Sunday Morning Book Thread 02-09-2020

concord free public library 01.jpg
Concord (MA) Free Public Library


Good morning to all you 'rons, 'ettes, lurkers, and lurkettes, wine moms, frat bros, crétins sans pantalon (who are technically breaking the rules). Welcome once again to the stately, prestigious, internationally acclaimed and high-class Sunday Morning Book Thread, a weekly compendium of reviews, observations, snark, witty repartee, hilarious bon mots, and a continuing conversation on books, reading, spending way too much money on books, writing books, and publishing books by escaped oafs and oafettes who follow words with their fingers and whose lips move as they read. Unlike other AoSHQ comment threads, the Sunday Morning Book Thread is so hoity-toity, pants are required. Even if it's these pants, which would probably get you killed if you got caught wearing them in any Italian neighborhood. You probably shouldn't wear them when you're hungry, either.

(h/t Gus Roberts on Twitter)


It Pays To Increase Your Word Power®

A pastiche is a work of visual art, literature, theatre, or music that imitates the style or character of the work of one or more other artists. Unlike parody, pastiche celebrates, rather than mocks, the work it imitates.



20200209 book pic 03.jpg



A Pastiche Novel

I've never been satisfied with any of the film adaptions of H.G. Wells' War of the Worlds novel. One of the reasons is that there is a particular episode in the book that is never filmed, and I'm talking about the part where the Martian tripods are rampaging across the river Blackwater, and the captain of an ironclad warship, the HMS Thunder Child, decides to take them on. The battle lasts maybe a page, and, if I recall correctly, the ship takes out two of the Martian machines before it gets destroyed. For some reason, that episode has always stuck with me.

It apparently has also stuck with British author A.C. Powell, who wrote on his blog:

Imagine, if you will, how it would have been to be a Victorian sailor from retro British times of 1898. You are on board HMS Thunder Child and the ship is picking up strange semaphore messages from the shore stations. Invaders from Mars are striding about and destroying the entire fabric of our nation. Would you believe such outrageous things? The entire ship would be alive with speculation and disbelief. These sailors were destined to see three Martian fighting machines and confront the colossal edifices in battle.

As an impressionable young lad, I always found myself pondering such things.

I would walk about in my dream thinking, “If I was in that story, I would do this or that.”

I found myself wishing for all sorts of adventures.

So he wrote a novel about this episode, The Last Days of Thunder Child: Victorian Britain in Chaos!, in which the events of the battle

...unfold through the eyes of an ironclad crew and a land-based clerk attached to the War Office, Mister Albert Stanley. Gradually everyone moves towards the dreadful outcome as the strange alien tripods rampage around Victorian Britain.

What fun. And the Kindle version is only $3.99.

They need to do another remake of WotW, only set it in 1898, like the novel. Make the Martian machines look like how a Victorian might actually imagine them. Lots of steampunk possibilities here. I think it might be pretty awesome.



Who Dis:

who dis 20200209.jpg


Last week's 'who dis' was the drummer for Rush, Neil Peart, recently deceased.



Moron Recommendations

Lurker Chuck e-mails it in:

Found a good selection of weird maritime stories in “From the Depths and Other Strange Tales of the Sea” edited by Mike Ashley. My paperback copy says it is from the British Library Tales of the Weird. The stories were carefully chosen and included short bios of the authors to allow you to search for more of their other offerings. I had not heard of a lot of them and have now embarked on searches of their works. Anyway, the stories were good and might appeal to others on the thread.

From the description, the stories sound deliciously spooky:

In this anthology we see a thrilling spread of narratives: sailors are pitched against a nightmare from the depth, invisible to the naked eye; a German U-boat commander is tormented by an impossible transmission via Morse Code; a ship ensnares itself in the kelp of the Sargasso Sea and dooms a crew of mutineers, seemingly out of revenge for her lost captain. The supernatural is set alongside the grim affairs of sailors scorned in these salt-soaked tales, recovered from obscurity for the 21st century.

There is no e-version of From the Depths and Other Strange Tales of the Sea. The price of the paperback edition is approx. $10.

And for $11, you can buy the companion volume, The Platform Edge: Uncanny Tales of the Railways, which contains "a collection of the greatest stories of strange happenings on the tracks". Makes me wonder if there is a railroad equivalient to the Flying Dutchman.

___________

I did not know this, but the play/musical Hamilton is based on an actual biography of Hamilton, namely Alexander Hamilton by Ron Chernow. Although I'm guessing the real Hamilton probably didn't do a lot of rapping or beat-boxing in real life. Neverthless, a lurking moron read the biography, which is a hefty tome that took him 4 months to read, and he very much recommends it. He was very much impressed with what Hamilton was able to achieve:

I appreciated how Mr. Chernow covered all the Founding Fathers, and a few of the Founding Mothers, warts and all. Politics was a rough business back then, even without instant social media, with battling newspapers printing the most salacious details they could find, or make up. The issue of slavery is not ignored--Hamilton was an early abolitionist, as was John Adams. George Washington eventually freed his slaves AND provided for their education and welfare after their manumission, a fact often ignored by modern historians.

Hamilton was a genius, frankly. As Treasury Secretary, he convinced Congress that taxes were a necessary evil to pay down U.S. debt, convinced European nations to lend money to the nascent U.S. government, paid down the national debt, and started not just the Bank of the U.S., but also the Bank of New York. During the Quasi War with France, Hamilton set up and ran the first standing Army. He wrote most of "The Federalist Papers" while a full-time lawyer.

The Kindle version is $14.99, but at 800+ pages, you're getting some real heft for your money.

___________



They Don't Publish Books Like This Any More:

20200209 book pic 02.jpg



Books By Morons

A new (to me) lurkette author has just published her first novel, which she describes as "pulp fiction, but not too pulpy":

The only thing more deadly than the Chicago Mob is a United States Marine whose best friend they just killed.

Gunshots echo down the brick canyon walls of Wrigleyville. Jess Archer runs toward the sound, hoisting her scuffed leather briefcase as a battering ram, shoving meat and chrome out of her path. Skidding to a stop in front of her home, she identifies her best friend and business partner lying face up on the dirty sidewalk, a bloody third eye staring blindly into the bright winter sky.

When the charred body of a second programmer is discovered twelve hours later among the smoldering remains of Archer’s home, the Chicago Mob wants her head because this dead man is one of their own.

Decoding the thread connecting the two murders leads Archer a thousand miles south, when she learns the mob killed the wrong coder, and they are sending an army to remedy the mistake. Archer discovers too late that she can’t run from trouble on an island.

An Accidental Homicide by RKF Adams is currently available on Kindle for $6.99.

___________

Moron author Max Cossack is back with the 4the installlment of his adventure novels featuring Hack Wilder, Low Tech Killers. He tells me it's very un-PC and he thinks morons will get a kick out of it. One review calls it The Most Insightful SJW For Dummies in Print. Also:

It’s a comic adventure/satire which tells the story of the Hack Wilder’s hunt through the Internet underground for evidence to clear attorney Sam Lapidos’s client Rick Kadlec, on trial for murder. Hack’s investigation entangles him first with a fellowship of homicidally censorious left wingers at software giant Gogol-Checkov, then drives Hack and his friend Gus Dropo deep into the north country wilderness in a desperate struggle to save an old friend’s life.

And the price is right: just $2.99 for the eBook, $12.99 for the paperback.


___________


So that's all for this week. As always, book thread tips, suggestions, bribes, insults, threats, ugly pants pics and moron library submissions may be sent to OregonMuse, Proprietor, AoSHQ Book Thread, at the book thread e-mail address: aoshqbookthread, followed by the 'at' sign, and then 'G' mail, and then dot cee oh emm.

What have you all been reading this week? Hopefully something good, because, as you all know, life is too short to be reading lousy books.



20200209 book pic 01.jpg

Posted by: OregonMuse at 09:00 AM




Comments

(Jump to bottom of page)

1 “Hark and lo!” he whispered, “I do hear the sound of Nine Riders galloping nigh the road in full battle array.” A few minutes later a dispirited brace of steers ambled awkwardly past, but to give Stomper his due, they did carry some rather lethal-looking antlerettes.

“the foul Nasdrul have bewitched my ears”, mumbled Stomper as he apologetically replaced his batteries.

--- from “Bored of the Rings” by the Harvard Lampoon

Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at February 09, 2020 09:01 AM (Dc2NZ)

2 Hiya

Posted by: JT at February 09, 2020 09:01 AM (arJlL)

3 HI

Posted by: CN at February 09, 2020 09:01 AM (ONvIw)

4 Current doing a re-read of Modesitt's Recluse series. I started with the Fall of Angels which wasn't the first in the series as written, but chronologically it is the first book.

Posted by: Vic at February 09, 2020 09:02 AM (mpXpK)

5 Tolle Lege
Still nothing new, Tuesday is going to be my next best opportunity to get to the used book store.

Posted by: Skip at February 09, 2020 09:02 AM (ZCEU2)

6 Great artwork today, kiddo looks like Natalie Wood

Posted by: CN at February 09, 2020 09:02 AM (ONvIw)

7 Margaret O'Brien?

Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at February 09, 2020 09:03 AM (Dc2NZ)

8 runs to find pants, clean ones preferably!

Posted by: Commissar Hrothgar at February 09, 2020 09:04 AM (BiNEL)

9
g'mornin' book-ish 'rons

is "who dis" one of the Olson twins?

Posted by: AltonJackson
Commissar, Michigan for Bernie 2020
If not now, whom?
at February 09, 2020 09:04 AM (IXVOm)

10 Still on junk books. Reading a 3 books series by Jennifer Chase on a young woman soldier turned detective. Pretty good stories.

Posted by: rhennigantx at February 09, 2020 09:04 AM (JFO2v)

11 They Don't Publish Books Like This Any More:




Now it's Barry Obama's Queer Holidays but with an entirely different meaning of queer

Posted by: TheQuietMan at February 09, 2020 09:05 AM (U39ge)

12 The book shelf diagrams are missing one,
Aceonian

Posted by: Skip at February 09, 2020 09:05 AM (ZCEU2)

13 Dorothy's queer holiday probably includes a visit from that cousin that went to a womens college in SoCal.

Posted by: rhennigantx at February 09, 2020 09:05 AM (JFO2v)

14 I'm guessing it's Friday's Who Dis.

Posted by: Eeyore at February 09, 2020 09:05 AM (ZbwAu)

15 They Don't Publish Books Like This Any More:

The word "queer" has been redefined in modern times.

Posted by: Vic at February 09, 2020 09:06 AM (mpXpK)

16 Dorothy Dales LUG years.

Posted by: rhennigantx at February 09, 2020 09:07 AM (JFO2v)

17 Alternate universe Greta Thunberg where she's a sweet well-adjusted child.

Posted by: Bandersnatch at February 09, 2020 09:07 AM (gd9RK)

18 Is the little girl Margaret O'Brian?

Posted by: JTB at February 09, 2020 09:08 AM (7EjX1)

19 BTW, "ironclad" is anachronistic by 1898. But I've noticed that literary types are usually out of date about warships, unless they're specifically nautical writers. E.g., if you read Boxen, Warnie Lewis's cruiser is vintage c 1890; about 20 years old design by the time the Lewis boys were writing.

Posted by: Eeyore at February 09, 2020 09:08 AM (ZbwAu)

20 Makes me wonder if there is a railroad equivalent to the Flying Dutchman.

https://www.youtube.com/
watch?v=uR75CFVCaNA

Still gives me chills.

Posted by: Commissar Hrothgar at February 09, 2020 09:09 AM (BiNEL)

21 Speaking of Wells, his "Socialism and the Family" was released on Gutenberg today. Just as fresh today as a hundred years ago. Quotes on the last thread.

Posted by: freaked at February 09, 2020 09:09 AM (Tnijr)

22 Good morning fellow Book Threadists. I hope everyone had a great week of reading. Mine was different but interesting.

Posted by: JTB at February 09, 2020 09:09 AM (7EjX1)

23 Anyway, I gave up completely on the interest in the Ford Madox Ford/Joseph Conrad collaborative works. Using the "word power" of the day, the results come across as a pastiche, But I'm not sure which one is doing the imitating and the result is that you get neither.

Posted by: CN at February 09, 2020 09:10 AM (ONvIw)

24 Reading non-edifying but fun books this week.

John Steakley's "Armor" (about which much has been said on this blog) and Victoria Laurie's YA novel "When", about a girl who can see the exact date of a person's passing, and the suspicion surrounding her when she predicts the deathdate of a boy who goes missing.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at February 09, 2020 09:10 AM (Dc2NZ)

25 Those pants are fine. I would were them, if I wore pants.

Posted by: Little Ceaser at February 09, 2020 09:11 AM (Tnijr)

26 18 Is the little girl Margaret O'Brian?
Posted by: JTB at February 09, 2020 09:08 AM (7EjX1)

I was guessing Natalie Wood, but I think you are correct.

Posted by: CN at February 09, 2020 09:11 AM (ONvIw)

27 So a couple of weeks ago I mentioned Rosemary Taylor's Chicken Every Sunday, which was a memoir of growing up in Tucson in the early years of the 20th century.

While looking for other books of hers (she did a handful, all set in the West), I saw that she penned a sequel to Chicken called Ridin' the Rainbow. While her first book concentrated on her mother and the boarders who lived with the family, Rainbow centers itself on her father and his schemes for getting the family on to Easy Street.

If you liked Chicken, you will like Rainbow. Thumbs up!

https://tinyurl.com/ua4dkdk

Posted by: Mary Poppins' Practically Perfect Piercing at February 09, 2020 09:11 AM (Ki5SV)

28 Now that's a lieberry!

Those pants are either pizza pants or guess the caliber gunshot wound pants......take your pick.

More coffee.

Posted by: Hairyback Guy at February 09, 2020 09:12 AM (Z+IKu)

29 The word "queer" has been redefined in modern times.
Posted by: Vic at February 09, 2020 09:06 AM (mpXpK)

Much to society's loss, like the word "gay". It's a sickening appropriation of the language. They are homosexual.

Posted by: CN at February 09, 2020 09:13 AM (ONvIw)

30 I thought a pastiche was more a mash-up, a mixing of genres.

Posted by: Bandersnatch at February 09, 2020 09:13 AM (gd9RK)

31 I read The Princes of Ireland by Edward Rutherfurd. The author of Sarum, London, and Russka turns his attention to the history of Ireland as he traces the lives of a handful of families through the ages in this work of historical fiction. A sequel, The Rebels of Ireland, completes the history. I love Rutherfurd's writing as he weaves an interesting story while giving me much new knowledge of Irish history.
On the Kindle, I finished The Theos, book five of The Survivors series, by Nathan Hystad. In this volume, humans contact the ancient gods, the Theos, who help them defeat the Iskios and stop the unraveling of the universe. However, the humans are left stranded on a planet abandoned by its former civilization builders.

Posted by: Zoltan at February 09, 2020 09:13 AM (PevXk)

32 Greetings!

A brutal work schedule left me utterly worn out by Friday, but despite all that Vampires of Michigan continues to grind towards publication.

I'm doing a final read-through and should be done today. This is a little different from my prior editing process because this book was written over such a large span of time. To ensure continuity not only of events but also of style, I wanted to just to a straight read-through and see if anything stood out. Not finding a lot of mistakes, but I am changing some word choices to improve description, clarity and flow.

The next step will be applying the edits and then formatting for publication.

I'll also need a cover blurb and description. Here's what I got so far:

Vampires have a saying: lie is good but unlife is better.

Dwight Emerson "Zip" Zimmer might find this out for himself - if he isn't killed first.

There he was, playing in a weekend band in Marquette, Michigan and trying to put his life together after dropping out of college when a beautiful and mysterious woman approached him after one of his bar gigs.

The next thing he knows, he's in the middle of a torrid love affair and caught in up in a bloody vendetta between the Vampires of Michigan.

Author A.H. Lloyd's eighth novel takes readers on a wild ride of nonstop action from the mean streets of Detroit to the shores of Lake Superior. Violent, sexy and wickedly funny, the Vampires of Michigan is certified 100 percent angst free, a fresh take on the timeless story of boy meets undead girl.

Posted by: Ace-Endorsed Author A.H. Lloyd at February 09, 2020 09:15 AM (cfSRQ)

33 I rarely pay attention to various book of the year type awards as they almost never contain books I care about. But there is the odd exception. I just read "The Boy, The Mole, The seFox and The Horse", written and illustrated by Charlie Mackesy. It's difficult to describe. In short, the characters meet in a rural area, get to know one another, and exchange some pholosophical observations. All this accompanied by minimalist pen and ink drawings. The end.

The effect of the book is more complicated to explain its appeal, at least to adults. There are echoes of Winnie the Pooh and Wind in the Willows in the childhood (not childish) innocence of wonder and discovery. The setting could be The Hundred Acre Wood or the Shire. The artwork is rough and sketchy but is still very effective, even poignant, and contributes to the feel of childhood. Even the text is cursive, with the appearence of being written with a broad nib dip pen. It is almost caligraphy. Some criticisms gripe about the simplistic, sugary observations. Others that the text is difficult to read or the illustrations are too sketchy. They miss the point. And I suspect they value a sophistication (theirs) over basics in life.

I found the book to be charming and relaxing. It was easy to get into the world of the story. The 'sugary' observations are a reminder that the basics in life are important. That there is joy in discovery and friendship. And it is a wonderful distraction from the constant noise, lies and hate bombarding us from the 24 hour news cycle.

The book isn't cheap but most libraries will have it. And I noticed it is in the adult section, not the children's area. I liked it enough to get a hardcover edition to own.

Posted by: JTB at February 09, 2020 09:15 AM (7EjX1)

34 BTW, which one of those pictures is Ace's bookshelves?

Hah! Answer is none of them! Ace's shelves run vertical rather than horizontal. He read the level incorrectly.

Posted by: Ace-Endorsed Author A.H. Lloyd at February 09, 2020 09:17 AM (cfSRQ)

35 (I'm going with Natalie Wood for the "who dat?" pix too.)

Good morning. I had a great week of books. I finished Vertical Run, by Joseph Garber, which you'd swear was written for Bruce Willis in the Die Hard years (in fact, I think the author patterned it on that, plus it's set in a high rise. A former Green Beret (Vietnam era) goes to his NYC investment job just like he has the last 20 years but his boss tries to kill him. Then a whole team of former Green Berets tries to kill him. His wife and son urge him to give himself up, but he has no idea what he has done. When you find out, it makes the story that much more intriguing.

Then I saw I had missed the latest in the "Hap and Leonard" series. A travesty! The Elephant of Surprise takes place during two days of hurricane-stricken East Texas and begins when our heroes are driving home through the dead of night, blinding rain, torrential winds when an Asian albino woman -- missing most of her tongue -- stumbles onto the road and collapses. Seems lots of people want her dead too.

Both are highly recommended IMHO. "Hap and Leonard" was first adapted by the Sundance channel, and the series appears on Netflix after. The author is Joe R. Lansdale.

Posted by: SandyCheeks at February 09, 2020 09:17 AM (u1+n/)

36 Posted by: Ace-Endorsed Author A.H. Lloyd at February 09, 2020 09:15 AM (cfSRQ)

Nice work! Any sort of vampirism is absolutely not my cup of tea, but I'd actually like to read your book, from the jacket blurb.

Posted by: Mary Poppins' Practically Perfect Piercing at February 09, 2020 09:17 AM (Ki5SV)

37 Posted by: Ace-Endorsed Author A.H. Lloyd at February 09, 2020 09:15 AM (cfSRQ)


Just how heartily did Ace endorse you and is that going to be your moniker forever?

Posted by: Bandersnatch at February 09, 2020 09:18 AM (gd9RK)

38 I started and am plowing through John Frost's A Drop too Many, recommended here. I was expecting it to be largely about Arnhem, but was pleasantly surprised that it detailed much more about his career and military life and began in Iraq.

Posted by: CN at February 09, 2020 09:18 AM (ONvIw)

39 Nice first, Eris !

Posted by: JT at February 09, 2020 09:19 AM (arJlL)

40 I love Grant Snider's cartoons. He has a new book coming out called "I Will Judge You By Your Bookshelf", which I need because I totally do that.

https://twitter.com/grantdraws

Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at February 09, 2020 09:20 AM (Dc2NZ)

41 I don't think the who dis is Charles Bronson......

Posted by: JT at February 09, 2020 09:20 AM (arJlL)

42 30
I thought a pastiche was more a mash-up, a mixing of genres.

Posted by: Bandersnatch at February 09, 2020 09:13 AM (gd9RK)

---
It's a fancy word for "cut and paste job."

R.E. Howard's works were subjected to this by subsequent editors who tried to build a cohesive narrative out of the short stories.

Key giveaways are awkward transitions and uneven writing styles.

Posted by: Ace-Endorsed Author A.H. Lloyd at February 09, 2020 09:20 AM (cfSRQ)

43 I'm still hacking away at a bio: "Augustus," by Adrian Goldsworthy.

As a by-product of reading it, I feel like I have a more accurate historical fix on Antony, Pompey & Cleopatra, as well as Augustus himself.

There is nothing inherently wrong, imo, with elevating a 19-yr-old to a position of great power... if you're lucky enough to get the right 19-yr-old. The key to Augustus' success & survival was the affection Julius Caesar's legions felt for Caesar's heir. Augustus had done nothing to earn that, but he certainly made the most of it.

A 19-yr-old with an army is different than a 19-yr-old without one. By the godawful standards of his era, Augustus rated fairly low on the cruelty scale, btw. He murdered people rather sparingly.

Posted by: mnw at February 09, 2020 09:22 AM (Cssks)

44
Just how heartily did Ace endorse you and is that going to be your moniker forever?

Posted by: Bandersnatch at February 09, 2020 09:18 AM (gd9RK)

---
He plugged my books in both the sidebar AND in a post. That's why I added the title.

I don't always use that, though. Sometimes I'm a former gun owner.

And of course I have a couple of regular socks that still manage to fool the unwary.

Posted by: Ace-Endorsed Author A.H. Lloyd at February 09, 2020 09:22 AM (cfSRQ)

45 Author A.H. Lloyd's eighth novel takes readers on a wild ride of nonstop action from the mean streets of Detroit to the shores of Lake Superior. Violent, sexy and wickedly funny, the Vampires of Michigan is certified 100 percent angst free, a fresh take on the timeless story of boy meets undead girl.
Posted by: Ace-Endorsed Author A.H. Lloyd at February 09, 2020 09:15 AM (cfSRQ)

I am looking forward to your publication. I'm not into vampires and such, but the Michigan connection interests me a lot, and will be reading.

Posted by: CN at February 09, 2020 09:22 AM (ONvIw)

46 And BTW if you are ever in Concord Mass take a walk down the Common where there is the famous statue of the Minuteman and you will immediately and quite certainly know what 2A is all about and no it's not hurting

Posted by: jaytrain at February 09, 2020 09:23 AM (eh3OZ)

47 Good Morning, all! I am so enjoying Rosemary Taylor's Chicken Every Sunday (Thanks, Mary PPP, for the mention!) that I will definitely go looking for her other books, especially the sequel.
Other than that - still working on Luna City, and what happens when Richard is invited to have Christmas dinner with Kate's family...
A flaming-brandy soaked Christmas pudding is involved, and I shall say no more.

Posted by: Sgt. Mom at February 09, 2020 09:23 AM (xnmPy)

48 I agree that it's Margaret O'Brien.

There's great dessert place in Providence RI called Pastiche. At least it was great where I was there quite a few years ago. Still gets good reviews. On Federal Hill.

Posted by: Art Rondelet of Malmsey at February 09, 2020 09:24 AM (fTtFy)

49 Posted by: JTB at February 09, 2020 09:15 AM (7EjX1)

Thanks for the recommendation! There's a long waiting list at my library, so apparently others feel as you do.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at February 09, 2020 09:25 AM (Dc2NZ)

50 OT: I went out this morning to get a load of firewood from the woodpile, and I looked up and saw a string of lights go over, I counted about 30, going quite fast WSW to ENE, and all on a slightly different track but clearly in a string.

I looked up launches and found that OneSat launched about 35 communication satellites in a single payload yesterday from Baikonur for part of global cell communication constellation. I think I saw it go overhead.

It was really spooky at first.

Posted by: Kindltot at February 09, 2020 09:25 AM (6rS3m)

51 So, for my own writing:

I finally made it to the midpoint of the book, where Theda Bara is threatened with arrest for the murder of her friend, a NY gossip columnist. There is still a small, earlier scene to write, but that's not going to be too difficult.

What will be difficult is the going forward and plotting out the second half. I wish I had access to some place without web access or TV reception, which would force me to sit down and write. It's easy enough to say, 'just turn everything off at home,' but I am a very lazy person.

Posted by: Mary Poppins' Practically Perfect Piercing at February 09, 2020 09:25 AM (Ki5SV)

52 I was at my daughter's school this week for the 8th grade basketball game and saw posted on the "what I'm reading this week" sign posted on the librarian's door was Billy Graham's The Holy Spirit: Activating God's power in your life. She attends public school.

Posted by: Drc at February 09, 2020 09:25 AM (llGBY)

53 The best pastiche I know is Ronald Knox's Let Dons Delight. Some of it moves to satire, but some not. Especially good is a made-up part of Boswell's Johnson which I swear you could insert and no one would guess it wasn't original.

Posted by: Eeyore at February 09, 2020 09:26 AM (ZbwAu)

54 Finished "No Time for Sergeants." BOY, the novel is way different from the movie -- and I think the movie is much better.

The only similarities are the characters' names, the latrine scene, and the mistaken deaths. No bar fight. No nuclear test. Nothing about Sgt. King's watch. Even my favorite line, about whom the general will court-martial, is different.

I have a copy of the stage script; that's next on my reading list. I look forward to learning how much of the movie's dialogue came from the stage.

Not often does the source material come off second best.

Posted by: Weak Geek at February 09, 2020 09:26 AM (u/nim)

55 I finished Robert Crais' The Monkey's Raincoat. It's OK but didn't knock me out. I also finished Pugio Bruti, a Latin crime novel that, if it were in English, I would describe as a third or fourth grade child's first chapter book. I'm quite p!eased with myself because, although I had to really try to read it, I could read it well enough to enjoy the story (although I didn't like the ending; too many loose ends).

https://www.latinitium.com/books/pugiobruti/#book

Posted by: Anonosaurus Wrecks, Tyrannosaur Wrangler at February 09, 2020 09:26 AM (+y/Ru)

56 I am Currently reading Wolf Pack by C.J . Box.

It is excellent.

I've read all of his books, and they are excellent, too.

What a coincidence !

Posted by: JT at February 09, 2020 09:27 AM (arJlL)

57 You have to give credit to HG Wells and his chummy family advice.
There was not a lot of risk that his girlfriend would get pregnant.
(This will be slightly funny if you know who his girlfriend was).

Posted by: Way, Way Downriver at February 09, 2020 09:28 AM (oRpiG)

58 I recently finished The Passage Trilogy by Justin Cronin on the recommendation of a friend. It's basically about a virus that turns people into vampires and becomes a near human extinction event and the story of a small surviving colony a hundred years after the outbreak.

Overall it was decent, if a bit uneven. The author is prone to 100+ page flashback reveries for exposition and character development that would better serve the reader in maybe 20 pages. Plot wise it's solid, unpredictable and engaging. It's worth a read if the general genre fits your tastes.

Posted by: Bilwis Devourer of Low Glycemic Souls at February 09, 2020 09:29 AM (Wm5SB)

59 A review of today's book thread.

- I love that library in the photo.
- The illustration of the old man reading to his granddaughters is a delight.
- This thread is going to cost me money. Too many interesting books mentioned.
- The vintage book cover and the book shelves are F'ing hilarious and clever.
- It's going to take several hours to go through all the comments and check out all the suggestions.

Thanks to OM for another wonderful book thread.

Posted by: JTB at February 09, 2020 09:29 AM (7EjX1)

60 Nice work! Any sort of vampirism is absolutely not
my cup of tea, but I'd actually like to read your book, from the jacket
blurb.

Posted by: Mary Poppins' Practically Perfect Piercing at February 09, 2020 09:17 AM (Ki5SV)

---
Thanks!

Yeah, this is not your typical vampire story. I tried to think about how vampires could exist with today's technology and my conclusion was that they're slowly dying out, hiding on the margins, and the usual tropes of them seducing young girls and biting them etc. just doesn't work.

They also hold grudges and this basically dominates their thinking.

Posted by: Ace-Endorsed Author A.H. Lloyd at February 09, 2020 09:31 AM (cfSRQ)

61 You have to give credit to HG Wells and his chummy family advice.
There was not a lot of risk that his girlfriend would get pregnant.
(This will be slightly funny if you know who his girlfriend was).
Posted by: Way, Way Downriver at February 09, 2020 09:28 AM (oRpiG)


I ought to know that without looking it up. My brain is slow today.

Posted by: Mary Poppins' Practically Perfect Piercing at February 09, 2020 09:31 AM (Ki5SV)

62 LOL, Eris !
Not sure how it survived, but I found my battered copy of that ancient classic a while ago.



Not often I give Bezos money before I even finish the content, but Last Days of Thunder Child did the trick !

Posted by: sock_rat_eez, we are being gaslighted 24/365 at February 09, 2020 09:31 AM (zlgJP)

63 It's easy enough to say, 'just turn everything off at home,' but I am a very lazy person.


When I was writing my novella (unfinished, of course) I did a lot of writing in bars. Longhand, with an ink pen.

I like reading and writing in bars for the exact reason that there isn't an internet (not counting the one in my pocket) and also I like bars and usually not talking to people.

Posted by: Bandersnatch at February 09, 2020 09:31 AM (gd9RK)

64 I like the architecture of the library, but that green is no bueno.

Posted by: Mr Aspirin Factory at February 09, 2020 09:33 AM (oVP12)

65
OT:

Duck bacon was a failure.

Tasted exactly like Canadian bacon, ie. ham.



Posted by: naturalfake at February 09, 2020 09:33 AM (z0XD8)

66 I've been spending a lot of time on Gutenberg the last couple of days because I've been sick. I like to check out the new releases. One that I found that I enjoyed a lot was

"Charles W. Quantrell
A True Report of His Guerrilla Warfare on the Missouri and Kansas Border During the Civil War of 1861 to 1865"

Now Quantrell's real name was William, and Charles was an alias he used "undercover", and his name is normally spelled "Quantrill" so I questioned the factuality from the start. The book however is a recounting of events by Captain Harrison Trow, who rode with Quantrill. Trow is the guy who identified Jesse James' body.

It's the most sympathetic thing I ever read or seen concerning Quantrill and his raiders. He and his men are normally portrayed as psychokillers. Maybe sme were, but the truth is many had seen there families killed and homes destroyed by Jayhawkers and the like and they saw this as revenge. They didn't care about the war so much as just taking care of business.

Especially sympathetic is the books characterization of Frank and Jesse James. After the war, everyone was out to get them and they had no peace.

Anyway, it's a alternate look at Quantrill and his Raiders. If you are interested in that kind of thing or would like to learn more about the inspiration form many western movies, I highly recommend.

https://tinyurl.com/rs7eljq

Posted by: Little Ceaser at February 09, 2020 09:33 AM (Tnijr)

67 dang it off Pizza Pizza sock

Posted by: freaked at February 09, 2020 09:34 AM (Tnijr)

68 Posted by: Kindltot at February 09, 2020 09:25 AM (6rS3m)

Wow, very cool!

I'm currently reading Whoever Fights Monsters by Robert Ressler. I tried to read Mindhunterby his counterpart John Douglas, but the first 100 pages were basically his autobiography which I wasn't interested in, so I gave up.

PS my favorite is the aquatic bookshelves, with the cat on top trying to catch a fish.

Posted by: Jordan61 at February 09, 2020 09:34 AM (QLlrr)

69 7 Margaret O'Brien?
Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at February 09, 2020 09:03 AM (Dc2NZ)


Winner!

18 Is the little girl Margaret O'Brian?
Posted by: JTB at February 09, 2020 09:08 AM (7EjX1)


Yes, but you got beat by All Hail Eris at #8.

Posted by: OregonMuse, AoSHQ Thought Leader, Pants Monitor & Austere Religious Scholar at February 09, 2020 09:35 AM (CoLi6)

70
Do those pants also come with Cheese-filled Cuffs?

Posted by: naturalfake at February 09, 2020 09:35 AM (z0XD8)

71
When I was writing my novella (unfinished, of course) I did a lot of writing in bars. Longhand, with an ink pen.

I like reading and writing in bars for the exact reason that there isn't an internet (not counting the one in my pocket) and also I like bars and usually not talking to people.
Posted by: Bandersnatch at February 09, 2020 09:31 AM (gd9RK)


I've done that myself, before. I should do it for this. I know that if I took a long weekend, I would have the rest of the book plotted out.

BTW, are you and AtC going to the MoMe in May?

Posted by: Mary Poppins' Practically Perfect Piercing at February 09, 2020 09:36 AM (Ki5SV)

72 O/T

Update on Jacksonville vehicular assault posted the EMT

Posted by: Village Idiot's Apprentice at February 09, 2020 09:36 AM (tT0V4)

73
What will be difficult is the going
forward and plotting out the second half. I wish I had access to some
place without web access or TV reception, which would force me to sit
down and write. It's easy enough to say, 'just turn everything off at
home,' but I am a very lazy person.

Posted by: Mary Poppins' Practically Perfect Piercing at February 09, 2020 09:25 AM (Ki5SV)

---
The great room in our house has no TV. That was a decision we made when we moved in. TV is downstairs. It's a good place to read or write. I've got a speaker so I can plug in my phone or MP3s, but that's it.

Surfing the web can be a distraction, but my job requires I be current on what's going on, so when I get home it's a relief for me to get away from that.

I'll take a break from writing and finish of LotR and then move on to some of the books people talked about here.

Posted by: Ace-Endorsed Author A.H. Lloyd at February 09, 2020 09:37 AM (cfSRQ)

74 BTW, are you and AtC going to the MoMe in May?


Yes. I hope to see you there.

Posted by: Bandersnatch at February 09, 2020 09:37 AM (gd9RK)

75 I'm still reading the Lee Child "Jack Reacher series of books. Mindless reading for entertainment.

Don't have any room for more books. Have about (15) 18 gallon totes full of books in storage. I think I might go through them and find some to re-read and maybe a couple that I haven't read yet.

One that I want to read, but have been putting off, is a collected works of Carl Sandberg.

Posted by: Traveling Man&&&& at February 09, 2020 09:37 AM (VLzNr)

76 I finished Robert Crais'

ARRGGHHHHHH !!!

Slowlwwwy I turned......

I just finished L.A. Requiem by him, and it was TERRIBLE !

Starts to tell the story, then a detour to backstory...ok, continues the story, then more backstory, continues story....MORE backstory....and on and on.

I was beginning to think the author didn't WANNA tell the story.

Toward the end of the book, the author revealed the murderer's identity....a character who hadn't been mentioned previously...(I guess the author didn't want the reader to guess who it was.)

I wasn't gonna mention it on the Thread, but since his name came up,

I will NEVER read anything by him again.

Posted by: JT at February 09, 2020 09:38 AM (arJlL)

77 I do not have a worthy literary comment this morning , but I have been having great fun perusing the web and reading the left's freak out about Trump shitcanning the wonder twins. They are positively apoplectic.

Posted by: Tom Servo at February 09, 2020 09:39 AM (q3gwH)

78 Margaret O'Brien?
Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at February 09, 2020 09:03 AM (Dc2NZ)

Winner!

18 Is the little girl Margaret O'Brian?
Posted by: JTB at February 09, 2020 09:08 AM (7EjX1)

Yes, but you got beat by All Hail Eris at #8.
Posted by: OregonMuse, AoSHQ Thought Leader, Pants Monitor & Austere Religious Scholar at February 09, 2020 09:35 AM (CoLi6)



She was great in "Meet Me in St Louis".


These days though she looks almost exactly like Nancy Pelosi!

Yikes!.

Maybe like her younger, less evil twin.

Posted by: naturalfake at February 09, 2020 09:39 AM (z0XD8)

79 77 I do not have a worthy literary comment this morning , but I have been having great fun perusing the web and reading the left's freak out about Trump shitcanning the wonder twins. They are positively apoplectic.
Posted by: Tom Servo at February 09, 2020 09:39 AM (q3gwH)

It's grand, isn't it.

Posted by: CN at February 09, 2020 09:39 AM (ONvIw)

80 52 I was at my daughter's school this week for the 8th grade basketball game and saw posted on the "what I'm reading this week" sign posted on the librarian's door was Billy Graham's The Holy Spirit: Activating God's power in your life. She attends public school.

Posted by: Drc at February 09, 2020 09:25 AM (llGBY)


School receiving warning letter from the ACLU and/or the Freedom From Religion org in

3...
2...
1...

Posted by: OregonMuse, AoSHQ Thought Leader, Pants Monitor & Austere Religious Scholar at February 09, 2020 09:40 AM (CoLi6)

81 When my family and I went to see the Impressionism special exhibit at the Philadelphia Museum of Art this spring, squeakyspouse bought me the Museum's companion book.

It is always nice to see artwork in person, then relive the experience on a smaller scale once you return home. The book's notations about the authors are sometimes a bit of mind reading, but the factual stuff about who the artists were friends with, and some of their family and personal struggles they were contending with while creating great art is always interesting to me.

Posted by: squeakywheel at February 09, 2020 09:41 AM (n6wjb)

82 Finished Silva's 'The New Girl'.


His books are always entertaining.

Posted by: Village Idiot's Apprentice at February 09, 2020 09:41 AM (tT0V4)

83 This will be slightly funny if you know who his girlfriend was.

Posted by: Way, Way Downriver at February 09, 2020 09:28 AM (oRpiG)

I thought that Wells was quite the cocksman...he had tons of affairs.

Posted by: CharlieBrown'sDildo at February 09, 2020 09:41 AM (dLLD6)

84 There was not a lot of risk that his girlfriend would get pregnant.
(This will be slightly funny if you know who his girlfriend was).
Posted by: Way, Way Downriver at February 09, 2020 09:28 AM (oRpiG)
---
I had to look it up. Ha!

And wow did Wells git around.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at February 09, 2020 09:42 AM (Dc2NZ)

85 I had to look it up. Ha!

Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at February 09, 2020 09:42 AM (Dc2NZ)

Well?

Posted by: CharlieBrown'sDildo at February 09, 2020 09:43 AM (dLLD6)

86 On a completely different note:

A friend and I are re-watching the brilliant TV adaptation of Brideshead Revisited. I've seen it twice before, but it's been a while.

I never noticed how profoundly Catholic this thing is. I'm picking up tons of religious/philosophical stuff that completely passed me by before.

I noticed it in the book, but seeing it on the screen is of course different.

I used to think of it as just sort of a languid British period piece about a dysfunctional family, kind of a well-done soap opera for wine moms who drink only premium vintages.

Of course that's absolutely not true, and as we move to the conclusion, my friend and I frequently have a post-viewing discussion about the finer points of both the adaptation and the work.

He's re-reading the book, having blasted through a bunch of Waugh's works he had not yet perused (I loaned him one of my anthologies).

As readers of Waugh know, Brideshead is very different from his previous work. It's got some satire and snark, but the tone and subject matter is sharply different from his earlier "smart set" stories.

One thing that staggers me: how could do a show where EVERY ACTOR is perfect?! Not a weak performance in the whole thing! Friday night we got to Julia's breakdown by the fountain - the beginning of the end of her affair with Charles and it was an amazing performance.

We talk about adaptations where the book is better or the film is better, but is there ever been such a sterling example where they compliment each other so pefectly?

Posted by: Ace-Endorsed Author A.H. Lloyd at February 09, 2020 09:44 AM (cfSRQ)

87 Thanks for the posting on Ron Chernow's work. I'm halfway through his biography of Ulysses Grant - up to the point of Lincoln's assassination. So far, it's quite good. Chernow does have the unfortunately habit of making little editorial comments in the text - deploring slavery for example, which hardly seems necessary these days - and he fails to quote some of the pithier bits from Grant's "Personal Memoirs". And his attitude toward Grant himself may strike some readers as a bit over the top. But all in all, a good read - and much better than McFeeley's biography from 30 years ago. If Chernow only succeeds in getting more people to read the "Personal Memoirs", which is a masterpiece, he will have done the country a service.

Posted by: Brown Line at February 09, 2020 09:45 AM (S6ArX)

88 I mentioned last week that I was going to re-read "The Wind in the Willows". I started but it is slow going. This time I am hearing, in my head, the words as it I were reading aloud to a child. Doing that adds a layer of fun to an already fun story and reinforces just how well written the book is. Definitely worth the extra time.

Posted by: JTB at February 09, 2020 09:45 AM (7EjX1)

89 Strolled through a local used bookstore yesterday and in the $1 rack found "Irish Gold" by Andrew Greeley -- the liberal Catholic priest famous for writing rather racy novels. It caught my eye because it was supposed to be about the mystery of who killed Michael Collins, the Irish rebel of the 1910s and 20s. It is speculative fiction, of course, but actually includes lots of background info on the Irish rebellion and the civil war between its factions that followed. I rather like it so far..,

Posted by: Secret Square at February 09, 2020 09:46 AM (9WuX0)

90 One of Wells' many, many side pieces was Margaret Sanger. No surprise there! I bet they had many spirited discussions on eugenics.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at February 09, 2020 09:47 AM (Dc2NZ)

91 I Googled Margaret O'Brien and see that one of her movies is Halloween Pussy Trap Kill! Kill! I assume it is some kind of role-playing SMBD comedy adventure on the Disney Channel.

Posted by: Anonosaurus Wrecks, Tyrannosaur Wrangler at February 09, 2020 09:47 AM (+y/Ru)

92 "40 I love Grant Snider's cartoons. He has a new book coming out called "I Will Judge You By Your Bookshelf", which I need because I totally do that.

https://twitter.com/grantdraws

Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at February 09, 2020 09:20 AM (Dc2NZ) "




So do I.


It's getting harder and harder though, as it seems fewer people have bookshelves.

Posted by: sock_rat_eez, we are being gaslighted 24/365 at February 09, 2020 09:49 AM (zlgJP)

93 We talk about adaptations where the book is better or the film is better, but is there ever been such a sterling example where they compliment each other so pefectly?
Posted by: Ace-Endorsed Author A.H. Lloyd at February 09, 2020 09:44 AM (cfSRQ)
--

One of my favorite adaptions is the movie of Michael Chabon's "Wonder Boys".

Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at February 09, 2020 09:50 AM (Dc2NZ)

94 I suddenly remember reading a novel back in the 80's, Gardens of Stone.

I remember liking it, but not retaining much more than the overall story arc.

And my views of politics and history have shifted since my youth.

May need to re-read it.

Posted by: Village Idiot's Apprentice at February 09, 2020 09:50 AM (tT0V4)

95 Also recently released on Gutenberg is :

"Magnetation Methods of Birth Control by Margaret Sanger"

Best I can tell, the "Magnetation Method" is to do everything except the final act, not even after pulling out. Then your essence will be absorbed back into the body. I think this may be the origin of Buck Turgidson's attitude about women.

Posted by: freaked at February 09, 2020 09:52 AM (Tnijr)

96 Chernow does have the unfortunately habit of making little editorial comments in the text - deploring slavery for example, which hardly seems necessary these days

-
Speaking of which, Tomahawk Lizzie:

Kimberley Strassel@KimStrassel
Elizabeth Warren says we need "race-conscious laws." Think about that. Isn't that what we spent so long trying to make sure we didn't have?

-
Maybe we could name them after some sort of bird with the first name of Jim.

Posted by: Anonosaurus Wrecks, Tyrannosaur Wrangler at February 09, 2020 09:52 AM (+y/Ru)

97 17 Alternate universe Greta Thunberg where she's a sweet well-adjusted child.
Posted by: Bandersnatch at February 09, 2020 09:07 AM (gd9RK)


Nice. You get an honorable mention for the most interesting incorrect answer.

Posted by: OregonMuse, AoSHQ Thought Leader, Pants Monitor & Austere Religious Scholar at February 09, 2020 09:53 AM (CoLi6)

98 We talk about adaptations where the book is better or the film is better, but is there ever been such a sterling example where they compliment each other so pefectly?
Posted by: Ace-Endorsed Author A.H. Lloyd at February 09, 2020 09:44 AM (cfSRQ)

I loved the series, and have read the book a few times as well. The only actor, I would have replaced is Olivier (!). He seemed to be in everything back then, from MacArthur to the Cantor-dad in the Jazz Singer. I would have liked someone less overused in that role.

Posted by: CN at February 09, 2020 09:53 AM (ONvIw)

99 The 2005 War of the Worlds movie is a celebration of defeatism.

Posted by: BeckoningChasm at February 09, 2020 09:53 AM (l9m7l)

100 Kimberley Strassel@KimStrassel
Elizabeth Warren says we need "race-conscious laws." Think about that. Isn't that what we spent so long trying to make sure we didn't have?

We should have two water fountains: People Who Lied About Being Minorities, and Everyone Else.

Posted by: DHS at February 09, 2020 09:54 AM (U7voe)

101 I Googled Margaret O'Brien

So did I.

I was thinking of Margaret Hamilton. the Wicked Witch of the West.

After reading her filmography, I realized that I've never seen any of her films.

(No wonder I didn't know who the fook she was !)

Posted by: JT at February 09, 2020 09:55 AM (arJlL)

102 Off DHS sock. I've been trying to work my way through a small book of Soren Kierkegaard that I bought years ago for some reason. I'm not convinced there's a lot of there, there-- a lot of it reads like he's alone in a room after ten espressos, pacing up and down and talking to himself.

Posted by: Vanya at February 09, 2020 09:56 AM (U7voe)

103 H G Wells makes an appearance, along with other famous "geniuses" of the time, IIRC.

In

"My Uncle Oswald" by Roald Dahl.

It's a hilarious romp about the narrator's uncle who discovers a fool-proof aphrodisiac, and goes about assembling a team to heist spoink from the geniuses.

He plan is to use said spoink as a Jizz Broker for women who wish to bear genius babies.

Yep. This is the same Roald Dahl who wrote "Charlie and the Chocolate Factory" and "James and the Giant Peach", etc.

This book is absolutely not for kids.

Lots of funny situations and irreverent portraits of famous men from that era.

Check it out.

Posted by: naturalfake at February 09, 2020 09:56 AM (z0XD8)

104 I finished reading "So, Anyway", John Cleese's autobiography. I think I would have liked it more had I known that it's mostly his life before Python and had I been more familiar with 1960's British comedians. I know Peter Sellers and Marty Feldman but not Bill Oddie, Ronnie Barker, and Ronnie Corbett. Some bits of it were funny, but on the whole, I'm glad I checked it out from the library rather than buying a copy.
Now reading "Collapse" by Kurt Schlichter.

Posted by: roamingfirehydrant at February 09, 2020 09:57 AM (THS4q)

105 There is a short on YuouTub called The Great Martian War (1913 - 1917) that mixes CGI and WWI footage


Not much of a plot, but visually striking

Posted by: Kindltot at February 09, 2020 09:57 AM (6rS3m)

106 The 2005 War of the Worlds movie is a celebration of defeatism.
Posted by: BeckoningChasm at February 09, 2020 09:53 AM (l9m7l)

Utterly O/T, but the German title of that movie sounds much cooler. 'Krieg Der Welten'

Posted by: Vanya at February 09, 2020 09:57 AM (U7voe)

107 Nice. You get an honorable mention for the most interesting incorrect answer.


*preens*

Posted by: Honorable Mention Recipient and Occasional Fish HostBandersnatch at February 09, 2020 09:58 AM (gd9RK)

108 Chernow does have the unfortunately habit of making
little editorial comments in the text - deploring slavery for example,
which hardly seems necessary these days -


Posted by: Brown Line at February 09, 2020 09:45 AM (S6ArX)

---
See also: Barbara W. Tuchman's A Distant Mirror.

The narrative will be clipping along and then she has to start dropping her 70s era feminist agenda about why it would have gone so much better if only women could go out into the workplace and own land and property and stuff.

Uh, what part of "endemic low-level warfare" did you miss? Once one realizes that for most of human history property ownership was entirely dependent on the ability to physically defend it, the business of women not owning land makes a hell of a lot of sense.

When you had periods of peace where brigandage wasn't a threat, golly, the laws opened up.

It really wrecked an otherwise good book.

Posted by: Ace-Endorsed Author A.H. Lloyd at February 09, 2020 09:59 AM (cfSRQ)

109 The combat of HMS Thunder Child against three of the Martian tripods is also discussed in George H. Smith's The Second War of the Worlds. That novel is a lot of fun and published in 1976. The Martians make a second attempt on a parallel Earth and "Mr. H" and "Dr. W" come to help defeat them.

Posted by: Retired Buckeye Cop is now an engineer at February 09, 2020 09:59 AM (00fXp)

110 There is a short on YuouTub called The Great Martian War (1913 - 1917) that mixes CGI and WWI footage


Not much of a plot, but visually striking

-
I loved that. A faux documentary of Tommies v. Martians.

Posted by: Anonosaurus Wrecks, Tyrannosaur Wrangler at February 09, 2020 10:00 AM (+y/Ru)

111 That Concord Free Library is gorgeous. I love the colors of the interior.

An amusing bit fro Wikipedia: "In March 1885, the Concord Free Library was the first institution to ban Mark Twain's The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, and a number of New England newspapers applauded their condemnation. But many criticized or mocked the library's decision, and as a number of contemporaries and Twain himself noted, the ban contributed to the novel's publicity and helped its sales."

Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at February 09, 2020 10:01 AM (Dc2NZ)

112 Little Caesar - I'll have to forward the info about the Quantrill book to my dad. He has studied quite a bit about how the Civil War played out in Missouri and Kansas, and he was always interested in the guerrilla fighters. Quantrill became who he was for a reason; namely, his friends and family had been killed and he sought revenge.

Posted by: PabloD at February 09, 2020 10:01 AM (a0kj6)

113
Got my pants half off.............can I at least read the newspapers?


Costco? NO HOBO.

Posted by: saf at February 09, 2020 10:01 AM (5IHGB)

114 Good morning y'all!

Posted by: tbodie at February 09, 2020 10:02 AM (21UM+)

115 See also: Barbara W. Tuchman's A Distant Mirror.

To paraphrase Danny Vermin, I read that book once.

Once.

Didn't like it, and I have a thing for mediaeval studies.

I prefer her The Proud Tower. And I have The Guns of August, but never have got very far into it.

Posted by: Mary Poppins' Practically Perfect Piercing at February 09, 2020 10:02 AM (Ki5SV)

116 An amusing bit fro Wikipedia: "In March 1885, the
Concord Free Library was the first institution to ban Mark Twain's The
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, and a number of New England newspapers
applauded their condemnation. But many criticized or mocked the
library's decision, and as a number of contemporaries and Twain himself
noted, the ban contributed to the novel's publicity and helped its
sales."



Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at February 09, 2020 10:01 AM (Dc2NZ)

---
New England: Your home for humorless scolds since 1620.

Posted by: Ace-Endorsed Author A.H. Lloyd at February 09, 2020 10:03 AM (cfSRQ)

117 Recently had the unpleasant experience of reading John Lescroart's Rule of Law. No attempt whatsoever in dealing fairly with the issue of illegal immigration. Was tempted to stop reading his pablum early on, but decided it might be character building to stay with it. Moreover, I was curious as to just how bad it would be. Excruciatingly bad, as it turned out. I don't know if Lescroart shows such disdain for his conservative readers in his previous books. I will never know either, as I'll never read anything he has, or will ever write in the future.

Posted by: Old Dude at February 09, 2020 10:03 AM (LGXGf)

118 Since we were talking about Northanger Abbey recently, it's a pastiche. Of Gothic novels, specifically. I may have mentioned that already.

I still haven't gotten around to reading Glenarvon...it's a roman a clef, for another word of the day.

Posted by: Mrs. Peel at February 09, 2020 10:04 AM (rWZ8Y)

119 Who Dis ?................Epstein's angel Girl Friend? she IS going to kill herself.

Posted by: saf at February 09, 2020 10:04 AM (5IHGB)

120 runs to find pants, clean ones preferably!
Posted by: Commissar Hrothgar at February 09, 2020 09:04 AM


You knew what day and time it was.

Be prepared!

Posted by: Your Scoutmaster at February 09, 2020 10:05 AM (cdHtX)

121 "I'll have to forward the info about the Quantrill book to my dad."

He should be very interested. It's a side of the whole affair I had never seen.

Posted by: freaked at February 09, 2020 10:05 AM (Tnijr)

122 An amusing bit fro Wikipedia: "In March 1885, the Concord Free Library was the first institution to ban Mark Twain's The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, and a number of New England newspapers applauded their condemnation. But many criticized or mocked the library's decision, and as a number of contemporaries and Twain himself noted, the ban contributed to the novel's publicity and helped its sales."
Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes

Much like the 400,000 letters Ed Sullivan received after Elvis' first appearance on his show......

Posted by: JT at February 09, 2020 10:06 AM (arJlL)

123 Didn't like it, and I have a thing for mediaeval studies.



I prefer her The Proud Tower. And I have The Guns of August, but never have got very far into it.

Posted by: Mary Poppins' Practically Perfect Piercing at February 09, 2020 10:02 AM (Ki5SV)

---
What makes it so (unintentionally) amusing is that even as she mocks the "outdated" opinions of the 14th Century, her own have been proven equally obsolescent in only a couple of decades.

The whole "given a fair shot, women will seamlessly fit into the work force entirely on their own merit" thing has crashed and burned.

She's more dated than the people she writes about with such sneering contempt.

Posted by: Ace-Endorsed Author A.H. Lloyd at February 09, 2020 10:06 AM (cfSRQ)

124
Gotta get me some more Margaret Penrose anthologies.


Hello Mudder hello Fapper here I am at Camp GrandTaca....

Posted by: saf at February 09, 2020 10:07 AM (5IHGB)

125 I don't know if Lescroart shows such disdain for his conservative readers in his previous books.
Posted by: Old Dude at February 09, 2020 10:03 AM


Conservatives can read? Who knew? Heaven forfend!

Posted by: J. Lescroart at February 09, 2020 10:07 AM (cdHtX)

126 Ok Book Horde, I'm goin' back to C.J. Box.

I'll stop in later.....

Posted by: JT at February 09, 2020 10:08 AM (arJlL)

127 See also: Barbara W. Tuchman's A Distant Mirror.

-
Part of her thing was that some centuries are cursed with misery. The 14th was one and the 20th another.

Posted by: Anonosaurus Wrecks, Tyrannosaur Wrangler at February 09, 2020 10:08 AM (+y/Ru)

128 How is that van driver NOT charged with attempted murder?

And these are all civil rights violations of the first degree. Anyone think it's wise to put a MAGA sticker on your car?

And God bless those willing to wear the hat in public, but not going to go borrowing trouble.

Our side is absolutely on the receiving end of all the intimidation, and atca minimum it has made it not worth it to show public support for our candidates.

Posted by: TexasDan at February 09, 2020 10:08 AM (hr5kG)

129 That library looks cozy. And I love the picture of Grandpa reading to the girls by the fire. You always find such nice pictures, OMuse.

Please excuse this PSA, but if you would like to meet fellow Morons including book enthusiasts, Weasel and I cordially invite you to join us at the NoVaMoMe in May 9. See the left sidebar or email me at the link in my nic.

Posted by: bluebell - NoVaMoMe2020! at February 09, 2020 10:08 AM (/669Q)

130 Gonna do some stuff. BBL book fags!

Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at February 09, 2020 10:09 AM (Dc2NZ)

131 Hiya Bluebell !

Posted by: JT at February 09, 2020 10:09 AM (arJlL)

132 The only problem with Eris posting excerpts from Bored of the Rings is it makes me want to stop everything else and find my copy. Hey! I got stuff to do, ya know.

Posted by: JTB at February 09, 2020 10:09 AM (7EjX1)

133
Our side is absolutely on the receiving end of all the intimidation, and atca minimum it has made it not worth it to show public support for our candidates.
Posted by: TexasDan at February 09, 2020 10:08 AM (hr5kG)

Their violence is "speech"

Posted by: CN at February 09, 2020 10:09 AM (ONvIw)

134 Welp.

Time to get ready.

Work, work ,work.

Posted by: naturalfake at February 09, 2020 10:09 AM (z0XD8)

135 I'm not going to go borrowing. Should have said.

Posted by: TexasDan at February 09, 2020 10:10 AM (hr5kG)

136
WOT no boogy woogy on the piana in the rotunda.....


OK RAP then........

Posted by: saf at February 09, 2020 10:10 AM (5IHGB)

137 The Atlanta Radio Theatre Co. (artc.org) has an audio-drama work concerning "What else was going on during Wells's 'War' " entitled "The War of the Worlds: The Untold Story." It won a Silver Mark Time Award a few years back. You might enjoy it.

Posted by: RNB at February 09, 2020 10:10 AM (DjjZJ)

138 Years ago I had Jeff Wayne's musical anthology War of the Worlds. Quite good IIRC. And it did have a song about Thunderchild, which I can hear in my mind right now.
I believe the narrator was Richard Burton.

Posted by: Northernlurker at February 09, 2020 10:10 AM (Uu+Jp)

139 Mayor Pete and Diet Dr. PepperŪ have partnered to destroy your thirst democratically.

WTF

Posted by: rhennigantx at February 09, 2020 10:11 AM (JFO2v)

140 "Chernow argues that in contrast to Jefferson and Washington's now outmoded agrarian idealism, Hamilton was 'the prophet of the capitalist revolution' and the true forebear of modern America." (from an amazon editorial review)

Delving into that contrast, agrarian versus "free trade", would be quite enlightening, I imagine. I'm bending back toward more agrarian views, in the sense that the "American commoners" should own and maintain the land. There has been movement toward hollowing out the rural areas, and the contrived profiteering from currency and stock manipulation can be turned into real land purchases (Ted Turner owns two million acres).


Another big change was in the 80's when the globalist free traders openly stated that only the bottom line mattered, not any commitment to liberty or country.


The old American "oligarchs" committed (some) money to building a better nation. Carnegie libraries, some large land purchases made public. Henry Ford is sometimes credited with building the middle class almost single-handedly, when he pushed toward better pay for his workers, and shorter hours allowing for some family time. (maybe those are partly "fake news" examples, but there is truth to Americanism being killed, murdered even, by globalism)


(this is Tucker's rant on that) ... https://tinyurl.com/v6gdkbd


There is no doubt that fair access to capital CAN accommodate the build out of middle class dreams via real estate and small business. At the same time, the control of such powerful monetary flows and taxation can strangle the middle class worker and reward the corporate raiders, and/or beltway buccaneers and their piracy (via klans in the bureaucracy).


From that perspective, Washington's agrarianism versus Hamilton's capitalism could be enlightening as we face bigger than ever debt, richer than ever anti-America oligarchs/conglomerates.

Posted by: illiniwek at February 09, 2020 10:11 AM (Cus5s)

141 Hiya, JT. Get any books at any yard sales yesterday?

Posted by: bluebell - NoVaMoMe2020! at February 09, 2020 10:11 AM (/669Q)

142 Beijing begins mass arrest of suspected virus patients...

-
A fellow with a tendency toward conspiracy theories might interpret Kung Flu as a hoax designed to allow a huge power grab. You know, like global warming.

Posted by: Anonosaurus Wrecks, Tyrannosaur Wrangler at February 09, 2020 10:12 AM (+y/Ru)

143

Cornish pastische YUM

Posted by: saf at February 09, 2020 10:12 AM (5IHGB)

144 The word "queer" has been redefined in modern times.
Posted by: Vic at February 09, 2020 09:06 AM (mpXpK)

Much to society's loss, like the word "gay". It's a sickening appropriation of the language. They are homosexual.
Posted by: CN at February 09, 2020 09:13 AM (ONvIw)


The appropriation of "gay" to a group with a higher than average suicide rate was particularly galling. Nobody asked my opinion on that ironic dumbfuckery and I can only register my outrage in forums like this.

Posted by: Captain Hate at February 09, 2020 10:13 AM (Yp/pV)

145 OK, all, time for breakfast and then puttering around.

Hope you all have a lovely day.

Posted by: Mary Poppins' Practically Perfect Piercing at February 09, 2020 10:13 AM (Ki5SV)

146 Posted by: Bandersnatch at February 09, 2020 09:07 AM

=====

Nice. You get an honorable mention for the most interesting incorrect answer.
Posted by: OregonMuse, AoSHQ Thought Leader, Pants Monitor


Dude didn't have his pants on yet. Are you sure you want to reinforce maladaptive behaviors like that?

Posted by: Assistant Associate Hall & Pants Monitor, Third Class at February 09, 2020 10:14 AM (cdHtX)

147 The Thunder Child scene is one of my favorite bits from War of the Worlds.

It's also a neat bit of honest-to-god science fiction writing: Mars is a desert planet, and the one time they get their asses handed to them is at sea. Nice work, H.G.! (And shortly thereafter they get their aircraft operational, completely negating any advantage the humans might have at sea.)

And no, no film version has ever done a good job with that. The BBC did a TV serial recently, and Thunderchild is there -- off in the distance half-hidden by mist!

Someone involved with Star Trek in the Next Generation to DS9 era obviously loved that scene in WotW also, as there's a USS Thunderchild in Starfleet. Amazingly, it does NOT ram the Borg cube in the big battle at the start of the movie First Contact.

Posted by: Trimegistus at February 09, 2020 10:14 AM (A1psc)

148 Posted by: Brown Line at February 09, 2020 09:45 AM (S6ArX)

Never read the Grant biography, but I do have the Hamilton bio, and I could see that. Chernow is very thorough in his work, but he does have the habit of unnecessarily slighting his subject's personal rivals or enemies--especially Jefferson and Madison, in this case. They come off as a bit too unserious or short-sighted, which isn't very fair to them in my view.

Posted by: Dr. T at February 09, 2020 10:16 AM (2PXwn)

149 Hiya, JT. Get any books at any yard sales yesterday?
Posted by: bluebell -

Nah, I got a pretty nice pic of a Cardinal and a GIANT metal toolbox with no handle for 3 bucks.

Posted by: JT at February 09, 2020 10:17 AM (arJlL)

150 A fellow with a tendency toward conspiracy theories might interpret Kung Flu as a hoax designed to allow a huge power grab. You know, like global warming.
Posted by: Anonosaurus Wrecks, Tyrannosaur Wrangler at February 09, 2020 10:12 AM (+y/Ru)

There are a lot of conspiracy theories around this one and biological weapons.

I read an interesting medical piece suggesting that this particular virus has an affinity for a protein found in greatest quantity in Asian people. The Asian authors state that this was present in SARS as well.

I'm not sure what to make of this, but it attracted a lot of negativity.

Posted by: CN at February 09, 2020 10:18 AM (ONvIw)

151 94
I suddenly remember reading a novel back in the 80's, Gardens of Stone.



I remember liking it, but not retaining much more than the overall story arc.



And my views of politics and history have shifted since my youth.



May need to re-read it.

Posted by: Village Idiot's Apprentice at February 09, 2020 09:50 AM (tT0V4)





I used to have a DVD called Gardens of Stone. I didn't like it so I gave it to my MIL. I wonder if that is the same as the book. Here is the movie.

https://tinyurl.com/r9q3kaf

Posted by: Vic at February 09, 2020 10:18 AM (mpXpK)

152 Our side is absolutely on the receiving end of all the intimidation, and atca minimum it has made it not worth it to show public support for our candidates.

-
From ABC News: "though it is unsure if the crash was politically motivated."

We'll probably never know his true motive.

Posted by: Anonosaurus Wrecks, Tyrannosaur Wrangler at February 09, 2020 10:18 AM (+y/Ru)

153 I used to have a DVD called Gardens of Stone.

I saw that; didn't like it.

Not a James Caan fan......

Posted by: JT at February 09, 2020 10:19 AM (arJlL)

154 Nah, I got a pretty nice pic of a Cardinal and a GIANT metal toolbox with no handle for 3 bucks.
Posted by: JT at February 09, 2020 10:17 AM (arJlL)
---------

I love cardinals. Cardinals and bluebirds are my favorite birds.

Can you put a handle on the toolbox yourself?

Posted by: bluebell - NoVaMoMe2020! at February 09, 2020 10:19 AM (/669Q)

155 In my youth I read most of HG Wells' novels. You know, I don't remember much about them. On the other hand, I really enjoyed Jules Verne much more and that is now magnifyed by the superb translations made in the lastten or twenty years.

I wonder if there is a rift between folks who prefer Well over Verne or vice versa.

Posted by: JTB at February 09, 2020 10:20 AM (7EjX1)

156 "I wonder if that is the same as the book. Here is the movie.
"

Vic..


Yes, yes it is.

Posted by: Village Idiot's Apprentice at February 09, 2020 10:22 AM (tT0V4)

157 I wonder if there is a rift between folks who prefer Well over Verne or vice versa.

-
Like East Coast/West Coast rapper wars except they'd use lasers in their drive bys.

Posted by: Anonosaurus Wrecks, Tyrannosaur Wrangler at February 09, 2020 10:23 AM (+y/Ru)

158 On Gutenberg there is Garrett P. Serviss' Edison's Conquest of Mars, which is about Earth taking a slap back after the Martians' failed invasion.

It was a serial published in 1909 and collected as a novel in 1947

Posted by: Kindltot at February 09, 2020 10:24 AM (6rS3m)

159 OT: In his interviews this morning, Chris Wallace lobbed a bunch of softballs (with no follow ups) at Mayor, but he challenged Bernie Sanders several times. Guess I know who Wallace is backing.

Posted by: FloridaMan at February 09, 2020 10:24 AM (r28kI)

160 Posted by: JTB at February 09, 2020 10:20 AM (7EjX1)

I remember The Invisible Man being really good.

Posted by: Vanya at February 09, 2020 10:26 AM (U7voe)

161 159: The less inflammatory socialist? One who can appear genteel and moderate?

There is no good choice among the donks.

Posted by: CN at February 09, 2020 10:26 AM (ONvIw)

162 My recollection of "Hamilton" was how disheartened I was that he placed so much effort in "protecting his reputation" such that he was compelled to answer many slights with facts and argument thus giving them further notoriety.

Posted by: Lurking Guy at February 09, 2020 10:27 AM (Rs1MW)

163 There is no good choice among the donks.
Posted by: CN at February 09, 2020 10:26 AM (ONvIw)
----------

An evergreen statement if I've ever seen one.

Posted by: bluebell - NoVaMoMe2020! at February 09, 2020 10:27 AM (/669Q)

164 Thanks for the comments on Northanger Abbey. I didn't make much headway in it since I'm visiting family in Santa Cruz and my grandchildren are monopolizing most of my time. But I made progress in The Gift, Nabokov's last full length work of fiction originally written in Russian while he was trying to get out of European pre WW2. The fourth chapter was the protagonist's book, The Life of Chernyshevsky, a biography of this nutty character who made daft comments on literature that people like Lenin thought were brilliant. At first I thought he was a fictional creation until in the middle I looked his name up and thought "holy shit, this loon was real" and started it again with that in mind. Rereading it with that knowledge didn't help much because he still was a loon either way, but it was still enjoyable. Ironically when the book was subsequently serialized in periodicals, Vlad couldn't get anyone interested in that chapter and nobody knew about it for a while. I guess you can kind of figure out making sense of the whole work without it, but it seemed like an odd exclusion. Maybe that's why Nabokov was so brutal to critics in later works like Pale Fire.

Posted by: Captain Hate at February 09, 2020 10:28 AM (Yp/pV)

165 Now straying into the "you can't make this shit up" territory...

https://tinyurl.com/vsdsozw

Looks like China's table just got flipped.

Posted by: CPT. Charles at February 09, 2020 10:30 AM (W+kMI)

166 I liked the movie "Gardens of Stone." I liked the screenplay & James Earl Jones. Other aspects too.

James Caan is a good actor! I don't know why he gets hated on so much. I have read that he's "difficult" on the set, & that's cost him some choice roles over the years.

Posted by: mnw at February 09, 2020 10:30 AM (Cssks)

167 Last week I read Next of Kin by Eric Frank Russell. Published in 1959, it is based on two novellas that appeared previously in science fiction magazines. The protagonist is a scout pilot in the Allied fleet fighting an interstellar war. He is a rugged individualist and chafes under regimentation. He volunteers for a long-range mission to chart the depth of the enemy's region behind the front lines. He eventually has to crash land and is captured by a not particularly intelligent alien species used as prison guards. He sets out to convince the enemy that each Terran has an invisible counterpart.

The story is rather amusing and hat-tip for the recommendation. Rating = 4.0/5.0. (The novel starts a bit slow and the second half, based on "The Space Willies", is given a rating of 5/5).

Posted by: Retired Buckeye Cop is now an engineer at February 09, 2020 10:32 AM (00fXp)

168 In his interviews this morning, Chris Wallace lobbed a bunch of softballs (with no follow ups) at Mayor, but he challenged Bernie Sanders several times. Guess I know who Wallace is backing.
Posted by: FloridaMan at February 09, 2020 10:24 AM (r28kI)


As bad as Wallace obviously is, Ol' Yeller oddly says nice things about him, at least in the past.

Posted by: Captain Hate at February 09, 2020 10:33 AM (Yp/pV)

169 One that I want to read, but have been putting off, is a collected works of Carl Sandberg.
Posted by: Traveling Man&&&& at February 09, 2020 09:37 AM (VLzNr)

Had an assignment in high school to memorize a poem. Don't think the teacher was pleased by my choice.

Fleas by Carl Sandberg

Adam had'em



Posted by: Fox2! at February 09, 2020 10:34 AM (qyH+l)

170 James Caan is a good actor! I don't know why he gets hated on so much. I have read that he's "difficult" on the set, & that's cost him some choice roles over the years.
Posted by: mnw at February 09, 2020 10:30 AM (Cssks)


He plays arrogant prick roles very convincingly so maybe people think that's the real person.

Posted by: Captain Hate at February 09, 2020 10:35 AM (Yp/pV)

171 Wife & I are headed to South Florida this week for a little sun and relaxation. So I packed a couple of old John MacDonald/ Travis McGee books. It just seems right.

Posted by: Buck Throckmorton at February 09, 2020 10:35 AM (5fXlj)

172 "So I packed a couple of old John MacDonald/ Travis McGee books. It just seems right."

Yep

Posted by: Village Idiot's Apprentice at February 09, 2020 10:37 AM (tT0V4)

173 Mayor Pete and Diet Dr. Pepper have partnered to destroy your thirst democratically.



Well, they do both come in a can.

Posted by: Mr. Peebles at February 09, 2020 10:38 AM (oVJmc)

174 Now straying into the "you can't make this shit up" territory...

https://tinyurl.com/vsdsozw

Looks like China's table just got flipped.

-
Our anthem is all about rockets and bombs and shit! We're going to have to censor that shit if we're ever going to end school shootings.

Posted by: Anonosaurus Wrecks, Tyrannosaur Wrangler at February 09, 2020 10:38 AM (+y/Ru)

175 He plays arrogant prick roles very convincingly so maybe people think that's the real person.

-
I liked it when they machine gunned him at the toll booth.

Posted by: Anonosaurus Wrecks, Tyrannosaur Wrangler at February 09, 2020 10:40 AM (+y/Ru)

176 hey SMOD

The University of Massachusetts-Lowell Center for Public Opinion surveyed Democratic primary voters at the end of January and found nearly two-thirds would rather a meteor hit the earth, extinguishing all human life, than President Trump win re-election on Nov. 3.

Posted by: rhennigantx at February 09, 2020 10:41 AM (JFO2v)

177 Garrett P. Serviss' Edison's Conquest of Mars, which is about Earth taking a slap back after the Martians' failed invasion.

It was a serial published in 1909 and collected as a novel in 1947
Posted by: Kindltot at February 09, 2020 10:24 AM (6rS3m)


I read that one after it got mentioned on the Book Thread a year or two ago. I found it more interesting as a curiosity; it's mostly exposition rather than action. Besides the rather rare standalone printing, a substantial excerpt can be found in The Treasury of Science Fiction Classics edited by Harold Kuebler published in 1954.

Posted by: Retired Buckeye Cop is now an engineer at February 09, 2020 10:41 AM (00fXp)

178 165 Now straying into the "you can't make this shit up" territory...

https://tinyurl.com/vsdsozw

Looks like China's table just got flipped.
Posted by: CPT. Charles at February 09, 2020 10:30 AM (W+kMI)

Big Government always gets free speech wrong.

Posted by: rhennigantx at February 09, 2020 10:42 AM (JFO2v)

179 From Lloyd's suggestion, Aceonian shelves

| | |
| | \

Posted by: Skip at February 09, 2020 10:43 AM (ZCEU2)

180 Can you put a handle on the toolbox yourself?
Posted by: bluebell

Yep.......

Posted by: JT at February 09, 2020 10:43 AM (arJlL)

181 Wife & I are headed to South Florida this week for a little sun and relaxation. So I packed a couple of old John MacDonald/ Travis McGee books. It just seems right.
Posted by: Buck Throckmorton at February 09, 2020 10:35 AM (5fXlj)
---------

We were there a week ago, gulf side, and the weather was lovely. Hope you have the same.

Posted by: bluebell - NoVaMoMe2020! at February 09, 2020 10:46 AM (/669Q)

182 Wallace taking his talking points, Buttaguy is the new appointed frontrunner.

Posted by: Skip at February 09, 2020 10:46 AM (ZCEU2)

183 Film adaptations that are better than the original book (a minor example):

A VERY good BBC series called "Piece of Cake," about the Battle of Britain. Concerns characters interacting against that historical backdrop.

I liked it so much that I went to some trouble to get the original novella... & discovered the film version is WAY better than the source material.

Posted by: mnw at February 09, 2020 10:46 AM (Cssks)

184 This is interesting, and was pointed out in a Spectator column JJS linked Friday. In an April 2016 interview with Kirsten Powers and posted in USA Today, she said:

Trump described himself as an Ayn Rand fan. He said of her novel The Fountainhead, "It relates to business (and) beauty (and) life and inner emotions. That book relates to ... everything." He identified with Howard Roark, the novel's idealistic protagonist who designs skyscrapers and rages against the establishment.

When I pointed out that The Fountainhead is in a way about the tyranny of groupthink, Trump sat up and said, "That's what is happening here."


Since she is snippy about his dearth of literary references, I'm not linking the actual article (but will on request)...

It's true that Trump doesn't mention literature much. He doesn't seem to read novels -- I think he's a more visual person, as seen in his frequent twitter links to videos.

So this reference to The Fountainhead is a rare glimpse into his readings, and philosophy.

Posted by: GnuBreed at February 09, 2020 10:48 AM (wwSQm)

185 Wife & I are headed to South Florida this week for a little sun and relaxation. So I packed a couple of old John MacDonald/ Travis McGee books. It just seems right.
Posted by: Buck Throckmorton

At one time, I had every book that John D. wrote.

They took up a LOT of space.

I had to set them free.

Posted by: JT at February 09, 2020 10:49 AM (arJlL)

186 In the film "Misery," James Can does NOT play an arrogant prick, & he's still very good.

Posted by: mnw at February 09, 2020 10:49 AM (Cssks)

187 Let's counterpoint the coverage given to the Covington Kids vs. James Hodgkinson on Wheels.

Posted by: Mr. Peebles at February 09, 2020 10:50 AM (oVJmc)

188 I thought Lonesome Dove was better than the underlying work it was based on, surely because it was well cast with superb actors, although to give McMurtry credit, he was involved in the production. We may have discussed this here previously.

Posted by: Captain Hate at February 09, 2020 10:51 AM (Yp/pV)

189 Remember Reading is Fundamental?

We should still be promoting that.

A lot of "news" now seems to be about tendentious reading.

There is a headline at Drudge right now that says AI picks Pete Buttigieg to win. It links to a Washington Examiner article.

If you actually read the article, what it says is that the AI analyzed prior debates and polls and found that Buttigieg had convinced more Dem voters in NH that he was the guy who could beat Trump.

That's a far cry from saying that an AI has predicted that he will beat Trump.

Posted by: blaster at February 09, 2020 10:51 AM (ZfRYq)

190 "Chinese social networking platform Douban has censored lyrics from #China's own national anthem "rise, people who do not wish to be slaves" due to "radical content"


same with the USA ... the proles are useful for overturning the American structure, BUT once the commies get control, it is time to "punch a Nazi, silence all dissent, Resist/Remove a duly elected president.


The ongoing coup against Trump, the open borders crowd in both parties, the GoogleArchipelalo of control, globalist banks underwritten by America itself, the GreenNewDeal, lawfare in many forms ... all that is the iron fascist fist moving toward silencing the middle class revolt. (cling to your religion and guns)

Posted by: illiniwek at February 09, 2020 10:52 AM (Cus5s)

191 Eric Frank Russell is one of my always favorite writers (as opposed to Murray Leinster, who is one of my mostly always favorite writer )

When I was in grade school my mom would park me at the library and let me read, and I started reading Science Fiction. One of the books that stuck with me turned out to be a series turned into a novel called The Great Explosion.
The story is about the first interstellar exploration after Earth went into a slump, after the discovery of a simple, easy interstellar drive allowed all the individualists, crazies and maladjusteds to travel and set up their own colonies where they could be them and not have to put up with all the normies.

The book follows the expedition out to various colonies, and shows how it ultimately falls apart.

The last section is found online, if you are interested, it is called, "And Then There Were None"

It is written along the lines of Swift's Gulliver's Travels

Posted by: Kindltot at February 09, 2020 10:53 AM (6rS3m)

192 139 Mayor Pete and Diet Dr. Pepper have partnered to destroy your thirst democratically.


Biden / Pomac 2020

Posted by: REDACTED at February 09, 2020 10:56 AM (rpxSz)

193 188
I thought Lonesome Dove was better than the underlying work it was based
on, surely because it was well cast with superb actors, although to
give McMurtry credit, he was involved in the production. We may have
discussed this here previously.

Posted by: Captain Hate at February 09, 2020 10:51 AM (Yp/pV)

I did not like the movie and I hated the book. I gave the book to the library for their dollar table sales.

Posted by: Vic at February 09, 2020 10:57 AM (mpXpK)

194 And Then There Were None by Eric Frank Russell . . .

Not the Agatha Christie one.

Posted by: Kindltot at February 09, 2020 10:57 AM (6rS3m)

195 I liked it when they machine gunned him at the toll booth.
Posted by: Anonosaurus Wrecks, Tyrannosaur Wrangler at February 09, 2020 10:40 AM (+y/Ru)

--------

The scene could have been improved somewhat if they would have set the soundtrack to Yackety Sax.

Posted by: Cicero (@cicero) at February 09, 2020 10:58 AM (XVuno)

196 In "Gardens of Stone" the Lt, speaking of Viet Nam, says "some of our helicopters are coming back with arrows in them. How can they expect to win if they are trying to fight helicopters with bows and arrow?"

James Caan replies "How can we expect to win if they are willing to fight helicopters with bows and arrows?"

I've always remembered that telling exchange...

Posted by: retropox at February 09, 2020 10:58 AM (DEpA/)

197 Just finished the third book in the Maelstrom Rising series by Peter Nealen, Crimson Star. It's a good "what if" micro view on the theme of EMP and a team that is looking for answers, and the events they have to react to.

Posted by: Grog at February 09, 2020 11:00 AM (weXmt)

198 Re: HMS Thunder Child.

In the opening hours after 7 Dec in Shanghai, an aging British gunboat captain told the Japanese who came to demand his surrender to get the hell off his ship, cleared for action, and opened fire on the nearby Japanese cruiser.

Posted by: Anna Puma at February 09, 2020 11:00 AM (0Ehdk)

199 It's true that Trump doesn't mention literature much. He doesn't seem to read novels -- I think he's a more visual person, as seen in his frequent twitter links to videos.

So this reference to The Fountainhead is a rare glimpse into his readings, and philosophy.
Posted by: GnuBreed at February 09, 2020 10:48 AM (wwSQm)


Thanks for this tidbit, which I need to track down. Because I've been meaning to do a book thread on Trump's favorite books.

Posted by: OregonMuse, AoSHQ Thought Leader, Pants Monitor & Austere Religious Scholar at February 09, 2020 11:01 AM (CoLi6)

200 BOOK NERDS!!

Posted by: Insomniac - Ex Cineribus Resurgo at February 09, 2020 11:03 AM (NWiLs)

201 When I was in grade school my mom would park me at the library and let me read, and I started reading Science Fiction. One of the books that stuck with me turned out to be a series turned into a novel called The Great Explosion.
The story is about the first interstellar exploration after Earth went into a slump, after the discovery of a simple, easy interstellar drive allowed all the individualists, crazies and maladjusteds to travel and set up their own colonies where they could be them and not have to put up with all the normies.
The book follows the expedition out to various colonies, and shows how it ultimately falls apart.
The last section is found online, if you are interested, it is called, "And Then There Were None"

It is written along the lines of Swift's Gulliver's Travels
Posted by: Kindltot at February 09, 2020 10:53 AM (6rS3m)


I read that story in one of Ben Bova's 'Greatest Science Fiction Stories' anthologies. An entire society organized around one principle:

"F - IW".

It was a pretty fun story. I never knew it was part of a larger work.

Posted by: OregonMuse, AoSHQ Thought Leader, Pants Monitor & Austere Religious Scholar at February 09, 2020 11:04 AM (CoLi6)

202 As I mentioned in the ONT have taken up pen and rewriting a stalled novel.

Posted by: Anna Puma at February 09, 2020 11:04 AM (0Ehdk)

203 159 OT: In his interviews this morning, Chris Wallace lobbed a bunch of softballs (with no follow ups) at Mayor, but he challenged Bernie Sanders several times. Guess I know who Wallace[i's paymaster[\i] is backing

Posted by: Vlad the impaler,whittling away like mad at February 09, 2020 11:05 AM (d6mdH)

204 NEW: Nevada Democrats are developing a new "tool" to be preloaded onto iPads and distributed to precinct chairs. The tool - which volunteers who attended a training today were told is not an "app" - will fold in early vote results on Caucus Day.

-
This is the part in the movie when the chicken is accidentally exposed to radiation.

Posted by: Anonosaurus Wrecks, Tyrannosaur Wrangler at February 09, 2020 11:05 AM (+y/Ru)

205 >>That's a far cry from saying that an AI has predicted that he will beat Trump.


The way I reads it, he already President!

Posted by: Stacey Abrahms at February 09, 2020 11:07 AM (lWoG2)

206 Democrats vs the Incredible Chicken?

Posted by: Anna Puma at February 09, 2020 11:07 AM (0Ehdk)

207 On topic, CSPAN2 has a thing on about books turned into movies right now.

Posted by: Honorable Mention Recipient and Occasional Fish Host Bandersnatch at February 09, 2020 11:08 AM (gd9RK)

208 This day in 1944 at Anzio:

Feb 9
Battery started moving to new area. No shelling. Spent all day with Evans digging a "house" to sleep in. Quite a fancy affair. About 3 ft deep, log roof with rushes and dirt, a fireplace. Moved in for the night and really appreciated it when the flak started falling.

Posted by: Muldoon at February 09, 2020 11:10 AM (m45I2)

209 Still reading Neil Peart's Ghost Rider. I'm not even sure how to describe it. On one hand its pretty cool to get inside the mind of a dude who I knew little about, and who was an absolute wall of power in one of my life long favorite non metal bands, but sad in some ways to almost experience the roller coaster ride of emotions he was dealing with. I like how he describes all the places he saw, and gives some history about these places, sometimes with a dose of humor. You see America through a Canadian's eyes, and ironically brings places I never knew about in my own country to life. One part that made me laugh was how he noticed the courthouses are all different, and says "I wonder if any of these small towns had ever saved their taxpayers some money by sharing the same plans for their imposing neoclassical edifice with another county seat, which might be hundreds or thousands of miles away, after all. I decided civic pride would probably preclude that. "We've got to have an imposing neoclassical edifice of our own".

He doesn't just go from town to town, he seems to absorb what he can. He'll go on hikes, visit historical sites, try to learn what he can, and what I found interesting was his not too demanding choice of hotels and places to eat. He wasn't all the demanding as long as it wasn't a shithole. The musician part of myself knows that, and he seems to have not forgotten it either. I'm liking the book a lot.

Posted by: Berserker-Dragonheads Division at February 09, 2020 11:10 AM (9Om/r)

210 Thanks for this tidbit, which I need to track down. Because I've been meaning to do a book thread on Trump's favorite books.

Posted by: OregonMuse, AoSHQ Thought Leader, Pants Monitor & Austere Religious Scholar at February 09, 2020 11:01 AM (CoLi6)


Here's the link to the USA Today article:

https://tinyurl.com/qq7yhje

Posted by: GnuBreed at February 09, 2020 11:12 AM (wwSQm)

211 Robert Conrad passed. Certainly inspired me to read Baa Baa Black Sheep.

Posted by: InspiredHistoryMike at February 09, 2020 11:12 AM (x8Q/V)

212 Shorpy is back!

Posted by: Vic at February 09, 2020 11:12 AM (mpXpK)

213 Virtually all of my reading this past month has been cancer related.
My friend has Stage Two DCIS. This is her third bout of cancer. In this case a mastectomy is the, "Good news".
Her second bout was sweat gland cancer which has not been well researched or even found much.
Pathology reports do not make light reading.
We see her surgeon Tuesday to get the amputation scheduled. I'll be in touch with Fenafter that to get her on the Prayer List.

Posted by: Winston a dreg of society at February 09, 2020 11:12 AM (Tt761)

214 212 Shorpy is back!

Posted by: Vic at February 09, 2020 11:12 AM (mpXpK)


I never knew they were gone. Did they lose funding or something?

Posted by: OregonMuse, AoSHQ Thought Leader, Pants Monitor & Austere Religious Scholar at February 09, 2020 11:14 AM (CoLi6)

215 Apparently some pro-Trump (read BAD!) people are releasing a dossier of negative material on reporters. All of it seems to be quotes from their past and actual facts.

This is considered to be an attack on the First Amendment, Democracy, Mom, apple pie, blah blah blah.

Score one for D-Lamp.

Posted by: blaster at February 09, 2020 11:14 AM (ZfRYq)

216 Reading a book about the House of Medici -- not a new one, it's from 1975, but I like old histories because they tell me what people did and what they were like, instead of ticking off whether they were racists and how they felt about drag queen story hour.

Posted by: Trimegistus at February 09, 2020 11:15 AM (A1psc)

217 How did the British know the Tripods were from Mars?

Posted by: Mel Gibson at February 09, 2020 11:15 AM (QZCjk)

218 "F - IW

===
????

Posted by: Vlad the impaler,whittling away like mad at February 09, 2020 11:15 AM (d6mdH)

219 This week finished the Moron-Recommended 'Lucky 666'. Drury and Clavin. Whoever suggested it, I tip my hat.

This is a non-fiction recounting of an incredible pilot/crew of a cobbed together B-17 in the S. Pacific during WWII. The plane produced two MOH winners. Their experiences were simply beyond imagining.

If you're interested in WWII history, and especially if you are interested in the S. Pacific, this is a must read.

Still working on 'The Making of the Atomic Bomb', Rhodes. After some thought, I've concluded that this is probably the most interesting book that I have ever read, and believe me, that is a LOT of books.

Apparently I'm not the only one who has liked it, Pulitzer Prize, National Book Award, and National Book Critics Circle Award.

Rhodes had to have conducted a staggering amount of research to have written this. While the technical details are there, in a reasonably readable form for the non-technically inclined, the details of the people and events involved are like interwoven serial biographies.

Frankly, it is very difficult to understand how Rhodes managed to do it. It is a real tour de force. I note that Goodreads has 16,122 ratings, and 898 reviews.

This is in no way strictly about the bomb, but rather about all of the WWII events, domestic and international, and individual diplomats, physicists, and engineers involved. It was staggering.

An easy 5 Stars.

Posted by: Mike Hammer, etc., etc. at February 09, 2020 11:16 AM (xSo9G)

220 This involves words but not reading. I enjoy crossword puzzles and usually get the big 300 puzzles per volume. I guess this was bound to happen. The newer ones have all sorts of clues involving new movies, Taylor Swift song titles (I don't know any), modern slang, and celebrities I've never heard of and the like. Rather annoying.

Posted by: JTB at February 09, 2020 11:16 AM (7EjX1)

221 I have a copy of Chernow's Grant bio sitting on my "to read" pile. I confess I was rather reluctant about it, partly because of its sheer mass, and partly because I had a lurking suspicion that he might throw in a lot of lefty bullshit -- since he's Lin-Manuel Miranda's favorite historian that seemed likely.

Glad to hear my suspicions were ill-founded. I'll give it a look.

Posted by: Trimegistus at February 09, 2020 11:17 AM (A1psc)

222 Chernow is a great Biographer.

Posted by: garrett at February 09, 2020 11:18 AM (lWoG2)

223 This day in 1944 at Anzio:



Feb 9

Battery started moving to new area. No shelling. Spent all day with
Evans digging a "house" to sleep in. Quite a fancy affair. About 3 ft
deep, log roof with rushes and dirt, a fireplace. Moved in for the night
and really appreciated it when the flak started falling.

Posted by: Muldoon at February 09, 2020 11:10 AM (m45I2)


yeah, compare that to today.
Feb 9
The coffee shop on my way to the weed dispensary was closed, no latte for me, life sucks. I wasn't able to pollute twitter and charge my phone, fuck my life.

Posted by: Berserker-Dragonheads Division at February 09, 2020 11:18 AM (9Om/r)

224 I think I read a biography of the real Pappy Boyington in high school when the show was new.

legalinsurrection.com/dem impeachment managers deny reality in cnn therapy session
I missed a comedy gem, hope there is a replay

Posted by: Skip at February 09, 2020 11:18 AM (ZCEU2)

225 217: In the novel they observed flashes of light on Mars shortly before the first meteors landed on Earth. I think it's the narrator who makes the connection, or maybe his astronomer friend.

Posted by: Trimegistus at February 09, 2020 11:19 AM (A1psc)

226 214 I never knew they were gone. Did they lose funding or something?


Posted by: OregonMuse, AoSHQ Thought Leader, Pants Monitor Austere Religious Scholar at February 09, 2020 11:14 AM (CoLi6)

Their site went down early this morning.

Posted by: Vic at February 09, 2020 11:19 AM (mpXpK)

227 209: berserker, one of my favorite reads.

Posted by: chavez the hugo at February 09, 2020 11:19 AM (KP5rU)

228 Picked up Three Men in a Boat. Looking to start it this week.,

Posted by: Mel Gibson at February 09, 2020 11:20 AM (QZCjk)

229
Since the Book Thread with Folio Society Books, I've been thinking about finding some classic novels or personal faves in that sort of format(there are lots of presses similar to FS) only on sale.

Cuz $900.00+ for the Moby Dick Special Edition from FS would have the Lovely and Thrifty Mrs naturalfake slowly running me feet first thru a sausage maker.

But, I found these two volumes which look interesting even if they're not on sale.


This one has a great reputation cuz it's reproduction of the Arion Press Moby Dick, which is supposed to have great woodcut illustrations:

https://www.amazon.com/Herman-Melville-published-University-California/dp/B00E6T1QB8


This is new and contains the painting of a Moby Dick obsessed commie. Over 100+ of them along with the novel.

He's dead so he won't be getting the cash if you buy.

And the paintings are kinda interesting in a Soviet Style Socialist dealio like their posters:

https://www.amazon.com/Moby-Dick-Illustrated-Gilbert-Wilson/dp/1732734518

Either one will run you around $50 whether new or old, but there could be better bargains out there.

$50 is more than I'm looking to pay, so I'll check half price books this week.

If wonder if "The Fountainhead" comes in a nice readable volume instead of the squinty little typeface as usual?

Posted by: naturalfake at February 09, 2020 11:21 AM (9wmyx)

230 Three Men in a Boat is possibly the funniest book ever written. I'll stop now before I ruin it for you.

Posted by: Trimegistus at February 09, 2020 11:21 AM (A1psc)

231 Oh, forgot. Still working on Gary Power's memoir 'Operation Overflight'. Those of you who are over 29 will be refocused on the U2 incident, and it's consequences. Pretty amazing that Powers survived the whole thing.

As an aside, if 'U2' causes you to think of Bono, this may not be the book for you.

Posted by: Mike Hammer, etc., etc. at February 09, 2020 11:21 AM (CDGwz)

232 Picked up Three Men in a Boat. Looking to start it this week.,

Posted by: Mel Gibson at February 09, 2020 11:20 AM (QZCjk)



But, first, they will blow you?


Posted by: naturalfake at February 09, 2020 11:22 AM (9wmyx)

233 Thanks. I always found Verne difficult to read. But his Classic Illustrated Comics were some of the best.

Posted by: Mel Gibson at February 09, 2020 11:23 AM (QZCjk)

234 berserker, one of my favorite reads.

Posted by: chavez the hugo at February 09, 2020 11:19 AM (KP5rU)


You read it, or are you still reading it? You feel like you're almost riding next to him. I wouldn't mind seeing some of the places he wrote about.

Posted by: Berserker-Dragonheads Division at February 09, 2020 11:23 AM (9Om/r)

235 Here's the link to the USA Today article:

https://tinyurl.com/qq7yhje

Posted by: GnuBreed at February 09, 2020 11:12 AM (wwSQm)


Thanks!

Posted by: OregonMuse, AoSHQ Thought Leader, Pants Monitor & Austere Religious Scholar at February 09, 2020 11:23 AM (CoLi6)

236 Top of the morning to you, OregonMuse and fellow Morons! I've been rebranding my website and screwing around with trying to generate a podcast from my blog posts...didn't work. Why doesn't Ace have a weekly Podcast review? Anyways, I'm thinking about bundling my eBooks into one eBook in the near future. I'll keep you posted!


Posted by: scrood at February 09, 2020 11:24 AM (RGVbn)

237 The Arion Press edition is the one illustrated by Barry Moser. I don't know if he's a Commie -- he's an artist and lives in western Massachusetts, so odds are he's a lefty, but he does seem to believe in God . . .

Posted by: Trimegistus at February 09, 2020 11:25 AM (A1psc)

238 228 ... "Picked up Three Men in a Boat. Looking to start it this week."

Warning. If you are in some place where you have to be quiet, avoid reading Three Men. I couldn't help but laugh out loud at some of the passages.

Posted by: JTB at February 09, 2020 11:25 AM (7EjX1)

239 Three Men in a Boat is possibly the funniest book ever written. I'll stop now before I ruin it for you.
Posted by: Trimegistus
------

There were several Brit novels in that vein. I regard Wodehouse as the master. Any of his are entertaining, but the Wooster & Jeeves series are especially fine.

I think that we have also discussed Canning's 'Mr. Finchly Discovers His England' series also. Entertaining and amusing.

Posted by: Mike Hammer, etc., etc. at February 09, 2020 11:26 AM (CDGwz)

240 217 How did the British know the Tripods were from Mars?
Posted by: Mel Gibson at February 09, 2020 11:15 AM (QZCjk)

The license plates.

Posted by: Insomniac - Ex Cineribus Resurgo at February 09, 2020 11:26 AM (NWiLs)

241

I HATE FUCKING JAMES CAAN.








said no woman anytime.

Posted by: saf at February 09, 2020 11:26 AM (5IHGB)

242 Wasn't chernow part of the group of historians who signed a letter stating trump needed to be impeached? Think it was in December. 700 historians.

Posted by: NCKate at February 09, 2020 11:28 AM (QLEJC)

243 The coffee shop on my way to the weed dispensary was closed, no latte for me, life sucks.
Posted by: Berserker


*************


Heh!

Posted by: Muldoon at February 09, 2020 11:28 AM (m45I2)

244 As I mentioned in the ONT have taken up pen and rewriting a stalled novel.
Posted by: Anna Puma at February 09, 2020 11:04 AM (0Ehdk)


A case of writer's block and/or the work not going where you wanted it?

Posted by: Captain Hate at February 09, 2020 11:29 AM (Yp/pV)

245 Since she is snippy about his dearth of literary references, I'm not linking the actual article (but will on request)...

It's true that Trump doesn't mention literature much. He doesn't seem to read novels -- I think he's a more visual person, as seen in his frequent twitter links to videos.

So this reference to The Fountainhead is a rare glimpse into his readings, and philosophy.
Posted by: GnuBreed at February 09, 2020 10:48 AM (wwSQm)


The left of course, fell in love with the idea of the intellectual President. Woodrow Wilson was a kollej perfesser, for pete's sake. Carter, Clinton, Obama... they would all marvel at how "well-read" these guys are.

I would argue, a good leader doesn't have much time to read. Not that he can't, just that it's not the best use of his time.

Maybe he did all his reading when he was younger, but if you got a guy who's got his nose in a book, he's not likely paying enough attention to what's happening in front of him.

Now, most of us aren't THAT busy that we can't do both, but if you're Presidentin', I'd kinda prefer you have your nose in the day to day, and less in the clouds.

Posted by: BurtTC at February 09, 2020 11:29 AM (hku12)

246 Oh, forgot. Still working on Gary Power's memoir 'Operation Overflight'. Those of you who are over 29 will be refocused on the U2 incident, and it's consequences. Pretty amazing that Powers survived the whole thing.

-
A retired naval officer college professor of mine told us that Powers should have killed himself.

It was a different time.

Posted by: Anonosaurus Wrecks, Tyrannosaur Wrangler at February 09, 2020 11:29 AM (+y/Ru)

247 234:berserker, read it two years ago. brilliant writing. have to read it again. going to check out some of the places he went this summer. alas, not on a bike though.

Posted by: chavez the hugo at February 09, 2020 11:29 AM (KP5rU)

248 220 This involves words but not reading. I enjoy crossword puzzles and usually get the big 300 puzzles per volume. I guess this was bound to happen. The newer ones have all sorts of clues involving new movies, Taylor Swift song titles (I don't know any), modern slang, and celebrities I've never heard of and the like. Rather annoying.
Posted by: JTB at February 09, 2020 11:16 AM (7EjX


Mrs. Muse only does the NY Times Sunday crossword.* The incidence of clues depending on purely modern references is not as bad as you might think.


*Mrs. Muse is not some high-falutin' innerleckshual with fancy book learnin'. But she is very persistent, like a terrier who has latched on to your ankle, and won't let go. Incidentally, the Saturday Times crossword is actually more difficult than the Sunday crossword.

Posted by: OregonMuse, AoSHQ Thought Leader, Pants Monitor & Austere Religious Scholar at February 09, 2020 11:30 AM (CoLi6)

249 Morning!

Have you book people signed up for NoVaMoMe 2020 yet?

Posted by: Weasel at February 09, 2020 11:31 AM (JwkED)

250 Since she is snippy about his dearth of literary references,

-
She's like Eeyore in Winnie the Pooh.

Posted by: Anonosaurus Wrecks, Tyrannosaur Wrangler at February 09, 2020 11:32 AM (+y/Ru)

251 I would argue, a good leader doesn't have much time to read. Not that he can't, just that it's not the best use of his time.



Maybe he did all his reading when he was younger, but if you got a
guy who's got his nose in a book, he's not likely paying enough
attention to what's happening in front of him.



Now, most of us aren't THAT busy that we can't do both, but if
you're Presidentin', I'd kinda prefer you have your nose in the day to
day, and less in the clouds.

Posted by: BurtTC at February 09, 2020 11:29 AM (hku12)


Yeah, I would prefer my leaders to have real world experience, not be an insufferable book worm know it all who in the end really don't know jack shit.

Posted by: Berserker-Dragonheads Division at February 09, 2020 11:32 AM (9Om/r)

252 On the third book of the Ruins of the Galaxy series by JN Chaney and Christopher Hopper.

Thanks to whomever suggested this series to me about 3 weeks ago in this very thread. It is a very good series.

Also very impatiently awaiting the publication of the 9th and final book in The Expanse seties. That release will cause me to re-read the other 8 books in a Binge-Read session of Biblical Proportions.

Posted by: Sharkman at February 09, 2020 11:32 AM (jcBcB)

253 240 Weasel where is it held?

Posted by: Mel Gibson at February 09, 2020 11:32 AM (QZCjk)

254 Wasn't chernow part of the group of historians who signed a letter stating trump needed to be impeached? Think it was in December. 700 historians.
Posted by: NCKate at February 09, 2020 11:28 AM (QLEJC)


They're likely in a 180 position, from the commie "blacklist" era. These days there better be evidence of your commie leanings, or you won't get work in your chosen intellectual profession.

Posted by: BurtTC at February 09, 2020 11:33 AM (hku12)

255 So this reference to The Fountainhead is a rare glimpse into his readings, and philosophy.
Posted by: GnuBreed
------

I recall Bush the younger being asked what he was reading, the answer, 'The Guns of August'. Well, that is certainly fine, but it's unfortunate that he had not read it when he was considerably younger.

Posted by: Mike Hammer, etc., etc. at February 09, 2020 11:33 AM (CDGwz)

256 barky ocracky read two books per week. from what i've seen of that crackheaded fuck, they must have been pre school comic books.

Posted by: chavez the hugo at February 09, 2020 11:34 AM (KP5rU)

257 253 240 Weasel where is it held?
Posted by: Mel Gibson at February 09, 2020 11:32 AM (QZCjk)
-----
Fairfax, Va on May 9th. Hope you can make it! Email in nic.

Posted by: Weasel at February 09, 2020 11:34 AM (MVjcR)

258 Busy executives rarely do much leisure reading. A glimpse into the obvious that, I suppose.

Nixon was a serious reader, however, & of course... he got savaged for being a yuuge vulgarian anyway. "He puts ketchup on cottage cheese!"

(He also read Will & Ariel Durant)

Posted by: mnw at February 09, 2020 11:35 AM (Cssks)

259 Picked up Three Men in a Boat. Looking to start it this week.,

Posted by: Mel Gibson at February 09, 2020 11:20 AM (QZCjk)



Hi Mel Gibson (if that is your real name),

"Three Men in a Boat" is a very funny book. But, it's more in the Brit low key consistently amusing category with some laugh out loud moments sprinkled about.

I believe it's being oversold here to the point that you may be disappointed with it not providing you with gales of laughter.

Just expect a fun read and amusing time and you won't go wrong.

Posted by: naturalfake at February 09, 2020 11:35 AM (9wmyx)

260 Pizza pants!!!
Now we're talking!

Posted by: Diogenes at February 09, 2020 11:35 AM (axyOa)

261 Posted by: BurtTC at February 09, 2020 11:29 AM (hku12)


Yeah, I would prefer my leaders to have real world experience, not be an insufferable book worm know it all who in the end really don't know jack shit.
Posted by: Berserker-Dragonheads Division at February 09, 2020 11:32 AM (9Om/r)


Weren't we told that Clinton went through... maybe not a book a day, but some insanely high number?

All the ooh's and ah's. I always wondered, where'd all that knowledge go. I never saw any evidence of growth or practical applications of what he was supposedly absorbing all the freakin' time.

Posted by: BurtTC at February 09, 2020 11:35 AM (hku12)

262 I recall Bush the younger being asked what he was reading, the answer, 'The Guns of August'. Well, that is certainly fine, but it's unfortunate that he had not read it when he was considerably younger.
Posted by: Mike Hammer, etc., etc. at February 09, 2020 11:33 AM (CDGwz)


George Bush regularly read lots of books, a fact not noticed by the progs who were too busy calling him Chimpy McBushhitler to notice.

Posted by: OregonMuse, AoSHQ Thought Leader, Pants Monitor & Austere Religious Scholar at February 09, 2020 11:36 AM (CoLi6)

263 I would argue, a good leader doesn't have much time to read. Not that he can't, just that it's not the best use of his time.

Maybe he did all his reading when he was younger, but if you got a guy who's got his nose in a book, he's not likely paying enough attention to what's happening in front of him.



That's why I preferred ESPN all day and night.

Posted by: Barack Hussein Obama at February 09, 2020 11:37 AM (9wmyx)

264 I read Guns of August in 70s. Big fan of Tuchman.

Posted by: Mel Gibson at February 09, 2020 11:38 AM (QZCjk)

265 I saw my name in the EMT and yes I don't post much. Always way late to a thread. If not Free Tibet, etc. it was going to be Visualize Whirled Peas.

Carry on.

Posted by: free tibet at February 09, 2020 11:39 AM (wA9n3)

266 Recent court process have been entirely false in their depictions of my dream boats physical attributes.

Once you get past those cute foods of fat and the matted body hair Harvey Weinstein is all man.

Posted by: Hillary setting the record straight Clinton at February 09, 2020 11:42 AM (Pgcou)

267 Patton read a lot . I guess someone's opinion on whether being well read is a negative or positive depends on their bias on the person who is being judged.

Posted by: Sebastian Melmoth at February 09, 2020 11:43 AM (2DOZq)

268 Where's all the smelly hobos in those library photos?. That's what we got here. God forbid you get stuck on the elevator with one like I did. Ripe.

Morning.

Posted by: Cannibal Blob at February 09, 2020 11:43 AM (hmgiv)

269 BurtTC

W.J. Clinton once said that his favorite writer was Gabriel Garcia Marquez... so we know for sure he's lying about his supposed reading, just from that.

There are only two kinds of Gabriel Garcia Marquez "readers": those who quit 25 pages in, & those who lie about ever having read him at all.

The idea of Clinton wading through "100 Years of Solitude" is coffee-spewing funny!

Posted by: mnw at February 09, 2020 11:44 AM (Cssks)

270 Weren't we told that Clinton went through... maybe not a book a day, but some insanely high number?

All the ooh's and ah's. I always wondered, where'd all that knowledge go. I never saw any evidence of growth or practical applications of what he was supposedly absorbing all the freakin' time.
Posted by: BurtTC

Well, he was a Roads scholar. So he new the best time of year to put in cold patch

Posted by: Bruce at February 09, 2020 11:45 AM (vd8XM)

271 Well you have to assume Clinton read Leaves of Grass.

Posted by: Sebastian Melmoth at February 09, 2020 11:46 AM (2DOZq)

272 @220 --

JTB, I have the same experience with Looney Tunes. So many of those have references to what were then-contemporary film stars, who to me were relics of yesteryear. If current cartoons did the same -- maybe they do -- I'd still be lost.

As my wife says, "Is it comfortable under that rock of yours?"

Posted by: Weak Geek at February 09, 2020 11:46 AM (u/nim)

273 Heck, I've got too many books going.

Forgot to mention that I'm also well into 'Street Without Joyn, The French Debacle In Indochina ', Bernard Fall.

This was recommended to me by a friend, ex-infantry captain, who read it before being deployed to VN. I've learned that I am horribly ignorant of the Indo-China wars.

This was published in 1961, and Fall had spent considerable time there from the early-mid fifties, so was there amongst the French through the whole thing. After the French pulled out, he spent an enormous amount of time searching through the sundry VN and French archives to gather information.

It's not dry reading, lots of anecdotes, and shit-storm stuff that make you happy that you were not there...unless you were.

Posted by: Mike Hammer, etc., etc. at February 09, 2020 11:47 AM (CDGwz)

274 Hey, Coronavirus is kicking SARs ass.

Posted by: Mel Gibson at February 09, 2020 11:47 AM (QZCjk)

275 Crap. 'Street Without Joy...'

Posted by: Mike Hammer, etc., etc. at February 09, 2020 11:48 AM (CDGwz)

276 I liked James Caan in "The Killer Elite".

But Burt Young's kung fu moves stole the show.

Mac was kicking ass.......

Posted by: Hairyback Guy at February 09, 2020 11:48 AM (Z+IKu)

277 273 Good book. For Vietnam French fiction read The Five Fingers.

Posted by: Mel Gibson at February 09, 2020 11:49 AM (QZCjk)

278 Does Rhodes book on the a bomb mention Vannevar Bush? He was our head scientist during WWII and Olpenheimers boss

Posted by: Ignoramus at February 09, 2020 11:50 AM (eZk26)

279 Slick's so called enjoyment of reading was just a tactic in snagging cooch. I think I've read that he gave Leaves of Grass to some of his targets who wouldn't automatically fall for the semi educated hick's dogshit charms. I don't think Whitman would be pleased although he could be pretty fucking weird...

Posted by: Captain Hate at February 09, 2020 11:51 AM (Yp/pV)

280 The public library of my youth had the children's section, and a young reader's section called the Brainard Room. A painting of young Mr. Brainard was on display there, painted before his departure to France. He lost his life in WW1. Kind of felt adultish to go in there.

Posted by: bill in arkansas at February 09, 2020 11:51 AM (C1Lsn)

281 Posted by: Mike Hammer, etc., etc. at February 09, 2020 11:47 AM (CDGwz)

It can be assumed the French f'd that up like they pretty much have f'd things up throughout history. I may exaggerate but I think the only thing they got right was screwing with the British and becoming an ally to help the USA in the Revolution.

Posted by: Sebastian Melmoth at February 09, 2020 11:53 AM (2DOZq)

282 Just finished a Heinlein juvenile I'd never read before: Space Cadet. Loved it.

Posted by: Jim S. at February 09, 2020 11:53 AM (ynUnH)

283 Still going through the mystery novels by Garry Disher, set in and around Melbourne, Australia. So far they have all been very good to stellar, but stalled out a bit on this one: Snapshot. It is not a bad book, but only average. Never very interested in the plot or what is happening with the characters. Will head into the next one on the list and hope that Snapshot was an exception. Dragon Man and Kittyhawk Down, the novels before, were excellent. Blood Moon, the first one I read that I picked up when I was in Australia, was what got me to read the rest of the series- it is later on the list than the previous books.

Posted by: Charlotte at February 09, 2020 11:54 AM (Aj6Tl)

284 At Georgetown Bill would go to the library at closing time and volunteer to walk the girls home. For their safety

Posted by: Ignoramus at February 09, 2020 11:54 AM (eZk26)

285 Rhodes' first bomb book (he also did one on the H-bomb) has been on my list forever, need to get to it. Mike H's related tip of the book on Capt. Deak Parsons (Oddly titled "Target Hiroshima") was a good one - could have been even longer and delved more into the pre-Manhattan Project stuff, for my taste, as it was fascinating.

Just about through "Wages of Destruction" by Tooze, Nazi economy. It's the only thing I've read with a financial/economic/industrial focus on the Nazi regime, so nothing to compare it to, but it's solid. Author makes one or two odd points that are kind of off-topic, and rides a few hobby horses (how much Speer really was responsible for the "armaments miracle" later in the war, for example). But good overall.

My usual practice of mining the notes and sources for further reading might be difficult in this case. Seems like most of his sources are German-language.

Posted by: rhomboid at February 09, 2020 11:54 AM (El6T/)

286 Clinton's grade point average at Oxford was 0.0.

Posted by: Sebastian Melmoth at February 09, 2020 11:55 AM (2DOZq)

287 @284. I got this from comedian John Mullaney. It's his parents were Classmates of Bill

Posted by: Ignoramus at February 09, 2020 11:56 AM (eZk26)

288 Make the Martian machines look like how a Victorian might actually
imagine them. Lots of steampunk possibilities here. I think it might be
pretty awesome.




Some of the best examples of steampunk and perhaps leading the way in that had to the be ingenious gadgets on The Wild Wild West TV show. RIP Robert Conrad

Posted by: TheQuietMan at February 09, 2020 11:56 AM (cZWh1)

289 I see no reason that a leader can't be a avid reader, Frederick the Great seemed to go through books like they were water.

Posted by: Skip at February 09, 2020 11:56 AM (ZCEU2)

290 Almost finished Give Me A Fast Ship by Tim McGrath. Learned a whole bunch I didn't know about the Continental Navy and maritime hijinks in general during our Revolution. There was a lot more going on than John Paul Jones. Pretty good read.

Posted by: Notorious BFD at February 09, 2020 11:56 AM (EgshT)

291 Does Rhodes book on the a bomb mention Vannevar Bush? He was our head scientist during WWII and Olpenheimers boss
Posted by: Ignoramus
------

Oh, sure, lots. Bush was a major player.

The average person does not realize that the entire, massive project was being controlled, nurtured and directed by diplomats/statesmen/politicians.

There were very complex moral and international philosophies involved, never mind the personalities.

It's one hell of a read.

I can also recommend 'Churchill's Bomb', Farmelo, as a follow-on. Both very interesting.

Posted by: Mike Hammer, etc., etc. at February 09, 2020 11:57 AM (CDGwz)

292 The idea of Clinton wading through "100 Years of Solitude" is coffee-spewing funny!
Posted by: mnw at February 09, 2020 11:44 AM (Cssks)


There was a character who was hung like a colossus. Bent Willie just wistfully read that part.

Posted by: Captain Hate at February 09, 2020 11:58 AM (Yp/pV)

293 Give Me A Fast Ship
--------

...for I intend to go in harm's way.

We have produced some incredible men.

Posted by: Mike Hammer, etc., etc. at February 09, 2020 11:59 AM (CDGwz)

294
...There are only two kinds of Gabriel Garcia Marquez "readers": those who quit 25 pages in, & those who lie about ever having read him at all....

Posted by: mnw at February 09, 2020 11:44 AM (Cssks)


Not so.

"One Hundred Years of Solitude" is a great novel, which I did, in fact read, all the way through and enjoyed quite a bit.

However, Gabriel Garcia Marquez was apparently a one-shot. His other novels failed to hold my interest or flat out bored me.

Posted by: naturalfake at February 09, 2020 12:00 PM (9wmyx)

295 "Outside of a dog, a book is man's best friend.

Inside of a dog it's too dark to read."

- Groucho you-know-who

Posted by: BackwardsBoy. #DemocratsSuck at February 09, 2020 12:00 PM (HaL55)

296 271 Well you have to assume Clinton read Leaves of Grass.
Posted by: Sebastian Melmoth at February 09, 2020 11:46 AM (2DOZq)

At least he gave copies to his inamorata of the month

Posted by: CN at February 09, 2020 12:00 PM (ONvIw)

297
Weren't we told that Clinton went through... maybe not a book a day, but some insanely high number?



To be fair, there's not lot of words in issues of Big 'Uns.

Posted by: Mr. Peebles at February 09, 2020 12:01 PM (oVJmc)

298 Well you have to assume Clinton read Leaves of Grass.
Posted by: Sebastian Melmoth at February 09, 2020 11:46 AM (2DOZq)

At least he gave copies to his inamorata of the month
Posted by: CN at February 09, 2020 12:00 PM (ONvIw)
-----
Too early for Kahlil Gibran, eh?

Posted by: Captain Obvious at February 09, 2020 12:01 PM (jW9oF)

299 Morning y'all


Breaking the rules as usual, I read the book thread in bed in my nightie with Lucy next to me and a cup of coffee.

Been reading popcorn this week. "Ninth House" by Leigh Bardugo. It's quite good. Very easy reading for an over wired brain.

Posted by: Nurse ratched at February 09, 2020 12:01 PM (PkVlr)

300 ...for I intend to go in harm's way.
We have produced some incredible men.


Indeed.

Posted by: Notorious BFD at February 09, 2020 12:01 PM (EgshT)

301 https://www.c-span.org/video/?468518-1/books-adapted-movies

Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at February 09, 2020 12:02 PM (Dc2NZ)

302 298: Wrong generation. Wasn't he more of a 60s-70s thing?

Posted by: CN at February 09, 2020 12:02 PM (ONvIw)

303 "One Hundred Years of Solitude" is a great novel, which I did, in fact read, all the way through and enjoyed quite a bit.

However, Gabriel Garcia Marquez was apparently a one-shot. His other novels failed to hold my interest or flat out bored me.

Posted by: naturalfake at February 09, 2020 12:00 PM (9wmyx)


Plus he was a tyranny supporting dickhole in real life. Love the art not the artist and all that but fuck that guy in particular.

Posted by: Captain Hate at February 09, 2020 12:02 PM (Yp/pV)

304 Also a moron is also know as a "pastiche eater"

Posted by: TANSTAAFL at February 09, 2020 12:03 PM (T09ml)

305 - Groucho you-know-who
Posted by: BackwardsBoy. #DemocratsSuck at February 09, 2020 12:00 PM (HaL55)

I suspect this is AOC's favorite political philosopher, except he is not a suburb of London

Posted by: CN at February 09, 2020 12:03 PM (ONvIw)

306 rhomboid - Deke Parsons was one of those unknown great men. I suppose that engineers are not as glamorous as physicists.

Frankly, in 'Making the Atomic Bomb', Parsons is mentioned multiple times, but given short shrift I thought. 'Target Hiroshima' compensates.

Posted by: Mike Hammer, etc., etc. at February 09, 2020 12:03 PM (xSo9G)

307 I see no reason that a leader can't be a avid reader, Frederick the Great seemed to go through books like they were water.
Posted by: Skip at February 09, 2020 11:56 AM (ZCEU2)


Needless to say, the world of the 18th century was a very different place from the 20th/21st centuries.

Still, anyone going through books "like they were water" just sounds like a fish story.

*Holds hands widely apart*

"I read this many books!"

But they got away.

Posted by: BurtTC at February 09, 2020 12:04 PM (hku12)

308 Wow pre steampunk. History goes in different directions and it seams to curve some and then it curves some more then it looks straight....no it curves more but not to much . It's like a box but no corners and no straight lines.

Posted by: Humphreyrobot at February 09, 2020 12:04 PM (9PtLS)

309 Just finished a Heinlein juvenile I'd never read before: Space Cadet. Loved it.

If that's the Tom Corbett series, I read every one our primary school had in its library. Probably why I now identify as an astronaut and will be volunteering for the Space Force when they start hiring.

Every military force needs bands.

Posted by: BackwardsBoy. #DemocratsSuck at February 09, 2020 12:04 PM (HaL55)

310 "...for I intend to go in harm's way.

We have produced some incredible men."

That be olde school.

Posted by: Village Idiot's Apprentice at February 09, 2020 12:05 PM (tT0V4)

311 If that's the Tom Corbett series, I read every one our primary school had in its library. Probably why I now identify as an astronaut and will be volunteering for the Space Force when they start hiring.

Every military force needs bands.
Posted by: BackwardsBoy. #DemocratsSuck at February 09, 2020 12:04 PM (HaL55)

A zero-G marching band would be interesting.

Posted by: Insomniac - Ex Cineribus Resurgo at February 09, 2020 12:05 PM (NWiLs)

312 Some of the best examples of steampunk and perhaps leading the way in that had to the be ingenious gadgets on The Wild Wild West TV show. RIP Robert Conrad
Posted by: TheQuietMan at February 09, 2020 11:56 AM (cZWh1)


The Wild Wild West was an outlying point to other shows then. It attracted enough viewers to stay on the air but it surely confused a lot of people.

Posted by: Captain Hate at February 09, 2020 12:05 PM (Yp/pV)

313 The concept of pastiche vs homage vs rip off is an interesting one to me, of particular interest. If, for example, I write a book that redoes - say - Die Hard in a fantasy setting, is it a rip off? If someone rewrites The Magnificent Seven in space did they do an homage?

Some redone stories are respected and appreciated (such as indeed the Magnificent Seven). Others are despised as rip offs (such as the Island and Clonus Horror, Eragon and Star Wars or even Star Wars and The Hidden Fortress).

Posted by: Christopher R Taylor at February 09, 2020 12:05 PM (KZzsI)

314 Well you have to assume Clinton read Leaves of Grass.
Posted by: Sebastian Melmoth at February 09, 2020 11:46 AM (2DOZq)

At least he gave copies to his inamorata of the month
Posted by: CN at February 09, 2020 12:00 PM (ONvIw)
-----
Too early for Kahlil Gibran, eh?
Posted by: Captain Obvious at February 09, 2020 12:01 PM (jW9oF)


And too late for Tennis'shoe Coates.

Posted by: BurtTC at February 09, 2020 12:06 PM (hku12)

315 Did Ace make the homemade book shelf in the cartoon?

Posted by: The Man from Athens at February 09, 2020 12:06 PM (QMwOT)

316 278 Does Rhodes book on the a bomb mention Vannevar Bush? He was our head scientist during WWII and Olpenheimers boss
Posted by: Ignoramus at February 09, 2020 11:50 AM (eZk26)


The Vannevar Bush that invented hypertext?

http://alturl.com/5bxsy

Posted by: OregonMuse, AoSHQ Thought Leader, Pants Monitor & Austere Religious Scholar at February 09, 2020 12:07 PM (CoLi6)

317 If that's the Tom Corbett series, I read every one our primary school had in its library. Probably why I now identify as an astronaut and will be volunteering for the Space Force when they start hiring.
----
The Corbett novels were written by several diffenet authors under a common pseudonym, much like the Hardy Boys novels.

Posted by: Captain Obvious at February 09, 2020 12:08 PM (jW9oF)

318 I've been watching Wartime Farm, about farming in Britain during WWII. Makes me wonder if things were as bad here. The government took it over and could even kick you off your land if they decided you weren't good enough at it. They just told about one farmer being killed. They told him to plow up the bulk of his land, even though it was too wet. He held them off for 18 hours. Pretty chilling.

Posted by: Notsothoreau at February 09, 2020 12:08 PM (Lqy/e)

319 Clinton's grade point average at Oxford was 0.0.
Posted by: Sebastian Melmoth
-------

While soaking in the warm money-bath of a Cecil Rhodes, arch-racist, colonialist scholarship.

The Left is populated with such, say...Rachel Maddow. No one ever talks about it.

Posted by: Mike Hammer, etc., etc. at February 09, 2020 12:09 PM (CDGwz)

320 Does Rhodes book on the a bomb mention Vannevar Bush? He was our head scientist during WWII and Olpenheimers boss

"Was he homoseual, trans, black or a woman? Then we're not interested"
--Hollywood, making yet another movie about Alan Turing

Posted by: Christopher R Taylor at February 09, 2020 12:09 PM (KZzsI)

321 Why doesn't Ace have a weekly Podcast review?
Anyways, I'm thinking about bundling my eBooks into one eBook in the
near future. I'll keep you posted!
Posted by: scrood at February 09, 2020 11:24 AM (RGVbn)


Ooh! Oooh! I know!

"Rogan spoke for about 90 minutes with a world renowned scientist who has a new book, and they discussed marsupials and smoking weed, falling off of bicycles and helmet laws"

"Peter Attia spoke for 90 minutes today on longevity and mental health with a popularizer of the works of Marcus Aurelius, in which they discussed acceptance, stoicism, facing reality, something that might have been a snake or a snapping turtle that ate a goose on his farm and how much of a liar Trump is. Next week promises to be about endocrinology"

"Tom Woods this week put out 5 podcasts in which he discussed the Iowa Caucus, Nullification, the Fed, Murray Rothbard, Social media marketing and the compact theory of the Constitution, so pretty much a repeat of what he did last week"

"Bridget Phetasy started talking about feminism and the problems of intersectionality and then talked about recovery."

"Babylon Bee is now doing two interviews a week, one a discussion of the news and another with an interview, they had Michael Malice, a declared Anarcho-Capitalist podcaster, on this week and they asked him who, in a perfect libertarian world, would shoot the dogs? Malice also discussed North Korea"


Posted by: Kindltot at February 09, 2020 12:10 PM (6rS3m)

322 Clinton's grade point average at Oxford was 0.0.
Posted by: Sebastian Melmoth
-------

While soaking in the warm money-bath of a Cecil Rhodes, arch-racist, colonialist scholarship.
Posted by: Mike Hammer, etc., etc
-------

While being thrown out of the institution for raping a girl

Posted by: Christopher R Taylor at February 09, 2020 12:10 PM (KZzsI)

323 Clinton's grade point average at Oxford was 0.0.
Posted by: Sebastian Melmoth
-------

While soaking in the warm money-bath of a Cecil Rhodes, arch-racist, colonialist scholarship.

The Left is populated with such, say...Rachel Maddow. No one ever talks about it.
Posted by: Mike Hammer, etc., etc. at February 09, 2020 12:09 PM (CDGwz)


Some rayciss ancestors are more equal than others.

Posted by: BurtTC at February 09, 2020 12:10 PM (hku12)

324 That be olde school.
Posted by: Village Idiot's Apprentice
------

Yep. Per 223

Posted by: Mike Hammer, etc., etc. at February 09, 2020 12:11 PM (CDGwz)

325 Ace don't make bookshelves. Ace hasn't been to the grocery store or touched himself in 10 years.

Has gobs of interns.

Posted by: Humphreyrobot at February 09, 2020 12:11 PM (SYa7K)

326 A retired naval officer college professor of mine told us that Powers should have killed himself.

It was a different time.
Posted by: Anonosaurus Wrecks, Tyrannosaur Wrangler at February 09, 2020 11:29 AM (+y/Ru)
---
That was pretty typical of the time. The man who ran Skunkworks felt sorry for him and hired Powers as a test pilot.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at February 09, 2020 12:11 PM (Dc2NZ)

327 There's a pastiche in my pants.

Posted by: Jerry "Comedy Gold" Nadless at February 09, 2020 12:12 PM (EgshT)

328 Posted by: scrood at February 09, 2020 11:24 AM (RGVbn)

Ooh! Oooh! I know!

.............................


Posted by: Kindltot at February 09, 2020 12:10 PM (6rS3m)


That's a lot of podcast.

Posted by: BurtTC at February 09, 2020 12:13 PM (hku12)

329 Slick looked up to segregation supporting J William Fulbright.

Posted by: Captain Hate at February 09, 2020 12:13 PM (Yp/pV)

330 The Wild Wild West was an outlying point to other shows then. It attracted enough viewers to stay on the air but it surely confused a lot of people.
Posted by: Captain Hate at February 09, 2020 12:05 PM (Yp/pV)


A lot of western or "country" themed TV shows got axed in the late 60s, early 70s because the networks basically gave the middle finger to their rural audiences, and I think WWW was one of the shows. They were tired of having to cater to the "hicks" and preferred a hipper, urban demographic.

Posted by: OregonMuse, AoSHQ Thought Leader, Pants Monitor & Austere Religious Scholar at February 09, 2020 12:14 PM (CoLi6)

331
I heartily recommend the works of master economist Milton Keynes, such as "There is Always a Free Lunch", and "Monetary Policy: PRINT MORE MONEY!!!!!"

Posted by: AOC at February 09, 2020 12:14 PM (rCwaK)

332 One of the officers shot over the weekend has just been released from the hospital.

Posted by: Fox2! at February 09, 2020 12:14 PM (qyH+l)

333 Way O/T but too cute not to tell the Horde about:

Was walking my gear to the club yesterday afternoon, dragging my amp on a mini handtruck behind me and not wanting to interrupt people walking across in front me. A young lady of color had her two children in tow, a boy who appeared to be about 6 and his little sister who looked to be about 4 years old.


Mom was walking ahead so I slowed down to let them pass. The little girl spotted me, stopped dead in her tracks, looks right at me and says, "Hello mister man!" To which I replied, "Hello, young lady."

I'm still chuckling about that today.

Posted by: BackwardsBoy. #DemocratsSuck at February 09, 2020 12:14 PM (HaL55)

334
It was the Great Rural Purge. The Beverly Hillbillies, Green Acres, etc, etc got the axe.

Posted by: publius, Rascally Rapscallion of a Poperin Pear at February 09, 2020 12:15 PM (rCwaK)

335 NOOD

Posted by: Skip, the guy who says NOOD at February 09, 2020 12:16 PM (ZCEU2)

336 334
It was the Great Rural Purge. The Beverly Hillbillies, Green Acres, etc, etc got the axe.
Posted by: publius, Rascally Rapscallion of a Poperin Pear at February 09, 2020 12:15 PM (rCwaK)

But Hee Haw!

Posted by: Insomniac - Ex Cineribus Resurgo at February 09, 2020 12:16 PM (NWiLs)

337 The Wild Wild West was an outlying point to other shows then. It attracted enough viewers to stay on the air but it surely confused a lot of people.
Posted by: Captain Hate at February 09, 2020 12:05 PM (Yp/pV)

A lot of western or "country" themed TV shows got axed in the late 60s, early 70s because the networks basically gave the middle finger to their rural audiences, and I think WWW was one of the shows. They were tired of having to cater to the "hicks" and preferred a hipper, urban demographic.
Posted by: OregonMuse, AoSHQ Thought Leader, Pants Monitor & Austere Religious Scholar at February 09, 2020 12:14 PM (CoLi6)


I know, man.

F'n space toys.....

Posted by: Woody at February 09, 2020 12:16 PM (hku12)

338


Posted by: Ace-Endorsed Author A.H. Lloyd at February 09, 2020 09:15 AM

I just got here and getting caught up saw the post about the new Vampire book. I love this type of fiction. Do you need a test reader?



Posted by: sharon at February 09, 2020 12:17 PM (QzF6i)

339 Haven't read the article, but I will assume there are a few Trump books on that Trump's-favorite-books list.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at February 09, 2020 12:17 PM (Dc2NZ)

340 Ooh! Oooh! I know!

This is why I don't listen to podcasts very often. They're like some kind of free form NPR show with even less structure and content, scattered with ads read by the "star." Almost all of it is forgettable, dull, and distracting.

Very few stay on target and are genuinely engaging for even just the bulk of the show. Yeah I like Dennis Miller but most of his podcast is him being kind of dull or telling inside jokes and stories.

Maybe you shouldn't do one every day if you have nothing to talk about.

Posted by: Christopher R Taylor at February 09, 2020 12:17 PM (KZzsI)

341 A couple of interesting tidbits about our Revolutionary navy. English prison ships we so bad that for most American sailors, being captured was considered a fate worse than death. Also, many who managed to survive the war didn't get paid for years after their service. Our fledgling nation was flat broke.

Posted by: Notorious BFD at February 09, 2020 12:18 PM (EgshT)

342 >> But Hee Haw!

They cancelled that in '71 along with everything else. It was just so popular it went right into syndication and the local stations kept it right in the same time slot.

Posted by: publius, Rascally Rapscallion of a Poperin Pear at February 09, 2020 12:19 PM (rCwaK)

343 A retired naval officer college professor of mine told us that Powers should have killed himself.

It was a different time.
Posted by: Anonosaurus Wrecks, Tyrannosaur Wrangler at February 09, 2020 11:29 AM (+y/Ru)
---
That was pretty typical of the time. The man who ran Skunkworks felt sorry for him and hired Powers as a test pilot.
Posted by: All Hail Eris
--------------

I would like to think that I would have reacted differently than Powers, but I've been around enough to know that while it is nice to think that, if you weren't there, then you do not know what you would have done.

Powers had seconds to react to what was happening, in the air at least. I think his big mistake was not pulling the Destruct switch to destroy the cameras.

As far as suicide, well, see the first sentence above. Self-preservation is a VERY powerful instinct, probably the most powerful.

Posted by: Mike Hammer, etc., etc. at February 09, 2020 12:19 PM (xSo9G)

344 A lot of western or "country" themed TV shows got axed in the late 60s, early 70s because the networks basically gave the middle finger to their rural audiences, and I think WWW was one of the shows. They were tired of having to cater to the "hicks" and preferred a hipper, urban demographic.
Posted by: OregonMuse, AoSHQ Thought Leader, Pants Monitor & Austere Religious Scholar at February 09, 2020 12:14 PM (CoLi6)


Plus westerns were clear morality plays with well defined good versus evil conflicts. The networks preferred something more nuanced in an I'm ok you're ok namby pamby horseshit kind of way. Ironically Dennis Hopper and Bruce Dern got their starts in westerns playing crazed loners.

Posted by: Captain Hate at February 09, 2020 12:21 PM (Yp/pV)

345 I cannot remember the exact details but someone convinced businesses in the late 60s that advertising to established people who have money is a mistake and they should seek a younger demographic and they've stuck with that ever since.

Posted by: Christopher R Taylor at February 09, 2020 12:22 PM (KZzsI)

346 Just about through "Wages of Destruction" by Tooze,
Nazi economy. It's the only thing I've read with a
financial/economic/industrial focus on the Nazi regime, so nothing to
compare it to, but it's solid. [. . .]


My usual practice of mining the notes and sources for further
reading might be difficult in this case. Seems like most of his sources
are German-language.
Posted by: rhomboid at February 09, 2020 11:54 AM (El6T/)


look up Vampire Economy: Doing Business Under Fascism by Gunter Reimann

https://mises.org/library/vampire-economy

Posted by: Kindltot at February 09, 2020 12:24 PM (6rS3m)

347 282 Just finished a Heinlein juvenile I'd never read before: Space Cadet. Loved it.
Posted by: Jim S. at February 09, 2020 11:53 AM (ynUnH)

Dahlquist! Answering for Dahlquist!
Rivera! Answering for Rivera!
Martin! Answering for Martin!
Wheeler! Answering for Wheeler!

Posted by: Fox2! at February 09, 2020 12:27 PM (qyH+l)

348 Well, this trailer looks cool as . . . something really really cool!:

https://youtu.be/4SZMyj9Bfzc

A Rough Draft.

Posted by: Sharkman at February 09, 2020 12:31 PM (80EFL)

349 I heartily recommend the works of master economist
Milton Keynes, such as "There is Always a Free Lunch", and "Monetary
Policy: PRINT MORE MONEY!!!!!"
Posted by: AOC at February 09, 2020 12:14 PM (rCwaK)


Tom Woods has a free e-Book out called AOC is Wrong: The Upside-down World of Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez

https://aociswrong.com/

Posted by: Kindltot at February 09, 2020 12:32 PM (6rS3m)

350 Going to have four days of rain down here so I'll have time to read my favorite Terry Pratchett books: "Guards, Guards" and "Maskerade". Deep reading, I know. Then I think I'll re-read "The Roosevelt Myth" by John T. Flynn. FDR and his family make the Bidens look like pikers.

Posted by: Bean Counteress of Rohan at February 09, 2020 12:33 PM (2+j2N)

351 I cannot remember the exact details but someone convinced businesses in the late 60s that advertising to established people who have money is a mistake and they should seek a younger demographic and they've stuck with that ever since.

Sort of. Until you walk into a Target or a Chilis or whatever and the background music sounds like my boom box in 1985. They know GenX has the money, for all their bullshit posturing at Millennials.

Posted by: Ian S. at February 09, 2020 12:34 PM (6XLoz)

352 When my family and I went to see the Impressionism special exhibit at the Philadelphia Museum of Art this spring, squeakyspouse bought me the Museum's companion book.

Posted by: squeakywheel at February 09, 2020 09:41 AM

++++

My one sister had bought tickets for the family to Philly Art Museum to see the first Barnes exhibit.

So we're walking along and said to another sister (the artsy one) "What's the difference between a Monet and a Manet?"

She stopped, looked and me and said "A vowel, you idiot."

Then she walked away.

Posted by: TANSTAAFL at February 09, 2020 12:35 PM (T09ml)

353 Thunderchild!!!! In 1978, producer Jeff Wayne created the music version of War of the Worlds, with Richard Burton narrating the story, along with Justin Heyward, David Essex and Phil Lynott. The most complelling scene was Thunderchild....great literary bravery, and a magnificant musical story.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8Mfz4rMThEE

Posted by: Coregis at February 09, 2020 12:38 PM (yrSPi)

354 Had a whole sub-plot that the more I wrote the more unworkable it became. So stripping it out of 50,000 some words stalled me for a bit.

Posted by: Anna Puma at February 09, 2020 12:41 PM (0Ehdk)

355 Those Westerns which were not killed during the great purge in the 60s were downgraded to nothing but pablum. Gunsmoke went from a "shoot'em up" to a morality play. You should compare season one to one of those seasons just before they killed the show.

Posted by: Vic at February 09, 2020 12:42 PM (mpXpK)

356 Posted by: Anna Puma at February 09, 2020 12:41 PM (0Ehdk)

I admire our authors and all their dedication.

Posted by: CN at February 09, 2020 12:49 PM (ONvIw)

357 At Georgetown Bill would go to the library at closing time and volunteer to walk the girls home. For their safety

-
Well, at least Ted Kennedy didn't volunteer to drive them.

Posted by: Anonosaurus Wrecks, Tyrannosaur Wrangler at February 09, 2020 01:06 PM (+y/Ru)

358 Tootie, the fierce destroyer of Snow People.

Posted by: mr wilson at February 09, 2020 01:06 PM (vc4+d)

359 I just got here and getting caught up saw the post
about the new Vampire book. I love this type of fiction. Do you need a
test reader?

Posted by: sharon at February 09, 2020 12:17 PM (QzF6i)

---
Just got back from mass and a bit of lunch...

Thank you for the offer, but I'm wanting to get this thing published ASAP.

Posted by: Ace-Endorsed Author A.H. Lloyd at February 09, 2020 01:21 PM (cfSRQ)

360 Even if it's these pants...

Darn you! I was just about to indulge in some cold slices of last night's pizza.

Posted by: mindful webworker - click for short-storiesh thing at February 09, 2020 01:23 PM (TIFWI)

361 This involves words but not reading. I enjoy crossword puzzles and usually get the big 300 puzzles per volume. I guess this was bound to happen. The newer ones have all sorts of clues involving new movies, Taylor Swift song titles (I don't know any), Rather annoying.
Posted by: JTB

"You put the Hoochie in my Coochie " ?

Posted by: JT at February 09, 2020 02:06 PM (arJlL)

362 I don't have any recent worthy reads to report. I read a cozy mystery, "The Clue in the Stew." Yes, the title alone should have warned me away. I keep reading these things and thinking "I could do a better job!"

I need to start writing.

Yesterday I took a little nostalgia trip back to the library my mother used to take me to when I was a little girl. Built in 1969 (I recognized the plaque and the "Returns" book deposit outside) but nothing inside looked familiar. Still has that midcentury feel to it.

Posted by: Dr Alice at February 09, 2020 03:54 PM (oW/8k)

363 I spent many a happy hour in those library stacks when I was in High School. They expanded into a middle school that was walking distance from the library.

Posted by: Rick T at February 09, 2020 06:05 PM (Bn6JN)

364 That first book reminds me of a book I have that I have treasured since my teen years, "Alfred Hitchcock's Tales from Davy Jones Haunted Locker". It is an anthology, with tales of spooky ships in the fog, and unseen creatures, felt but not seen, who stalk the decks at night. Highly recommend!!!

Posted by: Sumdumguy at February 10, 2020 12:54 AM (olpu0)

(Jump to top of page)






Processing 0.04, elapsed 0.051 seconds.
14 queries taking 0.0176 seconds, 372 records returned.
Page size 231 kb.
Powered by Minx 0.8 beta.



MuNuvians
MeeNuvians
Polls! Polls! Polls!
Frequently Asked Questions
The (Almost) Complete Paul Anka Integrity Kick
Top Top Tens
Greatest Hitjobs

The Ace of Spades HQ Sex-for-Money Skankathon
A D&D Guide to the Democratic Candidates
Margaret Cho: Just Not Funny
More Margaret Cho Abuse
Margaret Cho: Still Not Funny
Iraqi Prisoner Claims He Was Raped... By Woman
Wonkette Announces "Morning Zoo" Format
John Kerry's "Plan" Causes Surrender of Moqtada al-Sadr's Militia
World Muslim Leaders Apologize for Nick Berg's Beheading
Michael Moore Goes on Lunchtime Manhattan Death-Spree
Milestone: Oliver Willis Posts 400th "Fake News Article" Referencing Britney Spears
Liberal Economists Rue a "New Decade of Greed"
Artificial Insouciance: Maureen Dowd's Word Processor Revolts Against Her Numbing Imbecility
Intelligence Officials Eye Blogs for Tips
They Done Found Us Out, Cletus: Intrepid Internet Detective Figures Out Our Master Plan
Shock: Josh Marshall Almost Mentions Sarin Discovery in Iraq
Leather-Clad Biker Freaks Terrorize Australian Town
When Clinton Was President, Torture Was Cool
What Wonkette Means When She Explains What Tina Brown Means
Wonkette's Stand-Up Act
Wankette HQ Gay-Rumors Du Jour
Here's What's Bugging Me: Goose and Slider
My Own Micah Wright Style Confession of Dishonesty
Outraged "Conservatives" React to the FMA
An On-Line Impression of Dennis Miller Having Sex with a Kodiak Bear
The Story the Rightwing Media Refuses to Report!
Our Lunch with David "Glengarry Glen Ross" Mamet
The House of Love: Paul Krugman
A Michael Moore Mystery (TM)
The Dowd-O-Matic!
Liberal Consistency and Other Myths
Kepler's Laws of Liberal Media Bias
John Kerry-- The Splunge! Candidate
"Divisive" Politics & "Attacks on Patriotism" (very long)
The Donkey ("The Raven" parody)
News/Chat