Saturday Gardening Thread, May 18 [KT]

tulipand.jpg

Admirale's mate sent in the gorgeous photo of a tulip above from Andover, Massachusetts. Love it.

Memorial Day is coming up, but we are still having some weather in parts of the country. Thinking about a trip? Also today, a butterfly migration besides monarchs and lots of photos from The Horde.

Weather

Don in Kansas saw this on his way to work last week.

water-640x482.jpg

There's a lot of flooding in the region -- I see a "flash flood" warning every time I check the weather -- but so far it hasn't directly affected me, and the rains have stopped for the moment here.

Take a look at his more recent posts, too. He has some nice cacti up. And he reminds us that today is World Fiddle Day. Fun.

Let us know if you are facing a challenge like flooding.

We have had unusual rains here in the San Joaquin Valley and it is a little chilly. How are things where you are?

They have had some cold weather in Europe this month, too. This is how they keep Italian grape vines from freezing.

Pretty. But what about the carbon dioxide? Probably helps the vines grow, in addition to protecting them from frost.

Travel

At the end of April, Tailgunnersam a lurker saw weather like this in Chicago:

chicagoweath.jpg

And sent these photos:

Was just at Gettysburg and this photo of the Devil's Den from Little Round Top shows some lovely flowers.

getty11.jpg

These are flowers on the field of Pickett's Charge.

getty22.jpeg

I asked if the fence was similar to one that was there during the war:

Yes that fence was put up by the American Battle Field trust to match what was present in July 1863. The guide called it a worm fence and it is when you have more wood and want to put up a fence with less work. And they would be knocked by troops. Here's Matthew Brady's Gettysburg photo of three confederate prisoners.

confedpris.jpg

So interesting. A trip to consider as Memorial Day approaches.

Photography

Dr_No says these are peonies, photoshopped to alter the pink color and the mood. Do they look like peonies to you?

long and winding.jpg

A couple of closeups from crisis du jour. Care to try an I.D.?

DSC_0025a Flower Cascade LR.jpg

DSC_0517a Pink Chiffon LR.jpg

Butterfly migrations

The Western population of Monarch Butterflies typically leaves their coastal wintering grounds in late February or early March. I haven't seen any come through yet. I don't most years, at home. Sometimes when visiting the foothills I will see a few. Have you seen any Monarchs yet?

Here's a video of Monarchs in the larger Mexican wintering grounds. There are so many of them that you can sometimes hear a Monarch waterfall when they begin to stir in the morning. Start at 3:30 to listen.

I HAVE seen lots of Painted Ladies. Especially last week when we were stuck in construction traffic, and butterflies were crossing the highway to reach weeds on the other side of the road, and a couple of weeks ago at church, where they were particularly enamored of the Rhaphiolepsis bushes.

rhaphe.jpg

The migration of Painted Ladies from the Southern deserts through Southern California northward toward the Pacific Northwest is said to be the biggest this year since 2005. The migration that year was estimated to be in the billions. I'm not sure that the NBC report that the only wintering grounds for Painted Ladies are in Western Texas and Mexico. But like some of their relatives, they don't go dormant in winter and can't take freezing weather. They make to to most parts of the USA and Canada during the summer. There is a smaller southward migration in fall.

They started showing up in coastal Southern California in March. They can fly 25 miles per hour.


Butterflies At Home
has a nice little summary on Painted Ladies, including a guide on how to distinguish them from American Ladies. I like the furry parts of the open wings near the Painted Lady's body.

painted-lady-butterfly-woings-open.jpg

I think the underwing is also intriguing. So different from the upper wing.

Painted Lady on Pink Zinn.JPG

If you buy a kit to grow your own butterflies at home, they are likely to be Painted Ladies, whose caterpillars are not very particular about what they eat. If you find a caterpillar on a hollyhock, a legume or on weeds like thistle or mallow, you can bring them in and watch them turn into butterflies. The little spines are harmless. They usually start out darker than this when small. Often seen where a hollyhock leaf meets the stem, with some webbing.

painted-lady-butterfly-cater.jpg

You may also be interested in the useful chart of common orange butterflies. Ever seen a Goatweed Leafwing? You can also see the difference between a Question Mark and an Eastern Comma. The page on butterflies (and some moths) of Texas is also very nice.

If you want to grow some Painted Lady caterpillars and don't have enough weeds in your yard, here's a refresher on growing hollyhocks and using alpaca poop in the garden.

Gardens of The Horde

You know those Amaryllis (Hippeasturm) bulbs that people buy for Christmas gifts? Well, if you plant them out here in the San Joaquin Valley, this is about the time of year that they bloom. Actually, they are probably a little late this year because of the generally cooler spring weather (with a few hot days). We had some rain this week! Seems so strange after those years of drought.

These are across the street from me. They stand out from a distance. I like this dramatic size in containers. I generally prefer the slightly smaller ones in the landscape. Though these fit among the dwarf Pittosporum and Agapanthus (for summer bloom) near them.

amarylspr.jpg

The famous Pat* in Idaho sent in a photo and a report:

We're having a few days of chilly rain in the Treasure Valley. This is a photo from just a week ago, of those beautifully scented lily of the valley bells I love so much.

liliofvl.JPG

Do you think this flower from 40 miles north is a daylily or a tiger lily?

daylillly 40 mile.jpg

We appreciate the photos we have waiting for next week. If you would like to send information and/or photos for the Saturday Gardening Thread, the address is:

ktinthegarden
at g mail dot com

Include your nic unless you want to remain a lurker.

Posted by: Open Blogger at 12:55 PM




Comments

(Jump to bottom of page)

1 I got nuting.

Posted by: Paladin at May 18, 2019 01:03 PM (K541N)

2 nothing. Picked up 10 bags of mulch , fencing for the wife. Now finishing off a beer at Twin Peaks. After wings and ogling.

Posted by: Paladin at May 18, 2019 01:07 PM (K541N)

3 Paladin at May 18, 2019 01:07 PM

So, you've got plans.

Posted by: KTbarthedoor at May 18, 2019 01:10 PM (BVQ+1)

4 Closups look like spirea and azaleas, mine are in bloom now too.

Posted by: CN at May 18, 2019 01:12 PM (U7k5w)

5 agree with CN on photo IDs - I also think the last lily is a day lily rather than a tiger

Posted by: BlackOrchid at May 18, 2019 01:13 PM (Rarvo)

6 I did some weeding and cut grass so that the spray has a chance to knock it out in one large bed of tulips and iris. My back wants to be done for the day. Perhaps I'll prune a bit on the trees later if I decide I must do more landscaping and get the arms agreeing with my back.

Posted by: PaleRider is simply irredeemable at May 18, 2019 01:14 PM (pAkRe)

7 Don in Ks. has a great eye!

Raining here now (again) but my wife and I got about an hour in the garden. Cold and wet. We need sunshine and heat to get all in gear.
We weeded... and that's about it.
We bought 5 yds of "compost and topsoil mix" this spring. I'd call it screened wood chips and clay instead. The cellulose and hemi-cellulose of the wood is still obviously breaking down, as every seed sprouted in it is nitrogen starved. Won't buy that again.
Caught a swarm of bees Monday, so there's that!

Posted by: MarkY at May 18, 2019 01:14 PM (6CvQL)

8 I also love my lilies-of-the-valley for their scent; this part of the season is my best for scent, with those as well as my mock orange in bloom.

Posted by: BlackOrchid at May 18, 2019 01:14 PM (Rarvo)

9 Good afternoon,
My lupines are blooming beautifully as are the purple monarda plants. Gladiolus are about 9 inches tall, another liatris that I grew from corms , are looking great. I also noted my first rosebud of the season on a Madame Plantier shrub.It's been a great growing season, my patio tomatoes are fruiting up as well.

Posted by: CN at May 18, 2019 01:16 PM (U7k5w)

10 MarkY at May 18, 2019 01:14 PM

Yes, he does. We have several fine photographers featured today.

Posted by: KTbarthedoor at May 18, 2019 01:17 PM (BVQ+1)

11 "I asked Vic if the fence was similar to one that was there during the war"
----

Corrected.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at May 18, 2019 01:20 PM (kQs4Y)

12 We have several fine photographers featured today.

Generally, every week!

Posted by: MarkY at May 18, 2019 01:20 PM (6CvQL)

13 That Brady photo is memorable for me. When in high school, I had a book of Brady's war photos and this was my favorite.

Where do you think those guys were born? I always liked to think they were Georgians.

Look at the outfits, the boots, bedrolls, hats, beards. The guy on the left with his bandolier, cartridges still on board. His tin cup, plus the knife the Feds let him keep, is all he needs for eating and drinking.

But look at the poses, the expressions. Gettysburg is just one battle they fnought in and survived.

Posted by: Les Kinetic at May 18, 2019 01:26 PM (5+4v7)

14 I think that pattern inside the tulip must have something to do with bees.

Posted by: KTbarthedoor at May 18, 2019 01:29 PM (BVQ+1)

15 MarkY at May 18, 2019 01:14 PM

Where did you catch the swarm of bees, and where did you put them?

Posted by: KTbarthedoor at May 18, 2019 01:30 PM (BVQ+1)

16 The vegetable garden is all planted, except Zucchinis for some reason. We'll probably get some marigolds and other flowers for around the border

Posted by: Evasiveboat42 at May 18, 2019 01:35 PM (Rz2Nc)

17 I need to take some pics of our back area. Did a lot of work last year (and more this spring) and it's just bursting with color.

Also have herbs, tomatoes and peppers growing in pots. I'm so excited!

Posted by: Tami at May 18, 2019 01:39 PM (cF8AT)

18 I should say hubby 'did a lot of work'...I just water everything....

Posted by: Tami at May 18, 2019 01:40 PM (cF8AT)

19 We have some itty bitty tomatoes coming in. Yay!

Posted by: ALH, Herself at May 18, 2019 01:41 PM (htgmn)

20 Tulip peddling canal wogs.

Posted by: Something once posted at May 18, 2019 01:43 PM (xSo9G)

21 I have always liked Painted Ladies. They seem to tolerate people pretty well.

I think I have seen some in the winter here in the San Joaquin Valley, but they could have been American Ladies, too. I guess.

Posted by: KTbarthedoor at May 18, 2019 01:46 PM (BVQ+1)

22 Evasiveboat42 at May 18, 2019 01:35 PM

What region are you in?

Posted by: KTbarthedoor at May 18, 2019 01:47 PM (BVQ+1)

23 When I got feed a couple days ago the local coop had tomatoes and peppers and such. I might mention to dad, but if he wants fresh maters he'll have to water them hisself. Probably easier for him to find a farmers market, I think the local kid that used to sell excess produce growed up and quit doing that.

Posted by: PaleRider is simply irredeemable at May 18, 2019 01:48 PM (pAkRe)

24 Spent the morning cutting back Virginia Creeper that has enveloped the house. Quite pleasant to look through the back upstairs window greenery...but then you realize that a monster is taking over.

Pic http://tinyurl.com/y3be8ohs

Posted by: Something once posted at May 18, 2019 01:50 PM (CDGwz)

25 Oops. /Something sock

Posted by: Mike Hammer, etc., etc. at May 18, 2019 01:50 PM (CDGwz)

26 What region are you in?
Posted by: KTbarthedoor at May 18, 2019 01:47 PM (BVQ+1)

6a, central Ohio

Posted by: Evasiveboat42 at May 18, 2019 01:51 PM (Rz2Nc)

27 Gorgeous photos, KT. Great post.

>> is a daylily or a tiger lily
I know I thought it was tiger lily when I bought it, but google searches suggest that I was mistaken.

Posted by: 40 miles north at May 18, 2019 01:52 PM (o2vOl)

28 Facing a challenge like flooding?

Not at my place. South end of town might end up with problems. I'm towards the north end,,, 11 blocks away.

A duck did just knock on my front door and ask to borrow an umbrella though.

Posted by: teej at May 18, 2019 01:53 PM (A3w0Q)

29 The irises bloomed here this week, they have been spreading pretty good over the years which is fine with me, but the blooms just don't last too long. They have summer long greenery though with their big leaf stocks.

Posted by: Guy Mohawk at May 18, 2019 01:53 PM (r+sAi)

30 Something once posted at May 18, 2019 01:50 PM

Uh-oh. One to be careful with.

Posted by: KTbarthedoor at May 18, 2019 01:54 PM (BVQ+1)

31 There's a wild hive in a walnut tree at an urban park, that throws 2-3 swarms every year.
They always land on the same shrubbery, and the first will have the mated queen. The subsequent swarms usually have maiden queens.
I kept an empty hive box just for that swarm this year. I'm a third year beekeeper, and not very good at it yet. Lost them all due to mismanagement last year.
Just think, if I were a guvment worker, I'd get a raise!

Most beekeepers like swarms because it brings some genetic diversity into the hive yard.

Posted by: MarkY at May 18, 2019 01:57 PM (6CvQL)

32 KTbarthedoor at May 18, 2019 01:47 PM

Garden's coming along, then. Good.

Posted by: KTbarthedoor at May 18, 2019 01:58 PM (BVQ+1)

33 40 miles north at May 18, 2019 01:52 P

Tigerlily colored daylily, I would say.

Posted by: KTbarthedoor at May 18, 2019 01:59 PM (BVQ+1)

34 >> 14 I think that pattern inside the tulip must have
>> something to do with bees.

Yes, the tulip marks three separate Helipads and provides silent air traffic control.

Posted by: 40 miles north at May 18, 2019 02:00 PM (o2vOl)

35 M. Hammer
Is that vine saying "Feed Me!"?

Posted by: MarkY at May 18, 2019 02:00 PM (6CvQL)

36 >> A couple of closeups from crisis du jour
Great shots, cdj.

Posted by: 40 miles north at May 18, 2019 02:02 PM (o2vOl)

37 Time to quit stalling and get the grass cut.

Posted by: Evasiveboat42 at May 18, 2019 02:04 PM (Rz2Nc)

38 Mark Y,

I love raw honey and have thought about doing the bee thing in the recent past. Will probably have to wait a couple years though.

Between work and the music, I got, got, got, got no time.

Posted by: teej at May 18, 2019 02:05 PM (A3w0Q)

39 >> Butterflies At Home has a nice little summary on Painted Ladies

If I said I was going out to take photos of Painted Ladies, I don't think the announcement would be well-received.

Posted by: 40 miles north at May 18, 2019 02:05 PM (o2vOl)

40 re 1: neither does Slow Joe, full of sound and fury and signifying nothing

Posted by: mallfly the Peach of Hoboken at May 18, 2019 02:09 PM (ZqRa6)

41 teej,
I joined the local bee club about a year before I bought my first 2.
I also did an all-day beginner bee keeper class.
I spend more time watching them then I do working them... fascinating little critters.

Posted by: MarkY at May 18, 2019 02:10 PM (6CvQL)

42 Down in Rogue Valley (Medford Oregon) they used to run oil smudge burners to keep the orchards warm enough to not freeze out the peach and pear flowers when the weather dipped in the Spr___. Unfortunately the valley is a bowl and there was the issue of stagnant air and all the fumes getting trapped in the cold air at ground level, so they went to using natural gas burners. One of the orchards had bought a couple of truckloads of mortar powder cylinders and ammo cans, surplus, and rigged them up as burners with the gas pumped in from a central tank.

Around Salem, Oregon, and up in the Columbia Gorge the issue in cherries, pears and blueberries is that the cold air pools at ground level and will freeze off flowers and buds, so they have giant propane powered fans on pylons that they run when there is a threat of frost, to move and mix the air around.

Posted by: Kindltot at May 18, 2019 02:10 PM (KTmSx)

43 Amazing how many things in nature including flower blooms follow the golden ratio.

Posted by: Guy Mohawk at May 18, 2019 02:11 PM (r+sAi)

44 re: bees
Also, just about any older beekeeper can stand help at times.
Volunteer to be that helper, and collect in honey!
In our club, probably half the beeks are over 70. Honey harvest time is work!

Posted by: MarkY at May 18, 2019 02:11 PM (6CvQL)

45 MarkY at May 18, 2019 01:57 PM

Mr. Bar-the-Door likes bees. He has transferred swarms to boxes before. Sounds like you have a hobby developing there. Let us know how the honey turns out.

Posted by: KTbarthedoor at May 18, 2019 02:12 PM (BVQ+1)

46 Good afternoon Greenthumbs
Just got last of my plants in, Japanese Cucumbers, also have various tomatoes and peppers and dill.
Scaled down a little as last two years have largely been bust.

Posted by: Skip at May 18, 2019 02:13 PM (BbGew)

47 My peppers are finally sprouting in the seed tray, and I discovered that the corn that I was trying to plant was so old it was no longer fertile.

I used newer seed and that started sprouting too.

Once I get my squash, peppers, beans and corn in, I am mostly finished with planting.

I bought a dozen donuts in a plastic, clamshell tray, and once I ate the donuts I used the clamshell as a planter for sprouting the peppers.
It is actually cheaper than the seed sprouting kits from the garden store, and I got dounts too.

Posted by: Kindltot at May 18, 2019 02:14 PM (KTmSx)

48 40 miles north at May 18, 2019 02:05 PM

Probaly not. Better say, "butterfly migration" or something.

Posted by: KTbarthedoor at May 18, 2019 02:14 PM (BVQ+1)

49 Beautiful pics all.


OT: Pitch Meeting, Star Wars, Ep. IV, A New Hope:

https://youtu.be/NbmBY6plKvI

Posted by: Sharkman at May 18, 2019 02:15 PM (smc0A)

50 Skip,
Had to look up Jap. cukes.
Let us know what you think! We aren't doing any pickling cukes this year, cause wife made a 2 year supply last year!
MarketMore76 for eating fresh this year, like last.

Posted by: MarkY at May 18, 2019 02:16 PM (6CvQL)

51 Sounds like a wise thing to do, Mark.

I am so looking forward to having the time to get my place looking and producing like my place should,,, Lord willing and the river don't rise.

Work, music, mowing, cooking, laundry is about all I can handle.
And yes, something got left out of that list because,,, honest.

Guess I'd best do some dishes so I can fix some breakfast. So far only a couple of off brand pop tarts.

Posted by: teej at May 18, 2019 02:16 PM (A3w0Q)

52 MarkY at May 18, 2019 02:10 PM

Yes, bees are fascinating. I like that you got involved with a club.

Posted by: KTbarthedoor at May 18, 2019 02:17 PM (BVQ+1)

53 Biden wants free community college. that makes him a moderate.

Posted by: mallfly the Peach of Hoboken at May 18, 2019 02:18 PM (ZqRa6)

54 Skip at May 18, 2019 02:13 PM

Hope you can put those Japanese cucumbers on a fence or trellis.

Posted by: KTbarthedoor at May 18, 2019 02:18 PM (BVQ+1)

55 Guy Mohawk at May 18, 2019 02:11 PM

The golden ratio. Interesting.

Posted by: KTbarthedoor at May 18, 2019 02:19 PM (BVQ+1)

56 CN at May 18, 2019 01:16 PM

I looked up the Madame Plantier Rose. An Alba. Gorgeous. Never seen it before.

Posted by: KTbarthedoor at May 18, 2019 02:22 PM (BVQ+1)

57 I always plant my cucumbers on the fence line, they are spaced all around. Tried them a few years back and as not for pickles so wanted to try again. Last two years were bad, to much rain little sun.

Posted by: Skip at May 18, 2019 02:22 PM (BbGew)

58 Apple CEO Tim Cook to the class of 2019: My generation has failed you

Ah fuck you

Posted by: Nevergiveup at May 18, 2019 02:25 PM (Y+V3r)

59 Also have all tomatoes in cages, peppers I use those H wire stands realtors use for signs.which I will string the pepper plants to, seems every year a T--storm will come up breaking plants.

Posted by: Skip at May 18, 2019 02:26 PM (BbGew)

60 I have barely planted anything. It just won't stop raining here. We had 3 beautiful days this week with sunshine and warm weather. Now it's back to raining. I usually have pots all over the deck and patio. Getting pretty discouraged here.

Posted by: Jewells45 at May 18, 2019 02:27 PM (dUJdY)

61 Biden just mentioned that we are energy independent. Wonder why.

Posted by: mallfly the Peach of Hoboken at May 18, 2019 02:29 PM (ZqRa6)

62 56: Lovely fragrance too.

Posted by: CN at May 18, 2019 02:30 PM (U7k5w)

63 Only since it wasn't me to bring it up
This is a topography map of Gettysburg done a couple of years after of the battlefield. It shows different kinds of fences, and stone walls. The fences are much more by miles than are there now.
https://www.loc.gov/resource/g3824g.cw0325000a/

Posted by: Skip at May 18, 2019 02:34 PM (BbGew)

64 All cho cho Biden is doing is mouthIng platitudes that have no relation to reality.

Posted by: Nevergiveup at May 18, 2019 02:35 PM (Y+V3r)

65 16: I love marigolds. I had the grandsons plant a few flats of mixed colors , then we added purple petunias. It looks great.
Today, I had them do peppers, basil, and eggplant.

My only real garden issue is seeing raspberry plants springing up where they shouldn't. I will have to root them up and put them in a better place.

Posted by: CN at May 18, 2019 02:36 PM (U7k5w)

66 Surgery restrictions keep me out of the garden and yard. Back to Dr. Monday and hopeful for loosened restrictions. In the meantime, the ornamental peppers that I started in the Winter were becoming pot bound. Wifey volunteered to pull the pansies and plant the peppers. Thinking they would die before I could get to them, I told her to go ahead. Total of 25 plants. She's doing a good job but slow. Full day invested and a little over half way. Her time so whatever it takes her. Tomatoes went in early and thus far look good. All survived transplanting and are covered in blooms. Now if we can avoid all the fungi, viruses, blights, and pests, maybe decent tomatoes.

Posted by: Agitator at May 18, 2019 02:38 PM (m9DnX)

67 Snowing and raining here today. Temps in the 30s. Staying inside and zoning out.

Posted by: Archer at May 18, 2019 02:39 PM (vzk+c)

68 >> Mr. Bar-the-Door likes bees.
>> He has transferred swarms to boxes before.

Confirmation once again that 'ettes prefer thrill-seekers.

Posted by: 40 miles north at May 18, 2019 02:39 PM (o2vOl)

69 The zig-zag lines are the split rail fences, many of the period were higher but are very stout to get around or take apart. The dotted lines are stone walls, dots and dash are post and rail fences,

Posted by: Skip at May 18, 2019 02:40 PM (BbGew)

70 This morning we planted a Lebanese cucumber, cherry tomatoes, and the second seeding of leaf and romaine lettuce. Two hanging baskets of annual flowers are basking in the sun.

Posted by: Mrs. JTB at May 18, 2019 02:41 PM (bmdz3)

71 The picture of Devil's Den is very interesting. I think tge only picture if that spot that almost everyone has ever seen is the one with a dead rebel taken shortly after the battle.

This pic and the Pickett's Charge field pic really helps my brain gain a better understanding of what the field of battle looked like.

Posted by: Sharkman at May 18, 2019 02:42 PM (smc0A)

72 It's hard to believe but Biden has gotten worse on the stump.

If you want a fall down drunk drinking game, watch Biden give a speech and have "folks" as the pour word.

Make sure you got plenty of hooch

Posted by: REDACTED at May 18, 2019 02:42 PM (DPjeO)

73 Fabulous photos, especially those from Gettysburg.

Posted by: Mrs. JTB at May 18, 2019 02:43 PM (bmdz3)

74 61 Biden just mentioned that we are energy independent. Wonder why.
Posted by: mallfly the Peach of Hoboken at May 18, 2019 02:29 PM (ZqRa6)



UNCHAINED !!!!!!!!!

Posted by: REDACTED at May 18, 2019 02:43 PM (DPjeO)

75 >> I looked up the Madame Plantier Rose
Growing roses is like witchcraft. Bone meal. Fish entrails. Too strange for me.

Posted by: 40 miles north at May 18, 2019 02:46 PM (o2vOl)

76 70: I thought about lettuce, but I belong to a CSA, and tend to get lettuces there. It was the reason that I talked the grandsons out of beans, too. I have to use my credit on something.

Posted by: CN at May 18, 2019 02:46 PM (U7k5w)

77 Time check

Posted by: tbodie at May 18, 2019 02:48 PM (IrbWq)

78 >> Also have all tomatoes in cages

You're way ahead of me. I need to get my seeds going...

Posted by: 40 miles north at May 18, 2019 02:49 PM (o2vOl)

79 75: I guess it's in the blood. My grandmother was a master rotarian, and I loved being part of all that. I did the bonemeal before the last rain.

Posted by: CN at May 18, 2019 02:50 PM (U7k5w)

80 Looks y'all are 4 hours ahead of me. Anyhing going to happen that i need to know about?

Posted by: tbodie at May 18, 2019 02:50 PM (IrbWq)

81 The most famous picture of the supposed dead sniper in Devil's Den was a total fake news set up. The body was dragged to the stone wall build up.

Posted by: Skip at May 18, 2019 02:50 PM (BbGew)

82 40 Miles North, you asked about the weather in Anchorage last night and I missed it then.

The weather has been mostly cloudy with lows in mid 40s and highs in mid 60s. Very comfortable .

Posted by: tbodie at May 18, 2019 02:55 PM (IrbWq)

83 >> 79: I guess it's in the blood.
I can certainly appreciate the results, but the procedure itself feels like some kind of Wiccan ritual: "Eye of newt, and toe of frog..."

Posted by: 40 miles north at May 18, 2019 02:58 PM (o2vOl)

84 Mrs. JTB at May 18, 2019 02:41 PM

Sounds great. Lebanese cucumbers are a little different.

Posted by: KTbarthedoor at May 18, 2019 02:59 PM (BVQ+1)

85 CN at May 18, 2019 02:36 PM

And best to move those raspberries when they're sort of small.

The marigolds and petunias sound great.

Posted by: KTbarthedoor at May 18, 2019 03:02 PM (BVQ+1)

86 >> The weather has been mostly cloudy with lows
>> in mid 40s and highs in mid 60s. Very comfortable.

Nice. Thanks for responding.

Posted by: 40 miles north at May 18, 2019 03:03 PM (o2vOl)

87 Agitator at May 18, 2019 02:38 PM

Best wishes for your recovery and for your garden.

Posted by: KTbarthedoor at May 18, 2019 03:04 PM (BVQ+1)

88 Kindltot at May 18, 2019 02:14 PM

What kind of squash are you growing?

As I recall, corn seed is on the low side of the viability time scale.

Posted by: KTbarthedoor at May 18, 2019 03:06 PM (BVQ+1)

89 40 miles north at May 18, 2019 02:49 PM

Buy some plants. Unless you are planning some late-season tomatoes. Maybe cherries.

Posted by: KTbarthedoor at May 18, 2019 03:07 PM (BVQ+1)

90 83: A little, but the commercial preparations are not always great for the roots, especially for newer plants. Using old garden roses also minimizes freaking out over disease and wintering. I always feel for the people who are pained by their modern hybrids reverting to their root stock on year two...now that does feel like black magic!

Posted by: CN at May 18, 2019 03:08 PM (U7k5w)

91 Archer at May 18, 2019 02:39 PM

Where are you that you are getting snow?

Posted by: KTbarthedoor at May 18, 2019 03:08 PM (BVQ+1)

92 >> The marigolds and petunias sound great.

You can grow marigolds, KT? Petunias last awhile here, but marigolds all die of heat stroke inside two weeks. I don't even try them any more. Your thumb must be greener than mine...

Posted by: 40 miles north at May 18, 2019 03:09 PM (o2vOl)

93 CN at May 18, 2019 03:08 PM

Are your old roses all on their own roots?

Posted by: KTbarthedoor at May 18, 2019 03:10 PM (BVQ+1)

94 92: Here in NJ, they're going to flower til frost. I wasn't sure the orange and purple would be good, but I do like it.

Posted by: CN at May 18, 2019 03:12 PM (U7k5w)

95 93: Yes.

Posted by: CN at May 18, 2019 03:13 PM (U7k5w)

96 40 miles north at May 18, 2019 03:09 PM

I can grow French marigolds early in the season. Or the triploid ones. I deadhead them and plant in part shade. There are also the tiny signet marigolds that are edible, and the Mexican ones that bloom in fall.

Used to like the "African" marigolds in Southern California. They are short-timers around here. Early spring or fall.

Posted by: KTbarthedoor at May 18, 2019 03:13 PM (BVQ+1)

97 I have been to Gettysburg and walked where American fought against American. It was a day in October with a light wind and warm sun, and it was so quiet that as I walked, I swear I heard what appeared to be the sounds of men fighting and dying. Truly a haunted and venerated place.

Posted by: Tony Litwin at May 18, 2019 03:17 PM (uGbDu)

98 If you want when lottery numbers are posted I can comment in code so you know what they are and quick go get a few winners.

Posted by: Skip at May 18, 2019 03:18 PM (BbGew)

99 96: Marigold salad sounds beautiful.

Posted by: CN at May 18, 2019 03:19 PM (U7k5w)

100 Warning from years of experience, if you garden is under a acre do not plant spaghetti squash

Posted by: Skip at May 18, 2019 03:20 PM (BbGew)

101 Too late to post? I just read the comments. I was out mowing. It takes me about 3.5 hours to do my yard and my sainted neighbors.

I love the lilly of the valley picture. They are my second most favorite flower (after wisteria).

Posted by: Le Garde Vieux at May 18, 2019 03:21 PM (xpJpI)

102 100: Squash is another thing I get from the CSA.

Posted by: CN at May 18, 2019 03:21 PM (U7k5w)

103 Skip is right about the dead confederate in devils den. It was not Brady who posed that body.

The three Confederates on the rail fence by Brady where men who have been captured and worked in the hospital. Got their choice of clothing and then marched off to a prison camp in the north. No one knows who they are one guy claim to be a descendent but it was proven false.

Posted by: Tail at May 18, 2019 03:24 PM (MnVYk)

104 Le Garde Vieux at May 18, 2019 03:21 PM

Certainly not too late to post. Check back on Sunday, too.

Lily of the Valley is great. You go from big plants to little ones, don't you?

Posted by: KTbarthedoor at May 18, 2019 03:25 PM (BVQ+1)

105 CN at May 18, 2019 03:19 PM

Some of the edible marigolds are prettier than they are tasty. A few are kind of lemony.

Mexican Tarragon, the one that blooms in fall, is very pleasant, but on the strong side.

Posted by: KTbarthedoor at May 18, 2019 03:27 PM (BVQ+1)

106 105: Lemony is nice.

Posted by: CN at May 18, 2019 03:29 PM (U7k5w)

107 Tony Litwin at May 18, 2019 03:17 PM

Thanks for the story about your visit. Moving.

Posted by: KTbarthedoor at May 18, 2019 03:29 PM (BVQ+1)

108 They have done amazing work at Gettysburg. If you go the The Peach
Orchard now, it is a peach orchard. I guess The Wheat Field is planted
with wheat or at least long grass. Other than those, they took down the
observation tower
long ago and continue to improve the landscape. Many don't realize that
the place was much more commercialized and basically dicked up a
hundred years ago. They even had a trolley that went around the park
like a Disney monorail.

One thing they
can't and won't do is recreate the wooded areas that were cleared by
farm animals. During the battle, you could see much further into a wood
line because all the undergrowth was foraged.



Posted by: Quint at May 18, 2019 03:30 PM (n13/j)

109 Gardner and crew was the ones who were their first at Gettysburg mainly to photograph the dead. Brady didn't get there until a few days after the battle and didn't get any photos of dead as they were all buried by then.

Posted by: Skip at May 18, 2019 03:36 PM (BbGew)

110 I haven't been to Gettysburg in maybe 20 years, though as a kid wax there many times. They have done amazing landscaping to get it closer to what the battlefield looked like.

Posted by: Skip at May 18, 2019 03:38 PM (BbGew)

111 Just woke up. Update on my cherries (Sakuranbo in Japanese)

They sell cherries for about $3 for 100g in Japan. (that is about a dozen). I am learning why (experience keeps a dear school, but fools will learn from no other." - B. Franklin)

Next year I will try hand pollinating. I am also building a nest house for solitary bees. (mamekobachi) although I think it takes years to build up a population.

Posted by: Gentlemen, this is democracy manifest at May 18, 2019 03:46 PM (LWu6U)

112 Gentlemen, this is democracy manifest at May 18, 2019 03:46 PM

Do you have access to pollen from another compatible variety of cherry?

Posted by: KTbarthedoor at May 18, 2019 04:07 PM (BVQ+1)

113 I am hot, sweaty, tired and smell wonderful. I've been planting alyssums.

Posted by: Diogenes at May 18, 2019 04:20 PM (0tfLf)

114 Diogenes at May 18, 2019 04:20 PM

Sounds like you smell great. Did the alyssum go in front of something else?

Posted by: KTbarthedoor at May 18, 2019 04:33 PM (BVQ+1)

115 This morning we planted a Lebanese cucumber,

Do lebanese cucumbers have big noses ?

Posted by: JT at May 18, 2019 04:38 PM (kkoXz)

116 Sounds like you smell great. Did the alyssum go in front of something else?
Posted by: KTbarthedoor at May 18, 2019 04:33 PM (BVQ+1)

****

I use them to highlight other things in the flower beds. A birdbath. A little budda thing. And spread them around so they are more fragrant.

Posted by: Diogenes at May 18, 2019 04:39 PM (0tfLf)

117 Diogenes at May 18, 2019 04:39 PM

I especially like it with lobelia, if you are in a suitable climate. The white sets off lots of other flowers nicely, though.

Posted by: KTbarthedoor at May 18, 2019 04:52 PM (BVQ+1)

118 JT at May 18, 2019 04:38 PM

Some of them look sort of like certain noses. Heh.

Posted by: KTbarthedoor at May 18, 2019 04:54 PM (BVQ+1)

119 KT,
Since you asked, and I have spent the week researching cherry fertility.

They sell kits on internet, but mostly they just contain the tool and 3kg of powder dye for identifying which flowers have been pollinated. So I think only for farmers. It looks like some farmers actually do hand pollinate, but they strip off the flowers from one tree, dry and separate the pollen, and then use on the other trees. I do not know how long the pollen lasts but since I have two compatible trees, I really don't need pollen. (unless one tree was somehow mislabeled when I bought it.)

This is why they have a festival celebrating the mamekobachi bee in some cities.

Part of the problem is that the flower is only fertile for 12 to 24 hours after opening, and it takes 2-3 weeks for all the buds to open. I would have to do this every day for three weeks.

Posted by: Gentlemen, this is democracy manifest at May 18, 2019 04:55 PM (LWu6U)

120 What kind of squash are you growing?



As I recall, corn seed is on the low side of the viability time scale.
Posted by: KTbarthedoor at May 18, 2019 03:06 PM (BVQ+1)


Sweet Meat and Acorn squash. Both from saved seed, so we will see what I actually get.

If I had my druthers I would get delicata, but I didn't grow those and save the seeds.

All my plants except the tomatoes, scarlet runner beans and egglplants are from saved seeds, so there is going to be some odd plants growing.

The seed corn is from maybe five years ago and I only got two out of 24 sprouting, so I am not surprised that it doesn't survive well. It made such good corn plants too, so I am sad to see the end of that year.

Posted by: Kindltot at May 18, 2019 05:30 PM (KTmSx)

121 Gentlemen, this is democracy manifest at May 18, 2019 04:55 PM
You may not need as many bees as you think, but you may need to plant some flowers other than cherries to nourish them.

It would be much better to let bees pollinate the cherries if that is feasible. I have hand-pollinated some things in the past. You may be able to just take an anther from one tree and place it on the pistil of the flower from another tree with tweezers.

Posted by: KT at May 18, 2019 05:53 PM (BVQ+1)

122 KT, in case you read back, there are a few new hybrid cherries that self pollinate.

Back when I had contact with the orchardists, they were just starting out trying them, and one grower mentioned that in a bad year of late rain, those trees still have good crops.

Then the ones I saw were Montmorency types, but I suspect if it works there will be other strains as well.

Posted by: Kindltot at May 18, 2019 05:53 PM (KTmSx)

123 Kindltot,

If you didn't hand pollinate, you might spring for some squash seeds for at least part of your crop. Delicata if you like them, Sand Hill Preservation sells one called 'Honeyboat'.

Sweet Meat is great, and I think Nichols has a special strain.

Gill's Golden Pippin Acorn squash is supposed to be superior to other acorns, and I think it's from your area. Single serving size.

Some other yellow acorns are supposed to be dual use: summer or winter squash.

Posted by: KT at May 18, 2019 06:06 PM (BVQ+1)

124 Kindltot at May 18, 2019 05:53 PM
Yes, there are a few self-pollinating sweet cherries now. And they tend to be good pollinators for other cherries.

Posted by: KT at May 18, 2019 06:08 PM (BVQ+1)

125 Kindltot at May 18, 2019 05:30 PM
If you are looking for interesting types of corn, Sand Hill Preservation has those, too. And there are other sources.

Posted by: KT at May 18, 2019 06:09 PM (BVQ+1)

126 KT -

I actually think my problem is that the bees that are active so early in year are very finicky. Once they start feeding on a species, they do not switch and so farmers are advised to keep nearby flowers to a minimum. I happen to have many other trees, including an ornamental plum nearby. But also the apricot, ume, plum, and a neighbor with a small tulip farm are all active at same time. I know I saw bees in garden, but I do not know type (probably the horned faced one I am looking for) and I am not sure if they were on the Cherry. So I think I need to make my cherry trees a home base for bees to make sure they get attention.

As for self fertile - they still need bees. Cherry flowers do not self pollinate and wind is very unreliable. But there is also the problem of finding a variety that tolerates the Japanese weather.

Or the problem could be pruning. If the tree is too strong, it will drop fruit. Or maybe water -- this was a very dry spring and I did not water them since they looked fine. This is first year both trees were in full bloom at same time, so first year to expect cherries.

Posted by: Gentlemen, this is democracy manifest at May 18, 2019 06:14 PM (LWu6U)

127 Kindltot at May 18, 2019 05:30 PM
'
Actually, if you didn't plant summer squash or pumpkins and you don't have neighbors who planted squash or pumpkins, you may get true-to-type squashes from your Acorns and Sweet Meats. They are different species. Cross-pollination is rare.

Posted by: KTbarthedoor at May 18, 2019 06:22 PM (BVQ+1)

128 Busy all morning and afternoon - going out for the evening. Will post later.

Posted by: Pat* at May 18, 2019 06:23 PM (2pX/F)

129 Gentlemen, this is democracy manifest at May 18, 2019 06:14 PM

Sweet cherries are definitely a challenge in humid climates.

I was thinking of flowers to keep the bees going once the cherry blossoms are gone.

Posted by: KTbarthedoor at May 18, 2019 06:25 PM (BVQ+1)

130 So my neighbor just told me I should spray my strawberries with HB-101, and I just looked it up and it appears to be homeopathic spray for plants.

>>Make the world happy with the power of bio.
>>The name is derived from "Happy Bio 101%"

Good grief.

Posted by: Gentlemen, this is democracy manifest at May 18, 2019 06:26 PM (LWu6U)

131 Passing along a message:

I am a long time moron lurker from North Alabama, and though this is a long shot, thought I could do something to help out fellow morons in the area, if there are any.
I went a little overboard seed-shopping this winter with all the really cool varieties of tomatoes at Baker Creek, and didn't think they would germinate as well as they did, so have a few hundred extra heirloom tomato seedlings. If you know of anyone in the Huntsville/Decatur/Athens area, I would love to share. I really don't want them to die, and if I plant 300+ tomato plants, I will die.
Absolutely love your garden thread every week.

Posted by: KTbarthedoor at May 18, 2019 06:41 PM (BVQ+1)

132 Details on available varieties:

Lots of neat ones like Blue Beauty, White Tomesol, Yellow Garden Peach, and the bizarre Reisetomate. I have some extra peppers too, and had some heirloom french artichokes that sprouted fantastically in my aerogarden, just a few extras of those.

Posted by: KTbarthedoor at May 18, 2019 06:52 PM (BVQ+1)

133 129: Monarda would do the trick. or lots of lavender. Bees adore both. Also, don't purge your lawn of clover, it keeps bees in love with your property. I have spent much effort convincing neighbors not to fall for these lawn services that come weekly to poison another flowering weed. No flowers no bees and butterflies. I'd rather live with wild violets than lose my pollinators.

Posted by: CN at May 18, 2019 08:06 PM (U7k5w)

134 I'm stuck in the same boat as agitator. Recovery from broken ankle is preventing me from getting much in. Already had onions and spinach planted but that's all. It's been cold un seasonably cold here anyway we'll see what we can get in in the near future.

Posted by: Farmer at May 18, 2019 09:09 PM (QTAAG)

135 134:Hoping you recover quickly, broken ankles are dreadful, too many bones and so many presentations.

Posted by: CN at May 18, 2019 09:39 PM (U7k5w)

136 So many pretty flower pictures. I love flowers. Got my garden planted. Now doing overflow plants in spouses garden. That's where all the sprawling things go, like melons and squash. Using a horse corral for it as the ground is very fertilized from previous occupants.

Posted by: S.Lynn at May 19, 2019 12:35 AM (RbwbO)

137 From Idaho's Treasure Valley: We had some chilly rainy days, but we were blessed with a decent dry day today. My main project is still getting the dead leaves off 2 beds of strawberries (since we've already spotted berries forming). I actually finished the last bit of one bed today, and got over a quarter of the way through the second one, which was great progress for one day. We also planted out 2 of the indoor Big Boy tomato starts, and 2 of the Roma tomato starts. The weather will be cloudy, possibly drizzly, this coming week, so hopefully the plants won't be heat-stressed, and will get some good roots going, before it gets hot again.

I planted seeds for 2 zucchini, 4 butternut squash, 4 cucumber, and 4 cantaloupe this week. A friend gifted me 2 Sugar Baby watermelon starts, and 2 tomato "Black from Tula", which I have to figure out where to put!

I've thinned the carrots and lettuces.

My fall spinach and fall cilantro are seriously bolting. The new spinach is now harvestable. Not going to bother with spring cilantro. I do have to remember to get some basil seeds in. I did get some parsley sprouts from last year's dropped seeds. I cut some final sprouts of thyme (since it's starting to flower), and I continue to harvest and dry oregano.

We gave away a bunch of red raspberry sprouts to 2 of the adults associated with our smallbore rifle class.

The purple Siberian Iris are blooming; there must be more than a hundred flowers in the 5 clumps on the south side of my house. And the hummingbird-attracting seed mix in one of my raised beds is finally sprouting - I need to keep an eye for chamomile sprouts in that bed and pull them out, or the bed will be overrun with them again.

Husband rented a tiller, and tilled the bed that's for corn and beans, plus a new area to grow alfalfa in (for improving the soil and out-competing weeds). Question for those who keep chickens: I was thinking about whether I could cut some of the alfalfa, and give it to a friend for her chickens. Everything I'm reading online about alfalfa for chickens mentions dried bales. Is it OK for them to eat it as fresh greens?

Posted by: Pat* at May 19, 2019 12:43 AM (2pX/F)

138 Pat* at May 19, 2019 12:43 AM

Don't know about fresh alfalfa for chickens. Some legumes have toxic properties when fresh. More research may be in order.

The irises sound wonderful.

Posted by: KTbarthedoor at May 19, 2019 01:18 AM (BVQ+1)

139 Moar rain today in the Central Valley...Thursday we had 2-1/2 inches of rain including 2 inches of hail...which was so capricious that while our garden took a beating the neighbors across the road didn't. The spring garden really took the hit. As did the cherry, nectarine and peach trees. I doubt we'll get much edible fruit off them this year.

I harvested the cut & grow again leaf lettuces and such before the deluge, but will have to replant the unprotected climbing stuff; the cukes, beans and peas are a total loss.

The row covers held on the tomatoes, eggplants and peppers so hopefully they won't dampen off. It's pouring right now (Sunday) and thunder is rolling in the distance. Veggie gardening may be challenging this year, especially if the temps quickly change from cool to baking hot.

BTW- for some reason, the Montmorency and Rainier cherries were totes out of sync with the Bings this spring...so the Bings are sparse and I assume spoilt/split by now I haven't had the heart to go out and look.

I too have a patch of red Amaryllis. Five years ago I was given a big bag by a friend who was upping sticks. A vase of blooms sits on my desk as I type this...it's sooo decadent to have armfuls of these beauties and the perfume is wonderful. I also planted an expanding patch of Belladonna lilies, aka the Naked Ladies of late summer and Star Gazer lilies in big pots in the greenhouse are beginning to bud up.

Oh and joys of joys...rattlers abound this year. It's always something, ain't it?

Posted by: Shanks for the memory at May 19, 2019 02:33 PM (TdCQk)

140 Dang it, Shanks

Sorry about the hail. Capricious hail seems to be characteristic of this area. We didn't get quite as much rain as you, I don't think. Got thunder and rain this afternoon. Again.

Hope some of your fruit survives.

Rattlers . . . Always fun in the garden.

Posted by: KTbarthedoor at May 19, 2019 04:33 PM (BVQ+1)

(Jump to top of page)






Processing 0.02, elapsed 0.0187 seconds.
14 queries taking 0.0047 seconds, 148 records returned.
Page size 90 kb.
Powered by Minx 0.7 alpha.



MuNuvians
MeeNuvians
Polls! Polls! Polls!
Frequently Asked Questions
The (Almost) Complete Paul Anka Integrity Kick
Top Top Tens
Greatest Hitjobs

The Ace of Spades HQ Sex-for-Money Skankathon
A D&D Guide to the Democratic Candidates
Margaret Cho: Just Not Funny
More Margaret Cho Abuse
Margaret Cho: Still Not Funny
Iraqi Prisoner Claims He Was Raped... By Woman
Wonkette Announces "Morning Zoo" Format
John Kerry's "Plan" Causes Surrender of Moqtada al-Sadr's Militia
World Muslim Leaders Apologize for Nick Berg's Beheading
Michael Moore Goes on Lunchtime Manhattan Death-Spree
Milestone: Oliver Willis Posts 400th "Fake News Article" Referencing Britney Spears
Liberal Economists Rue a "New Decade of Greed"
Artificial Insouciance: Maureen Dowd's Word Processor Revolts Against Her Numbing Imbecility
Intelligence Officials Eye Blogs for Tips
They Done Found Us Out, Cletus: Intrepid Internet Detective Figures Out Our Master Plan
Shock: Josh Marshall Almost Mentions Sarin Discovery in Iraq
Leather-Clad Biker Freaks Terrorize Australian Town
When Clinton Was President, Torture Was Cool
What Wonkette Means When She Explains What Tina Brown Means
Wonkette's Stand-Up Act
Wankette HQ Gay-Rumors Du Jour
Here's What's Bugging Me: Goose and Slider
My Own Micah Wright Style Confession of Dishonesty
Outraged "Conservatives" React to the FMA
An On-Line Impression of Dennis Miller Having Sex with a Kodiak Bear
The Story the Rightwing Media Refuses to Report!
Our Lunch with David "Glengarry Glen Ross" Mamet
The House of Love: Paul Krugman
A Michael Moore Mystery (TM)
The Dowd-O-Matic!
Liberal Consistency and Other Myths
Kepler's Laws of Liberal Media Bias
John Kerry-- The Splunge! Candidate
"Divisive" Politics & "Attacks on Patriotism" (very long)
The Donkey ("The Raven" parody)
News/Chat