the trial they were, well sort of.

And who tipped off Tibbles and planted the idea of a lawsuit? Tibbles said it was BG George Crook.

Posted by: Jake Holenhead at March 01, 2020 09:07 AM (P1GvV)

"I Am a Man": Chief Standing Bear's Journey for Justice is "a story of life and death, despair and fortitude, freedom and patriotism. A story of Christian kindness and bureaucratic evil," that

...questions whether native sovereignty, tribal-based societies, and cultural survival are compatible with American democracy. Standing Bear successfully used habeas corpus, the only liberty included in the original text of the Constitution, to gain access to a federal court and ultimately his freedom. This account aptly illuminates how the nation's delicate system of checks and balances worked almost exactly as the Founding Fathers envisioned, a system arguably out of whack and under siege today.

This was actual social justice, before the social justice warriors got ahold of social justice and peed all over it.

___________

37 Hey! My college roommate wrote a book! "History is the Hook: A Chronological Approach to Education" is available at amazon and the target audience is homeschoolers, but it would be good for anyone. It's not a history book, but rather a book on how to teach. The main idea is that we learn better when a subject is taught in chronological order (or reverse chronological order) because the history creates a framework to attach the various new facts that are being learned. And having a narrative keeps students interested in learning.

There is more in the book about giving kids agency in what they study and accountability for what they learn. I've only just started the book, so I can't really say more, but check it out! (And I'm quoted in the book!)

Posted by: biancaneve at March 01, 2020 09:17 AM (hkMx0)

The Kindle version of History is the Hook: A Chronological Approach to Education is $9.99. Also available in paperback.

___________

I'm enjoying my signed copy of Mike "Thomas Paine" Moore's "How We Dismantled the FBI In Our Pajamas," this morning. The veteran FBI agent and journalists exposes deep state corruption after having been targeted by the FBI for knowing too much. Check out his reporting at TruePundit.

Posted by: Hans G. Schantz at March 01, 2020 09:19 AM (FXjhj)

I need to check that book out just on the title alone. Unfortunately, I won't be reading How We Dismantled the FBI In Our Pajamas anytime soon. More on that in a moment. First, the contenta:

SWAT-clad FBI agents stormed into Mike "Thomas Paine" Moore's home and terrorized his wife and young children at gunpoint after rousting them out of bed. Not once, but twice, pointing automatic weapons at the family. Historic, costly blunders for the FBI.

In response Paine assembled his journalism crew of former feds, launched True Pundit and literally dismantled the FBI in less than two years with pens and laptops while working from home, often in pajamas.

While the mainstream media ignored a corrupt FBI & DOJ, Paine and cohorts hammered away and knocked the FBI off its trusted public mantle. Revered FBI leaders were fired. Others quit. FBI officials, targeted by True Pundit's hard-hitting reporting, are now targets of numerous federal investigations...

Implicated too here are U.S. Special Counsel Robert Mueller along with former CIA Director John Brennan, among many others. A Criminal conspiracy involving top players in the Deep State, entrenched in one of the greatest public betrayals imaginable.

Looks like they messed with the wrong guy.

But the reason I won't be reading How We Dismantled the FBI In Our Pajamas is because it's so outrageously expensive. Both the Kindle version and new paperback editions are priced north of $150 and even used paperbacks are $63. So it looks like I'll have to wait until the price comes down a bit.

___________

66 I saw this cookbook at the library and had a good laugh at the cover:

https://tinyurl.com/v4tsx7r

Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at March 01, 2020 09:31 AM (Dc2NZ)

Little Kitchen of Horrors: Hideously Delicious Recipes That Disgust and Delight is a disgusting book filled with disgusting recipes, so it's no wonder Eris liked it. Here is the cover:


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Anyway:

Would you like Maggot Burgers for dinner? How about some Crispy Fried Mice for appetizers and Gooey Alien Limbs for dessert? You'll squeal with happy horror at the disgusting, terrifying (and totally tasty) recipes in this book. Clear step-by-step instructions and helpful photos make it easy to cook up each horrifying dish. With frightful delicacies like Bulging Cake Eyeballs, Juicy Bat Wings, and more, will you dare take a bite?

Sounds like it's a must-have book for your Halloween party. Paperback copies go for about $10.

___________

This morning, then, I started Imperium by Ryszard Kapuscinski. Someone here recommended it, and so far I am really appreciating his writing style. Vividly descriptive, but not in an overwrought way--more of a matter-of-fact childhood view of it. I'm looking forward to getting deeper into this one.

Posted by: April at March 01, 2020 09:26 AM (OX9vb)

The author of Imperium is the Polish journalist Ryszard Kapuscinski. He's written many books based on his reporting, this one on the collapse of the Soviet Empire:

Between 1989 and 1991, Kapuscinski made a series of extended journeys through the disintegrating Soviet empire, and his account of these forms the heart of the book. Bypassing official institutions and itineraries, he traversed the Soviet territory alone, from the border of Poland to the site of the most infamous gulags in far-eastern Siberia (where "nature pals it up with the executioner"), from above the Arctic Circle to the edge of Afghanistan, visiting dozens of cities and towns and outposts, traveling more than 40,000 miles, venturing into the individual lives of men, women, and children in order to understand the collapsing but still various larger life of the empire.

Go to Amazon and look at the books Kapuscinski has written. This is a real journalist. Look where he's been, and see what events he's covered. I don't think there's a so-called "journalist" in America worthy to tie his shoes.

All of Kapuscinski's books look very interesting. Seeing them makes me wish I was a younger man so I would have more time to read them.

I like this Imperium snipped April subsequently posted:

195 An excerpt from Imperium, regarding the Russians' destruction of anything religious:

"This is how at the time we reasoned about it in class: When the Bolsheviks were marching toward us...before they saw our town, they must have first caught a glimpse of the towers of the Pinsk church. They were that high. This apparently irritated them very much. Why? We didn't know how to answer that question. But we concluded it was irritation solely from the fact that as soon as the Russians entered the town, before they had taken a breather, before they'd had a look around to see which street is where, before they'd had a good meal and before they'd taken a few drags on their cheap tobacco, they had already set up a cannon in the square and started firing at the church."

Posted by: April at March 01, 2020 10:32 AM (OX9vb)

___________




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Books By Morons

Baen has just published a new book by a longtime lurking moron author, entitled The Initiate, which the author described to me in an e-mail as a modern day noir fantasy about a man who takes on an ancient secret conspiracy of wizards after his family are killed by a demon. Or, in short, what if Harry Potter was the Punisher?

The Apkallu are masters of magic. Theirs is a secret tradition stretching back to the dawn of civilization. They rule the world from the shadows, using mind control and deadly monsters to eliminate any threat to their power.

Sam Arquero lost his family to a demon, and knew that nobody would believe the truth. An old man named Lucas offers him the chance to find out who is responsible, and bring down the Apkallu forever. All he has to do is join them.

Under a new identity Sam learns the secrets of magic, infiltrates the Apkallu, and walks a razor's edge as he picks off their leaders while avoiding supernatural detectives on his trail.

But Sam faces a greater threat: As he fights monsters, what is he becoming?

You can purchase this book on Amazon or direct from Baen. The e-versions are sold without any DRM.


___________

I have mentioned various thematic short story collections from time to time. I have just been made aware of a new one, titled No Greater Love: Martyrs of Earth and Elsewhere, and the theme is, obviously, martyrdom. Here is what the Amazon blurb says:

For what or whom would you sacrifice your life? Why would you lay down the most precious gift you have been given? For what greater being, purpose, ideal, or calling would you choose to bleed out in the jaws of beast, take a bullet, hang crucified, jump in the way of a juggernaut, or await the injection that will stop your heart?

A lurking moron author made me aware of this anthology because he has writte on of the stories in it. Titled "The End", it is look at a martyr in Mao's China and the affect of one man's love for his faith.

___________

'Ette author artemis has just released thr 11th in her Doyle & Acton murder mystery series, Murder in Deep Regret:

A shocking death at St. Michael's Church pitches Detective Sergeant Kathleen Doyle into a confusing case--one where the motive for the crime is not at all clear, and only becomes less so as the investigation unearths a massive criminal enterprise.

Why was the murder of such a famous man necessary? And why does Doyle have the sense that the killer had to steel himself to commit the crime?

Once again, Doyle has to keep a wary eye on her husband, Chief Inspector Acton, as she ponders these strange events; Acton may protest his innocence but she knows--in the way she knows things--that he's harboring a secret, which does not bode well for her peace of mind.

Available for $4.99 on Kindle and in paperback for $14.99.

___________

So that's all for this week. As always, book thread tips, suggestions, bribes, insults, threats, ugly pants pics and moron library submissions may be sent to OregonMuse, Proprietor, AoSHQ Book Thread, at the book thread e-mail address: aoshqbookthread, followed by the 'at' sign, and then 'G' mail, and then dot cee oh emm.

What have you all been reading this week? Hopefully something good, because, as you all know, life is too short to be reading lousy books.




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Posted by: OregonMuse at 09:00 AM




Comments

(Jump to bottom of page)

1 “Do not mock powers beyond your knowledge, impudent hairfoot,’ he said, as five aces materialized in his hand, “for you see the efficacy of my enchantments!” -- Goodgulf Greyteeth, from “Bored of the Rings”

Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at March 08, 2020 09:00 AM (Dc2NZ)

2 hiya

Posted by: JT at March 08, 2020 09:00 AM (arJlL)

3 I has a sad, still no new book

Posted by: Skip at March 08, 2020 09:00 AM (ZCEU2)

4 Our mystery lady is ready for her closeup, Mr. DeMille!

Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at March 08, 2020 09:02 AM (Dc2NZ)

5 But still thinking of ideas for a book nook

Posted by: Skip at March 08, 2020 09:02 AM (ZCEU2)

6 Gloria Swanson !

Posted by: JT at March 08, 2020 09:04 AM (arJlL)

7 Another exciting page-turner

Posted by: mindful webworker
multi-dimensional
at March 08, 2020 09:06 AM (MukDh)

8 That's funny, the song Another One Bites the Dust was also written by John Deacon, the bass player for Queen.

Posted by: Vashta Nerada at March 08, 2020 09:06 AM (LZerG)

9 Nice Lieberry!

Runnin' bear loved little white dove with a love big as the sky
Runnin' bear loved little white dove with a love that couldn't die.....

The who dis is Joan "Coat Hanger" Crawford.

Posted by: Hairyback Guy at March 08, 2020 09:06 AM (Z+IKu)

10
g'mornin', book-ish 'rons

Posted by: AltonJackson at March 08, 2020 09:08 AM (ozGRz)

11 I wonder if Swanson really read Plato?

Posted by: CN at March 08, 2020 09:09 AM (ONvIw)

12 Maybe another excerpt from Bored of the Rings?


Of the Finding of the Ring

As is told in the volume previous to this hound, Valley of the Trolls, Dildo Bugger set out one day with a band of demented dwarves and a discredited Rosicrucian named Goodgulf to separate a dragon from his hoard of short-term municipals and converted debentures. The quest was successful, and the dragon, a prewar basilisk who smelled like a bus, was taken from behind while he was clipping coupons.

And yet, though many pointless and annoying deeds were done, this adventure would concern us a great deal less than it does, if that were possible, except for a bit of petty larceny Dildo did along the way to keep his hand in.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at March 08, 2020 09:10 AM (Dc2NZ)

13 But still thinking of ideas for a book nook
Posted by: Skip at March 08, 2020 09:02 AM (ZCEU2)


My bet is that it will be too small!

Posted by: Commissar Hrothgar at March 08, 2020 09:11 AM (BiNEL)

14 Skip, think "book wing".

Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at March 08, 2020 09:12 AM (Dc2NZ)

15 Gloria Swanson!

Posted by: Mary Poppins' Practically Perfect Piercing at March 08, 2020 09:13 AM (Ki5SV)

16 Good Sunday morning, horde!

I am continuing with Imperium, and am now in 1989 when he is touring the southern republics--Georgia, Armenia, Turkmenistan, and others. Still fascinating, informative, and a pleasant read.

I'm on the iPhone, so no excerpts this morning.

Posted by: April at March 08, 2020 09:15 AM (OX9vb)

17 I read A Bookshop In Berlin: The Rediscovered Memoir of One Woman's Harrowing Escape From the Nazis by Francoise Frenkel, trans. by Stephanie Smee. The book was originally published in 1945, entitled No Place To Lay One's Head. It was rediscovered in an attic in southern France in 2010. Frenkel, a Jewish woman from Poland, fulfills a lifelong dream by opening a French-language bookshop in Berlin in 1921. The shop survives Kristallnacht, but in 1939 she is forced to flee to France. Her story is a series of ups and downs, going from safe house to safe house until she is finally able to cross into Switzerland in June, 1943. Fascinating story.

Posted by: Zoltan at March 08, 2020 09:15 AM (3ugDL)

18 Another interesting book along the lines of Imperium is 'In Siberia' by Colin Thubron. A really interesting book on a fascinating place. It was written as the Soviet Union was collapsing, and is a bit of travellogue mixed with some history and interviews with the wide range of personalities in this vast region.

Posted by: Vashta Nerada at March 08, 2020 09:15 AM (LZerG)

19 Those pants are fine if they were made from free range Shmoos.

Posted by: Eat Mor Shmoo at March 08, 2020 09:16 AM (Tnijr)

20 How is it that I missed Doyle and Acton book 10???


Oh well...that particular oversight has been rectified.


Happy DST roonz and roonettez, hope everyone is on time today.

Posted by: GGE of the Moron Horde, NC Chapter at March 08, 2020 09:16 AM (ElZzh)

21 Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at March 08, 2020 09:12 AM (Dc2NZ)

Eris, I am getting a bit concerned about this Horde hive mind thing!

Posted by: Commissar Hrothgar at March 08, 2020 09:16 AM (BiNEL)

22 And of course, I was pipped at the post.

Twice.

Posted by: Mary Poppins' Practically Perfect Piercing at March 08, 2020 09:16 AM (Ki5SV)

23 Bored of the Rings had a cover that riffed off the Ballantine Books acid trip drawn by Barbara Remington (a.k.a. BREM), who also drew a celebrated map of Middle Earth. I personally liked the Pauline Baynes version better.

Illustrators Tolkien liked, and those he did not:

https://tinyurl.com/rugw6ye

Tolkien didn't like BREM's covers, but did like Baynes'.

I thought the illustrations of the Brothers Hildebrandt were technically beautiful but posed like stiff tableaux vivant. I preferred the likenesses by Tim Kirk, who also drew the character cards for the old Lord of the Rings tabletop game. Michael Hague’s are characteristically lush, but then I’m a fan.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at March 08, 2020 09:16 AM (Dc2NZ)

24 Chief Standing Bear now has a statue in the U.S. Capital, in Statuary Hall along with other great American historical figures.

Posted by: Huck Follywood at March 08, 2020 09:17 AM (NVYyb)

25 I finally finished Walter Isaacson's bio of Leonardo da Vinci (I was delayed by a couple of months because someone got into a tidying-up mood and put it on the shelf, which was the last place I thought of looking for it). It's a good bio, alternating chapters about Leo's life with deep-dive chapters about individual artworks.

I have to say I liked the straight historical chapters better than I liked the art-nerd fanboy gushing chapters. I say that because Isaacson takes it as a given that Leonardo Da Vinci was a super-genius and the greatest artist ever. This may be true, but it means every aspect of his paintings is interpreted through the lens of "how does this show what a great artist Da Vinci was?" The possibility of elements being mistakes, or afterthoughts, or done merely for the sake of flattering the client, or whatever, never seems to cross Isaacson's mind.

Example: he talks a lot about Da Vinci's pioneering studies of geology in his native Tuscany. But then he says one of the paintings (I think it's the Madonna of the Rocks?) shows that knowledge in practice -- but any fool can look at it and say caves don't look like that, in Tuscany or anyplace else.

Posted by: Trimegistus at March 08, 2020 09:17 AM (+pjYf)

26 So I'm in a hotel because there is a train show this weekend, and much to my surprise the alarm clock in the room automatically switched to DST. I didn't expect that, so of course I had reset it the night before...and didn't realize my mistake until I was already up and around and looked at my cell phone.


Mrs Hades, a notorious sleeper-in, was not amused.

Posted by: GGE of the Moron Horde, NC Chapter at March 08, 2020 09:18 AM (ElZzh)

27

Jewells and mindful,

Reply got willowed.
@266?

And now, I must be off.
Well, gone. Off is a given.

Posted by: teej at March 08, 2020 09:18 AM (ymIWG)

28 Those pants...


Looks more like someone was wearing a dry suit for about three weeks.

And just letting the ole' bladder rip without taking them off.

Posted by: Village Idiot's Apprentice at March 08, 2020 09:18 AM (O4024)

29 For spiritual Morons, I read the most unlikely author evah re spiritual matters, a politically active progressive. (Didn't find that out till I was well into it.) Traveling Mercies, by Anne Lamott, was quite the conundrum. Now 66, Lamott grew up in (a not-wealthy section of) Marin County, CA, born to an atheist father and mother who only went to church on Christmas Eve.

I nearly chucked it around page 90 when she voiced her support for abortion. IIRC, she had one and then went on to have a son as a single mother. That kid became her life -- bus she still never recanted.

Strangely, as a child, she found faith not from her parents but through observant neighborhood families. She takes a dig at all the "awful things" Repubs have done, but still can't see the forest for the trees, politically.

However, there are some observations/quotes in the book that are gems. In one passage, Lamott recalls one of her church members at the pulpit telling how she had come to adopt her son. The couple used an agency titled ASK, Adopt Special Kids. Their first questionnaire asked if they were willing to adopt an addicted baby, one with terminal illness, mild or moderate retardation or violent tendencies. "She ticked off the list and then she cried." The pastor stepped to her side and said, "God is an adoptive parent, too. And she chose us all. She says, "Sure, I'll take kids who are addicted or terminal. I pick all the retarded kids, and of course the sadists. The selfish ones, the liars..."
Yeah, Lamott had to throw "she" in there, but nevertheless, that was a poignant graf. Wonder if the proggies threw her out yet seeing as how she believes in God?

Anyway, I'm glad I read the book.

BBL

Posted by: SandyCheeks at March 08, 2020 09:19 AM (u1+n/)

30 I agree with the Kapuscinski statements. I sort of went on a binge after Imperium. His writing really hold your attention

Posted by: CN at March 08, 2020 09:20 AM (ONvIw)

31 After seeing some of the "these pants" images, along with shots of fashion shows elsewhere, I find myself wondering:

how do the models keep a straight face?

I mean, sure, you'll do anything for heroin and you have the intellect of a coat hanger, but surely when you are handed THOSE PANTS to put on, there must be some snickering or eye-rolling in the fitting-room, at least when the designer's not around.

Posted by: Trimegistus at March 08, 2020 09:21 AM (+pjYf)

32 Chief Standing Bear now has a statue in the U.S. Capital, in Statuary Hall along with other great American historical figures.
Posted by: Huck Follywood

What about Running Bare ?

And Little White Dove ?

Posted by: JT at March 08, 2020 09:22 AM (arJlL)

33 I am still reading my Mao Tse-tung biography, outstandingly researched and written by Jung Chang and Jon Halliday. I assume they were given access to CCP archives in an official effort to expose Mao to history, so the Chinese people can start to untangle the propaganda disguised as history they have been taught, but who really knows.


Mao's sociopathy was nothing short of Pol Pot levels. We are reaching the end of the Long March and Mao, so far, has personally killed hundreds of people (often torturing them first) and been responsible for killing perhaps hundreds of thousands (mostly fellow communists, in purges). The real blood-letting on a mass scale is still ahead of us but killing people is what animated Mao's life.

Posted by: Huck Follywood at March 08, 2020 09:24 AM (NVYyb)

34 And, I'm out...my beloved sister is visiting from out of state, so it's a Mom and sis day!

Have a lovely day, all.

Posted by: April at March 08, 2020 09:25 AM (OX9vb)

35 Test

Posted by: Mel Gibson at March 08, 2020 09:25 AM (QZCjk)

36 Regarding those pants.

I dare them to attempt to ride a bike

Posted by: jsg at March 08, 2020 09:27 AM (WOiz0)

37 I figured this was a good time to reread Oh No John Ringo’s 2008 novel “The Last Centurion”, wherein we are hit with the triple whammy of low sun activity/global cooling, an outbreak of avian flu, and the presidency of a woman clearly meant to be Hillary (as Ringo himself said, “Who could have foreseen Barack Obama?”. The tale takes place in 2019 (!)

Our protagonist, an Army officer in charge of a mechanized infantry unit in the Middle East, is informed by his father, a farmer, that weather data indicates the earth is entering a cooling period, so he is gambling on buying lots of rye seed. A few weeks later, the battalion surgeon receives a notice from the Army CoS on an outbreak of human-to-human transmitted H5N1 in China, and all DOD personnel are to be vaccinated.

“Th-th-th-that’s right, people. I got two months advanced warning of what was about to occur. With both the Great Cold and the motherfucking Plague. Two. Months. And I went back to sleep with my eyes open.”

Why? “You see, I was (and am to a lesser extent) a skeptic. Global warming, resource depletion, all the rest of the mantra the Left constantly used to scare us. It went in one ear and out the other. If somebody told me the sky was falling, I wouldn’t look up. This time I got hit in the head by a chunk of sky.” “And we mostly blew it off. Why? Because ‘if it bleeds, it leads’. The 24-hour news cycle had gotten so competitive that even the most minor [occurrence] became the first sign of The End of Civilization!!! The World is Coming to an End!!!”


The mutated avian flu breaks out in a small town in western China. A lot of locals get very sick. The local medical boss, a WHO reporter, informs Beijing that he believes it has become human-to-human transmissible and he wants to report it to WHO. Party officials forbid him to say anything and they send in (unvaccinated) Army troops to cordon off the area. They get sick. The survivors and mobile infected start fleeing the area. Mass deaths. It finally makes the news via second- and third-hand reporting.

It was prescient when the novel came out right as SARS hit, but I am struck again by how on the nose it is regarding how the CCP deals with catastrophes. Thank goodness we have PDJT in charge this time.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at March 08, 2020 09:27 AM (Dc2NZ)

38 Finished All the Pretty Horses last night. First time with McCarthy. Interesting writer.

Posted by: Mel Gibson at March 08, 2020 09:27 AM (QZCjk)

39 I really haven't been reading anything new lately. I'm in one of my depressive moods and nothing in the house appeals to me; I find myself just flipping through a couple of pages of a Hitler bio, then moving on to a Tintin collection and then over to a book about ancient Rome.

But let me give any movie-loving morons a couple of recommendations:

Vanity Fair's Tales of Hollywood: This is a collection of articles regarding classic movies that have been published in VF over the years. I bought it for "When Liz Met Dick," about Cleopatra, but there are also stories about The Graduate, All About Eve, The Producers, Saturday Night Fever and six others. Good behind-the-scenes gossip and interesting details of how these movies were written, cast and directed. Light reading, but intriguing.

https://tinyurl.com/s7zgfkm

Moving back to my wheelhouse (and this is a book Eris might like) is John Kobal's Hollywood: The Years of Innocence, from 1985. It's a collection of photographs by a man named Nelson H. Evans, covering the years from when Cecil B. DeMille first came to Hollywood to film The Squaw Man in 1914, right through the teens and twenties. There are pictures of the ramshackle early studios, stars and directors in mufti eating at a lunch counter or playing on the beach, location shots, posed "star" photos and much, much more. If you love silent movies as much as I do, you must have this book.

https://tinyurl.com/yxxfo52f

Posted by: Mary Poppins' Practically Perfect Piercing at March 08, 2020 09:28 AM (Ki5SV)

40 35 Test

Posted by: Mel Gibson at March 08, 2020 09:25 AM (QZCjk)


Ok, but first...

Posted by: Hierominous Botch at March 08, 2020 09:28 AM (YqED9)

41 I am re-reading some earlier books in series that have recently had new additions. Unlike many morons here I find myself reading pulp fiction purely for the escapism and enjoyment rather than more weighty tomes for education and enlightenment.


That's about to change, however, as I have recently taken advantage of a new program put in place by my company that will pay for a degree. Not quite the one that I wanted (mechatronics rather than electronics) but whatever, it's about time I had a piece of paper to show for my efforts. Funny really, I guess, I have the job that I would have gotten with the piece of paper, so I really don't need the degree. I'm getting it just for me.

Posted by: GGE of the Moron Horde, NC Chapter at March 08, 2020 09:28 AM (ElZzh)

42 I read "1177 B.C. The Year Civilization Collapsed" by Eric H. Cline. From the book's back cover: In 1177 B.C., marauding groups known only as the "Sea Peoples" invaded Egypt. The pharaoh's army and navy defeated them, but the victory so weakened Egypt that it soon slid into decline, as did most of the surrounding civilizations. After centuries of brilliance, the civilized world of the Bronze Age came to an abrupt and cataclysmic end.

So, who were the Sea Peoples? Nobody knows who they were, where they came from, or what happened to them, nor how much destruction they actually caused. There're a lot of theories, including that they might have been Celts from Western Europe.

Very little of the book is about the Sea Peoples. It's mostly about a perfect storm of natural and man-made events that brought about the collapse of kingdoms and cities in the eastern Med during the Late Bronze Age. It's an okay read.

Posted by: Jake Holenhead at March 08, 2020 09:28 AM (P1GvV)

43 I'm reading The Count of Monty Python by Alexander Dumbass.

Posted by: Sloppy Joe at March 08, 2020 09:30 AM (WOiz0)

44 "So, who were the Sea Peoples? Nobody knows who they were, where they came from, or what happened to them, nor how much destruction they actually caused. "


I'm hearing this in my mind being read by Nigel Tuffnel.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at March 08, 2020 09:31 AM (Dc2NZ)

45 "So, who were the Sea Peoples? Nobody knows who they were, where they came from, or what happened to them, nor how much destruction they actually caused. "

I'm hearing this in my mind being read by Nigel Tuffnel.
Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at March 08, 2020 09:31 AM (Dc2NZ)


And now, so is AltonJackson.

Posted by: hogmartin at March 08, 2020 09:32 AM (t+qrx)

46 42 So, who were the Sea Peoples? Nobody knows who they were, where they came from, or what happened to them, nor how much destruction they actually caused. There're a lot of theories, including that they might have been Celts from Western Europe.

Are we going to do Stonehenge ?

Posted by: Derek Smalls at March 08, 2020 09:32 AM (WOiz0)

47 Good morning! Another weekend half-gone, although since I am semi-retired, my work schedule is eccentric and self-directed. Spent yesterday morning at the Book Haus in New Braunfels, doing an author gig. I at least came home with fewer books than I lugged to the store. There was a woman who had come looking specifically to check out my books since hearing about them from someone else. She bought a set of the Adelsverein Trilogy, and Sabrina, who owns the Book Haus, bought another set, so the time was not wasted at all. Even though there was only one other person who came to the shop during the two-hour period - a silent guy in a hoodie who Sabrina said was from the comic-book/game shop two doors down. We have meets with potential clients next week for the Tiny Publishing Bidness, so today will be spent in the garden.

Posted by: Sgt. Mom at March 08, 2020 09:32 AM (xnmPy)

48 Posted by: Trimegistus at March 08, 2020 09:17 AM (+pjYf)

A book that I have had for many years is Margaret Rice Cooper's The Inventions of Leonardo Da Vinci. It's a general audience book, divided into chapters such as "War," "Music," "Home, "The City" and so on, showing sketches from Leonardo's notebooks concerning his thoughts on flying machines, alarm clocks, die-stamping and so on. Well worth getting, and a good book for a curious child, too.

https://tinyurl.com/wfopvvw

Posted by: Mary Poppins' Practically Perfect Piercing at March 08, 2020 09:32 AM (Ki5SV)

49 Welp, Mrs Hades is finally up and around so it's off to the train show. Later roonz and roonettez, fear no evil!

Posted by: GGE of the Moron Horde, NC Chapter at March 08, 2020 09:32 AM (ElZzh)

50 Biden has difficulty "word-finding."

Posted by: San Franpsycho at March 08, 2020 09:32 AM (EZebt)

51 Picked up and finished the book Doorways in the Sand by Roger Zelazny this week. I read it once, umblety years ago, and it holds up.

Fred Cassidy had an interesting life. He was the beneficiary of his uncle's trust that allowed him a free ride in college until he graduated with a baccalaureate degree, and he liked free-climbing buildings. Since his uncle had directed that after his graduation any balance remaining of the trust be bequeathed to the IRA, Fred felt no particular compunction to hurry up and graduate, and as the story opens, is on his thirteenth year as an underclassman and still switching subjects to avoid a degree.

Life becomes more interesting in that he is assigned an advisor who has determined to force Fred into graduating, and Earth has been contacted by an alien federation and has been asked to contribute a few culturally iconic items, including the Mona Lisa and the British Crown Jewels, in trade for an alien mechanism and an artifact called "the Star Stone" that is an extremely ancient mystery.

Fred becomes aware that the Star Stone is missing about the same time that he starts being chased around by a series of hoodlums who think he had it last. He heads off to his field practicum in Australia to avoid being involved, where is kidnapped by a pair of bloodthirsty thugs who don't accept "I don't know" for an answer, and is then rescued by alien "cops" disguised as marsupials. On getting himself free from the aliens, he runs himself, against everyone's advice, through one of the alien devices and turns himself into a stereo-isomer of himself, and eventually solves the problem of the missing Star Stone. He then has to come to terms with the fact that his adviser has managed to graduate him, against his will, as a Ph.D in Anthropology, and he is being offered a job.




Zelazny is one of the best of the new-wave writers, and is a very good prosist. This is a McGuffin hunt, with the McGuffin being odd and hidden in an strange place. This book tends to start scenes in the middle-to-end of each segment, and then works out how it all happened; calling back to the serial adventure stories where each chapter started with the hero half-way up a tree strangling a leopard or whatever, and then spent the rest of the time explaining how he got there. It is a very fast read, and a very fun read.

Posted by: Kindltot at March 08, 2020 09:33 AM (6rS3m)

52 I’m also reading “Nothing To See Here” by Kevin Wilson, a weird little tale of a loser who reconnects with her rich roommate from an elite girls’ school who tempts her with an offer of posh digs and a paycheck. All she has to do is be a nanny to her stepchildren, boy and girl twins who, oh, have a tendency to spontaneously combust when they are excited or angry.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at March 08, 2020 09:33 AM (Dc2NZ)

53 "Outside of a dog, a book is man's best friend.

Inside of a dog, it's too dark to read."


- Groucho Marx, whom Burnye should have studied instead of that other one.

Posted by: BackwardsBoy's new band is called The Swinging Epsteins at March 08, 2020 09:36 AM (HaL55)

54 And of course, I was pipped at the post.


I put a splash of Bourbon in the coffee but I wouldn't call myself pipped yet.

Posted by: Bandersnatch at March 08, 2020 09:36 AM (gd9RK)

55 I've been reading "The Modern Clock, A Study of Time Keeping Mechanism; Its Construction, Regulation
and Repair" 1905.

I had no idea there was so much involved in designing a proper pendulum. You have to account for temperature changes and even air resistance. By the time this book was written, it was a highly developed technology.

This book would serve anyone who is into old clocks well. For me, it serves well to put me to sleep withing ten minutes.

Anyway, it's one of the new releases on Gutenberg, and of course, free.

Posted by: freaked IIc at March 08, 2020 09:38 AM (Tnijr)

56 And that's what I'm reading. Sorry for all the word vomit, but as you can see from that cookbook cover...

Well, it's too pretty to be inside. Have a graet day, book fags!

Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at March 08, 2020 09:39 AM (Dc2NZ)

57 > And of course, I was pipped at the post.

I put a splash of Bourbon in the coffee but I wouldn't call myself pipped yet.
Posted by: Bandersnatch at March 08, 2020 09:36 AM (gd9RK)


No, like the Allman Brothers song.

Posted by: hogmartin at March 08, 2020 09:39 AM (t+qrx)

58 I continue to read for amusement and escape, not edification.

***backs out of door in shame***

Posted by: Ladyl at March 08, 2020 09:39 AM (TdMsT)

59 Oh, and I suppose I should mention that there is a new book out, The Big Goodbye: Chinatown and the Last Years of Hollywood by Sam Wasson. It's about, as you can guess, the making of the iconic film. However. . .

While the story is fascinating, I found Wasson's author voice to be irritating. Too many times, rather than being the omniscient narrator, he slips into a first-and-second-person viewpoint - "I don't know," Polanski thought to himself" sort of thing. It may not bother you, but it bothered me.

My advice is to borrow the book from the library or, if you must have it, wait a year until it comes out in paperback.

Posted by: Mary Poppins' Practically Perfect Piercing at March 08, 2020 09:40 AM (Ki5SV)

60 killing people is what animated Mao's life.
Posted by: Huck Follywood at March 08, 2020 09:24 AM (NVYyb)

And sleeping with the virgin daughters of the party faithful.

Posted by: Fox2! at March 08, 2020 09:40 AM (Mdmyk)

61 I had no idea there was so much involved in designing a proper pendulum. You have to account for temperature changes and even air resistance. By the time this book was written, it was a highly developed technology.

This book would serve anyone who is into old clocks well. For me, it serves well to put me to sleep withing ten minutes.
Posted by: freaked IIc at March 08, 2020 09:38 AM (Tnijr)


Dava Sobel's Longitude, mentioned here before, is a good (true) story even if you're not interested in clocks or navigation (it helps if you are).

Posted by: hogmartin at March 08, 2020 09:41 AM (t+qrx)

62 6 Gloria Swanson !
Posted by: JT at March 08, 2020 09:04 AM (arJlL)


I was told it was Bette Davis, but so many of you were saying Swanson, and Google image search agrees with you, so Swanson it is.

Posted by: OregonMuse, AoSHQ Thought Leader, Pants Monitor & Austere Religious Scholar at March 08, 2020 09:42 AM (GPb6S)

63 Wow- that elaborate labyrinth of a library up top! If you turned some portions of it and put in optical illusion staircases, it could be Escher's library.

--

Nothing wrong with the pants, but, oh, that poor young man's elephantiasis is so sad. I think it's cruel to parade him like that.

Posted by: mindful webworker
safe
at March 08, 2020 09:42 AM (MukDh)

64 MPPP, you logged out last night, but I suggested that you don't use German spies, but instead use Wobblies as the baddies in your Theda Barr story

Posted by: Kindltot at March 08, 2020 09:43 AM (6rS3m)

65 Go to Amazon and look at the books Kapuscinski has written. This is a real journalist. Look where he's been, and see what events he's covered. I don't think there's a so-called "journalist" in America worthy to tie his shoes.

One of the dumbest fucking things our trash popular culture inflicted on our public school propagandized tools were polack jokes. To their credit, unlike other ethnic groups most of which are pretty fucking obvious, they shrugged their broad shoulders and didn't whine about being victims. But I'll get pissed off for them because they were the most effective group in saying fuck this shit and casting off the yoke of communist oppression leading to the cascade that liberated everyone, at least temporarily before the Krauts put an East German in charge like a bunch of fucking retards.

In Travels With Herodotus, Kapuscinski pointed out how works of history were banned behind the Iron Curtain by Stalin lest people get curious about how things happened. Fast forward to how our public indoctrination centers push sappy dogshit fabrications like Rigoberta Menchu that don't tell you a fucking thing you can't see in a soap opera. Kapuscinski spent the whole book telling chronologically how traveling to different parts of the world made him encounter situations about which Herodotus had explicated. The only thing related to a normal person's life in Rigoberta Menchu would be a massive bout of diarrhea.

Posted by: Captain Hate at March 08, 2020 09:43 AM (y7DUB)

66 I continue to read for amusement and escape, not edification.
Posted by: Ladyl at March 08, 2020 09:39 AM (TdMsT)


That's not what it's for!

https://tinyurl.com/qmvr4lr

Posted by: hogmartin at March 08, 2020 09:43 AM (t+qrx)

67 Good morning fellow Book Threadists. I hope everyone had a great week of reading.

Posted by: JTB at March 08, 2020 09:44 AM (7EjX1)

68 what a contrived posture in that Gloria Swanson pic. Gotta love the studio system's publicity hacks.

Posted by: kallisto at March 08, 2020 09:45 AM (Xhp1L)

69 who wants to get into Roman Polanski 's perverted little mind anyway. yexch.

Posted by: boulder t'hobo at March 08, 2020 09:45 AM (Q804u)

70 The doggies have noticed the spring-like temperatures, dry ground, and beautiful blue sky. I may be forced by circumstances into a hike.

Posted by: Huck Follywood at March 08, 2020 09:47 AM (NVYyb)

71 Test - again

Posted by: Mel Gibson at March 08, 2020 09:48 AM (QZCjk)

72 killing people is what animated Mao's life.
Posted by: Huck Follywood at March 08, 2020 09:24 AM (NVYyb)

And sleeping with the virgin daughters of the party faithful.
Posted by: Fox2! at March 08, 2020 09:40 AM (Mdmyk)


Which must have been a real ordeal for them, since the Great Helmsman neither bathed nor brushed his teeth. "Does a tiger brush his teeth?" he once asked.

Posted by: Mary Poppins' Practically Perfect Piercing at March 08, 2020 09:48 AM (Ki5SV)

73 58 I continue to read for amusement and escape, not edification.

***backs out of door in shame***
Posted by: Ladyl at March 08, 2020 09:39 AM (TdMsT)

Hey, wait for me!

Posted by: Jordan61 at March 08, 2020 09:49 AM (QLlrr)

74 One thing I read about pendulums is that some were filled with mercury. The expansion and contraction of the mercury column would offset temperature changes. Pretty clever huh.

I have the "Longitude" book and yes it's a good read. Kind of short, I read it in a few hours.

Posted by: freaked IIc at March 08, 2020 09:49 AM (Tnijr)

75 - "I don't know," Polanski thought to himself" sort of thing. It may not bother you, but it bothered me.


Oh, that totally bothers me. There was a book about Lobsters a couple of years ago where the author pretty clearly is on the boat with one guy, and they meet another guy, and the point of view switches to the other guy without the author getting off the first boat.

So it's an invented point of view, or it's a mashup of two different trips made to look one way, but it violates the conventions of storytelling enough to make me mad.

Posted by: Bandersnatch at March 08, 2020 09:49 AM (gd9RK)

76 I was told it was Bette Davis, but so many of you were saying Swanson, and Google image search agrees with you, so Swanson it is.
Posted by: OregonMuse, AoSHQ Thought Leader, Pants Monitor & Austere Religious Scholar at March 08, 2020 09:42 AM (GPb6S)


Oh, it's absolutely Swanson - the mole / beauty mark on her chin is a dead giveaway. And from the style of her hair, I am going to guess the photo was taken around the time of Sunset Boulevard.

Posted by: Mary Poppins' Practically Perfect Piercing at March 08, 2020 09:49 AM (Ki5SV)

77 the real life backstory to something like the blacklist was the Edwin Wilson case, he was the ex naval intelligence logistics officer, who did the same for the company, who ended up provisioning qadaffi with c4 and other items, went 'private' hired ex company operatives to kill Libyan dissidents, it was his organization that provided the pretext for turner's purge, so was the story told to peter maas, by the dashing prosecutor, larry barcella, some of his underlings ended up in iran contra, secord clines et al years after his conviction, you can see the pitch from here, the next time you see barcella he's flacking for bcci, that's not what an upstanding fellow would do, 20 years later, one discovers one ofthe company's top man, ted shackley, who is familiar from heading Miami station, lied about him being a rogue, shackley would helm the meeting in hamburg with Ghorbanifar in 1985

Posted by: gaius martius at March 08, 2020 09:50 AM (hMlTh)

78 Bidet's latest gaffe makes me think Trump has a mechanism controlling that corruptocrat's speech from afar.

Posted by: kallisto at March 08, 2020 09:51 AM (Xhp1L)

79 MPPP, you logged out last night, but I suggested that you don't use German spies, but instead use Wobblies as the baddies in your Theda Barr story
Posted by: Kindltot at March 08, 2020 09:43 AM (6rS3m)


That is interesting - it would connect with the studio, as they would be fostering labor troubles. And it does keep the climax of the book (bombs are planted in every major studio, ready to go off when the word is given) intact.

I'll make a note of it. I was working on plotting yesterday and wrote myself into a bit of a corner, but I will keep your thought in mind. Thanks!

Posted by: Mary Poppins' Practically Perfect Piercing at March 08, 2020 09:52 AM (Ki5SV)

80 "58 I continue to read for amusement and escape, not edification."

I gave up long ago reading for edification. It just isn't how I learn. Nothing is retained.

Posted by: Dan Smoot's Apprentice at March 08, 2020 09:52 AM (H8QX8)

81 the other Michael moore, has provided a mix of half baked speculation with some nuggets of truth, we have learned to discount much of his speculations, like when he assured us the Orlando shooters wife was in Jordan, when she was hanging with her parents in the bay area,

Posted by: gaius martius at March 08, 2020 09:54 AM (hMlTh)

82 "The Discoverers" by Daniel Boorstin (?) is a great book about the "discovery" of time, clocks, and the impact of the technology on the history of man. It's a great book if you want to undserstand why things are the way they are in certain aspects of the world of man.

Posted by: pawn at March 08, 2020 09:54 AM (+LeF+)

83 Not many things distract me as easily as the New Additions list at Gutenberg.

Eris, I for one really enjoy your excerpts from Bored of the Rings !

Posted by: sock_rat_eez, we are being gaslighted 24/365 at March 08, 2020 09:55 AM (zlgJP)

84 "The Discoverers" by Daniel Boorstin (?) is a great book about the "discovery" of time, clocks, and the impact of the technology on the history of man.

Yeah, I was thinking about that when yunz started in on the pendulums. It was making a non-pendulum chronometer that would keep accurate time on a ship that allowed latitude and longitude to be accurate and all of the discoveries that flowed from that knowledge.

Posted by: Bandersnatch at March 08, 2020 09:57 AM (gd9RK)

85 "These pants" fall into several possible categories: stupid, anti-male, anti-human, insulting, ugly, etc. Today's example expands that universe by adding incredibly stupid/utterly tasteless to the list.

Unless they were done as a massive joke, which I doubt, the designer would likely fail a brain scan that was just looking for a brain. Sheeesh!

Posted by: JTB at March 08, 2020 09:59 AM (7EjX1)

86 Finished All the Pretty Horses last night. First time with McCarthy. Interesting writer.
Posted by: Mel Gibson at March 08, 2020 09:27 AM (QZCjk)


His publisher must have really given him a big push on that because it was the first thing I read too and since then I've read almost everything else he's written. Ironically even though it set the hook, it's probably the book of his I like least, probably because I thought he wrote really awkwardly about male female relationships. Some people don't like him for a bunch of reasons about which I don't argue because people like what they like. The only thing that annoyed me was that his books located in the Southwest, like All the Pretty Horses, use a lot of colloquial terms mixing Spanish and English that you won't find in an OED (pre internet lookups) which pissed me off not knowing what he said. But his more recent books, like No Country For Old Men, are much more accessible and The Road is an out and out page turner.

Posted by: Captain Hate at March 08, 2020 10:00 AM (y7DUB)

87 indeed captain, then there's conrad, or sienkowitz, there is much wisdom in this fledgeling nation and it's inhabitants, who like the canary in the coal mine were the first to note the Russian bears embrace,

Posted by: gaius martius at March 08, 2020 10:00 AM (hMlTh)

88 OM, Thanks for the illustrations throughout the post. They are an added delight.

Posted by: JTB at March 08, 2020 10:00 AM (7EjX1)

89 My reading will pick up this week. I safely returned my granddog to DC yesterday and the house is quiet and calm. At 17, he was a picky eater and I'm always preoccupied and anxious about caring for other people's pets or kids.

I enjoyed my foray into grandma's favorite modern author, Elizabeth Goudge, but am ready to move on to something other than fiction.

I'll be sending the Modern Clock book rec to a clock obsessed friend of the family. He's bound to love it.

Posted by: CN at March 08, 2020 10:00 AM (ONvIw)

90 Biden forgets Obama;s name: "By the way, are you gonna stick with President on the following, President Ob--the last guy, on this issue?"

Biden forgets his own name: "I'm an Obidenbama Democrat."

Biden forgets which team he's on: "We cannot win this re-election...We can only re-elect Donald Trump."

Biden forgets everything: "My name is Joe Biden. I'm a Democratic candidate for the United States Senate. Vote for me on Super Thursday in North South Carolina. We hold these truths to be self-ebident all men and women created by the go...you know the thing."

At dysphasia your life, you don't have to do this, Joe.

Posted by: The Gipper Lives at March 08, 2020 10:00 AM (Ndje9)

91 We're noticing some of you are without pants, and since I also see that one of the Assistant Associate AoSHQ Pants Monitors are preparing to start their patrol, I thought I'd give y'all a heads-up.

Just one of our many services.

Posted by: Bob from NSA at March 08, 2020 10:00 AM (DMUuz)

92 Navigation pretty much stayed the same for hundreds of years until radio technology allowed for Loran, etc. Now GPS is changing even how war is fought.

If we are going to explore the Moon and search for water wer're going to need a LPS system. No compass, no sextant.

Posted by: pawn at March 08, 2020 10:01 AM (+LeF+)

93 So, who were the Sea Peoples? Nobody knows who they were, where they came from, or what happened to them, nor how much destruction they actually caused. "



Easy.

They came from Atlantis.



They got all flooded out due to-

Ancient Global Warming(TM).


Posted by: naturalfake at March 08, 2020 10:03 AM (z0XD8)

94 You can use a sextant on the Moon. In fact you can use it to determine both latitude and longitude. Find celestial north, then see how high above the horizon Earth is: that never changes so it gives you longitude. Latitude can be figured by measuring the north point in the sky against the horizon.

I don't know if the Moon's axis points at the North Star just like Earth's, or if it's a few degrees off.

Posted by: Trimegistus at March 08, 2020 10:05 AM (+pjYf)

95 GPS made it really clear for boaters that Compass North is not True North.

It's a thing I'd always known intellectually, but it's different when the one thing points up and the other points at Greenland.

Posted by: Bandersnatch at March 08, 2020 10:05 AM (gd9RK)

96 "The prohibitive favorite."
What is Joe Biden trying to say, there?

Posted by: m at March 08, 2020 10:06 AM (M5wRT)

97 ...In 1877 the government forcibly removed the 700 Ponca to Indian Territory...

Greetings from Indian Territory. (See these bricks on my porch, all marked with "I.T."?) Whenever I read about the removal of tribes to my state, I think...

I live in the Cherokee allotment area. There's a 120yo-plus Cherokee graveyard right over there.

Next door is the vast and wealthy Osage Nation.

Don't know 'bout nowadays, but AmerInds used to outnumber everyone else but whites in this state (after the land runs). AmerIndian culture abounds. The streets of my home town include many AmerInd tribe names. There's a pow wow fest downtown every year.

Also, I hear the casinos can do a good job cooking up a steak.

Descendants of AmerInds removed to Oklahoma should be as grateful as descendants of Blacks brought to America as slaves - ugly origin, but mighty good place to end up.

I just want to say, thanks, other places and Federal government, for sending us those great tribes!

Also, Indian Territory - it's MAGA country!

/rant off

Oh, yeah, book thread topic... Um, um.....

The 46th Star: A History of Oklahoma's Constitutional Convention and Early Statehood

My copy's around here somewhere...

(disappears into the catacombs)

Posted by: mindful webworker
safe
at March 08, 2020 10:06 AM (MukDh)

98 Picked up and finished the book Doorways in the Sand by Roger Zelazny this week. I read it once, umblety years ago, and it holds up.

kindletot, Zelazny is one of my sci-fi faves. Doorways has a lot of amusing banter in it.

When the protagonist is staked out in the Australian sun by the hoodlums, he describes them coming to check on him as seeing how he is coming along in his journey to 'raisinhood'. Evocative and funny, for a guy being tortured.

Posted by: GnuBreed at March 08, 2020 10:07 AM (XF4b8)

99 prohibitive favorite:

So likely to win as to discourage competition: the prohibitive favorite to win the nomination.

Posted by: m at March 08, 2020 10:07 AM (M5wRT)

100 Mike Moore and his crew accomplished a lot, but the FBI is far from dismantled. They are strong enough and organized enough to try to overthrow a POTUS.

Posted by: kallisto at March 08, 2020 10:09 AM (Xhp1L)

101 Had a couple of disappointing reads this week. The first was "CS Lewis and the Art of Writing" by Corey Latta. Lewis is one of my favorite writers of the last 2,000 years and I had high hopes for the book. Unfortunately, it was too basic and repetitive, suitable for high school level. Readers would be better served by reading Lewis' collected letters which are interesting, entertaining, and educational.

The other disappointment was "Alligator", the Harvard Lampoon spoof of the James Bond books. It lacks the cleverness of "Bored of the Rings" and relies only on exaggeration. That gets tiresome quickly.

Posted by: JTB at March 08, 2020 10:09 AM (7EjX1)

102 Posted by: Kindltot at March 08, 2020 09:33 AM (6rS3m)
------
Do you smell me, Bread?

Posted by: Star Stone at March 08, 2020 10:11 AM (PD1/H)

103 How We Dismantled the FBI In Our Pajamas

The FBI was wearing their pajamas? That is really going too far.

Posted by: t-bird at March 08, 2020 10:11 AM (asM0l)

104 I have The Blade Itself on audio. The narrator is very good. I wanted something similar to Solomon Kane, and this fits.

When I looked on audible through the recommended choices I was looking for a liberal bias. I may have found it, although it is likely unintentional. In the category of sci-fi fantasy, this author, who I do not know, was between Tolkein and CS Lewis and thought, 'well ok then'. I suppose this is a poor way to judge, but I may get better the more fiction I read.

Posted by: BourbonChicken at March 08, 2020 10:11 AM (LxTcq)

105 39 Finished All the Pretty Horses last night. First time with McCarthy. Interesting writer.

Posted by: Mel Gibson at March 08, 2020 09:27 AM (QZCjk)

That is one of my favorite books. The rest of the trilogy is worth reading, with the second book probably being the most unusual and interesting of the three. The last book was not my fave but still good.

If you like McCarthy you pretty much have to read Blood Meridien. It is hard to describe really and still I am not sure what to think of it. But I am glad I read it.

To me All the Pretty Horses was his best novel but like all novels, everyone will have different views and experiences. It is situational.

Posted by: Quint at March 08, 2020 10:11 AM (n13/j)

106 On the other side of "Imperium" is a book by Ernest Poole titled "The Village". Ernest wandered around the Soviet Union just after the revolution, talking to folks.

I haven't made it very far into the book (general lack of enthusiasm lately; I'm blaming it on the earthquake), but one thing that has struck me is that nobody is against the idea of socializing stuff and stealing from the rich, they're just upset that the Soviets aren't listening to *them*. Everyone has better ideas about how things should be done than what the Soviets are actually doing, but everyone agrees that putting everything in a big pile and divvying it up is a good idea.

Posted by: Anachronda at March 08, 2020 10:11 AM (kf5Ci)

107 Good points above but it's hard to see the lunar horizon and the Earth when your down in Shakelton on the south end.

Posted by: pawn at March 08, 2020 10:12 AM (+LeF+)

108 After seeing some of the "these pants" images, along with shots of fashion shows elsewhere, I find myself wondering:

how do the models keep a straight face?

-
I keep wondering, who buys this crap? Surely they are in business to make money and they are in business so they must be making money but how?

Posted by: Anonosaurus Wrecks, Tyrannosaur Wrangler at March 08, 2020 10:12 AM (+y/Ru)

109 " I continue to read for amusement and escape, not edification."

Well I've been reading for amusement and escapement, which brings me to another fascinating clock trivia tidbit.

The "dead beat" escapement was made to make the second hand tick once a second, instead of moving in a more continuous sweep, "beating" multiple times within a second.

Posted by: freaked IIc at March 08, 2020 10:12 AM (Tnijr)

110 I mentioned I have Diplomacy by Kissinger. The man is a great mind.

Posted by: BourbonChicken at March 08, 2020 10:13 AM (LxTcq)

111 I love the implication of the Sea Peoples, and have thought that it would be a wonderful story line to build a "space viking" universe around.

Posted by: Kindltot at March 08, 2020 10:14 AM (6rS3m)

112 I don't know if the Moon's axis points at the North Star just like Earth's, or if it's a few degrees off.

I looked it up: the Moon's orbit is only 1.54 degrees off compared with our orbit around the sun. So that's how we get so many eclipses (and partial eclipses).

Posted by: t-bird at March 08, 2020 10:14 AM (dzJ3R)

113 Well, I should try to get some writing done.

Hope you all have a lovely weekend.

Posted by: Mary Poppins' Practically Perfect Piercing at March 08, 2020 10:15 AM (Ki5SV)

114 ...oops. 5 degrees off, not 1.54.

Posted by: t-bird at March 08, 2020 10:16 AM (dzJ3R)

115 I thought No Country For Old Men read like a movie script. And it was the movie script almost word for word.

Posted by: Quint at March 08, 2020 10:16 AM (n13/j)

116 Joe's brain has fallen and it can't get up.

Posted by: Anonosaurus Wrecks, Tyrannosaur Wrangler at March 08, 2020 10:16 AM (+y/Ru)

117 That candle is burning too close to the underside of the shelf above it. I'm reporting that painting to the authorities. It frightens me.

Posted by: some leftist autist what can't process whimsy at March 08, 2020 10:16 AM (ldmQR)

118 The other disappointment was "Alligator", the Harvard Lampoon spoof of the James Bond books. It lacks the cleverness of "Bored of the Rings" and relies only on exaggeration. That gets tiresome quickly.
Posted by: JTB at March 08, 2020 10:09 AM (7EjX1)

Yes, agreed.

"Bored of the Rings" remains a singular achievement.

Posted by: Dan Smoot's Apprentice at March 08, 2020 10:17 AM (H8QX8)

119 Someone should put out a McCarthy Thesaurus. It is one thing to throw in Spanish from time to time, but if you are throwing in archaic Spanish words and other obscurities, it an get to be a bit much.

Posted by: Quint at March 08, 2020 10:17 AM (n13/j)

120 "The prohibitive favorite."
What is Joe Biden trying to say, there?
Posted by: m at March 08, 2020 10:06 AM (M5wRT)

Hillary didn't want to be elected, she wanted to be coronated. People can tell.

Posted by: BourbonChicken at March 08, 2020 10:17 AM (LxTcq)

121 After enjoying Eric Sloanes' "Diary of an Early American Boy" I reread his "Reverence for Wood" (one of my all-time favorite books) and his "Weather Book" which is still valuable for the information and approach to the topic. And, as always, they include his wonderful pen and ink illustrations.

Speaking of weather, I recently downloaded Joe Bastardi's "The Climate Chronicles: Inconvenient Revelations You Won't Hear From Al Gore--And Others " for $2.99 for the Kindle. I just started reading it but so far I like his approach of dealing with weather/climate as facts, not political BS. I'll have more about it when I finish it.

Posted by: JTB at March 08, 2020 10:18 AM (7EjX1)

122 Funny that Biden talks about the fake 1% issues with no self awareness that's he's been part of the White House for the past 8 years.

Posted by: No one at March 08, 2020 10:18 AM (2DOZq)

123 If you spent a lunar year on the moon, would you see the earth in all the same cycles as we see the moon? Full, crescent, new etc?

Posted by: weirdflunky at March 08, 2020 10:18 AM (cknjq)

124 If you're in Shackleton crater then you know where you are . . . local landmarks would be more useful than position.

Posted by: Trimegistus at March 08, 2020 10:18 AM (+pjYf)

125 *pops head up from trap door in floor*

I read Bored of the Rings when it first came out. I was already a hobbit fan, and was not a lampoon fan. I read Bored, appreciated its amusement value as locker room fart joke humor like all that lampoon class stuff, and never had any interest or desire to re-visit it. Had put it completely out of my mind for decades. Then for some reason lately it has been recalled to mind. Like a bad earworm. (bookworm?)

I think I need to find my big collected Red Book of Westmarch volume and revisit the Shire.

*echoing trudge fading into the catacombs again*

Posted by: mindful webworker
safe
at March 08, 2020 10:20 AM (MukDh)

126 weirdflunky: short answer, yes. You'd see all the phases of the Earth in the course of one lunar revolution around the Earth.

Posted by: Trimegistus at March 08, 2020 10:20 AM (+pjYf)

127 The other disappointment was "Alligator", the Harvard Lampoon spoof of the James Bond books. It lacks the cleverness of "Bored of the Rings" and relies only on exaggeration. That gets tiresome quickly.
Posted by: JTB at March 08, 2020 10:09 AM (7EjX1)
-----
I don't remember the title, but the Bond parody written back in the Sixties about Israel Bond - Agent Oy-Oy-Seven - was a hoot. It helps if you know some Yiddish.

Posted by: Captain Obvious, USS Lone Fire at March 08, 2020 10:21 AM (PD1/H)

128 Posted by: Trimegistus at March 08, 2020 10:20 AM (+pjYf)

Thanks. Not a subject that i've ever thought about uintil this morning's comments. I blame DST.

Posted by: weirdflunky at March 08, 2020 10:22 AM (cknjq)

129 95 GPS made it really clear for boaters that Compass North is not True North.

It's a thing I'd always known intellectually, but it's different when the one thing points up and the other points at Greenland.
Posted by: Bandersnatch at March 08, 2020 10:05 AM (gd9RK)

True virgins make dull companions

True
Variation
Magnetic
Deviation
Compass

Posted by: Fox2! at March 08, 2020 10:23 AM (Mdmyk)

130 Every time I see the title "All the Pretty Horses" by Cormac McCarthy I start giggling and it's all Aaron Copeland's fault.

Copeland did an arrangement of "American Songs" including that one. For some reason whenever tenors perform "American Songs" they sing it in the most artificial and pretentious way possible. The whole piece is like a musical parody of how affluent liberal culturati think of American folk culture.

Anyway, so when I see the McCarthy title I hear the Copeland lyric and start giggling.

Posted by: Trimegistus at March 08, 2020 10:23 AM (+pjYf)

131 On one of the afternoon threads yesterday, pet or chess, there was mention of "The Dark Ages Collection" on Amazon as a free Kindle book. The offer is still in effect. It is apparently a collection of classic writers, such as Edward Gibbon, about that time period. I haven't had a chance to start it yet but the topic is of interest and the price is right. Keep in mind, it's about 1,900 pages long so it will take up some space on an e-reader.

Posted by: JTB at March 08, 2020 10:25 AM (7EjX1)

132 "I thought he wrote really awkwardly about male female relationships"
Posted by: Captain Hate at March 08, 2020 10:00 AM (y7DUB)


For sure he is bad at that. You would really hate the movie and rightfully so. It ramps up the love interest thing. The movie is really an abomination. The ending distorts the meaning of the book entirely. I can't think of a worse adaptation of a novel.

Posted by: Quint at March 08, 2020 10:27 AM (n13/j)

133 I thought No Country For Old Men read like a movie script. And it was the movie script almost word for word.
Posted by: Quint at March 08, 2020 10:16 AM (n13/j)


I didn't think of it that way initially but you're right. Everything was visually presented. So was Child of God which I just noticed was made into a movie.

Did you read Suttree? Not many people talk about it and it's *really* long but it has some incredible imagery when he's deliriously walking through a frozen wilderness in the Southeast.

Posted by: Captain Hate at March 08, 2020 10:28 AM (y7DUB)

134 One of the dumbest fucking things our trash popular culture inflicted on our public school propagandized tools were polack jokes.

-
My high school history teacher, Chicken Legs Ingraham, hypothesized that the stupid Pole idea came about because Poland constantly rose to free themselves of their various conquerors and were constantly beaten down.

Chopin's Revolutionary Etude.

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=g1uLrHq9TDg

Posted by: Anonosaurus Wrecks, Tyrannosaur Wrangler at March 08, 2020 10:28 AM (+y/Ru)

135 Did you read Suttree? Not many people talk about it
and it's *really* long but it has some incredible imagery when he's
deliriously walking through a frozen wilderness in the Southeast.

Posted by: Captain Hate at March 08, 2020 10:28 AM (y7DUB)

not yet, but it is on my list.

Posted by: Quint at March 08, 2020 10:29 AM (n13/j)

136 If we are going to explore the Moon and search for water wer're going to need a LPS system. No compass, no sextant.
Posted by: pawn at March 08, 2020 10:01 AM (+LeF+)

Celestial navigation ought to work just fine on the Moon. The sky is always visible.

Posted by: Alberta Oil Peon at March 08, 2020 10:30 AM (miJU3)

137 THIS WAY TO THE ICE CAVE->

Posted by: pawn at March 08, 2020 10:31 AM (+LeF+)

138 Thanks for The Dark Ages reccomendation. Taking a while to download. 2400 pages. yikes

Posted by: weirdflunky at March 08, 2020 10:31 AM (cknjq)

139 Easy. They came from Atlantis.

They got all flooded out due to-

Ancient Global Warming(TM).


Posted by: naturalfake at March 08, 2020 10:03 AM (z0XD

That legend still exists. There are some who try to say one of the mitochondrial DNA groups is from Atlantis. That is only marginally better than saying it was from outerspace.

Posted by: CN at March 08, 2020 10:34 AM (ONvIw)

140 I'm having minor foot surgery on Tuesday which will limit my mobility for a while (There goes running that marathon. Dang it!) I'm putting together a pile of books to read while laid up. So far the list has a couple of Nero Wolfe books, a Narnia tale, a book on flintlocks, and the start of one of the Cornwell series. Of course that assumes I keep to the list.

Don't know if others plan like this for recovery times.

Posted by: JTB at March 08, 2020 10:34 AM (7EjX1)

141 So, who were the Sea Peoples?

-
Sea People.
Sea People fight.
Fight, Sea People, fight.

Posted by: Anonosaurus Wrecks, Tyrannosaur Wrangler at March 08, 2020 10:35 AM (+y/Ru)

142 Someone should put out a McCarthy Thesaurus. It is one thing to throw in Spanish from time to time, but if you are throwing in archaic Spanish words and other obscurities, it an get to be a bit much.
Posted by: Quint at March 08, 2020 10:17 AM (n13/j)


I read somewhere, a long while back, that an American Heritage dictionary was a good source of his obscure terms but I wasn't about to buy one. He has a website that I haven't looked at for a while where he was open to discussing things about his books. He has a pretty funny sense of humor, at least he did then and there.

Posted by: Captain Hate at March 08, 2020 10:36 AM (y7DUB)

143 Sea people fight?

Sea? People fight

Sea people? fight

Posted by: weirdflunky at March 08, 2020 10:37 AM (cknjq)

144 Sea people. Right. If they were anything like Sea Monkeys,
they were a disappointment.

Posted by: freaked IIc at March 08, 2020 10:39 AM (Tnijr)

145 Yahoo! is despicable. 100% rotten.

Posted by: klaftern at March 08, 2020 10:41 AM (RuIsu)

146 Who were the C peoples?

Ancient software developers, whose null pointer weaponry caused much havoc.

Posted by: Duncanthrax at March 08, 2020 10:42 AM (DMUuz)

147 It's really the negative array indices you have to watch out for. Null pointers just crash. Negative indices can change a running program's code if they are big enough.

Posted by: leoncaruthers at March 08, 2020 10:43 AM (UfRqq)

148 Suttree looked interesting.

Posted by: Mel Gibson at March 08, 2020 10:44 AM (QZCjk)

149 Am I recalling incorrectly, but didn't one group of the Sea Peoples settle and becomes the Philistines?

Posted by: Captain Obvious, USS Lone Fire at March 08, 2020 10:44 AM (PD1/H)

150 145 Yahoo! is despicable. 100% rotten.
Posted by: klaftern at March 08, 2020 10:41 AM (RuIsu)

The Spanish flu stuff or the suggestion that Trump overruled the "elderly should not fly" idea. If you are old and susceptible you should not do travelling during flu season and should never cruise as even the norovirus outbreaks can wreak havoc. But your doctor should be telling you this based on your MR. I don't know any group that cruises as much as the American elderly, btw

Posted by: CN at March 08, 2020 10:44 AM (ONvIw)

151 As a bookish aside, has anyone read anything by Fulton Sheen?

Posted by: CN at March 08, 2020 10:48 AM (ONvIw)

152 105 I have a copy of Blood Meridian but I am gun shy of starting a 1 lb book. Too much book interrupted in my life.

Posted by: Mel Gibson at March 08, 2020 10:50 AM (QZCjk)

153 I read "1177 B.C. The Year Civilization Collapsed" by Eric H. Cline.Very little of the book is about the Sea Peoples. It's mostly about a perfect storm of natural and man-made events that brought about the collapse of kingdoms and cities in the eastern Med during the Late Bronze Age. It's an okay read.

Posted by: Jake Holenhead at March 08, 2020 09:28 AM (P1GvV)

What ended the Bronze Age? According to Cline..."everything".

Posted by: BignJames at March 08, 2020 10:50 AM (X/Pw5)

154 The American left (small "a") blames DJT personally for everything, because daddy issues. And it works.

Posted by: klaftern at March 08, 2020 10:50 AM (RuIsu)

155 So, the last few weeks I haven't had time to engage a new novel.

Instead, I've been reading short stories.

I found a nice used copy of "The Folio Book of Comic Short Stories" for a mere tuppence and cracked it open to read yesterday.

A couple of stories immediately caught my eye, I read those immediately:


"The Byzantine Omelette' by Saki

This story is still relevant today. Apparently, the "limousine liberal" or more to the point the "hypocritical socialist" have always been with us.

I won't spoil the story for you, as like all Saki stories, it is very short, only 4-5 pages long.

But, be assured the "Woke" antagonist of the story is cleanly, nicely, and neatly filleted.

If you enjoy "Three Men in a Boat", PG Wodehouse, and even in a roundabout way "Monte Python", you'll enjoy Saki (HH Munro).

His stories range from witty trifles to the macabre, always with a light touch and generally humorous approach.

"The Byzantine Omelette" comes from his book of short stories "Beasts and Super-Beasts", which would be a great start in acquainting yourself with Saki.

Saki has any number of collected stories available for very little on Amazon for the kindle..


The other story that caught my eye was:


"A Piece of Pie" by Damon Runyon

You know, I don't believe that I've ever read a Damon Runyon short story before.

Shame on me! Holy Cow! What an engaging and delightful writer.

I spent the whole of "A Piece of Pie" with a stupid smile on my face and chuckled at the twist at the end.

Like PG Wodehouse, he writes in a particular manner to gin up the comedy. That being the patois of New York grifters and gamblers during the Depression era.

If you've ever seen the musical "Guys and Dolls", you'll be familiar with this mode of speech as the plot and characters were taken from Damon Runyon's stories.

"A Piece of Pie" concerns an eating contest between two prodigious eaters and the gamblers betting on the contest.

Honestly, I was so impressed by the writing and story-telling that I went back and got a Folio Book of Damon Runyon stories titled, "Dream Street" for a song and a dance.

I sang. I danced. I went home with "Dream Street".

But, again, plenty of Damon Runyon collections available on Amazon for the kindle.

Posted by: naturalfake at March 08, 2020 10:51 AM (z0XD8)

156 As a bookish aside, has anyone read anything by Fulton Sheen?

Posted by: CN at March 08, 2020 10:48 AM (ONvIw)

Seen some of his movies.

Posted by: BignJames at March 08, 2020 10:52 AM (X/Pw5)

157 156: LOL

Posted by: CN at March 08, 2020 10:52 AM (ONvIw)

158 It's really the negative array indices you have to watch out for.

With great freedom comes great responsibility. ...but we can't have that, can we?!

Posted by: t-bird at March 08, 2020 10:52 AM (Zo1XC)

159 With great freedom comes great responsibility. ...but we can't have that, can we?!
Posted by: t-bird at March 08, 2020 10:52 AM (Zo1XC)

No we must be cared for cradle to grave like babies and told the real world outside the US doesn't exist.

Posted by: CN at March 08, 2020 10:53 AM (ONvIw)

160 Apparently, the "limousine liberal" or more to the point the "hypocritical socialist" have always been with us.?

-
Communism has been bery, bery good to Marxist Pig Carlos Maza.

https://bit.ly/2PYbpkE

Posted by: Anonosaurus Wrecks, Tyrannosaur Wrangler at March 08, 2020 10:55 AM (+y/Ru)

161 160: The "intellectually pure" have always been exempt from the rules for little people. They can be trusted with possessions, the rest of us can't.

Posted by: CN at March 08, 2020 10:59 AM (ONvIw)

162 Paul Giamatti doing VS commercials

Posted by: weirdflunky at March 08, 2020 10:59 AM (cknjq)

163 This is kinds early for the thread to wind down. Is there something major on the news?

Posted by: CN at March 08, 2020 11:00 AM (ONvIw)

164 Regarding what I read this week, it wasn't a good week since various family things occupied lots of time. But Sister Carrie has gotten better as the main character appears in a small production of a play and finds out that she's good at it which alters the relationship she has with the two men in her life. One of which Dreiser annoys the fuck out of me by continually using the term "drummer" to describe which I think would be currently called a cooch hound or something similar. I don't know why he didn't use "rake" or something more literarily historically employed; maybe it was a staple of Midwestern fiction of that time period in which I wasn't interested before and plan on avoiding in the future. The other guy is married to a bitch wife who spoils their bratty kids; since he's presented, at least so far, sympathetically I'm wondering if he doesn't mirror the author's real life. Anyway he seemed to really care about Carrie, and may have planned on leaving his dogshit marriage, but now sees the other guy maybe not just interested in using her and thinking he's fucked. Anyone still reading this is probably wondering why I'm going on about tripe like that but it's really well done and better than I was expecting; but I still don't plan to read anything by him going forward.

Posted by: Captain Hate at March 08, 2020 11:00 AM (y7DUB)

165 BE commercials! Wth is Vs?

Posted by: weirdflunky at March 08, 2020 11:00 AM (cknjq)

166 Easy. They came from Atlantis.

They got all flooded out due to-

Ancient Global Warming(TM).


Posted by: naturalfake at March 08, 2020 10:03 AM (z0XD

That legend still exists. There are some who try to say one of the mitochondrial DNA groups is from Atlantis. That is only marginally better than saying it was from outerspace.
Posted by: CN at March 08, 2020 10:34 AM (ONvIw)



When I was young and stupid, there used to be a series of paperbacks purporting to tell the "True Story" of the hidden civilization of MU.

The first one was presented in an archeological fashion and with folk evidence from other cultures of the great land of MU, that lay off the eastern coast of Europe.

In case you're wondering, MU = Atlantis.

Anyway, they got nuttier and nuttier as they went along, and somewhere in the middle of book 3, even young and gullible as I was, I thought "what a load of hooey", close the book and never revisited MU.

I guess other people thought the same cuz the MU books were everywhere for a while on paperback stands,

Then, suddenly, they weren't.

Posted by: naturalfake at March 08, 2020 11:01 AM (z0XD8)

167 Anyway, due to lack of comments/advice I went ahead and orders Fulton Sheen's book Communism and the Conscience of the West. Not a big expense.

Posted by: CN at March 08, 2020 11:01 AM (ONvIw)

168 Finished reading Tom Holland's Dynasty: Rise and Fall of the House of Caesar.

Meh. Not sure if it was the writing style, which seemed circular to me, or if it was just the subject.

Most of the Caesars were beyond reprehensible. The ones that weren't were still tyrants, but somewhat benevolent ones.

I think I'll take a break from reading about this particular part of history, as important as it is. I just don't want to read any more of the weird power plays among family members that seemed to end in death and how gross sexual acts were integral to nearly every one of the lives of the Caesars.

Posted by: squeakywheel at March 08, 2020 11:02 AM (uWJs1)

169 I guess other people thought the same cuz the MU books were everywhere for a while on paperback stands,

Then, suddenly, they weren't.
Posted by: naturalfake at March 08, 2020 11:01 AM (z0XD

Right, the Edgar Cayce stuff. I had a patient who told me he was sure his family was from Vulcan because of this nuttery

Posted by: CN at March 08, 2020 11:03 AM (ONvIw)

170 I would like to thank whoever it was that recommended the DC Smith detective series by Peter Grainger a while back. I listened to the audiobook versions on Hoopla and thoroughly enjoyed them all.

Posted by: DIY Daddio at March 08, 2020 11:03 AM (RJscS)

171 Ladyl,
I also read "popcorn " books. Nothing horribly cerebral, but fun and engaging.

Right now I'm reading "NInth House" by Leigh Bardugo. It's an entertaining mystery involving the occult at Yale University.

Before that I read "Kitchen Confidential " by Anthony Bourdain. Yeah, I know he's a progressive duece, but I read for entertainment and he's damn entertaining.

Posted by: Nurse ratched at March 08, 2020 11:03 AM (PkVlr)

172 One more try

VW commercials

Kindle auto correct is awful and I can't figure out how to kill it!

Posted by: weirdflunky at March 08, 2020 11:04 AM (cknjq)

173 165 BE commercials! Wth is Vs?
Posted by: weirdflunky at March 08, 2020 11:00 AM (cknjq)

Victoria's Secret? I thought that was weird, and creepy.

Posted by: Jordan61 at March 08, 2020 11:04 AM (QLlrr)

174 re "Free Book on Religious Liberty Jurisprudence"

"Pierce v. Society of Sisters" seems to be missing.

In the conclusion the wiki article about it states;

"The right of parents to control their children's education without state interference became a "cause célèbre" following the case, and religious groups proactively defended this right from state encroachment."
Which seems to be quit fundamental.

Posted by: PhilD at March 08, 2020 11:06 AM (vaDQ7)

175 Before that I read "Kitchen Confidential " by Anthony Bourdain. Yeah, I know he's a progressive duece, but I read for entertainment and he's damn entertaining.
Posted by: Nurse ratched at March 08, 2020 11:03 AM (PkVlr)

Well, he WAS a progressive douche.

Posted by: Jordan61 at March 08, 2020 11:06 AM (QLlrr)

176 Some 20 year old was hospitalized in St Louis after testing + for kung flu. She does not need to be hospitalized, they say, but they've tossed her in negative pressure room anyway. They posted all sorts of hazmat pics, then tell people "don't worry".
I understand the need to be safe, but they are really overdoing the black plague clothes.

Posted by: CN at March 08, 2020 11:08 AM (ONvIw)

177 171 Ladyl,
I also read "popcorn " books. Nothing horribly cerebral, but fun and engaging.

Right now I'm reading "NInth House" by Leigh Bardugo. It's an entertaining mystery involving the occult at Yale University.

Before that I read "Kitchen Confidential " by Anthony Bourdain. Yeah, I know he's a progressive duece, but I read for entertainment and he's damn entertaining.
Posted by: Nurse ratched at March 08, 2020 11:03 AM (PkVlr)


My requirement is that the writing is superb, and the plot entertaining.

So much truly awful stuff gets published.

Posted by: Ladyl at March 08, 2020 11:11 AM (TdMsT)

178 So much truly awful stuff gets published.
Posted by: Ladyl at March 08, 2020 11:11 AM (TdMsT)

This is so true. And with the sheer amount of content out there, it's really hard to find something worth reading.

Posted by: Jordan61 at March 08, 2020 11:12 AM (QLlrr)

179 In case you're wondering, MU = Atlantis.


I just typed ace.atlantis.nu into the browser and it didn't work, so I'm not sure that's correct.

Posted by: Bandersnatch at March 08, 2020 11:12 AM (gd9RK)

180 146 Who were the C peoples?

Ancient software developers, whose null pointer weaponry caused much havoc.
Posted by: Duncanthrax at March 08, 2020 10:42 AM (DMUuz

They were totally outclassed by the C++ People.

Posted by: Fox2! at March 08, 2020 11:12 AM (Mdmyk)

181 Riggs is a Steampunk library.

Posted by: Anna Puma at March 08, 2020 11:13 AM (iVrYZ)

182 Meh. Books are like alcohol.

Read/drink what you like.

Posted by: Nurse ratched at March 08, 2020 11:13 AM (PkVlr)

183 So much truly awful stuff gets published.

Posted by: Ladyl at March 08, 2020 11:11 AM (TdMsT)

....and made into tv shows...and movies.

Posted by: BignJames at March 08, 2020 11:13 AM (X/Pw5)

184 OM, those pants..

Rejected Fifth Element fashion?

Posted by: Anna Puma at March 08, 2020 11:15 AM (iVrYZ)

185 Learned that Abebooks is owned by Amazon. Not sure why that irritates me, but it does.

Posted by: EdmundBurkesShade at March 08, 2020 11:16 AM (gSgAd)

186 Hi nurse! Don't go to Starbucks in downtown Seattle. They have cooties.

Posted by: Jordan61 at March 08, 2020 11:16 AM (QLlrr)

187 So much truly awful stuff gets published.

Posted by: Ladyl at March 08, 2020 11:11 AM (TdMsT)

....and made into tv shows...and movies.
Posted by: BignJames at March 08, 2020 11:13 AM (X/Pw5)
-----
Occasionally, movies improve on the source material. I would use "The Last of the Mohicans" as an exemplar.

Posted by: Captain Obvious, USS Lone Fire at March 08, 2020 11:17 AM (PD1/H)

188

Looks like the Broad had a SWANSON's Leopard pie for lunch. On a leather Plate'o.

Posted by: saf at March 08, 2020 11:18 AM (5IHGB)

189 My Humor_Stack just overflowed with the C humor.

Posted by: Anna Puma at March 08, 2020 11:18 AM (iVrYZ)

190 Go to Amazon and look at the books Kapuscinski has written. This is a real journalist.

He almost certainly was an intelligence agent for the Polish People's Republic as well.

He is a wonderful writer, and kudos to the people who translated his books into English.

Posted by: The ARC of History! at March 08, 2020 11:18 AM (I2/tG)

191 151 ... "As a bookish aside, has anyone read anything by Fulton Sheen?"

I've read a couple of his books and have others on tap. So far they are brilliantly written. Worth looking for. Check your local library. Even mine has several of his books.

Posted by: JTB at March 08, 2020 11:19 AM (7EjX1)

192 Posted by: Captain Obvious, USS Lone Fire at March 08, 2020 11:17 AM (PD1/H)

I think the DDL version would have made a helluva miniseries

Posted by: weirdflunky at March 08, 2020 11:20 AM (cknjq)

193 149 Am I recalling incorrectly, but didn't one group of the Sea Peoples settle and becomes the Philistines?
Posted by: Captain Obvious, USS Lone Fire at March 08, 2020 10:44 AM (PD1/H)


Yeah, that's what I thought. Actually, I thought that the "Sea Peoples" were the Philistines.

Posted by: OregonMuse, AoSHQ Thought Leader, Pants Monitor & Austere Religious Scholar at March 08, 2020 11:20 AM (GPb6S)

194 187 Felt the same way with Kesey. Cuckoos Nest made a great movie while his best book, Sometimes a Great Notion, was lackluster.

Posted by: Mel Gibson at March 08, 2020 11:20 AM (QZCjk)

195 I understand the need to be safe, but they are really overdoing the black plague clothes.

It's how they get funding for thirty more negative pressure rooms.

Monty Python could have hid a field day with all this, though I'm not sure they would have chosen to.

Posted by: t-bird at March 08, 2020 11:20 AM (oTMWb)

196 Phoenicians. I thought the Sea Peoples were the Phoenicians.

Posted by: OregonMuse, AoSHQ Thought Leader, Pants Monitor & Austere Religious Scholar at March 08, 2020 11:20 AM (GPb6S)

197 Hi Jordan!
I try to avoid Starbucks. My brother has worked in the corporate office for over 20 years, so it's hard to avoid completely. But I do get free, small batch coffee. And some of it is quite good.

Posted by: Nurse ratched at March 08, 2020 11:21 AM (PkVlr)

198 167 Anyway, due to lack of comments/advice I went ahead and orders Fulton Sheen's book Communism and the Conscience of the West. Not a big expense.
Posted by: CN at March 08, 2020 11:01 AM (ONvIw)


I don't think you can go wrong with Sheen. I'll be expecting your review posted as a book thread comment in, oh, say, a couple of weeks.

Posted by: OregonMuse, AoSHQ Thought Leader, Pants Monitor & Austere Religious Scholar at March 08, 2020 11:22 AM (GPb6S)

199 I expect everyone's seen the trailer for _Greyhound_ the new Tom Hanks pic about a convoy commander in WWII. It's based on _The Good Shepherd_ by CS by-god Forester, which I read about thirty years ago and can't recall much about except that I enjoyed it.

Posted by: Trimegistus at March 08, 2020 11:22 AM (+pjYf)

200

Is it O.K if my breath comes in short pants?

Posted by: saf at March 08, 2020 11:23 AM (5IHGB)

201 Nabokov's The Real Life of Sebastian Knight is really good in a typically deceivingly lighthearted way that draws the reader into a maze of stories within stories, including how the fictional character was writing in English instead of his native Russian and having difficulty adequately expressing himself. Nabokov himself, having studied at Cambridge, is extremely fluent in English and was surely frustrated with prior translations of his work written in Russian. Anyway after the relative drudgery of The Gift this is a return to form.

Posted by: Captain Hate at March 08, 2020 11:23 AM (y7DUB)

202 Sea people were the ones whose women wore wasp waist to show off the bewbies. Truly a great civilization.

Posted by: Mel Gibson at March 08, 2020 11:23 AM (QZCjk)

203 I've read a couple of his books and have others on tap. So far they are brilliantly written. Worth looking for. Check your local library. Even mine has several of his books.
Posted by: JTB at March 08, 2020 11:19 AM (7EjX1)

Thanks. The county system has only a handful of religious books, so I bought the one on communism. I can't imagine anything anticommunism being available here

Posted by: CN at March 08, 2020 11:24 AM (ONvIw)

204 Mike Moore and his crew accomplished a lot, but the FBI is far from dismantled. They are strong enough and organized enough to try to overthrow a POTUS.
Posted by: kallisto at March 08, 2020 10:09 AM (Xhp1L)


Yeah, seems like a bit of an exaggeration in the title there. Still, I want to read it.

Has anyone bothered to ask these fellas why the book is so expensive? I mean, not just slightly expensive, but outrageously so. It's like you want to buy a car, and most of the others are going between $20K and $40K, and a comparable car on the market comes along, and they're selling it for $250K.

Yeah, no. I don't care how nice a car it is, I ain't paying that much.

And this is a good time to recommend Jack Cashill's "Flight 800." Book lists it at $28.99, but I bet book sellers are much lower than that.

It's really two main points, first the story of THAT particular case, and how mucked up it got, and the second is the extent to which our so-called intelligence community casually covered up the truth.

Posted by: BurtTC at March 08, 2020 11:24 AM (hku12)

205 I thought the Sea Peoples were the Phoenicians.


I thought Phoenicians was a fad in teaching kids how to read in the 70s.

Posted by: Bandersnatch at March 08, 2020 11:25 AM (gd9RK)

206 Phoenicians. I thought the Sea Peoples were the Phoenicians.

Me, too. But I just read the Wiki article on the Sea Peoples and Phoenicians didn't even make it to the first debate.

Posted by: t-bird at March 08, 2020 11:28 AM (dzJ3R)

207 As for that book with the barfing food on the cover, I'm not sure I want to see the rest, but I will recommend James Lilek's twin masterpieces of muck, "Gallery of Regrettable Food," and "Interior Desecrations."

You get the awfulness of whatever those people were thinking when they came up with that crep, and you get Lileks in his trademark wit and style.

What's not to love.

Posted by: BurtTC at March 08, 2020 11:29 AM (hku12)

208 I don't think you can go wrong with Sheen. I'll be expecting your review posted as a book thread comment in, oh, say, a couple of weeks.
Posted by: OregonMuse, AoSHQ Thought Leader, Pants Monitor & Austere Religious Scholar at March 08, 2020 11:22 AM (GPb6S)

Sure. I'm looking forward to this book.

Looking at Sheen's wiki, it seems like Spellman was quite a difficult man.

Posted by: CN at March 08, 2020 11:30 AM (ONvIw)

209 I've read a number of books that have indians taking captives as part or all of the content. For me, "Empire of the Summer Moon" started it.

You can get plenty of them online either free or at low cost, the ones written by former captives, and originally published 100 and more years ago.

Cormac McCarthy must have read a number of these, because the brutality depicted in "Blood Meridian" is all described in the captive stories.

Posted by: Les Kinetic at March 08, 2020 11:31 AM (+fPHo)

210 "meh" definition & usage guide:

It means, "I'd like to grovel on the floor & lick your filthy sneakers"

There has been a pandemic of "meh" lately, so I thought this style note might be helpful.

Posted by: mnw at March 08, 2020 11:33 AM (Cssks)

211 167 Anyway, due to lack of comments/advice I went ahead and orders Fulton Sheen's book Communism and the Conscience of the West. Not a big expense.
Posted by: CN at March 08, 2020 11:01 AM (ONvIw)


Thanks for the tip.

Posted by: Dan Smoot's Apprentice at March 08, 2020 11:33 AM (H8QX8)

212 I wake up.
(Morning Hordemates)
I look at those pants.
Now I know mankind is doomed.

Posted by: Diogenes at March 08, 2020 11:34 AM (axyOa)

213 Huh

Posted by: Mel Gibson at March 08, 2020 11:35 AM (QZCjk)

214 I have mild dysphasia I know it and live it and admit it freely. I lose words I misplace words I misuse words can't spell I forget what words to use. I have brain damage and live with it. Why can't joe admit it?

Posted by: USNtakim profoundly deplorable. at March 08, 2020 11:35 AM (0OmEj)

215 Finally in A People's Tragedy Lenin is starting to realize what a major league fuck job he inflicted on the Russian people by going straight from feudalism to communism with no interceding capitalism; at least that's his excuse for being not nearly as smart as he thought he was. Because the collective farms were such unmitigated failures the cities are starving and everyone's more pissed off than ever. So he permits limited capitalism and those guys do extremely well by partially addressing an overwhelming demand, which just creates more resentment while barely slaking the total needs. So it's an extremely bad situation which even the western cheerleaders realize and unfortunately current day dumbasses in the educrat industry completely obscure this in service to the likes of AOC and Bernie.

Posted by: Captain Hate at March 08, 2020 11:36 AM (y7DUB)

216 GPS made it really clear for boaters that Compass North is not True North.

It has wandered quite a bit. Here's gif of its recent movements:

https://t.co/FuJ3uQLgSS

It's gotten much closer to the North Pole

Posted by: t-bird at March 08, 2020 11:36 AM (BFizn)

217 Not surprised Abe Books is owned by Amazon, soon all book sellers will be, then the only books you can buy will be chosen by Amazon.

And decided perversely maybe that I will be glad to see Slow Jow throw himself on the pyre of forgotten history.

Posted by: Skip at March 08, 2020 11:37 AM (ZCEU2)

218 Just checked the True Pundit site, evidently they're not selling the book themselves. I was wondering if that was the reason it's so expensive.

The site appears a bit... dry. Just a bunch of stories in big bold sections.

One story says 38% of people are avoiding Corona beer because of the virus. That's not why people should avoid it.

Posted by: BurtTC at March 08, 2020 11:39 AM (hku12)

219 naturalfake, Thanks for the Damon Runyun mention. I just downloaded a Kindle omnibus version for 2 bucks. My only exposure to Runyun was through the "Guys and Dolls" movie, which I can recite as it plays and sing all the songs. I'm looking forward to his writing.

Posted by: JTB at March 08, 2020 11:39 AM (7EjX1)

220 Masters of the Universe has a lot of fun with the received ancient wisdom phenomena like Mu. Portis is a jewel.

Posted by: Mel Gibson at March 08, 2020 11:39 AM (QZCjk)

221 Posted by: Kindltot at March 08, 2020 09:33 AM (6rS3m)

I read all of Zelazny's stuff through the years, as did all three of my boys. Sharing sci-fi with them has been a real treat through the years. We still buy each other books for most occasions, then pass them around.

All of Zelazny's Amber books are available together in one BIG paperback volume for a reasonable price. His other stuff has gotten hard to find, at least in stores. Amazon, of course, probably has all it all.

Posted by: Hierominous Botch at March 08, 2020 11:40 AM (YqED9)

222 I guess other people thought the same cuz the MU books were everywhere for a while on paperback stands,

Then, suddenly, they weren't.
Posted by: naturalfake at March 08, 2020 11:01 AM (z0XD

To my recollection, Mu was supposed to be in the Pacific Ocean. There is no "eastern coast" to Europe; that's Asia.

The popularization of plate tectonics has pretty much tanked the market for drowned continents.

Now some part of the Atlantis/Flood stories may have some basis in fact based upon the flooding of the Mediterranean and Black Sea basins, caused by inflow from the Atlantic through the newly-opened Straits of Gibraltar.

Posted by: Alberta Oil Peon at March 08, 2020 11:40 AM (miJU3)

223 Is it O.K if my breath comes in short pants?
Posted by: saf

Tactical breathing only, synced with your heartbeat.

Too early.

I'll come back to this at 1800 tonight.

Posted by: BifBewalski at March 08, 2020 11:41 AM (VcFUs)

224 naturalfake, Thanks for the Damon Runyun mention. I just downloaded a Kindle omnibus version for 2 bucks. My only exposure to Runyun was through the "Guys and Dolls" movie, which I can recite as it plays and sing all the songs. I'm looking forward to his writing.
Posted by: JTB at March 08, 2020 11:39 AM (7EjX1)


De nada.


The main question is -

Can you sing as well as Marlon Brando?

Posted by: naturalfake at March 08, 2020 11:41 AM (z0XD8)

225 I have mild dysphasia I know it and live it and admit it freely. I lose words I misplace words I misuse words can't spell I forget what words to use. I have brain damage and live with it. Why can't joe admit it?
Posted by: USNtakim profoundly deplorable. at March 08, 2020 11:35 AM (0OmEj)


I'm sorry it's a struggle for you. I have such a profound love of words, and know many people who struggle with them.

It is truly amazing how little we understand about the human brain, but for those of us who find words come easy, it's a gift to be cherished.

Posted by: BurtTC at March 08, 2020 11:42 AM (hku12)

226 Can you sing as well as Marlon Brando?

He sang as well as Lee Marvin....

Posted by: JT at March 08, 2020 11:42 AM (arJlL)

227 >>GPS made it really clear for boaters that Compass North is not True North.

Boaters knew long before GPS the difference between magnetic north and true north. If they didn't they would have ended up on the rocks.

Paper charts have had magnetic correction gauges on them forever.

Posted by: JackStraw at March 08, 2020 11:42 AM (ZLI7S)

228 Ugh. Daylight savings time. I'm extra discombobulated today.

Posted by: Insomniac - Ex Cineribus Resurgo at March 08, 2020 11:46 AM (NWiLs)

229 "Little Kitchen of Horrors" reminds me of James Lileks' entertaining "The Book of Regrettable Food." The difference is that the recipes in the first book were designed to be disgusting and funny. The horrible recipes Lileks dug up (i recall cauliflower in jello and really unappetizing meat) were from actual 50's cookbooks.

There are things that have improved since the '50's. Food is one of them. I think so many men got used to living on canned C rations during the war that it wrecked their taste buds.

Posted by: Donna&&&&&&&&V at March 08, 2020 11:47 AM (d6Ksn)

230 224 ... "Can you sing as well as Marlon Brando?"

Sheesh, I hope so. Of course I haven't sung tenor since I was ten years old so "Luck Be A Lady" comes out an octave or two lower than Brando. :-)

Posted by: JTB at March 08, 2020 11:48 AM (7EjX1)

231 Why can't joe admit it?
Posted by: USNtakim profoundly deplorable. at March 08, 2020 11:35 AM (0OmEj)

Because he's a politician. Since when do they admit faults, errors, or weaknesses?

Posted by: Donna&&&&&&&&V at March 08, 2020 11:48 AM (d6Ksn)

232 Donna&&&&&&&&V-

I looked for your opinions of the dresses on yesterday's Chess Thread......

Posted by: JT at March 08, 2020 11:51 AM (arJlL)

233 Anyway, due to lack of comments/advice I went ahead
and orders Fulton Sheen's book Communism and the Conscience of the West.
Not a big expense.


Posted by: CN at March 08, 2020 11:01 AM (ONvIw)



My parents had some of his books. I can't remember ever reading them. A famous event on his TV show on February 21, 1953 he was talking about the evils of communism and did a part of the play Julius Caesar substituting Caesar, Cassius, Marc Antony, and Brutus with Stalin, Beria, Malenkov, and Vishinsky. At the end of it he said, "Stalin must one day meet his judgment!" On March 1, Stalin suffered a stroke. By March 5, he was dead. I wish he did that to more commies

Posted by: TheQuietMan at March 08, 2020 11:52 AM (tQSvt)

234 I had forgotten about Real Life. I always see it as practice for his best book , Pale Fire, which I think should be read last even reading the other greats twice before.

Posted by: Jamaica NYC at March 08, 2020 11:52 AM (LHVhu)

235 Insomniac everyone is, good thing those of us who don't get enough sleep are going to be joined by those who usually do.

Posted by: Skip at March 08, 2020 11:52 AM (ZCEU2)

236 Boaters knew long before GPS the difference between magnetic north and true north. If they didn't they would have ended up on the rocks.

Yes, but it's the difference between knowing and knowing. You knew that Magnetic North was over there somewhere so True North must be that way, but GPS made it concrete.

Posted by: Bandersnatch at March 08, 2020 11:53 AM (gd9RK)

237 It has wandered quite a bit. Here's gif of its recent movements:

https://t.co/FuJ3uQLgSS

It's gotten much closer to the North Pole

Posted by: t-bird at March 08, 2020 11:36 AM (BFizn)

Wasn't "someone" trying to start a "pole flipping panic" a few taers back?

Posted by: BignJames at March 08, 2020 11:54 AM (X/Pw5)

238 207 As for that book with the barfing food on the cover, I'm not sure I want to see the rest, but I will recommend James Lilek's twin masterpieces of muck, "Gallery of Regrettable Food," and "Interior Desecrations."

You get the awfulness of whatever those people were thinking when they came up with that crep, and you get Lileks in his trademark wit and style.
What's not to love.
Posted by: BurtTC at March 08, 2020 11:29 AM (hku12)


Dang. I should've mentioned the Lileks food book as a companion volume to the barfing peppers cookbook.

Posted by: OregonMuse, AoSHQ Thought Leader, Pants Monitor & Austere Religious Scholar at March 08, 2020 11:54 AM (GPb6S)

239 Ugh. Daylight savings time. I'm extra discombobulated today.
Posted by: Insomniac - Ex Cineribus Resurgo at March 08, 2020 11:46 AM (NWiLs)


Sure seems to be making for a slow book thread.

Posted by: BurtTC at March 08, 2020 11:54 AM (hku12)

240 years too.

Posted by: BignJames at March 08, 2020 11:55 AM (X/Pw5)

241 Wasn't "someone" trying to start a "pole flipping panic" a few taers back?
Posted by: BignJames at March 08, 2020 11:54 AM (X/Pw5)


Every few years, I see an article that claims we're about due for another "pole flip" of the earth's magnetic field, but it is unclear what the effects will be.

Posted by: OregonMuse, AoSHQ Thought Leader, Pants Monitor & Austere Religious Scholar at March 08, 2020 11:56 AM (GPb6S)

242 Daylight Savings Time is proof that Jimmy Carter had a time machine, because it's a Jimmy Carter-bad idea and I know it came before him.

Posted by: Bandersnatch at March 08, 2020 11:57 AM (gd9RK)

243 As for that book with the barfing food on the cover, I'm not sure I want to see the rest, but I will recommend James Lilek's twin masterpieces of muck, "Gallery of Regrettable Food," and "Interior Desecrations."

You get the awfulness of whatever those people were thinking when they came up with that crep, and you get Lileks in his trademark wit and style.
What's not to love.
Posted by: BurtTC at March 08, 2020 11:29 AM (hku12)

Dang. I should've mentioned the Lileks food book as a companion volume to the barfing peppers cookbook.
Posted by: OregonMuse, AoSHQ Thought Leader, Pants Monitor & Austere Religious Scholar at March 08, 2020 11:54 AM (GPb6S)


I almost never go to his website anymore, and I regret that.

It's almost like he has too much content. And this being America, here and now, he seems to come from a different era, not just because he is so fond of nostalgia, but because there's a lightness to his words that don't seem to fit in today's crass, jarring and ugly culture.

Posted by: BurtTC at March 08, 2020 11:58 AM (hku12)

244 Sure seems to be making for a slow book thread.
Posted by: BurtTC at March 08, 2020 11:54 AM (hku12)


It is pretty sluggish today, isn't it?

Posted by: OregonMuse, AoSHQ Thought Leader, Pants Monitor & Austere Religious Scholar at March 08, 2020 11:58 AM (GPb6S)

245 Every few years, I see an article that claims we're about due for another "pole flip" of the earth's magnetic field, but it is unclear what the effects will be.


Australia will be a regular place and we'll be upside down.

Posted by: Bandersnatch at March 08, 2020 11:58 AM (gd9RK)

246 Okay. I read Live by Night by Dennis Lehane.

Its about bootleggers during Prohibition.

Interesting characters, plot points, moves right along.

I don't normally rate books, but if a guy came up to me, pointed a gun at me and said "Allo. My name is Inigo Montoya. Rate thees book or prepare to die", I'd give it three and a half stars.

Posted by: JT at March 08, 2020 12:00 PM (arJlL)

247 I've read that 1177 book. My personal favorite theory about the Sea people is the (possibly fanciful) idea that they were Myceneans. The Trojan war left them in chaos (leaders and primary workers gone for almost a generation) and then they collapsed into a roaming mob of viking that pillaged every settlement they could find.

I just started reading the 'Sword Woman and other Historical Adventures' collection of Robert E Howard. Its the last of the Del Rey/Ballantine books that I have but haven't read. We'll see how far I get before I get distracted.....Likely by comic adaptations of Robert E Howard. Still have a lot of Roy Tomas & John Buscema 'Savage Sword of Conan' to read through.

Posted by: Castle Guy at March 08, 2020 12:01 PM (Lhaco)

248 Daylight Savings Time is proof that Jimmy Carter had a time machine, because it's a Jimmy Carter-bad idea and I know it came before him.
Posted by: Bandersnatch at March 08, 2020 11:57 AM (gd9RK)


Don't misunderestimate the ability of douchebags like Woody Wilson to be Carteresque before Carter was Carter.

Posted by: BurtTC at March 08, 2020 12:02 PM (hku12)

249 If we eliminate "Daylight Savings Time" we will need a catchy name for the new system.

I'm thinking we could call it "Time".

Posted by: Muldoon at March 08, 2020 12:02 PM (m45I2)

250 Sure seems to be making for a slow book thread.
Posted by: BurtTC at March 08, 2020 11:54 AM (hku12)

It is pretty sluggish today, isn't it?
Posted by: OregonMuse, AoSHQ Thought Leader, Pants Monitor & Austere Religious Scholar at March 08, 2020 11:58 AM (GPb6S)


Quick, everybody say something, or I will start talking about the Amazon series "Hunters" some more.

Posted by: BurtTC at March 08, 2020 12:03 PM (hku12)

251 >>Yes, but it's the difference between knowing and knowing. You knew that Magnetic North was over there somewhere so True North must be that way, but GPS made it concrete.

Well sort of. Swinging the compass was a real thing for those of us who had to navigate before GPS came along. Understanding magnetic north and the correction numbers for a particular boat was pretty damn important.

What GPS has done is made it one hell of a lot easier to navigate but also made it a lot easier for the inexperienced to get in trouble. I've some people do some really stupid things assuming that the GPS operates just like the one in a car.

Posted by: JackStraw at March 08, 2020 12:04 PM (ZLI7S)

252 Yes, but it's the difference between knowing and knowing. You knew that Magnetic North was over there somewhere so True North must be that way, but GPS made it concrete.
Posted by: Bandersnatch at March 08, 2020 11:53 AM (gd9RK)

Charts made it concrete. GPS usually doesn't even address magnetic declination. Why should it? If you are using the GPS to navigate, true North is the default.

Plenty of compasses have a screw so you can dial in the declination value, and make the needle show True North.

Posted by: Alberta Oil Peon at March 08, 2020 12:04 PM (miJU3)

253 I haven't really read anything more mature than what I consider 'mental chewing gum' this last week. I spend most of my day walking life baby sitting adult aerospace engineers so when I get home, I really don't want to think anymore.

This week's chewing gum was War Etrrnal, by M.R. Forbes. Humanity is stuck in a recursive time war with malignant AI that were created in a previous time event. Straight up Space Opera for the genre if you're interested.

Work research was math and statistics. 'Introduction to Statistics, An Intuitive Guide To Analyzing Data & Unlocking Discoveries', by Jim Frost, MS. It was only $10 and well worth the price. I had to walk a program manager at the director level through what a 'two tails hypothesis test' was so that he understood my engineers when they told him why they needed a very low false alarm rate. Frost's ability to make it digestible for non engineers is what let me push the director over the ledge for what was needed.

Posted by: BifBewalski at March 08, 2020 12:04 PM (VcFUs)

254 My point was I am not qualified to be president by the same token neither is joe.

Strangely enough while word output is a problem for me input works fine, I always have an easy time reading and understanding even complicated technical subjects. I completely and totally understand written and oral speech. Writing taking notes and speaking are where the dysphasia shows up. Mostly speaking.

Posted by: USNtakim profoundly deplorable. at March 08, 2020 12:05 PM (0OmEj)

255 I almost never go to his website anymore, and I regret that.

It's almost like he has too much content. And this being America, here and now, he seems to come from a different era, not just because he is so fond of nostalgia, but because there's a lightness to his words that don't seem to fit in today's crass, jarring and ugly culture.
Posted by: BurtTC at March 08, 2020 11:58 AM (hku12)


Lileks' site is a poorly organized mess, like an elderly couple's attic. But he's got great stuff.

What I like about it is that, despite all his jibes and snark, his love for that era (pre-1960s America) really shines through. He's not laughing at it, he's laughing with it. Well, sometimes he's laughing at it, but it's all good-natured fun. He never adopts that sneering, condescending tone I get so tired of hearing from present-day progressives who are deaf as a post and who know nothing of history.

Posted by: OregonMuse, AoSHQ Thought Leader, Pants Monitor & Austere Religious Scholar at March 08, 2020 12:05 PM (GPb6S)

256 Every few years, I see an article that claims we're about due for another "pole flip" of the earth's magnetic field, but it is unclear what the effects will be.

--------------
Australia will be a regular place and we'll be upside down.
Posted by: Bandersnatch at March 08, 2020 11:58 AM (gd9RK)


All their poisonous snakes and spiders will be shooken off and land on our heads.

Posted by: BurtTC at March 08, 2020 12:05 PM (hku12)

257 Am I recalling incorrectly, but didn't one group of the Sea Peoples settle and becomes the Philistines?
Posted by: Captain Obvious, USS Lone Fire at March 08, 2020 10:44 AM (PD1/H)


Aaren Maeir is doing a dig at Tell-es-Safi which was the Phillistine city of Gath from the OT

Quite interesting combined archeology/paleobotany review of where the Philistines may have come from and what they did.
among other things, apparently Gath had trading connections (indirect of course) with the Indian Ocean region

https://youtu.be/NJC8OAhm1f4

Posted by: Kindltot at March 08, 2020 12:07 PM (6rS3m)

258 Wasn't "someone" trying to start a "pole flipping panic" a few taers back?
Posted by: BignJames at March 08, 2020 11:54 AM (X/Pw5)

Well, the poles are going to flip, based upon past performance, and judging by the normal duration of a phase, such a flip is now due. But it's really nothing to panic about. Previous pole flips seem to have happened very rapidly, without any trauma to life on Earth.

Posted by: Alberta Oil Peon at March 08, 2020 12:07 PM (miJU3)

259
I'm thinking we could call it "Time".

Posted by: Muldoon at March 08, 2020 12:02 PM (m45I2)

Ticking away the moments that make up a dull day

Posted by: TheQuietMan at March 08, 2020 12:08 PM (tQSvt)

260 Wow is Jesse Jackson's Bernie endorsement a game changer?

Posted by: LOL at March 08, 2020 12:09 PM (AXS9h)

261 I've changed all my clocks except the one downstairs in my garage.

There's so much stuff in my garage, I may break a leg getting to it.

So, if you never hear from me again, you'll know what happened.

Bye, ya know those "help, I've fallen and I can't get up" buttons ?

They should come with a pill that IMMEDIATELY constipates you, so that you don't shit your pants waiting for help to arrive.

Posted by: JT at March 08, 2020 12:10 PM (arJlL)

262 I mentioned this at the end of a book thread a month back, but has anyone read 2066? I've heard interesting things, but no one will say they read it through.

Posted by: CN at March 08, 2020 12:10 PM (ONvIw)

263 I hear Florida is nice.

Posted by: Face-Sized Spider at March 08, 2020 12:10 PM (TYO9g)

264 Here's the link to Jim's store front if you're interested in getting his book.

https://tinyurl.com/uxruty9

Posted by: BifBewalski at March 08, 2020 12:10 PM (VcFUs)

265 My point was I am not qualified to be president by the same token neither is joe.

Strangely enough while word output is a problem for me input works fine, I always have an easy time reading and understanding even complicated technical subjects. I completely and totally understand written and oral speech. Writing taking notes and speaking are where the dysphasia shows up. Mostly speaking.
Posted by: USNtakim profoundly deplorable. at March 08, 2020 12:05 PM (0OmEj)


Understood. I do think it's something many of us take for granted, and we shouldn't. Language development is a complicated thing, as I said, not very well understood, and any of us can lose it at some point in our lives.

I know a guy who is quite intelligent, but has a very limited ability to speak. You can see the thoughts forming in his head, and it's like he has to translate it before he says anything, because the words don't just come. Often he has a dearth of words to say, and it's heartbreaking because I know he's got to feel at times like he's trapped inside his own head.

Posted by: BurtTC at March 08, 2020 12:10 PM (hku12)

266 make that 2666, the Bolano book

Posted by: CN at March 08, 2020 12:11 PM (ONvIw)

267 Have a great week of reading, Bookies !

Posted by: JT at March 08, 2020 12:11 PM (arJlL)

268 Posted by: BurtTC at March 08, 2020 11:58 AM (hku12)

Lileks' site is a poorly organized mess, like an elderly couple's attic. But he's got great stuff.

What I like about it is that, despite all his jibes and snark, his love for that era (pre-1960s America) really shines through. He's not laughing at it, he's laughing with it. Well, sometimes he's laughing at it, but it's all good-natured fun. He never adopts that sneering, condescending tone I get so tired of hearing from present-day progressives who are deaf as a post and who know nothing of history.
Posted by: OregonMuse, AoSHQ Thought Leader, Pants Monitor & Austere Religious Scholar at March 08, 2020 12:05 PM (GPb6S)


It's kinda like Ace, in a different sort of way, in that I want to throw more of my money at these guys, but they sure as hell don't make it easy to do.

And other websites one can frequent, it's like they only exist to sell their crep.

Posted by: BurtTC at March 08, 2020 12:13 PM (hku12)

269 make that 2666, the Bolano book
Posted by: CN at March 08, 2020 12:11 PM (ONvIw)


Damn, I don't have access to the time machine. I was gonna maybe wait for 2066, but 2666, I don't know if I'll still be around then.

Posted by: BurtTC at March 08, 2020 12:14 PM (hku12)

270 Dysphasia should not be confused with dysphagia, meaning difficult (or abnormal) swallowing.

Dys- abnormal
phage- devour or swallow

Side note: There is a class of white blood cells known as phagocytes ('swallowing cells') because they engulf (or 'swallow') bacteria or other cells.

Posted by: Muldoon at March 08, 2020 12:16 PM (m45I2)

271 NOOD

Posted by: Skip, the guy who says NOOD at March 08, 2020 12:16 PM (ZCEU2)

272 but 2666, I don't know if I'll still be around then.

Posted by: BurtTC at March 08, 2020 12:14 PM (hku12)


We don't even know if man will still be alive in the year 2525

Posted by: TheQuietMan at March 08, 2020 12:16 PM (tQSvt)

273 235 Insomniac everyone is, good thing those of us who don't get enough sleep are going to be joined by those who usually do.
Posted by: Skip at March 08, 2020 11:52 AM (ZCEU2)

DST, the great equalizer.

Posted by: Insomniac - Ex Cineribus Resurgo at March 08, 2020 12:16 PM (NWiLs)

274 Well, the poles are going to flip, based upon past performance, and judging by the normal duration of a phase, such a flip is now due. But it's really nothing to panic about. Previous pole flips seem to have happened very rapidly, without any trauma to life on Earth.
Posted by: Alberta Oil Peon at March 08, 2020 12:07 PM (miJU3)


If you look at the geological record of various places, you notice places that were once under the ocean at some points in their history, and desert land at others... while being dense forests at still other times.

I don't know what that has to do with "polar shifts," but I'm assuming it has everything to do with it.

In which case, I don't know how sudden they are, but yeah, they do tend to have an effect on life.


Posted by: BurtTC at March 08, 2020 12:19 PM (hku12)

275 Yup, My body has its share of dysfunction too. It is like being trapped. I just have to be comfy in my mind and in my body. There is no changing it. The body part is worse to deal with for me than the word and speaking part. In my case its my cerebellum (little brain) and brain stem damage that causes it all. My cortex is fine (cerebrum). Order rate and control are my issues.

Posted by: USNtakim profoundly deplorable. at March 08, 2020 12:20 PM (0OmEj)

276 I had forgotten about Real Life. I always see it as practice for his best book , Pale Fire, which I think should be read last even reading the other greats twice before.
Posted by: Jamaica NYC at March 08, 2020 11:52 AM (LHVhu)


I'm already looking forward to rereading Pale Fire.

Posted by: Captain Hate at March 08, 2020 12:20 PM (y7DUB)

277 NOOD
Posted by: Skip, the guy who says NOOD at March 08, 2020 12:16 PM (ZCEU2)


Bleh, oil.

All I know is, since moving to a smaller town, I fill my gas tank about a third as often as I used to.

Posted by: BurtTC at March 08, 2020 12:21 PM (hku12)

278 MNN BREAKING: Due to falling sales, Corona Beer is considering changing its name. The proposed new name: Virus Beer. ...Bubbling...

Posted by: Manufactured News Network: "The Nude Gnu Knew the Noose!" at March 08, 2020 12:22 PM (Ndje9)

279 Posted by: JT at March 08, 2020 11:51 AM (arJlL)

I wasn't home yesterday ....and I'm hardly a fashion expert

Posted by: Donna&&&&&&&&V at March 08, 2020 12:27 PM (d6Ksn)

280 I don't know what that has to do with "polar shifts," but I'm assuming it has everything to do with it.

In which case, I don't know how sudden they are, but yeah, they do tend to have an effect on life.


Posted by: BurtTC at March 08, 2020 12:19 PM (hku12)

Really, practically nothing. It's the magnetic poles that flip, not the rotational ones. Look at a map of remanent magnetism is the seafloor lavas of the Atlantic Ocean. It looks like a bar code, with the same pattern of white and black bars as mirror images on each side of the spreading ridge. I don't believe anybody has found any correlation between catastrophic events and geomagnetic reversals, and you can be sure that would win a Nobel prize for whoever found one.

Posted by: Alberta Oil Peon at March 08, 2020 12:27 PM (miJU3)

281 As for cast iron libraries, Jackson, Mi has a Carnegie Library and part of it is cast iron. I remember thinking it was a strange place with the cast iron floors, stairs and shelving. I visited a friend who lived there and the library seemed incongruent with the rest of the downtown.

Posted by: CN at March 08, 2020 12:28 PM (ONvIw)

282 there's a lightness to his words that don't seem to fit in today's crass, jarring and ugly culture.

That even shows up in his books. They're very well written, particularly the second, but while they deal with some dark issues and events they have a feel from an earlier time, when things weren't so angry, frustrated, and frightened.

Posted by: Christopher R Taylor at March 08, 2020 12:28 PM (KZzsI)

283 Definitely want to check out the works of that Polish journalist.

Posted by: Donna&&&&&&&&V at March 08, 2020 12:29 PM (d6Ksn)

284 By the way I do really recommend Lileks' novels. Particularly Casablanca Tango, although Graveyard Special is good. You can get both for under five bucks which is a good price for e-books.

Posted by: Christopher R Taylor at March 08, 2020 12:32 PM (KZzsI)

285 247 .. Thanks for mentioning "Sword Woman and other Historical Adventures". I have others in that series by Robert E. Howard but not that one. I splurged on the paper version. It should be here in a day or two.

Posted by: JTB at March 08, 2020 12:32 PM (7EjX1)

286 I thought the magnetic pole has always moved around a bit since it was discovered.

Posted by: Skip at March 08, 2020 12:34 PM (ZCEU2)

287 The Democratic Socialist dumdums in Washington State government still have no idea if we are suffering from the L (lethal) or S (sicky) strain of coronavirus. They may be keeping it secret, like they do many other things, to generate widespread panic. Allowing a frightened public to cede them extraordinary powers. Typical Commie bull pucky.
This info vacuum is straight from the Wuhan Communist Party Local 23 Handbook.


Posted by: Headless Body of Agnew at March 08, 2020 12:48 PM (e1mEI)

288 I had forgotten about Real Life. I always see it as practice for his best book , Pale Fire, which I think should be read last even reading the other greats twice before.
Posted by: Jamaica NYC at March 08, 2020 11:52 AM (LHVhu)

I'm already looking forward to rereading Pale Fire.
Posted by: Captain Hate at March 08, 2020 12:20 PM (y7DUB)



I agree that it's his best.


"Pale Fire" has everything you love about Nabokov and nothing you don't.

Posted by: naturalfake at March 08, 2020 12:49 PM (z0XD8)

289 the sunken-civilisation meme (and The Flood generally) is a composite from many, many coastal Mesolithic societies who noticed that their older villages kept getting dunked by rising sea levels. End of the Ice Age, you know.

"Atlantis" is likely different, and later. That's probably the Thera explosion and tsunami.

Posted by: boulder t'hobo at March 08, 2020 12:50 PM (ykYG2)

290 My personal favorite theory about the Sea people is the (possibly fanciful) idea that they were Myceneans. The Trojan war left them in chaos (leaders and primary workers gone for almost a generation) and then they collapsed into a roaming mob of viking that pillaged every settlement they could find.

There's LH-IIIC pottery in the intermediate layers between the Canaanites and Philistines. That's the first thing you notice when you're on a dig in Ashkelon, Ekron etc. It was produced on the premises which means, the potters there were speaking Mycenaean Greek.

Some of the other Sea Peoples were likely other, well, sea peoples: Carians, Lycians, maybe even Sicilians and Sardinians.

Posted by: boulder t'hobo at March 08, 2020 12:55 PM (ykYG2)

291 the C# peoples' swords could hold an edge longer.

Posted by: boulder t'hobo at March 08, 2020 12:57 PM (ykYG2)

292 I bought The Half Acre Homestead by Lloyd Kahn. He's the guy that did the Shelter books. This is his first book at his own home. I like it. It's not ground breaking but it's a comfortable place. His partner is a spinner/weaver/quilter so there's lots of her work on display.

Posted by: Notsothoreau at March 08, 2020 01:01 PM (Lqy/e)

293 "All their poisonous snakes and spiders will be shooken off and land on our heads.
Posted by: BurtTC at March 08, 2020 12:05 PM"


It could happen.

Posted by: zombie Charles Fort at March 08, 2020 01:06 PM (Tnijr)

294 "A story of Christian kindness and bureaucratic evil," that ... ...questions whether native sovereignty, tribal-based societies, and cultural survival are compatible with American democracy."

It is now a challenge for the landowner to fight the globalists and their EPA or other lawfare attacks. A few may challenge the bureaucracy, and with enough help and resources, maybe they convince the army of lawyers that they have a case.


While "redress of grievances" is useful, it still requires entering lawyer held territory and convincing the lawyer guild that "I am a (patriotic) Man". One has to hire a member of "The Guild" in hopes of clawing back any lost ground. In the end, we all will need our own gang/tribe to go to war with the Bureaucracy and the Guilds.


The Current DeepState Guild now honors its own tribe first and foremost ... which is the PC Globalist (citizen of the world) "Tribe". The Religious Liberty intended mostly for Christianity (p. 168 of that pdf link) ... has been flipped ... the third world migrant/invader now has alleged "rights" to entry, health care, jobs, squatter rights.


I'm not a real Illiniwek, but the current "advanced weaponry" of the DeepState mafia does seem to have taken our country and heritage, (as the "primitive Indian" tribes were taken). It will require a cultural revolution to save the Republic, but the Christian Patriots have a better foundation than the "native" Indians, imo.


The PsyOp war is now, the enemy has infiltrated but not conquered. More Red Pilling is needed. oskee wow-wow.

Posted by: illiniwek at March 08, 2020 01:31 PM (Cus5s)

295 Go to Amazon and look at the books Kapuscinski has written. This is a real journalist.
==================

I've said it before and I'll say it again. Kapuscinski is a good writer, but please please please do not accept everything he writes as true. He embellishes. He invents. He makes up stories to fit the story he wanted to tell. He's very much worth reading, but just realize he manufacturers facts to match his truth.

Posted by: dginnorcal at March 08, 2020 01:38 PM (v6C4B)

296 I'm currently reading Dominion, by Tom Holland, about the rise of Christianity and it's impact on the entire world--even the non-Christian and anti-Christian parts.

He's such a fantastic writer.

I can't wait to finish this and move on to his other books--especially Shadow of the Sword, which is about Islam--and for which he received death threats.

Posted by: JoeF. at March 08, 2020 01:42 PM (CqE5x)

297 Posted by: dginnorcal at March 08, 2020 01:38 PM (v6C4B)

You might be right but I'm gonna need some examples, specifically from Imperium, which I think was written in part to check out some wild claims about remote areas, or Travels With Herodotus.

Posted by: Captain Hate at March 08, 2020 01:55 PM (y7DUB)

298 297: Domaslawski did a lot of damage, but has been to a great extent discredited

Posted by: CN at March 08, 2020 02:14 PM (ONvIw)

299 Ah, had not known about that bio. Thanks.

Posted by: Captain Hate at March 08, 2020 02:35 PM (y7DUB)

300 I decided long ago, in college, that I like fiction, not literature.

Finally started a comic, "Monstro Mechanica," that I have held hostage from the library for about four months. Funny that da Vinci was mentioned earlier in the thread -- he's one of the main characters in this. He has an apprentice and an automaton made of wood. The apprentice is a woman who wears men's garb, of course. The bad guys are the Medicis and an opposing group, who both are trying to force Leonardo to design weapons for them. He's programmed the robot to be his bodyguard. The apprentice is trying to develop independent intelligence in the robot, unbeknown to da Vinci.

I think I would enjoy this more if Grrrl Power weren't emphasized so much in current society. As it is, the publisher's website shows only one trade collection, so I assume the comic didn't sell. Pity -- the art is nice.

I think if comics publishers are to survive they're going to have to abandon series and focus on standalone graphic novels, which can be part of a series. "Stumptown," which I read earlier this year, is an example of what I mean. Continuing characters, not stories.

Posted by: Weak Geek at March 08, 2020 03:07 PM (u/nim)

301 Hi,

Didn't have time to write up a report this week, but I still enjoyed the content. Got quite a chuckle about the cookbook cover. Thanks, OM!

Posted by: Violet at March 08, 2020 10:35 PM (9ppMC)

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