Saturday Gardening Thread, Memorial Day Weekend [KT]

farewellto.jpg

Farewell to Spring from 40 miles north

Hello, Horde! Hope your Memorial Day Weekend is starting out well. We still have some significant weather in parts of the country, but some of our gardening friends are making progress.

Weather

Naughty Pine sent in the following update and photo from Michigan:

Here's my front garden before another rain which added to the floods from Lake Huron down. Everything Is growing faster than normal. I can't seem to kill the wild violets that are taking over the lawn.

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Anybody gotten around to cleaning out their pool yet?

pool cleaned out.jpg

Anybody's driveway need a little work due to the weather?

flooded areas.jpg

There may be skiing at Mammoth Mountain into August.

There is snow in much of the Intermountain West, and there have been some high winds. Not like in Missouri. What's the weather like where you are?

Critters

Sometimes Hank Curmudgeon helps us ask the questions no one else is asking. like what do bees do during an eclipse?

Everybody wants to know what their dog and cat are doing during the eclipse, but they don't think about the flea.

And here are 10 things you didn't know about bumblebees

Illiniwek sent in a couple of photos of that bee favorite, Crimson Clover.

crimsonclovilini1.jpg

crimsonclovilini2.jpg

Here's an update from last Saturday:

I've seen some tiger swallowtails around, and some black swallowtails (I think) ... but not a lot of anything, including honey bees.

The lilacs had a nice smell, but I don't notice the iris aroma ... will have to get closer.

Our cool late start seems to have messed up the early blooms ... I just put some things in the garden today before another big rain, some even after the first rain.

And a Bearded Iris:

irisilini.jpg

The Edible Garden

I got the following message Saturday after the Gardening Thread went up:

I am a long time moron lurker from North Alabama, and though this is a long shot, thought I could do something to help out fellow morons in the area, if there are any.
I went a little overboard seed-shopping this winter with all the really cool varieties of tomatoes at Baker Creek, and didn't think they would germinate as well as they did, so have a few hundred extra heirloom tomato seedlings. If you know of anyone in the Huntsville/Decatur/Athens area, I would love to share. I really don't want them to die, and if I plant 300+ tomato plants, I will die.

Absolutely love your garden thread every week.

This is about 1/3 of them over a month ago. I am up to 10 trays now, at 15-18 a tray. Lots of neat ones like Blue Beauty, White Tomesol, Yellow Garden Peach, and the bizarre Reisetomate. I have some extra peppers too, and had some heirloom french artichokes that sprouted fantastically in my aerogarden, just a few extras of those. I even loaded up the poor Fedex guy.

tomabsmt.jpg

So many of us have been there . . . . .

Don't know if there are still some possibilities to pass along plants, but we can relate to the situation. Let us know how things turn out. If anybody is interested, mention it in the comments.

Get those tomato recipes ready . . . . .

Le Garde Vieux sent in a couple of garlic photos. You can eat garlic blossoms or leave them for the hummingbirds and butterflies.

garlc1.jpeg

There's a magnolia behind this one. I don't think he should eat it.

garlc2.jpeg

News from Garden and Gun

A magazine to which you might consider a subscription, and/or sign up for updates via email.

Via redc1c4:

Another plant pathogen invades the Southeast:

Josh Meyer was ten days into his position as the director of buildings, gardens, and grounds at Tudor Place Historic House and Garden in Washington, D.C.'s Georgetown neighborhood when a staff gardener told him something was up with the boxwood. This was on a Friday last October, and Meyer, trained as a landscape architect, didn't think much of the minor defoliation and leaf spotting. "But here's where it gets crazy," he says. "We came back on Monday, and the symptoms had spread to pretty much all the collection areas. You could see this thing just descending on the property."

The "thing" was boxwood blight, a fungal disease wiping out generations-old boxwood with the heartless efficiency of an Ebola epidemic.

A nursery may have developed a resistant cultivar.

boxwdsk.jpg

Big bat house in Florida:

In Miami, Florida, an ambitious conservation project is underway: the introduction of the world's largest bat house. "The bigger your bat house is, the better your chances of getting it inhabited," Fred Hubbard, part of the team that oversaw its construction, told the Miami Herald. Built within Patch of Heaven, a nature preserve in the Redland region, the soaring two-story structure will hopefully provide a safe haven for a variety of bats, but it's been specially outfitted for the Florida bonneted bat. Once thriving in South Florida's pinelands, the endangered bats have found their habitat gravely depleted by development--the total population now stands in the mere hundreds.

While there's no guarantee the new house will successfully attract the animals, the team is optimistic, this month installing speakers to pipe bat calls throughout the area. And they hope it will help foster a greater appreciation for all bats and the challenges they face. "One bat can eat 1,200 mosquitoes in an hour," Hubbard says. "They are the best."

Speakers to pipe bat calls throughout the area. I sort of feel like I have bats in my belfry today. Wonder if people can hear those bat calls?

Some smaller bat houses are also shown in the Miami Herald article. Interested in attracting some bats?

Last Week

We were sorry to learn that Shanks for the memory lost a considerable part of his veggies and fruits to hail. That isn't supposed to happen in California in May.

I am not sad that there are wild violets in CN's lawn. Or Naughty Pine's lawn. We are gonna have to do a little profile on Fritillary butterflies whose caterpillars feed on violets.

We had some great close-up photos last week. And crisis du jour. has send in some additional information:

Saturdays are work days for me, so I usually get to the Gardening Thread after it has become stale. So I didn't get to reply to the commenters who ID'd the flowers in the two pix of mine you posted. I looked up 'Spirea', and that looks right for the white-flower photo. But I didn't think the pink flowers belonged to an Azaelea, for the simple reason that those pink flowers were on a tree, not a bush or a shrub. (I was pointing the camera vertically upward when I took the pink-flower photo.) So after some research, it looks like those pink flowers belong to a cherry blossom tree ... which, I also learned, is not the same thing as a cherry tree!

From Quora:

How are cherry trees different from cherry blossom trees?

Glen Buschmann, former Landscape Gardening (Owner / Operator) (1987-201

Most flowering cherries are "sterile", meaning the flowers lack all the components needed for reproduction. The puffy "double" flowers are natural mutations (and sometimes not) where a flower's reproductive parts are replaced by extra petals. (This applies to most flowers.)

DSC_0517a Pink Chiffon LR.jpg

I had no idea there was a difference! The pink flowers in that second photo were definitely 'double'; I noticed that in the moment as I was photographing them, and that doubleness was largely (but not entirely) responsible for the chiffon look of the flowers.

I think it is probably a flowering cherry, too. But I don't know enough about the genus Prunus to rule out, say, a flowering apricot or something. And there is a lot of variety among flowering cherries.

There are several species in the genus Prunus (which also includes plums, apricots, peaches, etc.) that are called "flowering cherries". There are said to be over 300 hybrids and cultivars of flowering cherries. Some have single flowers (five petals) and some are very double with more than 300 petals! Some of the single ones are especially prized in Japan.

Flowering cherries mostly come in pink or white. Some are fragrant. Some have interesting bark or fall foliage.

Before planting a flowering cherry, you should check on its climate adaptation. Some are adapted to the Southeast and of course those in Washington D.C. are famous. Several are adapted to the Pacific Northwest. Some are adapted elsewhere.

Of course, fruiting cherries also flower, and are pretty in bloom, though generally not as spectacular as the "flowering cherries". Here's a white one planted with blue camas.

Prunus Shirofugen.jpg

Want to try that plant I.D. thing again?

What are these?

Spring Has Sprung sqr.jpg

Red Lipstick2 LR.jpg

Fireworks2 s.jpg


If you would like to send information and/or photos for the Saturday Gardening Thread, the address is:

ktinthegarden
at g mail dot com

Include your nic unless you want to remain a lurker.

Posted by: Open Blogger at 01:04 PM




Comments

(Jump to bottom of page)

1 Howdy, beloved Horde!

Posted by: Emmie Oakley at May 25, 2019 01:08 PM (4HMW8)

2 Gorgeous thread, KT. So many 'rons and 'ettes take great photos.

Posted by: 40 miles north at May 25, 2019 01:12 PM (o2vOl)

3 Snow into August? An Ice Age begins not with glaciers marching down from the north, but when snow starts hanging around all year in places it isn't supposed to.

Posted by: MW at May 25, 2019 01:12 PM (hNTtn)

4 Howdy, Emmie Oakley!

Posted by: KTbarthedoor at May 25, 2019 01:12 PM (BVQ+1)

5 Good afternoon Greenthumbs
Another attempt at transferring compost pile plants failed, onions I tried to move grew a little then stopped and wilted. Have little onion bulbs but that was it.

Posted by: Skip at May 25, 2019 01:14 PM (BbGew)

6 The bottom two photos look like tulip petals and lilac buds.

Posted by: Emmie Oakley at May 25, 2019 01:14 PM (4HMW8)

7 >> I am not sad that there are wild violets in CN's lawn.
>> Or Naughty Pine's lawn. We are gonna have to do a little
>> profile on Fritillary butterflies whose caterpillars feed on violets.

Apparently your taunting violets pushed KT a little too far.

Posted by: 40 miles north at May 25, 2019 01:16 PM (o2vOl)

8 The birds have been more interesting than usual this spring. One morning last week, the songs were so riotous that the backyard sounded like an aviary. And we've heard more finches, with their melodious calls, and we've seen more western tanagers than usual.

Posted by: Emmie Oakley at May 25, 2019 01:18 PM (4HMW8)

9 Morning Horde
I harvested my first zucchini today and had my first harvest of potatoes last week. Got 35 peaches off the peach tree, better than my estimate of 20 after the great snow fiasco this spring. Mulberries are done, but I am getting my first Boysenberry crop this year. Have had the boysenberry bush? shrub? thorny thicket? in for 3 years but this is the first fruit I am getting, I just hope to get them before the damn birds. Happy gardening everyone!

Posted by: wee kreek farm girl at May 25, 2019 01:20 PM (ygbGE)

10 Plant!

Posted by: E.V.E. at May 25, 2019 01:20 PM (NWiLs)

11 >> Want to try that plant I.D. thing again?
The first photo is from a fruit tree, but I'm not sure which one. Cherry tree?

Posted by: 40 miles north at May 25, 2019 01:20 PM (o2vOl)

12 I think the top photo of the white blooms is dogwood. Have no idea what the bottom two are, but the bottom-most one looks familiar.

Posted by: BackwardsBoy says #PurgeProgressivismBAMN at May 25, 2019 01:25 PM (HaL55)

13 Skip at May 25, 2019 01:14 PM


Thanks for the compost plant report. Hope the little onions bulbs are good.

Posted by: KTbarthedoor at May 25, 2019 01:26 PM (BVQ+1)

14 I would guess apple blossoms, tulips, and lilacs.

Beautiful photos in this thread, as always. Thank you KT!

Posted by: bluebell at May 25, 2019 01:27 PM (aXucN)

15 "Illiniwek sent in a couple of photos of that bee favorite, Crimson Clover."

I like that song.

Posted by: hogmartin invites you to the Summer MIMoMe (link: nick) at May 25, 2019 01:30 PM (t+qrx)

16 >> One bat can eat 1,200 mosquitoes in an hour,"

You would think we would have domesticated bats by now. We probably wouldn't even need to feed them much.

Posted by: 40 miles north at May 25, 2019 01:32 PM (o2vOl)

17 BBL, gig this afternoon. Y'all beehave.

Posted by: BackwardsBoy says #PurgeProgressivismBAMN at May 25, 2019 01:32 PM (HaL55)

18 11 14

I agree first pix is a fruit tree. I thought pear but it would be helpful to see the bark too.

Good quality photos!

Posted by: Le Garde Vieux at May 25, 2019 01:34 PM (swldI)

19 Maybe I'll put them in my salad tonight, my first harvest of the year.

Posted by: Skip at May 25, 2019 01:34 PM (BbGew)

20 Does anybody have any pitures of Presdent and Micheal Obona;s garden ???

Posted by: Mary Clogginstien from Brattleboro (aka: Obamaboro), VT at May 25, 2019 01:39 PM (qM84C)

21
g'early afternoon, 'rons

Posted by: AltonJackson at May 25, 2019 01:41 PM (2rCLa)

22 >> Snow into August?

Like I've been saying, "The climate crisis is real, y'all."

Oh and I love all the colorful bloomy things.

Posted by: Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez at May 25, 2019 01:42 PM (o2vOl)

23 >> Does anybody have any pictures of President and Micheal Obona's garden ???

What are implying? I'm all ears.

Posted by: Barry the T-chaser at May 25, 2019 01:47 PM (o2vOl)

24 Getting cucumbers and zucchini now. Zucchini is now becoming part of breakfast lunch and dinner!

Posted by: keena at May 25, 2019 01:47 PM (RiTnx)

25 I have most everything planted, except for some peppers I want to put in. Now it is a wait to see what sprouts and survives.

It has been rainy and cool so there is a lot of slug issues right now, they - or the snails - took off some of my beans and melons right at ground level.

Posted by: Kindltot at May 25, 2019 01:48 PM (hSQmw)

26 What's the weather been like in Idaho's Treasure Valley? Unusually wet, cool, and windy. I wish this weather had hit back in March or April, rather than now! We turn our irrigation system off some days, depending on rain totals.

On the occasional nice morning, I've kept working on getting dead leaves out of the strawberry beds - about 2/3 done with the second bed now. Fruits are already setting... we have some travel planned for June, so the friend who'll be watching the garden may get most of the crop.

Current harvesting is only spinach, lettuce, radishes, and herbs.

We planted out 2 Romas into a raised bed. Into a row we created to grow stuff directly in the ground, we planted 2 'Big Boy' on the ends, 2 'Black from Tula' heirlooms, and a Roma in the middle. 2 Poblanos went into a raised bed as well - we're waiting for the other 2 to get a bit bigger before transplanting out. I also planted 9 basil seeds.

Husband re-built the drip irrigation lines that water the corn bed, which includes new areas this year for testing soybeans (edamame) and garbanzo beans, as well as some area for green beans. It will also have an offshoot for growing 2 'Sugar Baby' watermelon in large pots (a friend had extra starts - we've never tried watermelon before).

To keep the few chamomile plants I left in a raised bed from over-seeding the universe, I'm trying to pick the flowers every day - homemade Sleepytime tea is my plan, once I cut some mint to go with it. Also, once we're done with summer vacations, I'm thinking about making mint syrup out of all that spearmint.

The purple Siberian Iris are already fading from their peak. There could easily have been 100-150 flowers on the 5 clumps on the south side of my house. At least the ones under husband's bedroom window, the 2 clumps beside the front door, and 2 of the 3 clumps behind the kitchen look nice now - they're the clumps that run late since they're shaded.

Does anyone else get catalogs from Territorial Seed Co.? I already got their fall/winter seed catalog - hey, guys, I haven't even planted my summer corn and green beans yet!!

(The 'Farewell-to-Spring' Clarkia is nice - wildflowers are one of the few things I miss about CA.)

Posted by: Pat* at May 25, 2019 01:50 PM (2pX/F)

27 hiya

Posted by: JT at May 25, 2019 01:51 PM (iwgjb)

28 The bearded irises look great, Illiniwek. I have a couple, but mine only bloom in years with a LOT of rain. I'm hoping one will bloom this year.

Posted by: 40 miles north at May 25, 2019 01:51 PM (o2vOl)

29 Here in NW IN it won't stop raining long enough to do anything but mow the grass one notch higher than last time.

Posted by: DaveA at May 25, 2019 01:51 PM (FhXTo)

30 >> Zucchini is now becoming part of breakfast lunch and dinner!
Keena, do you eat them with tomato sauce and some potato pieces? That way is my favorite.

Posted by: 40 miles north at May 25, 2019 01:54 PM (o2vOl)

31 Sitting out on deck reading and these little bugs are around, I think they are the lantern flus but real small. Black with dots on them, probably only 1/8 inch. Just to be sure I'm killing them.

Posted by: Skip at May 25, 2019 01:56 PM (BbGew)

32 keena at May 25, 2019 01:47 PM

You need to share a breakfast zucchini recipe.

Posted by: KTbarthedoor at May 25, 2019 01:59 PM (BVQ+1)

33 Emmie Oakley at May 25, 2019 01:18 PM

Why do you think you have so many bird this year? Sounds fun.

Posted by: KTbarthedoor at May 25, 2019 02:00 PM (BVQ+1)

34 You will all be greatly relieved to know that I fixed the tractor hydraulic system. Blown seal in a quick disconnect coupler. The part was $1.92 so I bought four to make sure it never happens again.

Posted by: Weasel at May 25, 2019 02:01 PM (Z/5Cj)

35 Kindltot at May 25, 2019 01:48 PM

You get some big slugs and snails up there. They can do a lot of damage in a short amount of time, can't they?

Posted by: KTbarthedoor at May 25, 2019 02:02 PM (BVQ+1)

36 I like the little stripes on the buds of the garlic flowers before they open.

Posted by: KTbarthedoor at May 25, 2019 02:03 PM (BVQ+1)

37 We went from an extended winter right into a rare monsoon season here in Northern Utah. Unbelievable amounts of rain, low overnight temps, and snowpack from winter may make for a good summer...if it ever gets here. Spring temps have yet to arrive. I don't think our montmorency cherries are going to amount to much this year.

Hope the rest of you are faring better this holiday weekend.

Posted by: Quilp at May 25, 2019 02:05 PM (4dX7C)

38 And speaking of bats, we were in Florida at Sanibel Island once and at dusk saw a zillion bats pouring out of a hole in the eaves of a building. It looked almost like a liquid pouring out. Creepy and cool at the same time!

Posted by: Weasel at May 25, 2019 02:05 PM (Z/5Cj)

39 Weasel at May 25, 2019 02:01 PM

Glad it was something cheap to fix. And that you knew how to fix it.

Posted by: KTbarthedoor at May 25, 2019 02:08 PM (BVQ+1)

40 >> 35 big slugs and snails ... can do a lot of damage

What do you people use? I use Deadline and a shovel to finish off the wounded ones.

Posted by: 40 miles north at May 25, 2019 02:08 PM (o2vOl)

41 39 Weasel at May 25, 2019 02:01 PM

Glad it was something cheap to fix. And that you knew how to fix it.
Posted by: KTbarthedoor at May 25, 2019 02:08 PM (BVQ+1)
------
Thanks KT. Me too! There is a great deal of satisfaction in being able to fix things like that oneself! Not to mention the money and downtime I saved.

Posted by: Weasel at May 25, 2019 02:11 PM (Z/5Cj)

42 flowering trees are nice ... some in my fenced in garden were supposed to be transplanted, but some are getting huge, haven't started flowering yet. so many chores ... ha.


No one said dogwood yet on that one tree, but I don't know the different blooms really, not even the ones I have. Looking out on my pond now, everything is green ... except the sycamore for nice structure. A big blooming magnolia or some such would really help, or maybe some tree with red foliage.


The watermelon, cantaloupe, sweet corn all just got replanted ... had old seed first time I guess. Some of my transplanted cantaloupes might make it. Garden still very wet, but I am browsing on the strawberries, sharing them with a rascally rabbit.

Posted by: illiniwek at May 25, 2019 02:15 PM (Cus5s)

43 Interesting photos, as always. Some are gorgeous like the flowering garlic and some are scary. The sink holes in that road and the flooded swimming pool are not happy scenes.

Thanks for that link about bees. I didn't know the OFA offered articles during the year even though I get the magazine the first day it comes out. Have to check into that.

Posted by: JTB at May 25, 2019 02:15 PM (bmdz3)

44 >> There is a great deal of satisfaction in being able to
>> fix things like that oneself!

Damn straight.

Posted by: 40 miles north at May 25, 2019 02:18 PM (o2vOl)

45 Just came in from helping the delightful misses plant a bunch of foxglove, elephant ears, yarrow, begonias and things I don't even know what they are.

Hotter and muggier than hell so I'm done.

I have been informed though that we are off to Lowes (again) to get more plants in a bit.

Le sigh.

Posted by: Tonypete at May 25, 2019 02:25 PM (Y4EXg)

46 blown seals are the worst ... ha. I've had to get a few hoses fixed, but haven't had to mess with the other inner workings. I did a quick search last time on whatever that part was (that Weasel mentioned last week, he would have to fix) and saw some guy taking it apart. I depend on YouTube for a lot of directions ... pretty good usually. Nice you fixed it yourself, Weasel ... it is satisfying.


Keeping up with the greasing and other maintenance schedules is important ... I fall behind usually. If it ever dries out, will be time for the big batwing mower here.

Posted by: illiniwek at May 25, 2019 02:27 PM (Cus5s)

47 >> Just came in from helping the delightful misses plant a
>> bunch of foxglove, elephant ears, yarrow, begonias

Gotta love those garden grills.

Posted by: 40 miles north at May 25, 2019 02:27 PM (o2vOl)

48 We are keeping the garden modest and simple this year. But the tomato plants are still with us, which is not a given, and the leaf lettuce and herbs are doing great. I'm getting spoiled with the fresh herbs in our recipes. What we can't get to fast enough gets dried in the dehydrator.

Posted by: JTB at May 25, 2019 02:29 PM (bmdz3)

49 I'm grateful for ya'll.

Posted by: Frasier Crane (I'm coming back!) at May 25, 2019 02:29 PM (F8YM0)

50 I envy those who are already harvesting. Most our garden is in, but with so many rain days, and no high temps for any stretch, nothing is really growing well.
Even the bees are slow... spending too much time indoors eating up stores instead of cranking out new bees.
We had poor pollination on our serviceberries, peaches and blueberries. We're blaming that on the rain, too.
Oh, well... the peonies were fabulous, and the iris good.
We have successfully failed twice at starting parsnips. Wife is going for the triple crown, by starting them in flats, then trying to transplant.

Posted by: MarkY at May 25, 2019 02:32 PM (LqiyU)

51 I have to remove another 50+ daisy seedlings today. I always feel like Planned Parenthood afterwards.

Posted by: 40 miles north at May 25, 2019 02:33 PM (o2vOl)

52 I really don't know what the lavender flowers up for I.D. are.

Posted by: KTbarthedoor at May 25, 2019 02:37 PM (BVQ+1)

53 40 miles north at May 25, 2019 02:27 PM

Do not grill foxgloves. They are toxic.

Posted by: KTbarthedoor at May 25, 2019 02:38 PM (BVQ+1)

54 And I found the teeny Allen wrench I dropped! Life is good.

Posted by: Weasel at May 25, 2019 02:39 PM (Z/5Cj)

55 MarkY at May 25, 2019 02:32 PM

Parsnip seeds have a very short shelf life. Always start with fresh seeds.

Posted by: KTbarthedoor at May 25, 2019 02:40 PM (BVQ+1)

56 The comments make me wish I still had a car or truck that I could maintain. Change out the plugs, general tune up, replace a head light, install new air and oil filters. SIGH!! Even I could do those things despite almost no mechanical talent. If someone came out with such a retro vehicle I would buy one in a split second. It would also be a way to stick a finger in the government's eye for saddling us with all the regulations. (Mini rant off.)

Staying with the thread, I seriously wonder if growing a garden is an aspect of that kind of self sufficient attitude.

Posted by: JTB at May 25, 2019 02:43 PM (bmdz3)

57 >> Do not grill foxgloves. They are toxic.

Unless you're a small brown moth. Or you know how to create your own heart medication.

Posted by: 40 miles north at May 25, 2019 02:44 PM (o2vOl)

58 Posted by: JTB at May 25, 2019 02:43 PM (bmdz3)
------
JTB - for a number of reasons, I've decided to get a restored FJ40 Land Cruiser (70s vintage) when my current vehicle lease is up. I'm working with a guy in AZ that specializes in them.

Farm related - we have a lot of lizards here which sort of surprises me. Eastern fence lizards and some sort of colorful striped racer.

Posted by: Weasel at May 25, 2019 02:52 PM (Z/5Cj)

59 Weird question: Do hummingbirds help pollinate plants? Seems to me a garden with bumble or honey bees and hummingbirds would be a productive, happy place.

Posted by: JTB at May 25, 2019 02:57 PM (bmdz3)

60 Farm related - we have a lot of lizards here which sort of surprises me. Eastern fence lizards and some sort of colorful striped racer.
Posted by: Weasel at May 25, 2019 02:52 PM (Z/5Cj)


There are only two lizards endemic to Michgan, and one of them's considered endangered (it's only found in part of one county). It's kind of sad, I like lizards. We have snakes, which is OK. I guess.

Posted by: hogmartin invites you to the Summer MIMoMe (link: nick) at May 25, 2019 02:58 PM (t+qrx)

61 Posted by: hogmartin invites you to the Summer MIMoMe (link: nick) at May 25, 2019 02:58 PM (t+qrx)
-----
Both of these are pretty cool. The fence lizards camouflage changes to blend exactly with pine tree bark. What is that called?

Posted by: Weasel at May 25, 2019 03:01 PM (Z/5Cj)

62 58 ... Weasel, We almost never see lizards around the house, even though we keep the garden well watered. But the range we use runs along side the Bull Run and I see a lot of them scurrying around during the warmer months.

Posted by: JTB at May 25, 2019 03:01 PM (bmdz3)

63 Thank you, KT.

Posted by: MarkY at May 25, 2019 03:03 PM (LqiyU)

64 Both of these are pretty cool. The fence lizards camouflage changes to blend exactly with pine tree bark. What is that called?
Posted by: Weasel at May 25, 2019 03:01 PM (Z/5Cj)


Realtree™.

Posted by: hogmartin invites you to the Summer MIMoMe (link: nick) at May 25, 2019 03:05 PM (t+qrx)

65 62 58 ... Weasel, We almost never see lizards around the house, even though we keep the garden well watered. But the range we use runs along side the Bull Run and I see a lot of them scurrying around during the warmer months.
Posted by: JTB at May 25, 2019 03:01 PM (bmdz3)
------
That's why I'm a little surprised to have so many here. I never see them at the house but I guess this is just far enough south maybe.

Posted by: Weasel at May 25, 2019 03:06 PM (Z/5Cj)

66 65 ... "That's why I'm a little surprised to have so many here. I never see them at the house but I guess this is just far enough south maybe."

I wonder if it's the proximity to a stream.

Posted by: JTB at May 25, 2019 03:15 PM (bmdz3)

67 66 65 ... "That's why I'm a little surprised to have so many here. I never see them at the house but I guess this is just far enough south maybe."

I wonder if it's the proximity to a stream.
Posted by: JTB at May 25, 2019 03:15 PM (bmdz3)
------
Not sure. I'm on a big hill that overlooks the James River but it's pretty dry here at the top.

Posted by: Weasel at May 25, 2019 03:23 PM (Z/5Cj)

68 The cold rainy weekend we had put a hurt on my lantana. It's alive but the blooms got windburn or something and fell off. New ones are forming, but I'd never experienced cold damage to container plants.

Posted by: kallisto at May 25, 2019 03:23 PM (RCRTc)

69 .
Posted by: hogmartin invites you to the Summer MIMoMe (link: nick) at May 25, 2019 03:05 PM (t+qrx)
-----
Like my camo crocs!

Posted by: Weasel at May 25, 2019 03:28 PM (Z/5Cj)

70 Annnnnnnnd, ticks.

Damn it.

Posted by: Tonypete at May 25, 2019 03:30 PM (Y4EXg)

71 Rain, rain go away...

In my little corner of NYS we have had a very long spring. It has been odd as usually spring is about 2 weeks long... 40 one day, 70 the next and BOOM! 'hello, summer'. Not this year... this year it has been in the 40s, 50s, low-60s for the last 8-10 weeks. And people are complaining "were's summer!?" SMH Never happy.

You'd think that would have meant early planting, right? Nope. The amount of rain we have had has delayed planting by several weeks.

I finally planted all my veggies earlier this week when it was about 65 out. That was a first as I usually manage to pick a sunny 85-degree day and feel like crap after I am finished.

This is a light year of only cucumbers, beans, peas, lettuce, spinach, and mustard greens, all container or bags.

More rain was predicted for today, so I decided to plant my flowers last night. It was a good thing I did because it came down in buckets overnight and this morning, and it is now well over 80 outside with the air so thick you could cut it with a knife.

I feel bad for the farmers. The fields are cleared but have lots of puddles, not much green. Hubby has many bags of soybeans that need to be planted - no idea when he will be able to get them in the ground.

Posted by: Ann at May 25, 2019 03:37 PM (NDO5Q)

72 Weasel, we have lizards here chez bluebell. We have some bigger ones that live under the juniper out by the mailbox - not sure what exactly they are, because I hear them way more than I've seen them. I'd hear rustling when I went to check the mail and hoped and prayed it wasn't a snake, and was relieved when I finally saw it was a (largish) lizard.

Do yours have bright blue tails? We have a fair number of blue-tailed skinks around our house. They're kind of cool. I don't mind them as long as they stay outside and don't come near me.

Posted by: bluebell at May 25, 2019 03:38 PM (aXucN)

73
Do yours have bright blue tails? We have a fair number of blue-tailed skinks around our house. They're kind of cool. I don't mind them as long as they stay outside and don't come near me.
Posted by: bluebell at May 25, 2019 03:38 PM (aXucN)
-----
These are bright blue, almost turquoise, on their belly. Yellowish and white stripes on top. They're fast!

Posted by: Weasel at May 25, 2019 03:42 PM (Z/5Cj)

74 We have bright green lizards, lovely gray striped ones and geckos. They geckos come out at night on our entry way and eat the bugs attracted by our nightlight. By the end of summer we have some huge geckos. There's gaps in the wall that let them take refuge in our attic over winter.
We also killed the first snake of the year on the driveway . It looked like a young rattler. It had the rattlesnake pattern but no rattles yet. I let DH mow down all the wildflowers after that so the snakes would have less cover to hide in.

Posted by: gingeroni at May 25, 2019 04:00 PM (/XPvv)

75 @30 and 32
I just chop them up and sauté w peppers, mushrooms and onions for a breakfast omelet filling. I love them sliced and grilled then drizzled with lemon juice and chopped dill. Or that roasted Greek veg dish briami w tomatoes potatoes and garlic. I honestly don't mind getting a lot but it's those hiding ones that when I find them are the size of a butternut squash that are problematic!

Posted by: keena at May 25, 2019 05:21 PM (RiTnx)

76 Sitting out on deck reading and these little bugs are around, I think they are the lantern flus but real small. Black with dots on them, probably only 1/8 inch. Just to be sure I'm killing them.
Posted by: Skip

Dead bugs tell no tales.

Posted by: JT at May 25, 2019 05:57 PM (jEQZz)

77 The cold rainy weekend we had put a hurt on my lantana


"I've got a Black Magic Woman....."

Posted by: JT at May 25, 2019 05:59 PM (jEQZz)

78 JTB at May 25, 2019 02:57 PM

Some flowers with a tubular structure are adapted to pollination by hummingbirds. Some other flowers, not so much.

Posted by: KTbarthedoor at May 25, 2019 06:34 PM (BVQ+1)

79 Northern Alabama tomato Moron; please send me an email at AnthonyB45 at Verizon dot net. I would like to help with your plant problem. Tony

Posted by: AnthonyB at May 26, 2019 11:51 PM (tCFRD)

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