Sunday Morning Book Thread 12-04-2016: A Long-Awaited Death

Picton Reading Room Liverpool - 1_525.jpg
Picton Reading Room, Central Library, Liverpool, England
Click for full size image


It's another beautiful day at AoSHQ's stately, prestigious, internationally acclaimed and high-class Sunday Morning Book Thread and continual soiree, where men are men, all the 'ettes are impossibly attractive, safe spaces are underneath your house and are used as protection against actual dangers, like tornados, hurricanes, politically motivated social media attacks, President Elect Donald Trump, and special snowflakes do not get respect, but instead, belly laughs. And unlike other AoSHQ comment threads, the Sunday Morning Book Thread is so hoity-toity, pants are required. Even if it's these pants, which are about as ugly as you can get.


Against All Hope

Years ago, I remember seeing the industrialist Armand Hammer on some TV talk show (probably the Tonight Show during the Carson era), and he was talking about the time he spent doing business deals in the Soviet Union, and incidentally, getting very rich in the process. Of course, Hammer was a big-time commie tool, and ne spoke of some meeting he had with Joseph Stalin that convinced him that the murderous psychopath was a great humanitarian. "...Stalin had tears in his eyes when he said to me, 'But what about the people?'" Hammer was apparently impressed that Stalin could exercise his tear ducts on cue. So Johnny told him, "What are you, an idiot? How do you get to be so rich by being so dumb? Don't you know you were being played?" When Hammer tried to protest, Johnny said, "Look, I've got 3 ex-wives, so I *know* about being played for a sucker!"

Actually, that's the speech I *wanted* Carson to make. He never said any of that. If he had any reservations about what Hammer told him, he kept them to himself. But that's when I realized that an essential part of the totalitarian commie thug business model was a lot of jabber about "children" and "the poor". It's like the old NYC mafia don (I forget which of the 5 families he ran) who dressed up as Santa every year at Christmas and handed out gifts.

The rat bastard commies figured out long ago that as long as they proclaim they good intentions, people will believe them. And I think that religious types are especially vulnerable to this line of baloney because of the biblical admonitions to help the poor and needy.

It takes a certain amount of backbone to call out this fakery for what it is. Nobody wants to be against "the poor". Or "the children". Nobody wants to be painted as an ogre. But the lie is so effective that liberal old ladies in tennis shoes will defend commie thug tyrants even as they produce tens of thousands of refugees fleeing in leaky boats from their despotism.

One man who wasn't fooled by any of this is the author Humberto Fontova. He and his family fled Castro's socialist paradise in 1961 when he was 7 years old. He has no illusions about Castro and does not suffer fools gladly. He wrote about the adulation given to Castro by the ignorant glitterati in his book Fidel: Hollywood's Favorite Tyrant,

[T]here’s a lot that Hollywood liberals and other Fidel Castro admirers would rather you didn’t know about the dictator of Cuba—like how he imprisoned more people as a percentage of population than Hitler or Stalin; how Fidel’s firing squads killed thousands of Cubans; how Fidel’s subjects would rather inject themselves with AIDS than live under his tyranny...Drawing on a wealth of research—including interviews with former Castro regime officials, anti-Castro freedom fighters, and Castro’s political prisoners—acclaimed author Humberto Fontova reveals the ugly face of the Castro regime. Along the way, he punctures some of the egregious myths about Cuba

Before Castro, Cuba was actually not a bad place to live, even under Batista. Yes, Batista was a dictator, but Fidel made him look like an amateur. And Batista didn't send thousands of Cubans fleeing the country in leaky boats.

Fontova also wrote The Longest Romance: The Mainstream Media and Fidel Castro:

History records few propaganda campaigns as phenomenally successful or enduring as Castro and Che's. The Longest Romance exposes the full scope of this deception; it documents the complicity of major U.S. media players in spreading Castro's propaganda and in coloring the world's view of his totalitarian regime. Castro's cachet as a celebrity icon of anti-Americanism has always overshadowed his record as a warmonger, racist, sexist, Stalinist, and godfather of modern terrorism.

As Joseph Stalin could count on NY Times reporter Walter Duranty to run interference for him, Fidel Castro had Herbert Matthews, who was, get this, also a reporter for the NY Times. He used to crank out swill like this:

“There are no Reds in [Castro's] Cabinet and none in high positions in the Government or army in the sense of being able to control either governmental or defense policies. The only power worth considering in Cuba is in the hands of the Premier Castro, who is not only not Communist but decidedly anti-Communist…” Herbert Matthews, 16 July 1959

Matthews' hagiographic reporting greatly influenced US foreign policy toward Cuba, as detailed in the book The Man Who Invented Fidel: Castro, Cuba, and Herbert L. Matthews of The New York Times by Anthony DePalma:

His heroic portrayal of Castro, who was then believed dead, had a powerful effect on American perceptions of Cuba, both in and out of the government, and profoundly influenced the fall of the Batista regime. When Castro emerged as a Soviet-backed dictator, Matthews became a scapegoat; his paper turned on him, his career foundered and he was accused of betraying his country

The only question is, was Matthews simply a clueless boob (as some liberals are), or did he know he was not telling the truth about Castro? I'm not sure it matters. Assuming he was ignorant of the truth about Castro, theologians make a distinction between "vincible" and "invincible" ignorance. I think Matthews' is the "vincible" sort, i.e. he really ought to have known. And furthermore, he had a responsibility to know, given his job as a reporter, and given his presence in Cuba where he could easily have found out the truth. Matthews clearly has blood on his hands. Or, had. He died in 1977. I'm glad to hear that his career suffered because of the crap that he wrote. I'm also glad he didn't follow in Walter Duranty's footsteps and win the Pulitzer Prize.


Epiphany


twilight is shit.jpg

(h/t Anna Puma)


___________

Moron Recommendations

Moron buzzion writes:

A high school classmate has just published his second book with his wife, also high school classmate. It is dealing with loss and faith. I think it would be nice for more eyes to get to see, and there are a lot of eyes at the horde. They're both wonderful amazing people and I think deserve it.

The book is It's not OK. And that's OK.: Inspiring stories from loss to love, and heartache to Hope by Benjamin and Lynn Hartings.

Ben Hartings has buried a son, beaten cancer two times, raised four beautiful children, married an incredible wife, written three books and read exponentially more.

So when it comes to suffering, it sounds like the Hartings know whereof they speak. As Christians, they have hope that goes beyond this mortal life:

This book is full of lessons and stories through when Life is NOT OK! Disease, Diagnosis and Death overcome our lives - These stories will lead you to the knowledge and peace that - "It will be OK" - regardless of the outcome, because of faith in Jesus Christ.

Available in paperback only.

I think some of you morons probably need this book. I have read a few comments on this blog detailing life hardships that have absolutely staggered me. I'd be curled up in a fetal position and weeping uncontrollably like Trigglypuff at a pro-life rally if I had to endure the things that some of you have.


___________

On ace's book recommendation thread back in June, Anna Puma mentioned Glenn Cook's Starfisher Trilogy

zombie asked if there were any famous sci-fi books set on a planet like Mercury

...that is "tidally locked" with its sun, so that one side always faces toward the sun and is super-hot, and the other side always faces away and thus is super-cold; as a result, there is an extremely thin "ring" around the planet defining the "sunset edge" where the sun is just barely visible on the horizon at all times. Thus, in this "ring," maybe only a mile wide, encircling the whole planet top top bottom, there is a zone of mid-temperature livability.

To which Anna Puma mentioned that

The first book of Cook's Starfisher Trilogy is called Shadowline and it's all about these two companies on a tidally locked planet fighting for control of the resources. So each hires a professional mercenary company to fight their war. But there are complications beneath the seemingly straight forward story.

The sequel is Starfishers and the third book in the trilogy is Star's End


___________

From a comment posted on a Friday thread-- oh heck, there's not much I can add to it, so I'm just going to copy and paste the whole thing:

141
While shopping on Amazon for ebooks, Amazon recommended a 99 cent republishing of something originally published in 1920; 'William Bradford of Plymouth Plantation' (B01M7TP226). The 1920 edition edited by Harold Paget.

The language is a bit more modern but I was surprised to read that in 1620 in England 'religious' was a pejorative in the same way that 'Christian' is today. It also details the 'established' churches of that time were obstacles and attempted to impede the Puritans in much the same way that modern leftists are doing. Back then you could be imprisoned for your religious belief. Today, you get hauled into court and fined.

The Puritans were cheated out of their money, and promised provisions and re-supply that never arrived.

I'm only about half way through the account, but I'm in awe to think these are the (modern) words of William Bradford from 500 years ago.

Posted by: Gordon Lancaster at December 02, 2016 12:27 PM (dRW51)

The Kindle edition of William Bradford of Plymouth Plantation is still available for 99 cents.


___________

Don't forget the AoSHQ reading group on Goodreads. It's meant to support horde writers and to talk about the great books that come up on the book thread. It's called AoSHQ Moron Horde and the link to it is here: https://www.goodreads.com/group/show/175335-aoshq-moron-horde.


___________

So that's all for this week. As always, book thread tips, suggestions, bribes, rumors, threats, and insults may be sent to OregonMuse, Proprietor, AoSHQ Book Thread, at the book thread e-mail address: aoshqbookthread, followed by the 'at' sign, and then 'G' mail, and then dot cee oh emm.

What have you all been reading this week? Hopefully something good, because, as you all know, life is too short to be reading lousy books.

Posted by: OregonMuse at 09:02 AM




Comments

(Jump to bottom of page)

1 Good Morning.

Posted by: HH at December 04, 2016 08:57 AM (DrCtv)

2 Taking break on the Dies the Fire series and now working on a new one by Robert Treskillard called Merlin's Blade. Got it via Book Bub for 99 cents. It's back to $5.99 now.

Posted by: Vic We Have No Party at December 04, 2016 08:59 AM (mpXpK)

3 Al my pants are i the wash.

Guess I'll stay on the EMT till the dryer is done.

Posted by: Village Idiot's Apprentice at December 04, 2016 09:00 AM (J+eG2)

4 I will pimp my blog post today which is my monthly wrap up

Looking over it I see I did some praying, some gloating, and some shopping in November.

Link in nic

Posted by: Votermom the Deplorable @vm on Gab.ai at December 04, 2016 09:02 AM (Om16U)

5 I'm sorry I stomped the EMT. Doesn't it usually go up much earlier than it did today?

Posted by: OregonMuse, deplorable since 2004 at December 04, 2016 09:03 AM (n8tHU)

6 Here's a topic we are talking about on the goodreads group -what's the best book you read in 2016?

Also Hallow Mass is on sale because it is our horde-written group read in January.
Oregon reviewed it back in spring, and I put up a link this week to it (in nic) .I am looking forward to reading it.

Posted by: Votermom the Deplorable @vm on Gab.ai at December 04, 2016 09:05 AM (Om16U)

7 Good morning fellow Book Threadists. The EMT went up much later than usual. Why not use it for political, non-book posts?

Posted by: JTB at December 04, 2016 09:05 AM (V+03K)

8 OM, just noticed, as far as I can tell, that if you click on a book title in your thread, it goes to Amazon, but NOT through Ace's Amazon Pay to Play link! Just saying.

Posted by: Hrothgar at December 04, 2016 09:06 AM (wCEn4)

9 The commies loved my baking soda.

Posted by: Arm and Hammer at December 04, 2016 09:06 AM (Tyii7)

10 "I'm sorry I stomped the EMT. Doesn't it usually go up much earlier than it did today?"

Usually it's up a little earlier than today.

But, both of you do a fine job, which generally goes unthanked and uncommented on.

No biggie.

The threads can co-exist in peace.

Posted by: Village Idiot's Apprentice at December 04, 2016 09:06 AM (J+eG2)

11 Church was refreshing, my coffee is rejuvenating, and now I can settle into a still-quiet house and read. The dogs obviously have forgotten my promise to take them for a morning hike, so it's book time!

Good morning all.

Posted by: MTF at December 04, 2016 09:07 AM (sCBEO)

12 I continued reading "The Philosophy of Tolkien" which continues to be excellent. Started raeding a couple of books about GK Chesterton by Dale Ahlquist, "The Apostle of Common Sense" and "The Complete Thinker". Ahlquist is a true Chesterton devotee but his writing is perceptive and well done. I expect to enjoy the books.

Posted by: JTB at December 04, 2016 09:09 AM (V+03K)

13 Armand Hammer? What kind of a name is that??? Sound fake to me.

Posted by: Heywood Jablome at December 04, 2016 09:10 AM (QlyN5)

14 There is a fair amount of evidence that Armand Hammer was a Soviet spy and a traitor. The author Joseph Finder addressed this in his nonfiction book Red Carpet: The Connection Between the Kremlin and America's Most Powerful Businessmen (1983) and in fiction in his very good espionage thriller The Moscow Club (1991).

Posted by: cool breeze at December 04, 2016 09:11 AM (StZrq)

15 Kid has Nutcracker dress rehearsal today, and I'm on costuming duty.

Posted by: Votermom the Deplorable @vm on Gab.ai at December 04, 2016 09:11 AM (Om16U)

16 Tolle lege

But I've got nothing started myself this week

Posted by: Skip at December 04, 2016 09:11 AM (5sOEp)

17 Do any of Ace's movie reviews count as "Books"?

Posted by: Village Idiot's Apprentice at December 04, 2016 09:11 AM (J+eG2)

18 Was Armand Hammer named after Arm and Hammer company or vice versa?

Posted by: Votermom the Deplorable @vm on Gab.ai at December 04, 2016 09:12 AM (Om16U)

19 Heavy thought of the week.

I'm trying to understand why the 'Big 3', Chesterton, Lewis, and Tolkien, have such a strong, and increasing, appeal for me. Is it that I agree with them? Mostly I do. Is it simply that they write so well? Definitely part of the appeal. Is it their defense and expression of an overall Christianity? Maybe, but I'm not formally religious. Is it their defense of Western culture/tradition and the value of certain approaches to education? Absolutely! Do they seem like sane voices in an increasing din of nihilism and inhumanity? Damn straight. But these are specifics, small islands in a huge ocean, and their writings are much bigger in how they appeal to me.

As I learn more about Chesterton, Lewis, and Tolkien (and it requires study), I realize they each weave a mesh of interconnectedness. They create a framework of topics and philosophy, each part of which reinforces the other parts to form the mesh or net. And that net, strong but also airy and flexible, is a tool to help capture more of the meanings in life. It also serves as a pattern to enlarge our own perceptions. To put it another way, they describe a world and give the readers the means to appreciate it, expand it, and apply it in life. What a beautiful gift.

(Honorable mention to Dorothy Sayers. I enjoy her detective stories but her non-fiction works are in the same league as Lewis.)

Posted by: JTB at December 04, 2016 09:12 AM (V+03K)

20 Having a life mate you love and loves you to share the hardships of life is more than half the battle. People without that are at a big big disadvantage .

Posted by: Sebastian Melmoth at December 04, 2016 09:13 AM (/ZLfx)

21 Armand Hammer was his name, Arm & Hammer was the company, ironically he bought the company around timeI was a teenager or so, there is a A&H company very near me.

Posted by: Skip at December 04, 2016 09:14 AM (5sOEp)

22 Having a life mate you love and loves you to share the hardships of life
is more than half the battle. People without that are at a big big
disadvantage .


What book did that come from?

Posted by: Arm and Hammer at December 04, 2016 09:15 AM (Tyii7)

23 5
I'm sorry I stomped the EMT. Doesn't it usually go up much earlier than it did today?

Posted by: OregonMuse, deplorable since 2004 at December 04, 2016 09:03 AM (n8tHU)

Krack must be having some problems this morning. I hope he is OK.

Posted by: Vic We Have No Party at December 04, 2016 09:16 AM (mpXpK)

24 OM, Thanks, as always, for the book thread. And I love that photo of the Liverpool reading room. Now THAT is what a public library should look like. It would benefit from some wing back and club chairs.

Posted by: JTB at December 04, 2016 09:16 AM (V+03K)

25 Here's a topic we are talking about on the goodreads group -what's the best book you read in 2016?
---
I would have to say "If You Can Keep It" by Eric Metaxas, which I have carnival-barkered on this esteemed book thread before.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at December 04, 2016 09:17 AM (EnKk6)

26 In the late '50s the NY Times was running an ad campaign with signs all over town reading "I got my job through the New York Times."

Under one someone had written: "So did Fidel Castro."

Best piece of graffiti I ever saw.

Posted by: Libra at December 04, 2016 09:19 AM (u0gU9)

27 I restarted my annual LOTR reading. The background reading I've done the past year on Tolkien is giving me a better appreciation of his writing. I wasn't sure that was possible after so many years.

Posted by: JTB at December 04, 2016 09:19 AM (V+03K)

28 Communist dictators figured out Westerners -- in particular, Americans -- long ago.

They know we adhere to the English tradition of avoiding conflict. You know, "Don't talk politics and religion." This is considered polite.

Conflict includes calling someone out for lying. For example, when your acquaintance at a cocktail party exaggerates his property value, commute time, or child's academic achievements, it's considered rude to disagree. After all, he hasn't said anything to offend you.

So when a Castro or Stalin or Ortega brags about the compassion of his regime, the U.S. reporter just nods and takes notes. It would be impolite to raise questions about boat people, infant mortality, or the Berlin Wall.

Just as, when your cocktail-party friend concludes his spiel on how much his home has appreciated in value, it would be rude of you to ask about the new sewage-treatment plant upwind of his neighborhood.

Posted by: Michael Rittenhouse at December 04, 2016 09:19 AM (WCKBV)

29 And I use to read sci-fi but stopped for unknown reasons, but Anna is making think about it again.

Posted by: Skip at December 04, 2016 09:20 AM (5sOEp)

30 On ace's book recommendation thread back in June, Anna Puma mentioned Glenn Cook's Starfisher Trilogy

Wow, thanks for the recommendation. Sounds like that would be right up my alley.

Posted by: Hope Solo at December 04, 2016 09:20 AM (QlyN5)

31 Yay book thread!

JTB, did anyone ever answer your question about Joseph Pearce a couple of weeks ago? (I meant to but got called away and never caught up.) I like him as a person--met him at a couple of C. S. Lewis conferences and heard him speak--but while I haven't read any of his books myself, a friend sent me a review he'd written of one of Pearce's recent books on Tolkien, and apparently Pearce basically bashes The Hobbit for not being LOTR. He's probably better on Chesterton.

You can't go wrong with Ahlquist for Chesterton, though. He's president of the American Chesterton Society and is leading the effort to have GKC canonized.

A few other Tolkien books by friends that I read pre-pub and can recommend: The Gospel According to Tolkien by Ralph C. Wood; On the Shoulders of Hobbits by Louis Markos (with bonus Narnia analysis); and Moments of Grace and Spiritual Warfare in The Lord of the Rings by Anne Marie Gazzolo.

And I'd best sign off for the time being--my parents are expecting me for birthday breakfast. Will catch up when I can!

Posted by: Elisabeth G. Wolfe at December 04, 2016 09:21 AM (G4y5c)

32 Slightly off topic, but if you didn't see the Lighthouse video from the ONT, you should:

http://tinyurl.com/oad529n

The phrase "For those on peril on the sea" comes to mind.

Posted by: Hrothgar at December 04, 2016 09:21 AM (wCEn4)

33 Eris, Paul Duffau (long running fool) did a nice review of that book for me. He was quite taken by it.

(Delete space)
http://www.bookhorde.org/2016/10/ if-you-can-by-metaxas-reviewed-duffau.html

How about non-fiction?

Posted by: Votermom the Deplorable @vm on Gab.ai at December 04, 2016 09:22 AM (Om16U)

34 Not shocked that a NYT reporter would glorify a Communist thug and dictator in the making. Definitely shocked that he actually had to pay a price for doing so.

Posted by: T at December 04, 2016 09:24 AM (IKdzI)

35 To put it another way, they describe a world and
give the readers the means to appreciate it, expand it, and apply it in
life. What a beautiful gift.
(Honorable mention to Dorothy Sayers. I enjoy her detective stories but her non-fiction works are in the same league as Lewis.) Posted by: JTB at December 04, 2016 09:12 AM (V+03K)
=====

Interbellum? (Stringer Davis would know the Latin) The 'War to End All Wars' shaped them in ways I don't think we can really grasp -- and then another before it was realized and assimilated.

Posted by: mustbequantum at December 04, 2016 09:24 AM (MIKMs)

36 Somebody should write a roman-a-clef about Pizzagate.
It would be like Fargo.

Posted by: Votermom the Deplorable @vm on Gab.ai at December 04, 2016 09:25 AM (Om16U)

37 >>>Actually, that's the speech I *wanted* Carson to make.

I actually remember that appearance. I forget what was said, but as I recall it was very respectful from Carson's end, so you caused me to do a double take. Nice one.

Posted by: Steve and Cold Bear at December 04, 2016 09:25 AM (QlyN5)

38 Best book I read this year was Skousen's The Naked Communist recommended on this thread before summer.

A little outdated but beautifully succinct critique of Marxism.

Coincidentally, the author points out that Communist successes throughout the 40s, 50s, and 60s would have been impossible without the collusion of their fellow travelers and interlocutors in the halls of power in the West and in the UN, including Duranty, Chambers, Wallace, and many others.

Posted by: San Franpsycho at December 04, 2016 09:25 AM (EZebt)

39 VM, one I've set aside to read after grades are in, and one I expect to be my best read of the year, is The Broken Way by Ann Voskamp. Will report back on GR when I've actually read it.

Posted by: Elisabeth G. Wolfe at December 04, 2016 09:25 AM (G4y5c)

40 I read SPQR I: The King's Gambit by John Maddox Roberts. Decius Caeulius Mettalus, the Younger, is beginning his political career in 70 B.C. Rome as a member of the Commission of Twenty-Six. It is his job to investigate crimes in his area, Subura. A series of murders and an arson leads Decius to uncover a world of corruption and treason at the highest levels. This is the first in the SPQR historical mystery series. I look forward to reading the whole series.

I also read If You Can Keep It: The Forgotten Promises of American Liberty by Eric Metaxas. The title come from a Ben Franklin quote who when leaving the Constitutional Convention was asked if we had a republic or a monarchy replied: "A republic, madam - if you can keep it."

The book is review of our uniqueness, based on liberty, not just for us, but as a beacon of liberty for the world. Metaxas believes that we must reconnect to this idea or we may loose our republic.

One idea Metaxas mentions is the Golden Triangle of Freedom put forth by Os Guiness. I had never heard of this idea before. In his book, A Free People's Suicide, Guiness set out his Golden Triangle which at its most basic form is that freedom requires virtue; virtue requires faith; and faith requires freedom.

Metaxas has written an interesting book which shows the importance of faith in our founding and how important faith is to keeping our republic.

Finally, I read Fall of Hades, the sixth book in the Michael Vey YA series by Richard Paul Evans. I got hooked on the story several years ago, and always look forward to the next installment. Good escape reading.

Posted by: Zoltan at December 04, 2016 09:25 AM (r8Q8T)

41 I reread Darkness at Noon by Arthur Koestler this week. It reminded me that the left always eats its young. It did then and it does now.
The left has no soul. They say they're the compassionate ones but they have abandoned their souls for power.

My edition of the book is from the Folio Society. I bought a handful of books through them a number of years ago, but they were ultimately too expensive for me.

Posted by: Northernlurker at December 04, 2016 09:25 AM (s7hQ/)

42 I have read the Tolkien quad books through twice, once in AF and again maybe 15 years ago(or around time the movies started). It did make me a purest in as the movies got advanced they wavered from them I like them less. The newest are almost unwatchable to me.

Posted by: Skip at December 04, 2016 09:26 AM (5sOEp)

43 The pizzagate based novel could be titled "For The Children"

Posted by: Votermom the Deplorable @vm on Gab.ai at December 04, 2016 09:27 AM (Om16U)

44 Picton Reading Room, Central Library, Liverpool, England



Time enough at last!

Posted by: Henry Bemis at December 04, 2016 09:29 AM (JO9+V)

45 25 ... "Here's a topic we are talking about on the goodreads group -what's the best book you read in 2016?"

Hi All Hail Eris,
That's an intriguing question and I can't answer it without some serious thought. My immediate reaction was "The Everlasting Man" or "A Preface to Paradise Lost" by Lewis. Then others occurred to me. Hmmmm!

Posted by: JTB at December 04, 2016 09:29 AM (V+03K)

46 Mercury isn't tidally locked. This has been known for decades. The first time I encountered the idea was in a Larry Niven short story in a collection that included an afterward that was essentially, "Well, that's what the astronomers thought at the time." This was less of an embarrassment than Larry's method for Beowulf Shaeffer to survive proximity to a neutron star (in the story of the same name) that was completely unfeasible. I remember thinking the first time I read it, I was probably around 12 years old, that I really didn't understand how that kept him from being turned to paste. Later, I felt a bit of pride when printings of the story included an after to the effect of "Yeah, that wouldn't work."

Posted by: Epobirs at December 04, 2016 09:29 AM (AK5Ni)

47 "I just realized Twighlight is shit"


One day, you grow up and you realize Fonzie isn't "cool", just silly. The leftists are still in that stage where they think Castro is Fonzie.

Posted by: Steve and Cold Bear at December 04, 2016 09:30 AM (QlyN5)

48 Hi

Posted by: Patssun at December 04, 2016 09:30 AM (FfBs4)

49 More recent novels set on Mercury have used the idea of a massive planet straddling rail line and a mobile city that remains in the shadow band but faces disaster if it ever stops more than briefly.

Posted by: Epobirs at December 04, 2016 09:31 AM (AK5Ni)

50 31 ... Elisabeth, Thanks for the recommendations. I'll check them out.

Posted by: JTB at December 04, 2016 09:32 AM (V+03K)

51 Finally, I read Fall of Hades, the sixth book in the Michael Vey YA series by Richard Paul Evans.

I was thinking of getting this series for my 12 year old. He's currently reading The Secrets of the Immortal Nicholas Flamel series. He read the first book and wants the rest. It will be a dual Christmas present, my husband wants to read them too. I have a feeling this thread is going to be expensive.

Posted by: no good deed at December 04, 2016 09:32 AM (/O5Ax)

52 religious persecution in 1600s Britain wasn't because the majority was atheist but because there was a state religion bound up with obedience to the secular king. if you didn't adhere to both the theology and the ritual of the kings church you were both heretic and traitor

Posted by: Bigby's Ouija Board at December 04, 2016 09:33 AM (U0lQa)

53 No very real progress in my own reading, I'm afraid - market and book events every weekend until two weeks from now, so my reading time is limited. Last night I meant to read for a bit on my kindle as there was a massive power outage - but the battery was run down. Oh, well - go to sleep listening to the patter of rain.
I finally have the cover for the print version of The Golden Road, which should be available in two weeks on Amazon, and the Chronicles of Luna City are proving wildly popular - so my hopes of living large on an income from my own writing are proceeding apace.

Posted by: Sgt. Mom at December 04, 2016 09:33 AM (xnmPy)

54 The rat bastard commies figured out long ago that as long as they proclaim they good intentions, people will believe them. And I think that religious types are especially vulnerable to this line of baloney because of the biblical admonitions to help the poor and needy.

Witness all the church groups helping to settle rapefugees in the US at the behest of the Obama regime. Or Glenn Beck and Ted Cruz beclowning themselves handing out teddy bears and soccer balls to illegal aliens at the border.

Useful idiots.

Posted by: cool breeze at December 04, 2016 09:35 AM (StZrq)

55 I forget the short story title and author but remember the gist of it. A rebel in a small ship is running from a large star cruiser. His ship is damaged and can't continue so he bails out onto a small asteroid. He runs and dodges from the large star cruiser by staying below the horizon from the star cruiser and eventually the captain of the cruiser gives up in frustration and leaves.

Posted by: Count de Monet at December 04, 2016 09:35 AM (JO9+V)

56 20 Having a life mate you love and loves you to share the hardships of life is more than half the battle. People without that are at a big big disadvantage .
Posted by: Sebastian Melmoth at December 04, 2016 09:13 AM (/ZLfx)

Rub it in, why don't you

Posted by: josephistan at December 04, 2016 09:37 AM (7qAYi)

57 18 Was Armand Hammer named after Arm and Hammer company or vice versa?
Posted by: Votermom the Deplorable @vm on Gab.ai at December 04, 2016 09:12 AM (Om16U)


That's what I always wondered about.

Posted by: rickl - THE MEDIA IS LYING TO YOU at December 04, 2016 09:38 AM (sdi6R)

58 Those are some damn ugly pants.

Posted by: Insomniac at December 04, 2016 09:39 AM (0mRoj)

59 I think I would rather deal with a mafioso than with a communist.

Mafiosos are more likely to hold up their end of a bargain.

I'm reminded of a comment I've made before. I once had an acquaintance who, after some prodding from me, explained that she worked as an escort/call girl.

Whereupon my reaction was 'Oh thank God, I was afraid you were going to say you worked in politics.'

And I meant it, too.

Posted by: Toastrider at December 04, 2016 09:39 AM (OTkvm)

60 and that religious iron fist came about because England was a hotbed of radical sects. there was a great deal more religious diversity than the puritans allowed, of course. in some respects, the varieties of expression were greater than the somewhat limited ones of modern times - although that may be more due to changes in circumstance.

Posted by: Bigby's Ouija Board at December 04, 2016 09:40 AM (U0lQa)

61 Hats off to the Moron authors. I'm not sure I could do it. I used to play music, and if I fluffed a note or rhythm it was gone right away. If I improvise a recipe and it turns out awful, I can toss it and make a sandwich. The thought of publishing a work, ink on paper, and later regretting something in it, is terrifying. There's also the intimate nature of fiction; it's not telling events that happened, it's showing the world "these are things I imagined". Personal hangup I guess.

Posted by: hogmartin at December 04, 2016 09:41 AM (8nWyX)

62 What have you all been reading this week? Hopefully something good, because, as you all know, life is too short to be reading lousy books.


And life is too lousy to be reading short books.

Posted by: Insomniac at December 04, 2016 09:42 AM (0mRoj)

63 I am still "enjoying" the boundless egomania of John Douglas and his book "Obsession." He came very, very close to stating my favorite theory with respect to crime: any and all burglars who enter occupied homes are rapists who are trying to work up their nerve to achieve their real goal.

And I finished "Jubilee Trail" and have moved on to "Calico Palace" which will, I hope, get better when all the endless background exposition ceases. Or it won't because Bristow just recycled characters for "Calico Palace" and, in come cases, changed their sex or nationality.

I am reading "Prayer for Beginners" by Peter Kreeft who is a delightful explainer of things. It is beyond me how he is a philosophy professor because he makes things very clear and uses metaphors and such to illuminate his point.

And at Eucharistic Adoration I am reading the Gospel According to St. Luke. I need to get a King James Version for my Kindle because these plain English versions have no soul. I might have a Douay Rheims, but it's still not King James.

Posted by: Tonestaple at December 04, 2016 09:42 AM (B6m/l)

64 "Against All Hope" by Armanda Valladares is a very good book about what happened to someone who also wanted to get rid of Batista, and then became an outlaw under Castro, and was punished for decades for it.


He lost so much, but never lost his integrity and decency. A tremendous read about human courage and personal honor.

I am repelled by the thugs in the media that constantly defend Castro, and ugly hagiography that surrounds him.

Posted by: Bossy Conservative....outlaw in America at December 04, 2016 09:42 AM (S6Pax)

65 Was Armand Hammer named after Arm and Hammer company or vice versa?

He bought stock in Church and Dwight because he liked the name. I think I read that somewhere. So, neither.

Posted by: no good deed at December 04, 2016 09:43 AM (/O5Ax)

66 Finished "Spellbound" and moved on to "Warbound", the third book in the Grimnoir series by Larry Correia. Really enjoying this series, and it helps to know the real history, like Zangara's assassination attempt on FDR.

Posted by: roamingfirehydrant at December 04, 2016 09:43 AM (THS4q)

67 20 Having a life mate you love and loves you to share the hardships of life is more than half the battle. People without that are at a big big disadvantage .
Posted by: Sebastian Melmoth at December 04, 2016 09:13 AM (/ZLfx)


Nobody likes a braggart.

Posted by: Insomniac at December 04, 2016 09:43 AM (0mRoj)

68 43 The pizzagate based novel could be titled "For The Children"
Posted by: Votermom the Deplorable @vm on Gab.ai at December 04, 2016 09:27 AM (Om16U)

"To Serve Children."

Posted by: Insomniac at December 04, 2016 09:44 AM (0mRoj)

69 8 OM, just noticed, as far as I can tell, that if you click on a book title in your thread, it goes to Amazon, but NOT through Ace's Amazon Pay to Play link! Just saying.
Posted by: Hrothgar at December 04, 2016 09:06 AM (wCEn4)


Right. It usually doesn't go to the AiSHQ book page. But if you look at the URL for each link, it contains the "aoshq-20" tag, which is all you need.

Posted by: OregonMuse, deplorable since 2004 at December 04, 2016 09:45 AM (n8tHU)

70 And at Eucharistic Adoration I am reading the Gospel
According to St. Luke. I need to get a King James Version for my
Kindle because these plain English versions have no soul. I might have a
Douay Rheims, but it's still not King James. Posted by: Tonestaple at December 04, 2016 09:42 AM (B6m/l)
=====

This old agnostic truly thinks that the King James was divinely inspired.

Posted by: mustbequantum at December 04, 2016 09:46 AM (MIKMs)

71 I had a week of adventure trying to get a book from Amazon. I placed an order for "The History of The Indian Navy" - by "Indian" the author was referring to the East Indian Company. I first saw the book years ago while working on a library appraisal. It was filled with colonial battles & expeditions that I had never heard of before, and has been on my wish list for a while. So last Sunday I pulled the trigger & ordered it. Amazon claims it was delivered on Tuesday, but I never got it. So they sent me a replacement, which I got yesterday. Only instead of being a reprint of the original two volumes, it was just the second volume. So I contacted Amazon & they offered me a credit, so I used that to order the first volume. Tune in to see what can go wrong with that!

Posted by: josephistan at December 04, 2016 09:46 AM (7qAYi)

72 20 ... "Having a life mate you love and loves you to share the hardships of life is more than half the battle. People without that are at a big disadvantage ."

Sebastian, So true and I am blessed that way. All I can add is sharing the beauty and good things enhances the joy.

Posted by: JTB at December 04, 2016 09:50 AM (V+03K)

73 A little off topic, but does anyone know what has happened to Sarah Hoyt this week?

She is now a co-blogger on Instapundit, and she stated she had cardiac problems the other night. A heart attack?

Posted by: Bossy Conservative....outlaw in America at December 04, 2016 09:52 AM (S6Pax)

74 20 Having a life mate you love and loves you to share the hardships of life is more than half the battle. People without that are at a big big disadvantage .

Posted by: Sebastian Melmoth at December 04, 2016 09:13 AM (/ZLfx)


Amen.

Posted by: OregonMuse, deplorable since 2004 at December 04, 2016 09:52 AM (n8tHU)

75 She is now a co-blogger on Instapundit, and she stated she had cardiac problems the other night. A heart attack?
Posted by: Bossy Conservative....outlaw in America at December 04, 2016 09:52 AM (S6Pax)


Yes, I heard she had a heart attack and was in the hospital.

Posted by: OregonMuse, deplorable since 2004 at December 04, 2016 09:53 AM (n8tHU)

76 The judge did offer them manslaughter and rightfully so:


SECTION 16-3-50. Manslaughter.


A person convicted of manslaughter, or the unlawful killing of another
without malice, express or implied, must be imprisoned not more than
thirty years or less than two years.



He could have got 30 years of "hard time" for that shoot.

Posted by: Vic We Have No Party at December 04, 2016 09:55 AM (mpXpK)

77 oops wrong thread sorry

Posted by: Vic We Have No Party at December 04, 2016 09:55 AM (mpXpK)

78 On the foolish belief that communist tyrants (and any 'benevolent' dictator) cares about the people. Handy quote to hold onto: A man has two reasons for everything he does; a good reason and the real one. In every instance, if you do not understand the real reason, you are being played. Hillary started her political career by advocating "for the children". Did the children ask her to do this? But if you opposed her, you were against the children. This is why the communist took over the Green Party; if you oppose them, you are against the environment. You defeat these people by relentlessly asking them questions that reveal their real reasons, not their good reasons.

Posted by: IanDeal at December 04, 2016 09:56 AM (teGBX)

79 Posted by: Vic We Have No Party at December 04, 2016 09:55 AM (mpXpK)

Er, let's please keep that in the other thread.

Posted by: Insomniac at December 04, 2016 09:56 AM (0mRoj)

80 Worth recalling that back in '64 when Goldwater was running for president, "little old ladies in tennis shoes" entered the nation's political vocabulary as a description of his fans.

Worth noting as well that the principal Sayers detective novels -- the four dealing with Lord Peter and Harriet -- are powerfully Christian in plot and structure. But DLS is almost too good an artist: the stories can be appreciated at several levels, and her characters themselves aren't Christian, so a surprising number of readers never catch on. She definitely belongs with Chesterton, Lewis and Tolkien.

Posted by: Bill Befort at December 04, 2016 09:59 AM (awbcm)

81 Wonderful to 'see' Elisabeth G this am! Hope her students are avoiding the worst of the election excesses and they are learning well. As much as I make fun of my own 'brit lit twit' background, I am confident that disciplined learning does have a place in the modern university. Be Strong!

Posted by: mustbequantum at December 04, 2016 10:00 AM (MIKMs)

82 Matthews' hagiographic reporting
-

You know what's ironic? The word "hagiographic" was invented before the Hillary campaign.

P.S. I just saw an ad on one of the alphabet networks about a National Christmas Party Special featuring Hilldog. I guess every Christmas needs its Grinch.

Posted by: Anonosaurus Wrecks, This Is the Dawning of the Age of the Trumpius! at December 04, 2016 10:00 AM (Nwg0u)

83 JTB, you should go on YouTube and search for the name "Ryan Reeves". He is a theology prof at Gordon Conwell University and he has put up many of lectures on Lewis and Tolkien and related topics, including church history. Mrs. Muse and I have listened to a number of them and I think you will find them very interesting.

Posted by: OregonMuse, deplorable since 2004 at December 04, 2016 10:00 AM (n8tHU)

84 Just finished another re-read of A Civil Campaign by Lois Bujold. The dinner party scene reads like something from a screwball comedy turned up to 11. My favorite bit from all her work.

Posted by: Vlad the Impaler, whittling away like mad at December 04, 2016 10:01 AM (dIc3Q)

85 Also not a commie:HoChi Minh,Tito and Mao.
The NY Times(actually commies in our own government promulgated this myth)

Posted by: steevy at December 04, 2016 10:02 AM (r/0kC)

86 [Sayers] definitely belongs with Chesterton, Lewis and Tolkien.
Posted by: Bill Befort at December 04, 2016 09:59 AM (awbcm)


Indeed. She was a member of that 'Inklings' writers' group back in the day along with Tokien, Lewis, and Charles Williams.

Posted by: OregonMuse, deplorable since 2004 at December 04, 2016 10:03 AM (n8tHU)

87 P.S. I just saw an ad on one of the alphabet networks about a National Christmas Party Special featuring Hilldog. I guess every Christmas needs its Grinch.
Posted by: Anonosaurus Wrecks, This Is the Dawning of the Age of the Trumpius! at December 04, 2016 10:00 AM (Nwg0u)
----
She needs to dump Greg Nicotero as her makeup artist.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at December 04, 2016 10:05 AM (EnKk6)

88 The dinner party scene reads like something from a screwball comedy turned up to 11. My favorite bit from all her work. Posted by: Vlad the Impaler, whittling away like mad at December 04, 2016 10:01 AM (dIc3Q)
=====

She is not one of my favorites. Her writing is technically beautiful, but character and plot are lacking for me. Too static.

Posted by: mustbequantum at December 04, 2016 10:06 AM (MIKMs)

89 Finished "Spellbound" and moved on to "Warbound", the third book in the Grimnoir series by Larry Correia. Really enjoying this series, and it helps to know the real history, like Zangara's assassination attempt on FDR.

=======
Correia's stuff is the epitome of a 'cracking good yarn'.

Posted by: Vlad the Impaler, whittling away like mad at December 04, 2016 10:06 AM (dIc3Q)

90 Sara Hoyt had a 'cardiac event'

https://accordingtohoyt.com

Posted by: Vlad the Impaler, whittling away like mad at December 04, 2016 10:10 AM (dIc3Q)

91 She needs to dump Greg Nicotero as her makeup artist.
Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at December 04, 2016 10:05 AM (EnKk6)

Ouch!

Posted by: Insomniac at December 04, 2016 10:11 AM (0mRoj)

92 83 ... OM, I'll check out those YouTube lectures. Also learned Ahlquist did a series about Chesterton that aired on EWTN and they are on YouTube as well. That site is becoming one of my favorite parts of the internet.

Posted by: JTB at December 04, 2016 10:11 AM (V+03K)

93 Currently reading Red Sparrow by Jason Matthews at the recommendation of the Horde. My view is that it is a taught spy thriller that starts out a bit slow while developing the character of the Dominika Ergorova and why she becomes a Russian spy for the CIA. I like the novel and can't wait to read the rest of the trilogy. I give the book 4.5 out of 5 stars.

Read A Noble Cause by Douglas Niles. It was about several noteworthy American battlefield victories during the Vietnam. The book doesn't break any new ground essentially summarizes other more detailed source material. The recurring theme was that the Vietnamese would try to destroy isolated American forces and overwhelming American firepower would win the battle. I did learn that the North Vietnam government leadership had purged officials opposed to the Tet 1968 offensive. The book needed better (i.e., tactical level) maps and the author sometimes used some odd phrasing more in keeping with his background as a novelist rather than a historian. I rate the book 3 out of 5 stars.

Posted by: Retired Buckeye Cop is now an engineer at December 04, 2016 10:11 AM (5Yee7)

94 87 P.S. I just saw an ad on one of the alphabet networks about a National Christmas Party Special featuring Hilldog. I guess every Christmas needs its Grinch.
Posted by: Anonosaurus Wrecks, This Is the Dawning of the Age of the Trumpius! at December 04, 2016 10:00 AM (Nwg0u)
----
She needs to dump Greg Nicotero as her makeup artist.
Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at December 04, 2016 10:05 AM (EnKk6)

The attempts by the media to portray Hillary as beloved, or pleasant, or warm, or accomplished ranged from pathetic to hilarious.

Posted by: Northernlurker at December 04, 2016 10:11 AM (s7hQ/)

95 67 20 Having a life mate you love and loves you to share the hardships of life is more than half the battle. People without that are at a big big disadvantage .
Posted by: Sebastian Melmoth at December 04, 2016 09:13 AM (/ZLfx)


Nobody likes a braggart.
Posted by: Insomniac at December 04, 2016 09:43 AM (0mRoj)

I'm not that fortunate at this time. . I'm just observing and commenting on one of the recommended reading selections. Also it was reinforced as I watched Its a Wonderful Life last night.

Posted by: Sebastian Melmoth at December 04, 2016 10:12 AM (/ZLfx)

96 I must second the recommendation for "Hallow Mass" by JP Mac. What a delightful take on Lovecraft, skewering college life and being quite scary all at the same time. I plan on reading it again.

My sister who's a bit of a lib but also a Lovecraft fan thoroughly enjoyed it too.

Posted by: Tonestaple at December 04, 2016 10:12 AM (B6m/l)

97 86 [Sayers] definitely belongs with Chesterton, Lewis and Tolkien.
Posted by: Bill Befort at December 04, 2016 09:59 AM (awbcm)

Indeed. She was a member of that 'Inklings' writers' group back in the day along with Tokien, Lewis, and Charles Williams.
Posted by: OregonMuse, deplorable since 2004 at December 04, 2016 10:03 AM (n8tHU)

I'm in the process of rereading The Whimsical Christian by Sayers. It's a little unfortunate that she seems largely forgotten.

Posted by: Northernlurker at December 04, 2016 10:13 AM (s7hQ/)

98 hagiographic.. needs a trigger warning

Every time I hear that word, I see an image of my ex mother in law on the cover of a "scary' comic book...


Posted by: The guy with the hair at December 04, 2016 10:13 AM (r7E9R)

99 I'm not that fortunate at this time. . I'm just observing and commenting on one of the recommended reading selections. Also it was reinforced as I watched Its a Wonderful Life last night.
Posted by: Sebastian Melmoth at December 04, 2016 10:12 AM (/ZLfx)


Ah so. Well in that case, welcome to the Big Big Disadvantage Club!

Posted by: Insomniac at December 04, 2016 10:13 AM (0mRoj)

100 That William Bradford book has been through 'hundreds' of editions and in all my life, I never knew it even existed. Behold the power of Amazon's customer database -- 'something you might like based on your history'.

Being something of a student of human behavior and seeing the parallels to current events is always interesting. If you go back further to the day Moses brought the Ten Commandments down from the mountain top, it is easy to imagine there were some who didn't want to be told they couldn't have sex with their neighbor's wives, human nature being what it is.

And I think that religious types are especially vulnerable to this line of baloney because of the biblical admonitions to help the poor and needy.

In reading about the Puritans, I had the same thought; Jim Jones, and the cable televangelists of years past, came to mind.

Posted by: Skandia Recluse at December 04, 2016 10:13 AM (0zl3t)

101 94 87 P.S. I just saw an ad on one of the alphabet networks about a National Christmas Party Special featuring Hilldog. I guess every Christmas needs its Grinch.
Posted by: Anonosaurus Wrecks, This Is the Dawning of the Age of the Trumpius! at December 04, 2016 10:00 AM (Nwg0u)
----
She needs to dump Greg Nicotero as her makeup artist.
Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at December 04, 2016 10:05 AM (EnKk6)

The attempts by the media to portray Hillary as beloved, or pleasant, or warm, or accomplished ranged from pathetic to hilarious.
Posted by: Northernlurker at December 04, 2016 10:11 AM (s7hQ/)

She is beloved & warm! It was White supremacists & Russian intelligence that stole the election from our beloved first vaginated President!

Posted by: Mary Cloggenstein from Brattleboro, VT at December 04, 2016 10:14 AM (7qAYi)

102 98 hagiographic.. needs a trigger warning

Every time I hear that word, I see an image of my ex mother in law on the cover of a "scary' comic book...


Posted by: The guy with the hair at December 04, 2016 10:13 AM (r7E9R)

Putting the "hag" in "hagiography."

Posted by: Insomniac at December 04, 2016 10:14 AM (0mRoj)

103 I read SPQR I: The King's Gambit by John Maddox Roberts.

-
One thing I like about that series is that unlike much historical fiction, the attitudes of the characters appear to be accurate as opposed to contemporary attitudes transported to Ancient Roman. The biggest offender may be Spartacus by Howard Fast which was the basis for the movie. There is zero, zip, nada (to add just a little Rush lingo) evidence that Spartacus was a crusader against slavery but he is presented as Ancient Rome's John Brown.

Posted by: Anonosaurus Wrecks, This Is the Dawning of the Age of the Trumpius! at December 04, 2016 10:15 AM (Nwg0u)

104 The newest are almost unwatchable to me.

Posted by: Skip at December 04, 2016 09:26 AM (5sOEp)

"The Hobbit" movies were awful not because they wandered so far from the story that they wer almost unrecognizable. It's that Peter Jackson took a beautiful, sweet children's story and made it into a clone of his LOTR movies.

http://tinyurl.com/gszb6ox

Posted by: CharlieBrown'sDildo at December 04, 2016 10:16 AM (42Mgr)

105 103 He was against his own slavery though.

Posted by: steevy at December 04, 2016 10:17 AM (r/0kC)

106 She is not one of my favorites. Her writing is technically beautiful, but character and plot are lacking for me. Too static.

Posted by: mustbequantum at December 04, 2016 10:06 AM (MIKMs)

=======
*ponders*

*types*

*deletes*

*revises*

*ah, le bon mot *

THHBBBBBBBBPPTTT!

Posted by: Vlad the Impaler, whittling away like mad at December 04, 2016 10:17 AM (dIc3Q)

107 Posted by: Mary Cloggenstein from Brattleboro, VT at December 04, 2016 10:14 AM (7qAYi)

I for one have missed you Mary. I'm glad you've emerged from your post election stupor.

Posted by: Northernlurker at December 04, 2016 10:18 AM (s7hQ/)

108 I guess I'm glad I didn't read the LOTR because it let me enjoy the movies. Am I the only one that thought that Samwise was the real hero?

Posted by: Sebastian Melmoth at December 04, 2016 10:19 AM (/ZLfx)

109
*ah, le bon mot *



THHBBBBBBBBPPTTT!

Posted by: Vlad the Impaler, whittling away like mad at December 04, 2016 10:17 AM (dIc3Q)
=====
I am suitably chastened. I'll go back to my 'Good Omens' and 'Hogfather' holiday reading. Whittle harder.

Posted by: mustbequantum at December 04, 2016 10:19 AM (MIKMs)

110 104 The newest are almost unwatchable to me.

Posted by: Skip at December 04, 2016 09:26 AM (5sOEp)

"The Hobbit" movies were awful not because they wandered so far from the story that they wer almost unrecognizable. It's that Peter Jackson took a beautiful, sweet children's story and made it into a clone of his LOTR movies.

http://tinyurl.com/gszb6ox
Posted by: CharlieBrown'sDildo at December 04, 2016 10:16 AM (42Mgr)

I have a set of the extended edition LOTR DVDs but have thus far entirely missed The Hobbit movies. Is it the consensus that I shouldn't bother?

Posted by: Northernlurker at December 04, 2016 10:20 AM (s7hQ/)

111 At least she learned something at college.

https://pjmedia.com/instapundit/250871/

Posted by: steevy at December 04, 2016 10:20 AM (r/0kC)

112 Tonestaple, the KJV is out of copyright, so you can get it for free at Gutenberg

You can tip them and they encourage it by the way

Anyhow, it is item #10 in their index

http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/10

Posted by: Kindltot at December 04, 2016 10:21 AM (yLUuz)

113 "Nobody wants to be against "the poor". Or "the children". Nobody wants to be painted as an ogre."

Actually, I enjoy my Ogredom. The only people who should be for "the poor" and "for the children" are those that are poor and those that have to take care of their own children.

Every one else needs to mind their own business. But then Marxists would be out of career.

I am currently reading up/watching vidoes on how to pick locks. Quite fascinating. Pins, springs, tumblers, etc.

Posted by: Hairyback Guy at December 04, 2016 10:22 AM (ej1L0)

114 Re: William Bradford and the dirty secret of government controlled religion (it's all about the government, not the religion). I was surprised how angry I became reading At Home by Bill Bryson as he extolled the way rural curates had leisure and money to study science and a number of other disciplines, but there was no recognition *at all* of what their job was actually supposed to be. They betrayed the trust (the spiritual wellbeing of the entire nation) that they had taken up willingly and this was considered a *good* thing. Oh, and while they amused themselves with their hobbies and learning for it's own sake, the people were forcibly compelled to pay a tithe even though most of these "clerics" already had more money than the people they "served" even if they weren't actually rich.

Posted by: Polliwog the 'Ette at December 04, 2016 10:24 AM (sEDyY)

115 I have a set of the extended edition LOTR DVDs but have thus far entirely missed The Hobbit movies. Is it the consensus that I shouldn't bother?
Posted by: Northernlurker at December 04, 2016 10:20 AM (s7hQ/)

Check out the extended Hobbit trilogy. I enjoyed it, but you do have to recognize that Jackson is trying to hammer The Hobbit into a LOTR shaped hole. They've very different books, but he attempted to make them all the same movie.

Posted by: Mary Cloggenstein from Brattleboro, VT at December 04, 2016 10:25 AM (7qAYi)

116 Is it the consensus that I shouldn't bother?

Posted by: Northernlurker at December 04, 2016 10:20 AM (s7hQ/)

The first isn't awful...the second approaches shitiness, and the third is a shit-show of epic proportions.

But on a rainy or snowy weekend when Kate Upton is on a photo shoot and you have nothing to do? Yeah, I guess they are worth a glance. Just don't pay more than a few bucks....

Posted by: CharlieBrown'sDildo at December 04, 2016 10:25 AM (42Mgr)

117 Hobby stuff. I discovered some fishing gear buried in a corner of the garage for at least thirty years. (Don't ask, please. It's embarrassing.) An ultralight spinning reel, suitable for 2 and 4 pound test line, and an old ABU Garcia Ambassadeur baitcasting reel. These are well made and reliable but have all those years of crud on them. I've been reading about restoring them, which will be a nice winter project. I've also been reading about how to use the baitcaster without getting terminal bird nest snarls. I suspect that's why I put it aside in the first place. These reels on appropriate rods should give a complete fresh water fishing battery, along with the fly fishing gear, come next spring.

Posted by: JTB at December 04, 2016 10:25 AM (V+03K)

118 For Historic fiction I always recommend Steven Pressfield. My recommendation today is The Afghan Campaign. It's a slice of Alexander the Great's campaign in Afghanistan. It does have a lot of parallels to our own campaign. I don't think it was intentional.

Posted by: Sebastian Melmoth at December 04, 2016 10:25 AM (Vnlws)

119 94
The attempts by the media to portray Hillary as beloved, or pleasant, or warm, or accomplished ranged from pathetic to hilarious.
Posted by: Northernlurker at December 04, 2016 10:11 AM (s7hQ/)



Hillary Clinton is the kindest, bravest, warmest, most wonderful human being I've ever known in my life.

Posted by: rickl - THE MEDIA IS LYING TO YOU at December 04, 2016 10:26 AM (sdi6R)

120 re: Sarah Hoyt, executive summary is no heart attack, perfect storm of autoimmune issues, low sodium, and dehydration. Red alert has been canceled. She has been firmly informed she is not authorized to die, but you know how excitable Portuguese can be.

Good books! I do not recall if I was steered by the glorious book thread to these books, but if you want funny Westerns, try Unwanted: Dead or Alive and the sequel How the West was Lost. Featuring cowboys Buck and Dobie, who are good with cows but rather inept at everything else they try, especially being outlaws, but develop gargantuan (and undeserved) reputations as gunslingers anyway. They get rescued by a red-headed schoolmarm (sorry, Buck, auburn), save the ranch, and capture real bad guys.

Posted by: Sabrina Chase at December 04, 2016 10:26 AM (SuJIo)

121 Isaac Asimov Magazine had a short story about a planet with a nearly solar locked rotation. Two populations marched on opposite sides of the world, one fleeing the burning sun, one fleeing the freezing night, both planting a world spanning vine in the graves left behind by the people on the other side of the world.

Posted by: TooLazyToNomDePlume at December 04, 2016 10:26 AM (NnnZy)

122 I reread Darkness at Noon by Arthur Koestler

-
That book is so depressing for me. Even though the protagonist is himself a commie rat bastard, it is too depressing watching his imprisonment, torture, and eventual execution.

Posted by: Anonosaurus Wrecks, This Is the Dawning of the Age of the Trumpius! at December 04, 2016 10:26 AM (Nwg0u)

123 I was so disappointed when you revealed that Johnny Carson didn't actually say those things! Wishful thinking has a bucket of ice water behind it's back, most of the time, so I got soaked.

Posted by: goon at December 04, 2016 10:26 AM (EaQ6/)

124 I am currently reading up/watching vidoes on how to pick locks. Quite fascinating. Pins, springs, tumblers, etc.
Posted by: Hairyback Guy at December 04, 2016 10:22 AM (ej1L0)


These guys have some very nice tools and starter kits.

http://toool.us/

Posted by: hogmartin at December 04, 2016 10:26 AM (8nWyX)

125 Off, Green Mountain sock

Posted by: josephistan at December 04, 2016 10:27 AM (7qAYi)

126 108 I guess I'm glad I didn't read the LOTR because it let me enjoy the movies. Am I the only one that thought that Samwise was the real hero?
Posted by: Sebastian Melmoth at December 04, 2016 10:19 AM (/ZLfx)

I hadn't thought of it that way before, but you can make a good case for it.

Posted by: Insomniac at December 04, 2016 10:27 AM (0mRoj)

127 Since mustbequantum has left a Pratchett opening, adding to the crossbow/longbow meme; which type of Discworld story:

Grimes
Death/Susan
Witches
Rincewind/Wizards

?

Posted by: Vlad the Impaler, whittling away like mad at December 04, 2016 10:28 AM (dIc3Q)

128 These guys have some very nice tools and starter kits.
http://toool.us/
Posted by: hogmartin at December 04, 2016 10:26 AM (8nWyX)

Thanks Hog!

Posted by: Hairyback Guy at December 04, 2016 10:28 AM (ej1L0)

129
I have a set of the extended edition LOTR DVDs but have thus far entirely missed The Hobbit movies. Is it the consensus that I shouldn't bother?
Posted by: Northernlurker at December 04, 2016 10:20 AM (s7hQ/)

I vote yes. I loved LOTR trilogy-the Hobbit? Not so much.

And Oregonmuse and book thread compatriots, thank you so much for the thread, the book suggestions and your comments. I learn so much from the Horde, and my pocket book is significantly lighter after indulging my book habit. Altogether a win, I think.

Posted by: Moki, deplorable mom and sammich maker at December 04, 2016 10:28 AM (VnCI9)

130 I've also been reading about how to use the baitcaster without getting terminal bird nest snarls.

The secret is in the thumb. You gotta govern the speed, mid-cast. FWIW.

Posted by: Brave Sir Robin at December 04, 2016 10:28 AM (ty7RM)

131 119 94
The attempts by the media to portray Hillary as beloved, or pleasant, or warm, or accomplished ranged from pathetic to hilarious.
Posted by: Northernlurker at December 04, 2016 10:11 AM (s7hQ/)


Hillary Clinton is the kindest, bravest, warmest, most wonderful human being I've ever known in my life.
Posted by: rickl - THE MEDIA IS LYING TO YOU at December 04, 2016 10:26 AM (sdi6R)

Would you like to play some solitaire?

Posted by: Insomniac at December 04, 2016 10:28 AM (0mRoj)

132 The first isn't awful...the second approaches shitiness, and the third is a shit-show of epic proportions.
----
Just jump right to the third movie and have an MST3K party with your friends. It's that bad.

To quote Bored of the Rings, "It was as thought some very large and untidy creature - perhaps a dragon - had quite recently suffered a series of disappointing bowel movements in the vicinity".

Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at December 04, 2016 10:30 AM (EnKk6)

133 Posted by: Vlad the Impaler, whittling away like mad at December 04, 2016 10:28 AM (dIc3Q)

I'd say all but Susan/Death ones. They're great stories, but Pratchett's best was when he had a huge cast of goofs playing off each other.

Posted by: hogmartin at December 04, 2016 10:30 AM (8nWyX)

134 122 I reread Darkness at Noon by Arthur Koestler

-
That book is so depressing for me. Even though the protagonist is himself a commie rat bastard, it is too depressing watching his imprisonment, torture, and eventual execution.
Posted by: Anonosaurus Wrecks, This Is the Dawning of the Age of the Trumpius! at December 04, 2016 10:26 AM (Nwg0u)

It is depressing. This time around my reading was less than intense. But my sense of heaviness in the reading came because the book seems, to me at least, that it could be prescient. I pray I'm wrong.

Posted by: Northernlurker at December 04, 2016 10:30 AM (s7hQ/)

135 Please. The Pilgrims were NOT the Puritans who settled in Massachusetts Bay Colony.

The Pilgrims were made up of a diverse group of people who had fled because of religious persecution and were not even "discovered" until the 1800's, I believe, when some papers in a house or barn in England, of all places, revealed them to history.

The Puritans were richer and more harsh in every way. They also arrived in Masachusetts about ten years after the Pilgrims first came ashore.

Posted by: Trump's Stubby Fingers at December 04, 2016 10:31 AM (SJ184)

136 126 108 I guess I'm glad I didn't read the LOTR because it let me enjoy the movies. Am I the only one that thought that Samwise was the real hero?
Posted by: Sebastian Melmoth at December 04, 2016 10:19 AM (/ZLfx)

I hadn't thought of it that way before, but you can make a good case for it.
Posted by: Insomniac at December 04, 2016 10:27 AM (0mRoj)

Yep. I always thought Frodo was not nearly the Hobbit Sam was. Because Sam was an administrator-he thought of the things they would need, and brought them. Frodo just tra la la la'd off with the ring, with no plan, no supplies, and no idea of what to do if things went south.

Samwise rocks.

Posted by: Moki, deplorable mom and sammich maker at December 04, 2016 10:32 AM (VnCI9)

137 I thought the LOTR movie followed the book fairly well. Yes, they did deviate some, and they cut a lot. The Tom Bombadil character was completely cut. But I thought that was appropriate since it really did not add much to the story and they had to cut something to fit into the three movies.


Shoot compared to Starship Troopers it was 100% accurate.

Posted by: Vic We Have No Party at December 04, 2016 10:32 AM (mpXpK)

138 126 108 I guess I'm glad I didn't read the LOTR because it let me enjoy the movies. Am I the only one that thought that Samwise was the real hero?
Posted by: Sebastian Melmoth at December 04, 2016 10:19 AM (/ZLfx)

I hadn't thought of it that way before, but you can make a good case for it.
Posted by: Insomniac at December 04, 2016 10:27 AM (0mRoj)

I've read the books several times and I loved the movies even though they are not entirely true to the books.

Posted by: Northernlurker at December 04, 2016 10:32 AM (s7hQ/)

139 Thanks for putting that up OM

Posted by: Buzzion at December 04, 2016 10:32 AM (bMG0w)

140 I guess this is a bit O/T: The left has completely lost their minds. I've been perusing Huffblo articles, and now, any Trump supporter or defender is automatically labeled "white supremacist." They are throwing that term around so freely, they have no idea how much they are be-clowning themselves. It just rolls off their tongue.
It's amazing to watch the utter destruction this election has had on the left.
Apologies for injecting politics into the book thread. I just couldn't help myself.

Posted by: Brave Sir Robin at December 04, 2016 10:33 AM (ty7RM)

141 Agree that Jackson's Hobbit movies lost the spirit of the book. Tolkien wrote The Hobbit before WWII, LOTR during and after and the war affected LOTR greatly. Jackson turned The Hobbit into a weak sequel of LOTR.

Posted by: Ignoramus at December 04, 2016 10:35 AM (bQxkN)

142 140 I guess this is a bit O/T: The left has completely lost their minds.


Sky blue, water wet.

Posted by: Insomniac at December 04, 2016 10:35 AM (0mRoj)

143 Shoot compared to Starship Troopers it was 100% accurate.

Frodo actually got the power armor.

Posted by: Johnnie Rico at December 04, 2016 10:35 AM (7COaW)

144 I haven't watched the Hobbit movies. I didn't really like that book as much as the LOTR.

Posted by: Vic We Have No Party at December 04, 2016 10:35 AM (mpXpK)

145 I read Bored of the Rings before LOTR. I would not recommend this procedure to others.

Posted by: Vlad the Impaler, whittling away like mad at December 04, 2016 10:36 AM (dIc3Q)

146 It was heartwarming when they finally let Samwise off the bench to play that final down.

Posted by: Insomniac at December 04, 2016 10:36 AM (0mRoj)

147 Yep. I always thought Frodo was not nearly the Hobbit Sam was. Because Sam was an administrator-he thought of the things they would need, and brought them. Frodo just tra la la la'd off with the ring, with no plan, no supplies, and no idea of what to do if things went south.
Samwise rocks.
Posted by: Moki, deplorable mom and sammich maker at December 04, 2016 10:32 AM (VnCI9)

Yup....Sam was a hero in my thinking but Frodo was affected by The Ring and he was not in his right mind if I remember right. The Ring was changing him into another Gollum kind of.

So Sam had to slap Frodo around because Frodo was banging waitresses two at a time as the Hobbits back at the Shire couldn't get their drinks on time.

Posted by: Hairyback Guy at December 04, 2016 10:36 AM (ej1L0)

148 143 Shoot compared to Starship Troopers it was 100% accurate.

Frodo actually got the power armor.
Posted by: Johnnie Rico at December 04, 2016 10:35 AM (7COaW)

But he didn't get to bang Dina Meyer though.

Posted by: Insomniac at December 04, 2016 10:37 AM (0mRoj)

149 Just finished listening to "A Player of Games", the second book in Ian Banks' "Culture" series. I believe he was fairly left wing in his politics but I have enjoyed the first two books in that series so far.

Also, I am about 120 pages into Ulrich Volker's first volume of his Hitler bio: "Ascent". So far it's pretty good

Posted by: nc at December 04, 2016 10:37 AM (iopMS)

150 Posted by: Northernlurker at December 04, 2016 10:32 AM (s7hQ/)

That's good because I seem to be disappointed in all the movies where I have read the book beforehand. I think we all make a movie in our head as we read a book and seldom does a real movie meet our own creation.

Posted by: Sebastian Melmoth at December 04, 2016 10:38 AM (Vnlws)

151 "I'd be curled up in a fetal position and weeping uncontrollably like Trigglypuff at a pro-life rally if I had to endure the things that some of you have."

--------------

I don't believe this is true. Often people will observe suffering in others, and see something they themselves would struggle to endure, and that's because character and strength are often like an unfilled balloon. You have it, and it will stretch and expand as you need it, but until you do it looks like a small, insignificant thing.

Posted by: BurtTC at December 04, 2016 10:38 AM (Pz4pT)

152 >>But that's when I realized that an essential part of the totalitarian commie thug business model was a lot of jabber about "children" and "the poor".

A good read on Communist information tactics is _Dedication_and_Leadership_ by Douglas Hyde (https://www.amazon.com/Dedication-Leadership-Douglas-Hyde/dp/0268000735).

At this point in history it may be better to read Alinsky in order to better "Know your opponent" though.

Posted by: SPinRHF16 at December 04, 2016 10:38 AM (5yp0V)

153 In the movie, it looked like he got to romp with Sean Astin. Yay?

Posted by: boulder terlit hobo at December 04, 2016 10:40 AM (6FqZa)

154 126 108 I guess I'm glad I didn't read the LOTR because it let me enjoy the movies. Am I the only one that thought that Samwise was the real hero?
Posted by: Sebastian Melmoth at December 04, 2016 10:19 AM (/ZLfx)

I hadn't thought of it that way before, but you can make a good case for it.
Posted by: Insomniac at December 04, 2016 10:27 AM (0mRoj)


--------

Isn't that basically the definition of of the loyal-to-the-end,
through thick-and-thin, sidekick?

The unsung hero?

There is actually a scene in the movie where Frodo says that.

Sam and frodo are discussing the " Great stories, the ones that stay with you". And Frodo says " and don't forget Samwise the Brave, wouldn't have made it very far without him".

Posted by: The guy with the hair at December 04, 2016 10:40 AM (r7E9R)

155 America's enemies hate America, and the Left--all of it--hates America too. Naturally they boost each other.

Posted by: BeckoningChasm at December 04, 2016 10:41 AM (MZcWR)

156 I have a set of the extended edition LOTR DVDs but have thus far entirely missed The Hobbit movies. Is it the consensus that I shouldn't bother?

Posted by: Northernlurker at December 04, 2016 10:20 AM (s7hQ/)



I have to pretty much agree with CBD's assessment.

The third movie is so bad that it almost killed my love of the LOTR movies.

Everything that was well done in LOTR becomes a CGI-fartfest in the Hobbit.

Just...just awful. And way too many secondary and/or newly injected characters given plot lines and personal villains.

I'd love to see a severely edited version that strips out all of the crap and see if it approaches the delightful quality of the book.

Posted by: naturalfake at December 04, 2016 10:42 AM (9q7Dl)

157 Posted by: BeckoningChasm at December 04, 2016 10:41 AM (MZcWR)

That's why they can be allies of Islam.

Posted by: Sebastian Melmoth at December 04, 2016 10:42 AM (Vnlws)

158 "I read SPQR I: The King's Gambit by John Maddox Roberts."

Seconded, thirded and fourthed, Ananosaurus. My daughter put me on to them a couple of years ago and I've devoured them all. It's a first-person narrative, and it sounds so *right* - not anachronistic at all. And funny - I love the main character (Decius Caecilius Metellus) snarking on foreigners ("a thousand years of civilization will never teach the Gauls to make a decent wine") moving through high and low Roman society, detecting murder and fraud.

Roberts has plainly done his homework, but wears it lightly - nothing feels shoveled in. They're good read-alouds, too - husband and self have gone through several that way.

Right now we're reading the memoirs of U.S. Grant, but I may go back to Decius afterwards, for a bit of relief.

Posted by: Annalucia at December 04, 2016 10:42 AM (a5bF3)

159 Read Moron Christopher Taylor's fantasy story Snowberry's Veil, where a ranger is scouting for a caravan of settlers, is attacked and separated from them and undergoes trials to survive and return to their aid. In many ways a realistic tale of surviving the wilds but also has monsters and magic and evildoers to battle. Looks like the start of a fantasy series, enjoyed it.

Read Terry Pratchett's Small Gods (Discworld #13), where the 'small gods' are those who have few if any followers and are like buzzing insects looking for someone's attention. The god Om now inhabits a tortoise and though a city is devoted to his worship, only has one true believer so is weak. The two team up for some adventures and battle with those using the Om religion for personal power. One of the better Discworld books I've read so far.

Re-listened to Brent Weeks' The Black Prism (Lightbringer #1) before tackling book 2, still an excellent fantasy with fascinating magic system using colors.

Posted by: waelse1 at December 04, 2016 10:43 AM (Yj+23)

160 157 Posted by: BeckoningChasm at December 04, 2016 10:41 AM (MZcWR)

That's why they can be allies of Islam.
Posted by: Sebastian Melmoth at December 04, 2016 10:42 AM (Vnlws)

What they don't realize is they'll get put to the sword just like everyone else.

Posted by: Insomniac at December 04, 2016 10:43 AM (0mRoj)

161 "The Hobbit" movies were awful not because they wandered so far from the story that they wer almost unrecognizable. It's that Peter Jackson took a beautiful, sweet children's story and made it into a clone of his LOTR movies.
http://tinyurl.com/gszb6ox

Posted by: CharlieBrown'sDildo at December 04, 2016 10:16 AM (42Mgr)


OK, so some guy on the internet took Jackson's bloated, craptacular 8+ hour Hobbit series and edited it out all the crap that didn't belong, or as much of it as he could. He pared it down to a slim, trim 4.5 hour movie.

Mrs. Muse and I watched it on election night instead of election coverage.

Do a bing search for "Hobbit tolkien edit" and you'll find the guy's site. You can download it via bittorrent.

Posted by: OregonMuse, deplorable since 2004 at December 04, 2016 10:44 AM (n8tHU)

162 146 It was heartwarming when they finally let Samwise off the bench to play that final down.
Posted by: Insomniac at December

--------

He turned into a real ogre on that play..

Posted by: The guy with the hair at December 04, 2016 10:44 AM (r7E9R)

163 Sam, you are the wind beneath my wings.

Posted by: Frodo at December 04, 2016 10:44 AM (JO9+V)

164 There was more than one scene in Return of the King where it looked like Frodo and Sam were going to swap spit.

Posted by: Insomniac at December 04, 2016 10:45 AM (0mRoj)

165 162 146 It was heartwarming when they finally let Samwise off the bench to play that final down.
Posted by: Insomniac at December

--------

He turned into a real ogre on that play..
Posted by: The guy with the hair at December 04, 2016 10:44 AM (r7E9R)

Okay that's just mean!
Funny, but mean!

Posted by: Moki, deplorable mom and sammich maker at December 04, 2016 10:46 AM (VnCI9)

166 Samwise is the Holy Spirit.

Posted by: no good deed at December 04, 2016 10:46 AM (/O5Ax)

167 Glad to see the morning update arrived about the same time as the book thread, maybe political talk can go there?

Posted by: waelse1 at December 04, 2016 10:46 AM (Yj+23)

168 Posted by: no good deed at December 04, 2016 10:46 AM (/O5Ax)

That's blasphemy.

Posted by: Insomniac at December 04, 2016 10:47 AM (0mRoj)

169 Priceless. Car transporting Castro's ashes keeps breaking down, soldiers have to get out & push. Hooray Communism!

http://tinyurl.com/z68fnkd

Posted by: josephistan at December 04, 2016 10:47 AM (7qAYi)

170 So Sam had to slap Frodo around because Frodo was banging waitresses two at a time as the Hobbits back at the Shire couldn't get their drinks on time.

Posted by: Hairyback Guy at December 04, 2016 10:36 AM (ej1L0)


This interpretation of the Lord of the Rings epic is certainly... uh, unique.

Posted by: OregonMuse, deplorable since 2004 at December 04, 2016 10:48 AM (n8tHU)

171 166 Samwise is the Holy Spirit.
Posted by: no good deed at December 04, 2016 10:46 AM (/O5Ax)

The "Secret fire" that Gandalf invokes while fighting the Balrog is Tolkien's code for the Holy Spirit.

Posted by: josephistan at December 04, 2016 10:48 AM (7qAYi)

172
Difference between Puritan and Pilgrim (.pdf) file from pilgrimhallmuseum.org

http://preview.tinyurl.com/o25zxq5

which quotes the William Bradford book, and explains the difference between the Puritans of Plymouth Colony and the 'Pilgrims' of Massachusetts Colony.

The Bradford book makes reference to other groups, religious and otherwise. There was a lot of factionalism, another similarity with current events.

Posted by: Skandia Recluse at December 04, 2016 10:49 AM (0zl3t)

173 169 Priceless. Car transporting Castro's ashes keeps breaking down, soldiers have to get out & push. Hooray Communism!

http://tinyurl.com/z68fnkd
Posted by: josephistan at December 04, 2016 10:47 AM (7qAYi)
---
Why aren't they taking public transportation?!

Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at December 04, 2016 10:49 AM (EnKk6)

174 @55 - I think that sounds like an early Arthur C. Clarke story.

Posted by: BeckoningChasm at December 04, 2016 10:49 AM (MZcWR)

175 170 So Sam had to slap Frodo around because Frodo was banging waitresses two at a time as the Hobbits back at the Shire couldn't get their drinks on time.

Posted by: Hairyback Guy at December 04, 2016 10:36 AM (ej1L0)

This interpretation of the Lord of the Rings epic is certainly... uh, unique.
Posted by: OregonMuse, deplorable since 2004 at December 04, 2016 10:48 AM (n8tHU)

We all know Frodo was playing for the other team.

Posted by: Insomniac at December 04, 2016 10:49 AM (0mRoj)

176 Off to Mass.

Posted by: josephistan at December 04, 2016 10:50 AM (7qAYi)

177 176 Off to Mass.
Posted by: josephistan at December 04, 2016 10:50 AM (7qAYi)

Achusetts?

Posted by: Insomniac at December 04, 2016 10:50 AM (0mRoj)

178 Slightly off topic, but if you didn't see the Lighthouse video from the ONT, you should:

http://tinyurl.com/oad529n

The phrase "For those on peril on the sea" comes to mind.
Posted by: Hrothgar at December 04, 2016 09:21 AM (wCEn4)



That reminds me a bit of getting on or off the boat from or to the oil rigs in the Gulf.

Not as dramatic obviously.

But, on the days when the waves were rough or right before a hurricane, you had to swing in on a rope and be careful and time things just right,

or you might find yourself dropping 15 feet or so on deck or banging up your knees scrambling to get on the rig before you got your legs crushed. Etc.

Fun times. Fun times.

Posted by: naturalfake at December 04, 2016 10:51 AM (9q7Dl)

179 There was more than one scene in Return of the King where it looked like Frodo and Sam were going to swap spit.

Posted by: Insomniac at December 04, 2016 10:45 AM (0mRoj)

Oh hell yes! When I see those scenes I usually yell out, "Kiss me Sam!"

But mostly I skip them.

Posted by: CharlieBrown'sDildo at December 04, 2016 10:51 AM (42Mgr)

180 To quote Bored of the Rings, "It was as thought some very large and untidy creature - perhaps a dragon - had quite recently suffered a series of disappointing bowel movements in the vicinity".

Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at December 04, 2016 10:30 AM (EnKk6)


Did you just type that in from memory?

Posted by: OregonMuse, deplorable since 2004 at December 04, 2016 10:51 AM (n8tHU)

181
Just went to Goodreads, logged in and imported my purchases from Lord knows how long ago up to now into Goodreads. Big mistake... now I have got more than a few things to review, completely aside from the obvious question(s) like, "Where is that book?"

Posted by: Krebs v Carnot: Epic Battle of the Irredeemable Cycling Stars (TM) at December 04, 2016 10:52 AM (BK3ZS)

182 176 Off to Mass.
Posted by: josephistan at December 04, 2016 10:50 AM (7qAYi)

Achusetts?

====
Gesundheit.

Posted by: Vlad the Impaler, whittling away like mad at December 04, 2016 10:54 AM (dIc3Q)

183 religious persecution in 1600s Britain wasn't because the majority was atheist but because there was a state religion bound up with obedience to the secular king. if you didn't adhere to both the theology and the ritual of the kings church you were both heretic and traitor

At the time, if you were in a church that dissented from the King's that generally meant one of two options.

One was Catholicism, which I'll fully admit had been persecuted... in the previous century. But that was for good reason - think Guy Fawkes. Under Mary Tudor, they basically had Guy Fawkes as Queen. When the real Fawkes failed in 1606, the remaining Catholics in Britain kept their heads down and quit trying to blow sh!t up.

The other was to join some church whose main selling point was that it was holier than the King. Think proto-SJWs. You just have to look at how the Dissenters behaved during the Civil War to see what King Charles I was up against.

In short, the Stuarts were absolutely correct in their diagnoses of the threats they faced, with their relative ranking on their dangers, and their main failing is that they didn't win.

Posted by: boulder terlit hobo at December 04, 2016 10:54 AM (6FqZa)

184 I was so disappointed when you revealed that Johnny
Carson didn't actually say those things! Wishful thinking has a bucket
of ice water behind it's back, most of the time, so I got soaked.

Posted by: goon at December 04, 2016 10:26 AM (EaQ6/)


OTOH, Hillary Clinton got soaked almost 3 weeks ago.

Posted by: Miley, Duchess of the DSR at December 04, 2016 10:54 AM (tHwdc)

185
Okay that's just mean!
Funny, but mean!
Posted by: Moki, deplorable mom and sammich maker at December 04, 2016 10:46

-------

I do blanket denouncing of self" every morning..

Posted by: The guy with the hair at December 04, 2016 10:54 AM (r7E9R)

186 So Sam had to slap Frodo around because Frodo was banging waitresses two at a time as the Hobbits back at the Shire couldn't get their drinks on time.
Posted by: Hairyback Guy at December 04, 2016 10:36 AM (ej1L0)
This interpretation of the Lord of the Rings epic is certainly... uh, unique.
Posted by: OregonMuse, deplorable since 2004 at December 04, 2016 10:48 AM (n8tHU)
We all know Frodo was playing for the other team.
Posted by: Insomniac at December 04, 2016 10:49 AM (0mRoj)

Frodo....Fredo.....what's the difference. Moe Green has a Shire to run and sometimes he has to kick butt.

Posted by: Hairyback Guy at December 04, 2016 10:54 AM (ej1L0)

187
Did you just type that in from memory?
Posted by: OregonMuse, deplorable since 2004 at December 04, 2016 10:51 AM (n8tHU)


Definitely recognizable, but that's one I'd have to look up myself.

Unlike, "Say it now. Say it loud. I'm a cow and I'm proud."

Posted by: Krebs v Carnot: Epic Battle of the Irredeemable Cycling Stars (TM) at December 04, 2016 10:54 AM (BK3ZS)

188 I managed to separate my love of the LOTR books from the movies and enjoy both. The Hobbit movies are another matter. The acting is fine and they are visually interesting but they distort the book out of recognition in a disturbing way that LOTR avoided. The one thing the Hobbit movie got right is that Legolas's father, king of the woodland elves, is a prick. Frankly, my favorite part of the Hobbit movies was the music. It lends itself to a bass voice, especially the songs of the Dwarfs.

I've always thought of Samwise as the quintessential Hobbit, more so than Frodo or Bilbo. Tolkien even mentions how unusual the latter two are. Sam is steadfast, loves the earth and what it can provide, and appreciates the balance. But he can be fierce and heroic if needed. I thought that Jackson got his character right in the movie. When Faramir asks if Sam is Frodo's bodyguard, Sam replies, "I'm his gardener".

Posted by: JTB at December 04, 2016 10:55 AM (V+03K)

189 Speaking of long books, such as LOTR, I'm in the process of reading Les Miserables. My word that's a shockingly long book.

My only familiarity with the book is the musical, which I saw in London. My wife and I bought cheap seats but the theatre wasn't full enough so we got moved six rows back from the stage and in the centre.

Anyhow the book, free on Kindle, is a hard go for me.

And yes, I know this is irrelevant to the discussion.

Posted by: Northernlurker at December 04, 2016 10:56 AM (s7hQ/)

190 The worst part of Jackson's version of Tolkien is he takes heroic humans and makes them look small compared to the "special" characters.

Faramir, and to a lesser extent, Aragorn himself, are made bit players in the story. Much of their heroism is distilled down to something akin to bravery, and not much more.

This ultimately, is the failure of Jackson's work, that cannot be overcome.

Posted by: BurtTC at December 04, 2016 10:57 AM (Pz4pT)

191 I read SPQR I: The King's Gambit by John Maddox Roberts.
-
One thing I like about that series is that unlike much historical fiction, the attitudes of the characters appear to be accurate as opposed to contemporary attitudes transported to Ancient Roman.

Posted by: Anonosaurus Wrecks, This Is the Dawning of the Age of the Trumpius! at December 04, 2016 10:15 AM (Nwg0u)


Thank you for this. A better recommendation could not be made, as far as I'm concerned. I need to check this one out.

Posted by: OregonMuse, deplorable since 2004 at December 04, 2016 10:57 AM (n8tHU)

192 Did you just type that in from memory?
Posted by: OregonMuse, deplorable since 2004 at December 04, 2016 10:51 AM (n8tHU)
---
Yes, to the best of my recollection. It's appalling how many lines I remember from that book.

I did an illustrated book report on it in the 7th grade. Got an A+!

Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at December 04, 2016 10:57 AM (EnKk6)

193 Showered and ready to go to church. Just hanging around and waiting for my Queen to finish her process, make up thingie.

Posted by: Northernlurker at December 04, 2016 10:58 AM (s7hQ/)

194 One thing I like about that series is that unlike much historical fiction, the attitudes of the characters appear to be accurate as opposed to contemporary attitudes transported to Ancient Roman.

Posted by: Anonosaurus Wrecks, This Is the Dawning of the Age of the Trumpius! at December 04, 2016 10:15 AM (Nwg0u)

You mean they weren't deeply concerned about racial quotas, gender equality and microaggressions?

Posted by: Insomniac at December 04, 2016 10:58 AM (0mRoj)

195 I watched the first Hobbit movie and enjoyed it for what it was. Tried watching the 2nd twice, getting half-way through both times. Have no interest in looking at any of it again. The padding was ridiculous and was the worst sort of book-to-film ever.

Posted by: waelse1 at December 04, 2016 10:59 AM (Yj+23)

196
115 I have a set of the extended edition LOTR DVDs but have thus far entirely missed The Hobbit movies. Is it the consensus that I shouldn't bother?
Posted by: Northernlurker at December 04, 2016 10:20 AM (s7hQ/)


The Hobbit, as written by Tolkien -- one book; The Hobbit, as filmed by Jackson -- three long flicks.

Math says, "Bloated, so, 'no', ain't watching". I'd be more entertained and edified visiting a beach where a bloated whale corpse came ashore.

Just one Moron's opinion.

Posted by: Krebs v Carnot: Epic Battle of the Irredeemable Cycling Stars (TM) at December 04, 2016 10:59 AM (BK3ZS)

197 I am reading Creating Christ by Valliant and Fahy. The book proposes that the Roman emperors' and Roman society's need for the stability of the Flavian dynasty caused them to create the myth of a risen leader, a theory then expropriated by the Christians.

Nero's suicide ignited the Year of Four Emperors which consisted of interminable civil war reminiscent of pre-Augustan Rome, a period nobody wished to repeat. Vespasian was eventually the last emperor standing and founder of the Flavian dynasty. He died after a resectable reign of ten years creating a certain stabity but his son and successor Titus died after only two years without heir. His brother, Domitian, who is generally considered a bad emperor, then became emperor but needed a gimmick to ease the people's fear of instability and yet another round of civil wars. He or his administration came up with the idea that he was the reincarnation of Vespasian or Titus, a theme borrowed by the Christians. The evidence consists of a remarkable similarity between Domitian's symbol, a dolphin or dolphins entwined around an anchor, and an early Christian symbol. The symbolism of the anchor representing stability is obvious; the symbolism of the dolphins less so.

I find the theory less than convincing but the archeological research is quite professional. I get the idea this book was written by wise fools. It is interesting but . . .

Incidentally, Domitian was assassinated ending the Flavian dynasty but ushering in the eighty year reign of the five good emperors.

Posted by: Anonosaurus Wrecks, This Is the Dawning of the Age of the Trumpius! at December 04, 2016 10:59 AM (Nwg0u)

198 OTOH, Hillary Clinton got soaked schlonged almost 3 weeks ago.

Posted by: Miley, Duchess of the DSR at December 04, 2016 10:54 AM (tHwdc)


Corrected for accuracy.

Posted by: OregonMuse, deplorable since 2004 at December 04, 2016 10:59 AM (n8tHU)

199 Old heretic here and never could finish LOTR; managed finishing Hobbit after giving up on the other. Strange, because I do know people who can quote whole paragraphs. Couldn't do it, even on a bet.

Have read a lot of Lewis, Chesterton, and Sayers, just can't do Tolkien. Even his essays seem impenetrable to me.

Confession over. Someone give me absolution.

Posted by: mustbequantum at December 04, 2016 11:00 AM (MIKMs)

200
The padding was ridiculous and was the worst sort of book-to-film ever.
Posted by: waelse1 at December 04, 2016 10:59 AM (Yj+23)


"Second place is first loser" is looking pretty good right now!

-- Winter Dreams

Posted by: Krebs v Carnot: Epic Battle of the Irredeemable Cycling Stars (TM) at December 04, 2016 11:00 AM (BK3ZS)

201 I've always thought of Samwise as the quintessential Hobbit, more so than Frodo or Bilbo. Tolkien even mentions how unusual the latter two are. Sam is steadfast, loves the earth and what it can provide, and appreciates the balance. But he can be fierce and heroic if needed. I thought that Jackson got his character right in the movie. When Faramir asks if Sam is Frodo's bodyguard, Sam replies, "I'm his gardener".
Posted by: JTB at December 04, 2016 10:55 AM (V+03K)

I agree but I also think he may represent the essential human--keeping on in the midst of circumstances that seem way beyond your capacity to understand or make it through. And, at the end of the day, getting to hear "well done my good and faithful servant." Only to respond with a sincere "what did I do, Lord?"

Posted by: Northernlurker at December 04, 2016 11:01 AM (s7hQ/)

202
Sorry, A Winter's Tale

Posted by: Krebs v Carnot: Epic Battle of the Irredeemable Cycling Stars (TM) at December 04, 2016 11:01 AM (BK3ZS)

203 Re: 151 "I'd be curled up in a fetal position and weeping uncontrollably like Trigglypuff at a pro-life rally if I had to endure the things that some of you have."

--------------

"I don't believe this is true. Often people will observe suffering in others, and see something they themselves would struggle to endure, and that's because character and strength are often like an unfilled balloon. You have it, and it will stretch and expand as you need it, but until you do it looks like a small, insignificant thing. "

I agree Burt to a degree. There are those to whom a flat tire is the worst thing in the universe and are numbed into despair due to the trauma of it all. Some of those folks will never be able to deal with trouble, real or imagined. I'm empathetic but, after a dead wife, a son lost as a toddler and being a FMF corpsman, I can no longer tolerate too much whining or complaint. I raised my children to be responsible, productive citizens and I'm tough on those who go on too long about their station in life. If they continue the waa waaing, I'll tell them, you don't want to play life poker with me pal - I have all aces.

Look for the happiness in life - it's there - quit your bitch'n long enough to see it - which was part of Harting's book IIRC.



Posted by: Tonypete at December 04, 2016 11:01 AM (tr2D7)

204 Just joined the Goodreads page, was inspired by the recommendation of the Bradford book. Had read about Winthrop many years ago, and remembered being fascinated by the period and the establishment of the colonies.

I also bought my grandson his first Tolkein (to be read aloud by me), Roverandom.

Posted by: Cn at December 04, 2016 11:01 AM (wczgi)

205 There was more than one scene in Return of the King where it looked like Frodo and Sam were going to swap spit.
Posted by: Insomniac at December 04, 2016 10:45 AM (0mRoj)


No, actually same becomes Dumbledore's gay lover. Off camera, of course, it's all very tasteful.

Posted by: JK Rolling (in dough) at December 04, 2016 11:01 AM (Pz4pT)

206 Discovered the Laundry Series this week, written by Charles Stross. Some of his novellas are online. Basically it's about a mathematician/computer genius who is forcibly inducted into a secret government program to prevent Cthulhu and other evil beings from destroying the universe. It's set in Britain. The proviso here is that higher mathematics and magic are seriously intertwined.

The appeal here is that it's funny. Really funny. Lots of snark about office politics, budget cuts and bureacracy. I'm enjoying the series.

Posted by: Dr Alice at December 04, 2016 11:02 AM (LaT54)

207 No, actually same becomes Dumbledore's gay lover. Off camera, of course, it's all very tasteful.
Posted by: JK Rolling (in dough) at December 04, 2016 11:01 AM (Pz4pT)


Sam, you stupid typist!

Posted by: JK Rolling (in dough) at December 04, 2016 11:02 AM (Pz4pT)

208 Posted by: CharlieBrown'sDildo at December 04, 2016 10:51 AM (42Mgr)

For a lack of a better term , I think we are a little more 'homophobic ' than in the past. I am reminded of the Christmas party in the movie Stalag 17. It makes me a little uncomfortable.

( I wish there was another term 'cause it's not a fear)

Posted by: Sebastian Melmoth at December 04, 2016 11:04 AM (Vnlws)

209
I did an illustrated book report on it in the 7th grade. Got an A+!
Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at December 04, 2016 10:57 AM (EnKk6)


Pard!

I wrote a book report on Will Cuppy's The Decline and Fall of Practically Everybody and scored well. An oh-so-literate and Ivy League-schooled friend of mine deigned to refer to me as a "literary hack" after I did that. I laughed, which only ruffled his feathers more.

Posted by: Krebs v Carnot: Epic Battle of the Irredeemable Cycling Stars (TM) at December 04, 2016 11:05 AM (BK3ZS)

210 Working my way through The Travels of Jaime McPheeters which won a Pulitzer in the 1950s.

At first glance I thought it akin to Huck Finn and maybe appropriate for our 10-year-old grandson, but it is far too rough in spots with graphic violence.

The plains indians are portrayed as they probably were, terribly savage in their practices of war and ritual.

Crooks and highwaymen also. Killings, disembowlments, and more. Definitely NOT OK for kids.

Posted by: the littl shyning man at December 04, 2016 11:05 AM (U6f54)

211 135
The Pilgrims were made up of a diverse group of people who had fled because of religious persecution and were not even "discovered" until the 1800's, I believe, when some papers in a house or barn in England, of all places, revealed them to history.

Posted by: Trump's Stubby Fingers at December 04, 2016 10:31 AM (SJ184)


Huh. I never heard that before.

Posted by: rickl - THE MEDIA IS LYING TO YOU at December 04, 2016 11:05 AM (sdi6R)

212 "I don't believe this is true. Often people will observe suffering in others, and see something they themselves would struggle to endure, and that's because character and strength are often like an unfilled balloon. You have it, and it will stretch and expand as you need it, but until you do it looks like a small, insignificant thing. "
------------------------------
I agree Burt to a degree. There are those to whom a flat tire is the worst thing in the universe and are numbed into despair due to the trauma of it all. Some of those folks will never be able to deal with trouble, real or imagined. I'm empathetic but, after a dead wife, a son lost as a toddler and being a FMF corpsman, I can no longer tolerate too much whining or complaint. I raised my children to be responsible, productive citizens and I'm tough on those who go on too long about their station in life. If they continue the waa waaing, I'll tell them, you don't want to play life poker with me pal - I have all aces.

Look for the happiness in life - it's there - quit your bitch'n long enough to see it - which was part of Harting's book IIRC.

Posted by: Tonypete at December 04, 2016 11:01 AM (tr2D7)


100% agree.

What I didn't say clearly, is that the character and strength to which I refer, is present in some, and woefully, sometimes tragically missing in others.

It won't be created after the fact, and as you say, some who experience minor setbacks find themselves wholly incapable of dealing with them, whereas others walk through the valley of the shadow of death. And emerge on the other side.

Posted by: BurtTC at December 04, 2016 11:05 AM (Pz4pT)

213
( I wish there was another term 'cause it's not a fear)
Posted by: Sebastian Melmoth at December 04, 2016 11:04 AM (Vnlws)


Homouneasy

Posted by: Krebs v Carnot: Epic Battle of the Irredeemable Cycling Stars (TM) at December 04, 2016 11:05 AM (BK3ZS)

214 Faramir, and to a lesser extent, Aragorn himself, are made bit players in the story. Much of their heroism is distilled down to something akin to bravery, and not much more.

Disagree on both. Both movies (I don't count RotK, which fell off in the books, too) expand both characters' arc, mainly dealing with their temptations.

Faramir is tempted by his need to prove himself a hero like, or better than, his brother; so in the movie he acts on it, diverting the Ring's route as far as Osgiliath.

Aragorn is tempted by his right to be King, which responsibility part of him doesn't even want, but to which end the Ring can be a shortcut. He almost takes it from Frodo when Frodo offers it.

Posted by: boulder terlit hobo at December 04, 2016 11:06 AM (6FqZa)

215

When Faramir asks if Sam is Frodo's bodyguard, Sam replies, "I'm his gardener".
Posted by: JTB at December 04, 2016 10:55 AM (V+03K)

------


I see Chauncey every time I watch that.

"As long as the roots are not severed, all is well. And all will be well in the garden."

Posted by: The guy with the hair at December 04, 2016 11:06 AM (r7E9R)

216 Peter Jackson took 3 long novels and made 3 long movies. Then he took 1 short novel and made 3 long movies. Not a recipe for success.

Posted by: waelse1 at December 04, 2016 11:06 AM (Yj+23)

217 Yes, to the best of my recollection. It's appalling how many lines I remember from that book.
I did an illustrated book report on it in the 7th grade. Got an A+!

Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at December 04, 2016 10:57 AM (EnKk6)


Impressive! My favorite is the physical description of hobbits, excuse me, "boggies" that goes something like, they walked on "....hairy, blunt instruments that could only be called 'feet' because of the position they occupied at the end of their legs."

Posted by: OregonMuse, deplorable since 2004 at December 04, 2016 11:07 AM (n8tHU)

218 Am I the only one on the entire internet who has never read Tolkien? I started "The Hobbit" in college, but lost interest after 30 pages.

Posted by: rickl - THE MEDIA IS LYING TO YOU at December 04, 2016 11:09 AM (sdi6R)

219 As a LOTR fanatic, I should resent the hell out of "Bored of the Rings". But it is just too damn funny.

Posted by: JTB at December 04, 2016 11:09 AM (V+03K)

220

... all the 'ettes are impossibly attractive serve tea & tea in the manner shown here: http://acecomments.mu.nu/?post=367174, ...


Edited & corrected.

Posted by: Arbalest at December 04, 2016 11:09 AM (FlRtG)

221 Anybody got any really good post-apocalyptic novels to recommend?

Not the prepper and survivalist kind. I've tried some of that and find it pap.

My nic comes from Russell Hoban's "Riddley Walker," my all-time favorite.

Posted by: the littl shyning man at December 04, 2016 11:09 AM (U6f54)

222 I have a love of the books by Manning Coles. These are spy books ranging from WWI to the cold war mostly involving Tommy Hambledon
.
I just finished Now or Never which is set in Cologne in 1953 and has Tommy asked to look into why two Spanish Falangists are traveling to Cologne to discuss importation of oranges

Cologne is a maze of cleared streets and bombed out neighborhoods, and while Tommy is lodged at a mostly intact htoel there a man is discovered having hanged himself from a girder down the block. In tying the two items together, he uncovers what the Allies are terrified of, a resurgent Nazi movement led by uncaptured Nazis

Tommy Hambledon is very much a detective in the style of Lord Peter Whimsey and British Public school in the manner of Bertie Wooster, right up to where he is leading an assault on an isolated meeting in the woods

I don't know why any of these books have not been made into movies, the dry humor and action and the odd twists seem to be made for one. It would play like Man From UNCLE

Posted by: Kindltot at December 04, 2016 11:10 AM (yLUuz)

223 Posted by: CharlieBrown'sDildo at December 04, 2016 10:51 AM (42Mgr)

For a lack of a better term , I think we are a little more 'homophobic ' than in the past. I am reminded of the Christmas party in the movie Stalag 17. It makes me a little uncomfortable.

( I wish there was another term 'cause it's not a fear)
Posted by: Sebastian Melmoth at December 04, 2016 11:04 AM (Vnlws)


What may go unnoticed much of the time, is that homosexuality was present, not only in society in times past, but also showed up in books, and eventually, movies.

It was just more subtle... mostly because it had to be.

So if we see it more clearly now, in past books and films, it's less because we invent something that wasn't there in the past, but see it more clearly for what it is.

Posted by: BurtTC at December 04, 2016 11:10 AM (Pz4pT)

224 Domitian was a victim of damnatio memoriae. A lot of provincial prosperity that actually happened under him was then appropriated by his successors Trajan and Hadrian.

Here's just the latest example:
http://tinyurl.com/ztgm8ax

Domitian's main sin as Emperor is that he treated his Senate like any member of the Horde, if elected Emperor for four years, would treat Harry Reid.

Posted by: boulder terlit hobo at December 04, 2016 11:10 AM (6FqZa)

225 The one you want to see is Jackson's masterwork, 'Bad Taste'.

A seminal work.

A masterpiece.

I highly recommend.

3 thumbs up.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YZPWWdQUigk

Posted by: Roger Ebert at December 04, 2016 11:10 AM (7COaW)

226 Am I the only one on the entire internet who has never read Tolkien?

I have never read Tolkien. Saw the movies.

Posted by: Skandia Recluse at December 04, 2016 11:10 AM (0zl3t)

227
169 Priceless. Car transporting Castro's ashes keeps breaking down, soldiers have to get out and push. Hooray Communism!

http://tinyurl.com/z68fnkd
Posted by: josephistan at December 04, 2016 10:47 AM (7qAYi)


LOL

And still there are those who say that there's no such thing as progress.

Posted by: Krebs v Carnot: Epic Battle of the Irredeemable Cycling Stars (TM) at December 04, 2016 11:11 AM (BK3ZS)

228 I didn't see any of the movies either.

Posted by: rickl - THE MEDIA IS LYING TO YOU at December 04, 2016 11:12 AM (sdi6R)

229 Am I the only one on the entire internet who has never read Tolkien? I started "The Hobbit" in college, but lost interest after 30 pages.
Posted by: rickl - THE MEDIA IS LYING TO YOU at December 04, 2016 11:09 AM (sdi6R)


Yes. Yes you are.

At times I had to keep quiet on this topic however, because so much of the books, I simply don't remember, and need more knowledgeable readers than I to parse out what was changed in Jackson's movies.

Posted by: BurtTC at December 04, 2016 11:12 AM (Pz4pT)

230 My favorites of the Pratchett books are the Grimes. Taking my son to buy a suit or rent a tuxedo made me laugh (and cry at the cost) with the description of painting a uniform on those in the watch who were essentially walls.

Susan/Death makes me think of 'Adventures in Babysitting'.

Posted by: mustbequantum at December 04, 2016 11:12 AM (MIKMs)

231 218 Am I the only one on the entire internet who has never read Tolkien? I started "The Hobbit" in college, but lost interest after 30 pages.
Posted by: rickl - THE MEDIA IS LYING TO YOU at December 04, 2016 11:09 AM (sdi6R)


eh.

I love the hell out of Neil Stephenson's Cryptonoimcon, but I lent it to a friend and he didn't get more than an hundred pages into it before returning it. It's wordy and florid, and you really have to like his style of writing to enjoy it. There's an entire chapter which is about 1/3 description of how a protagonist likes to prepare and eat Cap'n Crunch cereal. If you don't click with the writing, it just may not have been meant to be.

Posted by: hogmartin at December 04, 2016 11:13 AM (8nWyX)

232
Anybody got any really good post-apocalyptic novels to recommend?


A Canitcle for Leibowitz

Posted by: Krebs v Carnot: Epic Battle of the Irredeemable Cycling Stars (TM) at December 04, 2016 11:13 AM (BK3ZS)

233
169 Priceless. Car transporting Castro's ashes keeps breaking down, soldiers have to get out and push. Hooray Communism!

http://tinyurl.com/z68fnkd
Posted by: josephistan at December 04, 2016 10:47 AM (7qAYi)


Mea culpa... should have gone with:

In many ways, this is the story of Obama.

Mea maxima culpa.

Posted by: Krebs v Carnot: Epic Battle of the Irredeemable Cycling Stars (TM) at December 04, 2016 11:15 AM (BK3ZS)

234 Domitian was a victim of damnatio memoriae. A lot of provincial prosperity that actually happened under him was then appropriated by his successors Trajan and Hadrian.

Here's just the latest example:
http://tinyurl.com/ztgm8ax

-
Very interesting.

Posted by: Anonosaurus Wrecks, This Is the Dawning of the Age of the Trumpius! at December 04, 2016 11:16 AM (Nwg0u)

235 Yes I know some people who don't like Clancy books because of the technical detail he gets into where others love it for that reason. Didn't we have a discussion of whether Moby Dick was a novel or a technical manual for Whale hunting?

Posted by: Sebastian Melmoth at December 04, 2016 11:16 AM (Vnlws)

236 204 ... Cn, Tolkien's children's books, mostly written for his own kids, are a delight. In addition to Roverandom, check out "Mr. Bliss" and "The Father Christmas Letters". They are illustrated by Tolkien and are both charming and creative.

Posted by: JTB at December 04, 2016 11:16 AM (V+03K)

237 I enjoyed the Hobbit movies despite the flaws.

Posted by: @votermom's phone at December 04, 2016 11:17 AM (XFiZr)

238 Faramir is tempted by his need to prove himself a hero like, or better than, his brother;

Aragorn is tempted by his right to be King, which responsibility part of him doesn't even want,
Posted by: boulder terlit hobo at December 04, 2016 11:06 AM (6FqZa)


Yes, those two points right there... Faramir is driven by envy. Not in the books, he wasn't.

Aragorn, the way you describe it sounds more pure than it was portrayed in the films. You have him sounding more like Jesus, and he wasn't. That's more your interpretation, rather than Jackson's portrayal.

Posted by: BurtTC at December 04, 2016 11:17 AM (Pz4pT)

239 Anybody got any really good post-apocalyptic novels to recommend?



A Canitcle for Leibowitz



Posted by: Krebs v Carnot: Epic Battle of the Irredeemable Cycling Stars (TM) at December 04, 2016 11:13 AM (BK3ZS)
=====
Seconded.

Posted by: mustbequantum at December 04, 2016 11:18 AM (MIKMs)

240
But that's when I realized that an essential part of the totalitarian commie thug business model was a lot of jabber about "children" and "the poor".








Heh. Reminds me of this chick I knew who was in the same major track as I was in college. Beautiful brunette with big, gravity-defying tits. Kind of a snooty attitude, but I was willing to forgive that because......you know, tits. Even got her smiling a few times so that I'm reasonably sure she'd be receptive when I brought her over to the dark side.

I abruptly abandoned the project after one Q and A session in one of our classes where she was defending all sorts of horrid dictators because they were for "The People". The pregnant pause and head shake she affected before stating the words indicated to me that she thought that evoking the words was some sort of devastating argument.

Total boner-kill moment.

Posted by: IllTemperedCur at December 04, 2016 11:19 AM (LuZz8)

241 I'm reading The Crusades, by Geoffrey Hindley. It's good enough so far.

Posted by: Hooper X at December 04, 2016 11:19 AM (FYrz1)

242 Anybody got any really good post-apocalyptic novels to recommend?

Vic and Blood

Posted by: Sebastian Melmoth at December 04, 2016 11:20 AM (Vnlws)

243 221
Anybody got any really good post-apocalyptic novels to recommend?



Not the prepper and survivalist kind. I've tried some of that and find it pap.



My nic comes from Russell Hoban's "Riddley Walker," my all-time favorite.

Posted by: the littl shyning man at December 04, 2016 11:09 AM (U6f54)

My favorite post apocalyptic novel is a balance between Dies The Fire and Island In The Sea of Time. Both are three book series, by liberal union guy S. M. Stirling. But Dies The Fire continues into what they are calling the "Emberverse" which looks like it will continue forever.

Posted by: Vic We Have No Party at December 04, 2016 11:20 AM (mpXpK)

244 Votermom: Did you see my link in #82 of the EMT?

Posted by: rickl - THE MEDIA IS LYING TO YOU at December 04, 2016 11:20 AM (sdi6R)

245 Yes, those two points right there... Faramir is driven by envy. Not in the books, he wasn't.

Aragorn, the way you describe it sounds more pure than it was portrayed in the films. You have him sounding more like Jesus, and he wasn't. That's more your interpretation, rather than Jackson's portrayal.
Posted by: BurtTC at December 04, 2016 11:17 AM (Pz4pT)


Oh, and then Jackson takes the one Jesus-like thing Aragorn DID have about him, his ability to heal the dying, and completely cut it out of the film.

Why? Too... religiousy? He wanted HIS Jesus to be more badass sword-wielding?

Posted by: BurtTC at December 04, 2016 11:20 AM (Pz4pT)

246 Didn't we have a discussion of whether Moby Dick was a novel or a technical manual for Whale hunting?

-
How o make whale soup

First, get a whale . . .

Posted by: Anonosaurus Wrecks, This Is the Dawning of the Age of the Trumpius! at December 04, 2016 11:21 AM (Nwg0u)

247 Off, sock.

Posted by: Colorado Alex In Exile at December 04, 2016 11:22 AM (FYrz1)

248 I enjoyed the Hobbit movies despite the flaws.
Posted by: @votermom's phone at December 04, 2016 11:17 AM (XFiZr)


The first one is tolerable. The second is too filled with Jacksonian flibbery cgi, the third one... by the time I got to it, I was probably darning socks and paying bills whilst watching.

I mean, come on!

Posted by: BurtTC at December 04, 2016 11:23 AM (Pz4pT)

249 Before I end up in the Barrel for not talking about books, I can recommend Ida Glaser and Hannah Kay's book "Thinking Biblically about Islam". Yes yes, I'm an agnostic occasionally hostile and impolite here to points that conservatives like warble garble. Still.

Glaser and Kay carefully explain what is Bible-based doctrine about Christianity's prophets, and the role of Jesus; and carefully explain same about Islam's doctrines on both. They also talk about how the Qur'an, on the face of it a very different kind of scripture, shares the techniques of Semitic Rhetoric used in the Bible.

Their main point is that Islam has denied the Transfiguration. Moses and Elijah, in the Markan Gospel, hail Jesus as greater than they, in fact their culmination: there won't be a need for another Divine lawgiver or major prophet. The Qur'an says, nope - and here's our Prophet, who also reminds mankind of the Law.

This denial of the Transfiguration has forced the Qur'an to lay down further doctrines, like in sura 7 where mankind in Eden does not Fall as such. He just disobeys God and is punished, kicking off a cyclical pattern that continues.

Posted by: boulder terlit hobo at December 04, 2016 11:24 AM (6FqZa)

250 Why? Too... religiousy? He wanted HIS Jesus to be more badass sword-wielding?
Posted by: BurtTC at December 04, 2016 11:20 AM (Pz4pT)


I always thought Gandalf was the Christ figure of LoTR. He's the one who dies, fights a demon, and is resurrected.

Posted by: hogmartin at December 04, 2016 11:24 AM (8nWyX)

251 One of the post-apocalyptic novels that I really enjoyed was 'The Rift' by Walter Jon Williams. US breaks in half along the New Madras. Another was 'The Postman' by David Brin. Uplifting in establishing communication allowed civilization to survive.

The best of all time is 'Canticle for Leibowitz', however.

Posted by: mustbequantum at December 04, 2016 11:26 AM (MIKMs)

252 #20 Having a life mate you love and loves you to share
the hardships of life is more than half the battle. People without that
are at a big big disadvantage .

Posted by: Sebastian Melmoth at December 04, 2016 09:13 AM (/ZLfx)

When I had Mr. Deplorable (and his strong faith) by my side, I felt that I had everything I needed. I could clearly see that this is how God intended mankind to live.

Posted by: Miley, Duchess of the DSR at December 04, 2016 11:26 AM (tHwdc)

253 Glen Cook had a thing for mercenary companies, evidently. I read his Black Company books, but never got into his stuff beyond that.

Posted by: Aetius451AD at December 04, 2016 11:27 AM (92kX2)

254
Anybody got any really good post-apocalyptic novels to recommend?








Dreams from my Father

Posted by: IllTemperedCur at December 04, 2016 11:28 AM (LuZz8)

255 It was just more subtle... mostly because it had to be.

Posted by: BurtTC at December 04, 2016 11:10 AM (Pz4pT)

Agreed, but the current obsession with homosexuality has made me (and, perhaps, others) sick and fvcking tired of it being thrust into our faces.

So even an innocent expression of intense feelings between two men (or hobbits) becomes, in my hypersensitivity, homosexuality being mainstreamed.

As many have said, "The love that dare not speak its name," has become "The love that won't shut the fvck up."

Posted by: CharlieBrown'sDildo at December 04, 2016 11:28 AM (42Mgr)

256 250 Why? Too... religiousy? He wanted HIS Jesus to be more badass sword-wielding?
Posted by: BurtTC at December 04, 2016 11:20 AM (Pz4pT)

I always thought Gandalf was the Christ figure of LoTR. He's the one who dies, fights a demon, and is resurrected.
Posted by: hogmartin at December 04, 2016 11:24 AM (8nWyX)

Although I remember reading or hearing that Tolkien was trying to envisage a world without Christ, but desperately in need of one.

Posted by: Aetius451AD at December 04, 2016 11:29 AM (92kX2)

257 The best of all time is 'Canticle for Leibowitz', however.


Posted by: mustbequantum at December 04, 2016 11:26 AM (MIKMs)

I loved that, and everyone I recommended it to loved it as well. The sequel was a yuge disappointment, though.

Posted by: Miley, Duchess of the DSR at December 04, 2016 11:29 AM (tHwdc)

258 You have [Aragorn] sounding more like Jesus, and he wasn't.

The Houses of Healing scene is evocative of how Jesus heals the sick in Mark:
http://www.henneth-annun.net/events_view.cfm?EVID=1449

Aragorn might not be the Word Of God On Earth, but Tolkien deliberately made him out to be One With Authority.

Posted by: boulder terlit hobo at December 04, 2016 11:29 AM (6FqZa)

259 Canticle for Leibowitz is really good, wish the author's family would get it on e-book.

Posted by: waelse1 at December 04, 2016 11:30 AM (EKaFO)

260 Total boner-kill moment.

Posted by: IllTemperedCur at December 04, 2016 11:19 AM (LuZz

Nothing that a ball-gag and a bottle of bourbon can't fix.

Posted by: CharlieBrown'sDildo at December 04, 2016 11:31 AM (42Mgr)

261 Posted by: CharlieBrown'sDildo at December 04, 2016 11:28 AM (42Mgr)

Hypersensitive is the term I was looking for and your explanation for it even better.

Posted by: Sebastian Melmoth at December 04, 2016 11:31 AM (Vnlws)

262 Anybody got any really good post-apocalyptic novels to recommend?

Not the prepper and survivalist kind. I've tried some of that and find it pap.

My nic comes from Russell Hoban's "Riddley Walker," my all-time favorite.

Posted by: the littl shyning man at December 04, 2016 11:09 AM (U6f54)

Ben Winters has written that his pre-apocalyptic The Last Policeman series was influenced by Riddley Walker. I read Riddley Walker because of his recommendation. I recommend The Last Policeman series and it was generally very well received by the horde.

Posted by: cool breeze at December 04, 2016 11:31 AM (StZrq)

263 This year I read Freedom Betrayed:Herbert Hoovers secret history of WWII/
Conceived in Liberty by M. Rothbard/ re-read: The German Genius by Peter Watson; The Great Rebellion volumes by C.V. Wedgewood
Lets see....oh, read The Forgotten Man by Amity Shales, The Peloponnesian War by Donald Kagan, Revolutionaries by Jack Rakove, A Country of Vast Designs by Robert W. Merry....some others but, coffee hasn't taken full effect yet. Started reading The Nine Laws by Ivan Throne the other day and have Vox Day's SJW's Always Lie awaiting me. Always have my selected writings of Marcus Aurelius at hand for a daily reflection or two.Will likely get back to reading Kipling before years end.

Posted by: TJ Madison at December 04, 2016 11:31 AM (VExmM)

264 Why? Too... religiousy? He wanted HIS Jesus to be more badass sword-wielding?
Posted by: BurtTC at December 04, 2016 11:20 AM (Pz4pT)

I always thought Gandalf was the Christ figure of LoTR. He's the one who dies, fights a demon, and is resurrected.
Posted by: hogmartin at December 04, 2016 11:24 AM (8nWyX)


I think that's right. BTH's description, of Aragorn's challenge regarding his kingship, at least mimic's Jesus' doubts... if they WERE indeed, doubts... and now I want to avoid that discussion.

Posted by: BurtTC at December 04, 2016 11:31 AM (Pz4pT)

265 As many have said, "The love that dare not speak its name," has become "The love that won't shut the fvck up."


Posted by: CharlieBrown'sDildo at December 04, 2016 11:28 AM (42Mgr)



New keyboard required.

Posted by: Miley, Duchess of the DSR at December 04, 2016 11:32 AM (tHwdc)

266 Anyway BurtTC, your original point was that the movies hollowed out those characters, and when I proved they didn't, you moved on to saying that the movies changed those characters into something you don't like.

That is known in the trade, I believe, as Moving The Goalposts. I'll put it down to lack of coffee on your part and move on.

Posted by: boulder terlit hobo at December 04, 2016 11:32 AM (6FqZa)

267 OregonMuse, that is a top-notch lead-in for the book thread. Maybe it's just for those of 'a certain age', but the Cold War always gets me.

Posted by: t-bird at December 04, 2016 11:33 AM (7H/2n)

268
260 Total boner-kill moment.

Posted by: IllTemperedCur at December 04, 2016 11:19 AM (LuZz

Nothing that a ball-gag and a bottle of bourbon can't fix.

Posted by: CharlieBrown'sDildo at December 04, 2016 11:31 AM (42Mgr)







The problem is getting her to that point. Ugh.

Posted by: IllTemperedCur at December 04, 2016 11:33 AM (LuZz8)

269 New keyboard required.

Posted by: Miley, Duchess of the DSR at December 04, 2016 11:32 AM (tHwdc)

I aim to please, but that joke isn't mine.

Posted by: CharlieBrown'sDildo at December 04, 2016 11:33 AM (42Mgr)

270 Google brightside crossing and you get lots of interesting things in fiction about mercury. First published in 1956 I read the story in the sixties in a collection of short stories. As a story it still holds water.

Posted by: Ok at December 04, 2016 11:34 AM (zFpSK)

271 221 Anybody got any really good post-apocalyptic novels to recommend?

Not the prepper and survivalist kind. I've tried some of that and find it pap.

My nic comes from Russell Hoban's "Riddley Walker," my all-time favorite.
Posted by: the littl shyning man at December 04, 2016 11:09 AM (U6f54)

I have tried to find a decent one. The genre is pretty much totally dominated by zombie fiction.

One series I kind of liked was the Peter Clines Ex- series. It is a superhero/zombie kind of mashup. Not bad, although it suffers from a lot of zombie story problems (why don't they find an island, why are they staying in cities, why not find a better defensible position.)

It is strange that more people do not work in the much more plausible idea of nuclear apocalypse. Given the popularity of games like Fallout, I have to figure there is some kind of market out there.

Posted by: Aetius451AD at December 04, 2016 11:34 AM (92kX2)

272 It was just more subtle... mostly because it had to be.

Posted by: BurtTC at December 04, 2016 11:10 AM (Pz4pT)

Agreed, but the current obsession with homosexuality has made me (and, perhaps, others) sick and fvcking tired of it being thrust into our faces.

So even an innocent expression of intense feelings between two men (or hobbits) becomes, in my hypersensitivity, homosexuality being mainstreamed.

As many have said, "The love that dare not speak its name," has become "The love that won't shut the fvck up."
Posted by: CharlieBrown'sDildo at December 04, 2016 11:28 AM (42Mgr)


Right, and I think we're essentially forced to see it, because we have deciphered the code, and cannot unsee it where it is present, which unfortunately, is almost everywhere.

Posted by: BurtTC at December 04, 2016 11:34 AM (Pz4pT)

273 Priceless. Car transporting Castro's ashes keeps breaking down, soldiers have to get out & push. Hooray Communism!

http://tinyurl.com/z68fnkd

Posted by: josephistan at December 04, 2016 10:47 AM (7qAYi)

Heh. My Spanish is pretty primitive, but that Bing translation, "It breaks the Jeep that the move." is terrible. Should be, "the Jeep that moves them broke down."

And, heh again, for a beautiful example of the complete up-fuckedness of the Cuban regime.

Posted by: Alberta Oil Peon at December 04, 2016 11:35 AM (MiBfH)

274 I aim to please, but that joke isn't mine.


Posted by: CharlieBrown'sDildo at December 04, 2016 11:33 AM (42Mgr)

Bon mots should become memes and I thank you nonetheless.

Posted by: Miley, Duchess of the DSR at December 04, 2016 11:35 AM (tHwdc)

275 Samwise isn't the holy spirit, he was the quartermaster of the Hobbit expedition.

Posted by: Skip at December 04, 2016 11:36 AM (5sOEp)

276 Will likely get back to reading Kipling before years end.
=====

'Just So Stories' sum up most of my philosophy. I still want to know what the crocodile eats for breakfast.

Posted by: mustbequantum at December 04, 2016 11:37 AM (MIKMs)

277 Having a life mate you love and loves you to share the hardships of life is more than half the battle. People without that are at a big big disadvantage .

Posted by: Sebastian Melmoth


******


I agree wholeheartedly.


**Waves at Missus Muldoon, lurking at AoSHQ across the room**

Posted by: Muldoon, private citizen at December 04, 2016 11:37 AM (wPiJc)

278 Anyway BurtTC, your original point was that the movies hollowed out those characters, and when I proved they didn't, you moved on to saying that the movies changed those characters into something you don't like.

That is known in the trade, I believe, as Moving The Goalposts. I'll put it down to lack of coffee on your part and move on.
Posted by: boulder terlit hobo at December 04, 2016 11:32 AM (6FqZa)


Nonsense. You didn't prove anything. You over-inflated what YOU saw, and pretended Jackson created what he didn't.

And still, if you want to argue, what YOU said Jackson did to Faramir, is straight up envy. Tell me, in what universe is envy a good thing?

Posted by: BurtTC at December 04, 2016 11:37 AM (Pz4pT)

279 OMG. Just finished Neil Stephensen's "Baroque Cycle". I do love his work, but had to stop along the way and read other books. But I do know a lot more European history among other things.

Posted by: Deplorable RI Red at December 04, 2016 11:37 AM (ZXOnh)

280 Here's a nice list of stories based on Mercury:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mercury_in_fiction

I didn't know that Mercury rotated, because I guess I've only ever read stories written before 1965. (Should I be learning my science from fiction? Well, uhh...)

Posted by: t-bird at December 04, 2016 11:37 AM (7H/2n)

281 Agreed, but the current obsession with homosexuality has made me (and, perhaps, others) sick and fvcking tired of it being thrust into our faces.

So even an innocent expression of intense feelings between two men (or hobbits) becomes, in my hypersensitivity, homosexuality being mainstreamed.

As many have said, "The love that dare not speak its name," has become "The love that won't shut the fvck up."
Posted by: CharlieBrown'sDildo at December 04, 2016 11:28 AM (42Mgr)

I have to believe that the people who make the relationship between Frodo and Sam to be homosexual are barking up the wrong path. I seem to remember a counter theory in which Tolkien was trying to show the military relationship between an officer and his personal servant (WWI vet remember.)

Posted by: Aetius451AD at December 04, 2016 11:38 AM (92kX2)

282 "Total boner-kill moment"

google some man is tired of her

Posted by: Ok at December 04, 2016 11:38 AM (zFpSK)

283 BurtTC, I never said envy was a good thing, you unethical twat. I said that the movies fleshed out Faramir's character arc, to have him wrestle with envy and WIN.

Man I wish this blog had an ignore feature.

Posted by: boulder terlit hobo at December 04, 2016 11:39 AM (6FqZa)

284 But, on the days when the waves were rough or right before a hurricane, you had to swing in on a rope and be careful and time things just right,

or you might find yourself dropping 15 feet or so on deck or banging up your knees scrambling to get on the rig before you got your legs crushed. Etc.

Fun times. Fun times.

Posted by: naturalfake at December 04, 2016 10:51 AM (9q7Dl)

I have done that, ridden the man basket. Coming in by helicopter was much less exciting.

Posted by: Alberta Oil Peon at December 04, 2016 11:39 AM (MiBfH)

285 For as much as I love the Tolkien quad books I tried to get through the Silmarillion and didn't get 1/4 of the way. I have it here somewhere.

Posted by: Skip at December 04, 2016 11:39 AM (5sOEp)

286 ... apparently my favourite sin would be Wrath.

Posted by: boulder terlit hobo at December 04, 2016 11:40 AM (6FqZa)

287 I know some make a homosexual connection between Sam and Frodo, sometimes joking, sometimes serious. I always thought it reflected the closeness of two people caught up in a desperate, almost hopeless, struggle. The constant shared danger and need to persevere due to the importance of the struggle drives them to care deeply for each other, platonically. Any sexual context probably arises from 'modern' sensibility.

I suspect Tolkien encountered this kind of situation in the trenches of WW I.

Posted by: JTB at December 04, 2016 11:40 AM (V+03K)

288 286 ... apparently my favourite sin would be Wrath.
Posted by: boulder terlit hobo at December 04, 2016 11:40 AM (6FqZa)

Mine is Sloth. It's really easy.

Posted by: Insomniac at December 04, 2016 11:41 AM (0mRoj)

289 BurtTC, I never said envy was a good thing, you unethical twat. I said that the movies fleshed out Faramir's character arc, to have him wrestle with envy and WIN.

Man I wish this blog had an ignore feature.
Posted by: boulder terlit hobo at December 04, 2016 11:39 AM (6FqZa)


I wish it did, for your sake. Because you are a poor arguer.

Posted by: BurtTC at December 04, 2016 11:41 AM (Pz4pT)

290 283 BurtTC, I never said envy was a good thing, you unethical twat. I said that the movies fleshed out Faramir's character arc, to have him wrestle with envy and WIN.

Man I wish this blog had an ignore feature.
Posted by: boulder terlit hobo at December 04, 2016 11:39 AM (6FqZa)

I'd agree with that one. It is touched on in the books, but it is true that he was one of two characters who, when they had the chance with the ring in their grasp, they rejected it. Faramir and Samwise.

Posted by: Aetius451AD at December 04, 2016 11:41 AM (92kX2)

291
The love that dare not speak its name has become the love that won't shut up


-- Robertson Davies

Posted by: Krebs v Carnot: Epic Battle of the Irredeemable Cycling Stars (TM) at December 04, 2016 11:42 AM (BK3ZS)

292 287 I know some make a homosexual connection between Sam and Frodo, sometimes joking, sometimes serious. I always thought it reflected the closeness of two people caught up in a desperate, almost hopeless, struggle. The constant shared danger and need to persevere due to the importance of the struggle drives them to care deeply for each other, platonically. Any sexual context probably arises from 'modern' sensibility.

I suspect Tolkien encountered this kind of situation in the trenches of WW I.
Posted by: JTB at December 04, 2016 11:40 AM (V+03K)

This. Exactly this.

Posted by: Aetius451AD at December 04, 2016 11:42 AM (92kX2)

293 Car transporting Castro's ashes keeps breaking down, soldiers have to get out & push.

Is it a 1959 Jeep? Now we know why there were "nine days of mourning": that's how long it takes to push a jeep across Cuba.

And, Jesus, Bing, if there's any language that a computer should be able to translate, it's Spanish.

Posted by: t-bird at December 04, 2016 11:44 AM (7H/2n)

294 So even an innocent expression of intense feelings between two men (or hobbits) becomes, in my hypersensitivity, homosexuality being mainstreamed.
As many have said, "The love that dare not speak its name," has become "The love that won't shut the fvck up."
Posted by: CharlieBrown'sDildo at December 04, 2016 11:28 AM (42Mgr)


So is it now the consensus of the lit.-crit. crowd that Frodo and Sam were, uh, light in the loafers?

Posted by: OregonMuse, deplorable since 2004 at December 04, 2016 11:44 AM (n8tHU)

295 I have a set of the extended edition LOTR DVDs but have thus far entirely missed The Hobbit movies. Is it the consensus that I shouldn't bother?
Posted by: Northernlurker at December 04, 2016 10:20 AM (s7hQ/)

At the very least, you should see the first 45 minutes of An Unexpected Journey. It is an amazing adaptation of the chapter of the same name. Beyond that....The tone and pacing of the movies is wildly uneven. And there's a lot added that wasn't in the book. A lot of it bad, but some of it welcome. For instance, there is a lot of character given to the Dwarves. And Bilbo's character arc is also cool, even if it doesn't quite follow the book.

Despite it all, I love the first two movies. But it all falls apart in the epic faceplant that is The Battle of Five Armies. It all but ignores the Dwarves, it focuses on stupid stuff...It is an utterly unsatisfying conclusion to a troubled series that still had real potential.

Kind of like the Pirates of the Caribbean trilogy...

Posted by: Castle Guy at December 04, 2016 11:45 AM (7aeqx)

296 apparently my favourite sin would be Wrath.
Posted by: boulder terlit hobo at December 04, 2016 11:40 AM (6FqZa)

Mine is Sloth. It's really easy.

-
I'm a double threat, sloth and gluttony.

Posted by: Anonosaurus Wrecks, This Is the Dawning of the Age of the Trumpius! at December 04, 2016 11:45 AM (Nwg0u)

297 I too lost interest in the Hobbit after about 30 pages, never to return. I also never saw a single on of the movies.

Fantasy books aren't me cup of tea, though Science Fiction definitely is, and obviously sometimes fantasy themes can creep into SF.

Posted by: MTF at December 04, 2016 11:46 AM (sCBEO)

298 So is it now the consensus of the lit.-crit. crowd that Frodo and Sam were, uh, light in the loafers?
Posted by: OregonMuse, deplorable since 2004 at December 04, 2016 11:44 AM (n8tHU)

I don't think people who love Tolkien really believe that (it is not really a liberal story.) The literary crowd, well they are like Ian McKellan, always looking to push the agenda in everything they do.

Posted by: Aetius451AD at December 04, 2016 11:46 AM (92kX2)

299 The constant shared danger and need to persevere due to the importance
of the struggle drives them to care deeply for each other, platonically.
Any sexual context probably arises from 'modern' sensibility. JTB
=====

I have come to the point of resenting 'modern' sensibility. The opiate of the masses, i.e. the sex act itself raised as an Idol to worship, has become somehow more important than love and friendship (and the old Decalogue for public social interaction).

Posted by: mustbequantum at December 04, 2016 11:48 AM (MIKMs)

300 The literary crowd, well they are like Ian McKellan, always looking to push the agenda in everything they do.
Posted by: Aetius451AD at December 04, 2016 11:46 AM (92kX2)

Which if you have seen any of his interviews, he manages to work homosexual rights into pretty much everything: Tolkien, X-Men, everything.

Posted by: Aetius451AD at December 04, 2016 11:48 AM (92kX2)

301 There once was an elegant brune,*
Who once met a pantless baboon,
But she saw a faint glimmer
Of kindness and shimmer,
And now she is Mrs. Muldoon!

*Apologies if the lovely and tolerant Mrs. Muldoon does not have brown hair....

Posted by: CharlieBrown'sDildo at December 04, 2016 11:49 AM (42Mgr)

302 And, Jesus, Bing, if there's any language that a computer should be able to translate, it's Spanish.
Posted by: t-bird at December 04, 2016 11:44 AM (7H/2n)


Creo que si (literally, "I believe that yes").

Jokes aside, it's a language made from Lego; if you have any aptitude in any other Romance language, it's the easiest one to learn. Compared to any of the others I've learned or dabbled in, it's pretty good about following its own rules. Computer translation should be trivial.

Posted by: hogmartin at December 04, 2016 11:49 AM (8nWyX)

303 Finished Off Armageddon Reef by David Weber. It was okay, but I do not think I will continue the series. I found that I was more focused on trying to determine what proper name was being mentioned based on the spellings than following the actual story.

I have started reading The Vanquished: Why the First World War Failed to End by Robert Gerwarth. This history of the interwar years seems fascinating, and I have high hopes.

--'poop

Posted by: I. M. Nincompoop at December 04, 2016 11:51 AM (6K3JO)

304
Why did they bother cremating Castro if he's going straight to hell anyway???


-- A commenter on the Castro vehicular breakdown story

Posted by: Krebs v Carnot: Epic Battle of the Irredeemable Cycling Stars (TM) at December 04, 2016 11:52 AM (BK3ZS)

305 So is it now the consensus of the lit.-crit. crowd that Frodo and Sam were, uh, light in the loafers?

Posted by: OregonMuse, deplorable since 2004 at December 04, 2016 11:44 AM (n8tHU)

Probably. Although, since I ignore them except to mock them, I have no idea.

Posted by: CharlieBrown'sDildo at December 04, 2016 11:52 AM (42Mgr)

306 Which if you have seen any of his interviews, he manages to work homosexual rights into pretty much everything: Tolkien, X-Men, everything.
---

I know a gay man who does that as well.

He is not a man.

He is not his job.

He is not a son or a brother.

He is GAY. That is his entire identity and colors every single thing he does. Kind of annoying really.

I've seen women do something similar when they're in a new relationship; they are no longer themselves, they are "X's Girlfriend."

I know quite a few gay men, and I'd say that 50% of them have emotional issues... aka "unstable."

Posted by: shibumi, a deplorable who now just wants to yell at stupid people at December 04, 2016 11:54 AM (nFg65)

307 Yes, those two points right there... Faramir is driven by envy. Not in the books, he wasn't.


-----

I didn't see it as envy in either the book or movie..

I thought he was torn between doing what he knew was right, and pleasing his psychotic father

Posted by: The guy with the hair at December 04, 2016 11:54 AM (r7E9R)

308 Rub it in, why don't you

Posted by: josephistan at December 04, 2016 09:37 AM (7qAYi)

What I was thinking. Put a bit of a damper on my romp through the Book Thread. Oh well, onwards. I am going to skip anything by the Romantics.

Posted by: gracepc at December 04, 2016 11:55 AM (OU4q6)

309 Why did they bother cremating Castro if he's going straight to hell anyway??
---

Helping their buddy Satan by speeding up the process?

Posted by: shibumi, a deplorable who now just wants to yell at stupid people at December 04, 2016 11:56 AM (nFg65)

310 I am not of the opinion Sam and Frodo were the Bert and Ernie crowd.
Its two guys (Hobbits are not men, the same as Zebras and horses are not the same) who share combat together.

Posted by: Skip at December 04, 2016 11:56 AM (5sOEp)

311 Thanks for the replies as re post-apocalyptic.

I read and enjoyed "Canticle."

Will now see about getting into "Policeman."

Posted by: the littl shyning man at December 04, 2016 11:56 AM (U6f54)

312 I didn't see it as envy in either the book or movie..

I thought he was torn between doing what he knew was right, and pleasing his psychotic father
Posted by: The guy with the hair at December 04, 2016 11:54 AM (r7E9R)

Also living in the shadow of a very popular, charismatic, accomplished sibling and vying for the attention of a parent.

The quintessential second son of nobility.

Posted by: Aetius451AD at December 04, 2016 11:56 AM (92kX2)

313 Faramir in the book was much, much better character than the travesty that he was turned into in the films. I could write 40 pages about what a brutal rape those movies were of great books, and as an author I take that pretty personally.

Posted by: Christopher R Taylor at December 04, 2016 11:56 AM (39g3+)

314 Although it is almost ignored in the LOTR movies, I thought Aragorn's healing ability was an indication of his claim to kingship with echoes of King Arthur. (Never so stated, of course.) In the LOTR, the King is someone the grace and power of Good can work through. Gandalf and the High Elves like Elrond and Galadriel, creations closer to the Godly power, have this ability as well. But it is a distinction and rarity among men.

Posted by: JTB at December 04, 2016 11:56 AM (V+03K)

315 Priceless. Car transporting Castro's ashes keeps breaking down, soldiers have to get out and push. Hooray Communism!

******

Get Me To The Cemetery On Time - a limerick


Castro's final pass before the nation
Hit a snag upon his way to veneration
"We'll be there in a flash
'Cause we're really hauling ash
In a tow truck from a local service station!"

Posted by: Muldoon, private citizen at December 04, 2016 11:57 AM (wPiJc)

316 308 Rub it in, why don't you

Posted by: josephistan at December 04, 2016 09:37 AM (7qAYi)

What I was thinking. Put a bit of a damper on my romp through the Book Thread. Oh well, onwards. I am going to skip anything by the Romantics.
Posted by: gracepc at December 04, 2016 11:55 AM (OU4q6)

He clarified that he doesn't have this either. It was an observation not a boast. Us Forever Alones gotta stick together.

Posted by: Insomniac at December 04, 2016 11:57 AM (0mRoj)

317 zombie asked if there were any famous sci-fi books set on a planet like Mercury

There's also Lucky Starr and the Big Sun Of Mercury, part of a 6 book set, all with "Lucky Starr" in their names, that Isaac Asimov published under some other name, pretty early in his career. These books are formulaic but fun, and I've reread them a few times.

Posted by: Splunge at December 04, 2016 11:59 AM (iMxBJ)

318 So is it now the consensus of the lit.-crit. crowd that Frodo and Sam were, uh, light in the loafers?
Posted by: OregonMuse, deplorable since 2004 at December 04, 2016 11:44 AM (n8tHU)

I don't think people who love Tolkien really believe that (it is not really a liberal story.) The literary crowd, well they are like Ian McKellan, always looking to push the agenda in everything they do.
Posted by: Aetius451AD at December 04, 2016 11:46 AM (92kX2)


And not to belabor the point too much, but I think one could reasonably argue that homosexuality in Tolkien's version of Sam and Frodo is almost entirely absent, and beside the point, whereas in Jackson's version, it was almost certainly present.

Posted by: BurtTC at December 04, 2016 12:00 PM (Pz4pT)

319 Shouldn't they be using a (worn out, broken down) garbage truck to move Fidel's remains?

Posted by: rhomboid at December 04, 2016 12:02 PM (QDnY+)

320 I have done that, ridden the man basket.
Posted by: Alberta Oil Peon

When new and better double entendres are developed, you will see them first at this Smart Military Blog.

And @293, you take that back! No way in hell is that a Jeep.
Looks vaguely Soviet, though it could be Chinese.
I've heard they're interested in Cuba.

Posted by: Stringer Davis at December 04, 2016 12:03 PM (H5rtT)

321 I have started reading The Vanquished: Why the First World War Failed to
End by Robert Gerwarth. This history of the interwar years seems
fascinating, and I have high hopes.



--'poop
-----------------
You might find Dreadnought by Robert
Massie to be a good companion read. I found going back to what led to
WWI explained much of what led to WWII. Freedom Betrayed for a lot of
'nuts n bolts' of the pre-WWII conditions present in the European
political theatre is a must read, imho.

Posted by: TJ Madison at December 04, 2016 12:03 PM (VExmM)

322 I am not of the opinion Sam and Frodo were the Bert and Ernie crowd.

Heh. And neither were Bert and Ernie, for that matter.

Its two guys (Hobbits are not men, the same as Zebras and horses are not the same) who share combat together.

Posted by: Skip at December 04, 2016 11:56 AM (5sOEp)


Which is precisely how Tolkien intended it to be. But the progs are unable to see any human relationship in anything other than sexual terms.

Posted by: OregonMuse, deplorable since 2004 at December 04, 2016 12:03 PM (n8tHU)

323 I thought Aragorn's healing ability was an indication of his claim to kingship with echoes of King Arthur.

Its stated outright in that he could take the kingsfoil (athelas) herb which was not particularly useful, and use it to heal with because of his authority. The term "virtue" is used a lot in the books, where others might use power or magic; people like elves or Aragorn are able to perform wonders not due to special skill but because of their nature.

Posted by: Christopher R Taylor at December 04, 2016 12:03 PM (39g3+)

324 Shouldn't they be using a (worn out, broken down) garbage truck to move Fidel's remains?

The rice cooker was more practical.

Posted by: The Duke of Mish at December 04, 2016 12:04 PM (Tyii7)

325 Speaking of Armand Hammer and Books....

I always assumed that the villain of "Gorky Park" by Martin Cruz Smith. (played by Lee Marvin in the movie)-

was supposed to be a much less pajama-boyish version of Armand Hammer.


The first two books of that series were excellent but the fall of the Berlin Wall and "end" of the Cold Waar really took the air out of that storyline despite the fact that Smith is an excellent writer.

Posted by: naturalfake at December 04, 2016 12:05 PM (9q7Dl)

326 I suspect Tolkien encountered this kind of situation in the trenches of WW I.
Posted by: JTB at December 04, 2016 11:40 AM (V+03K)
This. Exactly this.
Posted by: Aetius451AD at December 04, 2016 11:42 AM (92kX2)

Yup....x1000. Everything today is homo this or homo that according to the modern purveyors of the gay agenda.

The Green Dragon Inn is not the Stone Pony.

Posted by: Hairyback Guy at December 04, 2016 12:05 PM (ej1L0)

327 Good post-apocalypse series ( heard about it on here) The Westerly Gales series by E C williams

Posted by: Redclay at December 04, 2016 12:06 PM (IvtB8)

328 The first two books of that series were excellent but the fall of the Berlin Wall and "end" of the Cold Waar really took the air out of that storyline despite the fact that Smith is an excellent writer.

Posted by: naturalfake at December 04, 2016 12:05 PM (9q7Dl)


Wolves Eat Dogs was good though.

Posted by: hogmartin at December 04, 2016 12:06 PM (8nWyX)

329 I don't think there is any aspect of homosexual feelings between Frodo and Samwise but as others have said the brotherhood and love that is formed through battle. The issue though is the hypersensitivity ( thanks CBD) today to subconsciously consider it thanks to it being shoved down our throats everyday ( no pun intended) .

Posted by: Sebastian Melmoth at December 04, 2016 12:06 PM (Dx2t8)

330 313 Faramir in the book was much, much better character than the travesty that he was turned into in the films. I could write 40 pages about what a brutal rape those movies were of great books, and as an author I take that pretty personally.

Posted by: Christopher R Taylor at December 04, 2016 11:56 AM (39g3+)


I generally enjoyed Jackson's LOTR movies, but I agree with this. And not just Faramir, he done effed up a number of the characters, i.e. made them significantly different than the book.

Posted by: OregonMuse, deplorable since 2004 at December 04, 2016 12:06 PM (n8tHU)

331 Yes, those two points right there... Faramir is driven by envy. Not in the books, he wasn't.
-----
I didn't see it as envy in either the book or movie..

I thought he was torn between doing what he knew was right, and pleasing his psychotic father
Posted by: The guy with the hair at December 04, 2016 11:54 AM (r7E9R)


I was mostly responding to bth's description, which was that Faramir was trying to prove he was better than his brother.

Which, in the movie, he does. And he does it, feeling the sadz because his daddy didn't love him enough.

It's a rather pathetic way to portray a character, who in the book, was one of the best.

Posted by: BurtTC at December 04, 2016 12:06 PM (Pz4pT)

332
I wish it did, for your sake. Because you are a poor arguer.
Posted by: BurtTC at December 04, 2016 11:41 AM (Pz4pT)


--------

Is there a Moron rule that states that every thread here eventually becomes a Monty Python skit?

Posted by: The guy with the hair at December 04, 2016 12:08 PM (r7E9R)

333 Nood.

Posted by: HH at December 04, 2016 12:08 PM (DrCtv)

334 And @293, you take that back! No way in hell is that a Jeep.
Looks vaguely Soviet, though it could be Chinese.
I've heard they're interested in Cuba.

Posted by: Stringer Davis at December 04, 2016 12:03 PM (H5rtT)

Yeah, well I know it's not a real Jeep, but I was referencing the media story at the link. And in Latin America, "jeep" has become a common noun, or even an adjective. A Toyota Land Cruiser will be described as a "jeep Toyota".

Posted by: Alberta Oil Peon at December 04, 2016 12:10 PM (MiBfH)

335 give a hoot, read a book!

Posted by: musical jolly chimp at December 04, 2016 12:10 PM (WTSFk)

336 "[Castro's] record as a warmonger, racist, sexist, Stalinist, and godfather of modern terrorism."

So many crimes, so little time--Fontova forgot "bank robber". Fidel ran the $7 mil Hartford Wells Fargo bank heist in '83. He kept half the money.

Castro was robbing Wells Fargo before Wells Fargo.

Posted by: The Gipper Lives at December 04, 2016 12:10 PM (Ndje9)

337 "Is there a Moron rule that states that every thread here eventually becomes a Monty Python skit? "

I didn't come here for abuse!

wait a minute. . . . .

Posted by: Tonypete at December 04, 2016 12:10 PM (tr2D7)

338 My favorite thing Tolkien wrote (that I've read) is the first chapter of the Silmarillion. Fantastic creation myth.

Posted by: most deplorable Ghost of kari - certified sidebar at December 04, 2016 12:10 PM (Iy6JT)

339 I get the impression that Peter Jackson loved the scope and visuals of Lord of the Rings but not particularly the story, given how much of it he changed to make "better." The first was very well done, despite turning Gimli into a cartoon. I understood skipping the Tom Bombadil parts, even if it was an important part of the film and Tolkien's vision, for the sake of time.

But then the next two movies he added tons of extra crap in to lengthen the films and left important bits out. Even more extra junk was cut that was going to be in the film, like this sequence in the Paths of the Dead that didn't make the cut

https://youtu.be/ZNd2OmsXzCw

then there's the 57 ending hours of saying good bye in the last film.

Posted by: Christopher R Taylor at December 04, 2016 12:11 PM (39g3+)

340 There, that's better.

Posted by: J.R.R.R.R.R. Tolkien at December 04, 2016 12:11 PM (Tyii7)

341 "Frodo cast about considering his options. How he wished to return to his hobbit hole in the Shire, but it was too late for that. Oh how he sorely wished to curl up right where he was with a nice pipe of tobacco and a footstool for his hairy feet, but there was no time for that. The only option, he decided, is to continue forward, for that is the way I am already heading.

There, in the forest before him was the Great Unknown, the Beast that devours All Things, the Hag of Chappaquadorafirn. With his tiny sword held bravely before him in his trembling hand, Frodo inched cautiously toward the Beast. Much to his surprise, he saw a tear rolling down her cheek, clinging to her puffy jawline before tumbling through space to splash on the mossy ground. "Why do you cry so, oh Hag of the Woods?" Frodo asked.

"Alas" replied the Beast. "I shall never be President!"

Posted by: Muldoon, private citizen at December 04, 2016 12:14 PM (wPiJc)

342 But then the next two movies he added tons of extra crap in to lengthen the films and left important bits out. Even more extra junk was cut that was going to be in the film, like this sequence in the Paths of the Dead that didn't make the cut

https://youtu.be/ZNd2OmsXzCw

Posted by: Christopher R Taylor at December 04, 2016 12:11 PM (39g3+)


That's an awful lot of skulls. That's like (counts on fingers) this many, except some more too.

Posted by: hogmartin at December 04, 2016 12:14 PM (8nWyX)

343 But then the next two movies he added tons of extra crap in to lengthen the films and left important bits out. Even more extra junk was cut that was going to be in the film, like this sequence in the Paths of the Dead that didn't make the cut

https://youtu.be/ZNd2OmsXzCw

then there's the 57 ending hours of saying good bye in the last film.
Posted by: Christopher R Taylor at December 04, 2016 12:11 PM (39g3+)

The thing is the movies started very strong (with the first scene, which established dramatically the power of Sauron better than even Tolkien did.) Then as the movies go by, he starts to stray off story and it gets more and more diffuse.

And yes, the false endings at the end of Return are just crazy.

Posted by: Aetius451AD at December 04, 2016 12:15 PM (92kX2)

344 I am going to skip anything by the Romantics.

Posted by: gracepc at December 04, 2016 11:55 AM (OU4q6)





Hey!!!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=56KPTQtsH8U

Posted by: The Romantics at December 04, 2016 12:15 PM (9q7Dl)

345 I picked up "In the Footsteps of Sheep" by Debbie Zawinski. I've wanted it since I first read about it. She walks around Scotland, picking up bits of fleece from some of the rarer sheep breeds. She spins it on a spinning stick and knits her own sock designs. The pictures are wonderful and the stories entertaining. The sock designs are very nice. The big problem with the book is almost nothing about spinning. They really don't even show her tools.

I'm starting to read Harvard Classics. I wanted to read something that would challenge me a bit. Starting out with Pilgrims Progress. I'm reading things that interested me to get into the habit.

Posted by: Notsothoreau at December 04, 2016 12:16 PM (Lqy/e)

346 303
Finished Off Armageddon Reef by David Weber. It was okay, but I do not
think I will continue the series. I found that I was more focused on
trying to determine what proper name was being mentioned based on the
spellings than following the actual story.



I have started reading The Vanquished: Why the First World War
Failed to End by Robert Gerwarth. This history of the interwar years
seems fascinating, and I have high hopes.



--'poop

Posted by: I. M. Nincompoop at December 04, 2016 11:51 AM (6K3JO)

I like the first book but it has become yet another run-on series that has no end.

Posted by: Vic We Have No Party at December 04, 2016 12:18 PM (mpXpK)

347 There's a video in a thread from yesterday where a knitter shows her tools.

Posted by: hogmartin at December 04, 2016 12:19 PM (8nWyX)

348 I'm starting to read Harvard Classics. I wanted to
read something that would challenge me a bit. Starting out with Pilgrims
Progress. I'm reading things that interested me to get into the habit. Posted by: Notsothoreau at December 04, 2016 12:16 PM (Lqy/e)
=====

What surprised me about Pilgrims Progress is how influential it was. Reading it brought up all kinds of connections -- that I didn't know until I read it.

Posted by: mustbequantum at December 04, 2016 12:21 PM (MIKMs)

349 Robert Jordan's 'Wheel of Time' series isn't bad...

The hero and his two sidekicks are, not-so-thinly veiled representations of Jesus and the Trinity


Jordan died before he finished them and a fan boy did the last 2 or 3.. He just turned the hero in Jesus and beat you about the head and shoulders with him.

Posted by: The guy with the hair at December 04, 2016 12:22 PM (r7E9R)

350

Car transporting Castro's ashes keeps breaking down, soldiers have to get out and push.


The Tyrant goes out, not with a bang, but with multiple breakdowns.

Posted by: Arbalest at December 04, 2016 12:22 PM (FlRtG)

351 The first two books of that series were excellent but the fall of the Berlin Wall and "end" of the Cold Waar really took the air out of that storyline despite the fact that Smith is an excellent writer.

Posted by: naturalfake at December 04, 2016 12:05 PM (9q7Dl)

Wolves Eat Dogs was good though.

Posted by: hogmartin at December 04, 2016 12:06 PM (8nWyX)



Yeah, I really liked the method of the murder in that book, which, surprise!, actually reflects Putin's real life shenanigans.

Posted by: naturalfake at December 04, 2016 12:24 PM (9q7Dl)

352 Posted by: Insomniac at December 04, 2016 11:57 AM (0mRoj)

Am aware. Tongue in cheek on my part. But thanks for the perspective.

Posted by: gracepc at December 04, 2016 12:26 PM (OU4q6)

353 Could go with homoaverse rather than homophobic.

Posted by: April at December 04, 2016 12:27 PM (e8PP1)

354 "I think I would rather deal with a mafioso than with a communist.

Mafiosos are more likely to hold up their end of a bargain."

I think either would squash you in a New York minute if they felt it was to their advantage. The advantages the Mafioso has in terms of holding up a bargain would be:

(1) In a specific circumstance he might feel he has to maintain credibility in his orbit by doing the "right thing".

(2) The Mafioso is dealing with you as an individual. He just might cut you some temporary slack for some peculiar reason, say, if you were an attractive woman, or if you owned a bar he could wedge his way into owning, or if you were related, etc. To the communist you are only a cipher.

(3) The Mafioso only cares about getting his money, or his end of the deal. He's like a shark that is looking for prey. He could care less what you believe or what your life philosophy is. The communist is a zealot who believes he is absolutely right, and that you are evil. To squash you like a bug would be not only part of business, but righteous.

The communist is like Orwell's comment of "Picture a boot stamping on a human's face, forever". Everyone who doesn't subscribe to their belief system needs to be stamped.

The Mafioso would stomp you with a boot, or worse, but generally only if you intersect with his world of your own doing and do wrong by his code. Stay out of his life, and you'll have no problem.


Posted by: RM at December 04, 2016 12:28 PM (U3LtS)

355 My complaint was that it is a book about spinning, yet doesn't talk about spinning. One of the patterns mentions that she spun the yarn on a wheel. There's not a lot of details in the patterns either. Still like the book, but think they lost the focus.

Posted by: Notsothoreau at December 04, 2016 12:29 PM (Lqy/e)

356 339 then there's the 57 ending hours of saying good bye in the last film.

Posted by: Christopher R Taylor at December 04, 2016 12:11 PM (39g3+)

To be honest there is a shit-ton of ending pages in the book too.

Posted by: Vic We Have No Party at December 04, 2016 12:29 PM (mpXpK)

357
And yes, the false endings at the end of Return are just crazy.


I was watching it in the theater and had to whiz, and kept going "well its almost done... almost... almost... I'm gonna pop..."

And despite taking an extra hour of just people walking away and saying goodbye, Jackson didn't think one of the most powerful and important scenes in the books -- the scouring of the shire -- was worth filming.

Posted by: Christopher R Taylor at December 04, 2016 12:35 PM (39g3+)

358 I'm enjoying the heck out of the LOTR and Hobbit discussions. In line with that, I came across a CD by Peter Hollens, "Misty Mountains". He does songs from the movies, which I consider one of their strong points. The songs are 'inspired' because they are his arrangements using his overdubbing technique. This is what the Carpenters did on their albums which gave them such a rich vocal sound. It is lovely music. I believe most of his material can be found on YouTube. He does a beautiful rendition of "Hallelujah" as a duet with Jackie Evancho.

Posted by: JTB at December 04, 2016 12:37 PM (V+03K)

359 357 And despite taking an extra hour of just people walking away and saying goodbye, Jackson didn't think one of the most powerful and important scenes in the books -- the scouring of the shire -- was worth filming.
Posted by: Christopher R Taylor at December 04, 2016 12:35 PM (39g3+)


Couldn't agree more. The scene where they return to Barliman Butterbur's place is less important, but very enjoyable in the book. Sure would have been a lot more interesting to see than a slideshow.

Posted by: Splunge at December 04, 2016 12:38 PM (iMxBJ)

360 I recently read The Hard Way, a Jack Reacher novel. every one of these is enjoyable but they're like half a good book and then just stuff. This was the most beleivable and human Reacher portrayal of the series I've read so far, he's not omniscient and superpowerful. He's cautious and nervous, gets things wrong, etc.

The problem is he got really obvious stuff wrong. I called exactly what was happening in the first three chapters of the book, and he only figured it out by the last two. It was like the author had a story that only could be long enough for a book if Reacher had an aneurism or something.

I want to like them more but I can't give any of them more than a hesitant 3 stars.

Posted by: Christopher R Taylor at December 04, 2016 12:40 PM (39g3+)

361
Castro's final pass before the nation
Hit a snag upon his way to veneration
"We'll be there in a flash
'Cause we're really hauling ash
In a tow truck from a local service station!"
Posted by: Muldoon, private citizen at December 04, 2016 11:57 AM (wPiJc)
---
Muldoon, please, please post this in the NY Times comments section somewhere. It needs to get traction.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at December 04, 2016 12:45 PM (EnKk6)

362 And yes, the false endings at the end of Return are just crazy.

This drives me crazy. They're not false endings. He storybooked the end of the movie to save time, but it all happens chronologically until they finally leave the Grey Havens. It's just how the story ends.

Frankly, though I was a big fan of the movies when they came out, I don't think they've aged well. Too much slow-mo and gay Hobbits.

Posted by: most deplorable Ghost of kari - certified sidebar at December 04, 2016 12:46 PM (Iy6JT)

363 Well, I didn't come anywhere near the 50K word count for NaNoWriMo but I had a lot of fun. It gave me a chance to overindulge my love of commas and subordinate clauses. Since I was composing on a manual typewriter, I wasn't tempted to try to go back and edit as I wrote. Very liberating compared to using a computer.

Posted by: JTB at December 04, 2016 12:46 PM (V+03K)

364 Well, I didn't come anywhere near the 50K word count for NaNoWriMo but I had a lot of fun. It gave me a chance to overindulge my love of commas and subordinate clauses.

My editor gives me crap about that. Its an older style but I find it very useful. I couldn't type on a typewriter, mostly because I can type nearly as fast as I come up with story and a typewriter would slow me down. But it is a great idea to do at least a short story on one to change how you approach a story and learn from it.

Posted by: Christopher R Taylor at December 04, 2016 12:49 PM (39g3+)

365 Hi Christopher, I am a lousy typist no matter the machine. The joke is I am at least as fast on the manual typewriter and a bit more accurate. Of course, that bar is not set high. :-) Since I don't have to worry about deadlines or business conditions and production anymore, I can indulge myself.

Posted by: JTB at December 04, 2016 12:58 PM (V+03K)

366 Right. It usually doesn't go to the AoSHQ book page. But if you look at the URL for each link, it contains the "aoshq-20" tag, which is all you need.

Posted by: OregonMuse, deplorable since 2004 at December 04, 2016 09:45 AM (n8tHU)


I agree that this initial URL contains the "aoshq-20" tag. but when you get to the place your order part, that tag seems to have disappeared from the URL. My very quick test indicated that the tag is there if I do a normal order direct from Amazon.

Posted by: Hrothgar at December 04, 2016 12:58 PM (wCEn4)

367 The Tyrant goes out, not with a bang, but with multiple breakdowns.

Posted by: Arbalest at December 04, 2016 12:22 PM (FlRtG)


The Final Revenge of the '57 Chevy!

Posted by: Hrothgar at December 04, 2016 01:01 PM (wCEn4)

368 Post-apocalyptic stories should also mention the Niven-Pournelle sci-fi novel Lucifer's Hammer, where a wealthy amateur astronomer discovers a comet. Then people notice it's headed this way. Exciting book I've read multiple times.

Posted by: waelse1 at December 04, 2016 01:02 PM (qrAjZ)

369 I was off at church for a bit, but I think the most influential book I read this year was C S Lewis' "Letters to Malcolm, Chiefly on Prayer".
The loose end that I found was that I constantly wondered what Malcolm had to say in his part of the "conversation".
My conclusion for the New Year is that I need to read and ponder a lot more of his (and Tolkien's) works

Posted by: Hrothgar at December 04, 2016 01:05 PM (wCEn4)

370 Muldoon, please, please post this in the NY Times comments section somewhere. It needs to get traction.

Posted by: All Hail Eris,


*****

It's uncopyrighted, in the public domain. Knock yourself out, no attribution desired.

Posted by: Muldoon, private citizen at December 04, 2016 01:07 PM (wPiJc)

371 I've not ever read Lucifer's Hammer but I have heard very good things about it. It would make a good miniseries on TV, I think.

Posted by: Christopher R Taylor at December 04, 2016 01:11 PM (39g3+)

372 Many years ago I wrote a paper on Lewis's Space Trilogy which turned into a talk and then an article. I gave the talk at a conference and was thrilled to have Dorothy Reynolds, Walter Hooper, and Thomas Howard in the audience. Professor Reynolds was Dorothy Sayers' friend, and the person who completed Sayers' translation of Dante, so hearing some nice comments from her after my presentation was an incredible experience, especially as I am not a professional scholar. Sadly, when the paper was published in the Bulletin of the New York C.S. Lewis Society, it was replete with errors and typos to the extent that I never suggest anyone read it. Also sadly, I re-read it myself not long ago and don't think it's so brilliant after all. Sigh.

Thomas Howard has written several books on Lewis which were very helpful to me, and I quoted him extensively in my paper. However, while Dorothy Reynolds was effusive in her praise, Professor Howard stayed on the other side of the room and just looked at me funny.

Bragging aside, I do agree with whoever earlier thought that WWI marked Lewis and Tolkien profoundly. I once pondered doing a study of Lewis, Tolkien, and Teilhard de Chardin and their experience of the war, but am not enough of a scholar (nor have any interest in Teilhard anymore) to do that.

Posted by: Miss Sippi at December 04, 2016 01:11 PM (ByoS/)

373 40
I read SPQR I: The King's Gambit by John Maddox Roberts.

Thanks for this. In checking it out I came aross a firewalled WSJ 5 Best Historical Mystery Novels review by David B. Rivkin Jr. I am newbie in reading this field. They all looked interesting with well credentialed authors. Had a heck of a job trying to transfer the info so here is very short version. The review date was February 27, 2010. Hope they are not the See Spot Run versions of the genre.

Alexandria, Lindsey Davis 1st c. Rome Detective Falco. Many of you have read this series I think.

A Morbid Taste for Bones, Ellis Peters. Brother Cadfael 12 c. Monk

The Emperor's Pearl , Robert H. Van Gulik Judge Dee is a busy magistrate in 7th c. China

Slayer of Gods, Linda S. Robinson. Ancient Egypt Lord Meren, as chief security officer for Pharoah Tutankhamun 14th c. BC

Fire Kimono , Laura Joh Rowland, Samuraii detective Sano Ichiro turn of 18th century Japan.

Posted by: gracepc at December 04, 2016 01:12 PM (OU4q6)

374 I enjoy the SPQR books quite a bit, they are fun. There are a host of medieval mystery books, Cadfael being among the best, but I really like the Templar mysteries by Michael Jecks in particular. Paul Doherty has written an interesting series of mysteries set in ancient Egypt, as well as a good series of medieval mysteries under the name PC Doherty.

Posted by: Christopher R Taylor at December 04, 2016 01:18 PM (39g3+)

375 344
I am going to skip anything by the Romantics.



Hey!!!



https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=56KPTQtsH8U





Posted by: The Romantics at December 04, 2016 12:15 PM (9q7Dl)

Perfect! Big smile. Had I known you felt this way ....

Posted by: gracepc at December 04, 2016 01:22 PM (OU4q6)

376 374

Thanks. I have been in a real reading slump. I am looking forward to this. Have bookmarked this thread to extract suggestions.

Posted by: gracepc at December 04, 2016 01:25 PM (OU4q6)

377 371
I've not ever read Lucifer's Hammer but I have heard very good things about it. It would make a good miniseries on TV, I think.

Posted by: Christopher R Taylor at December 04, 2016 01:11 PM (39g3+)

It is a good read but sort of bogs down toward the end.

Posted by: Vic We Have No Party at December 04, 2016 01:32 PM (mpXpK)

378 I've not ever read Lucifer's Hammer but I have heard very good things about it. It would make a good miniseries on TV, I think.

Posted by: Christopher R Taylor at December 04, 2016 01:11 PM (39g3+)
---
It's a very good read. It might have to be updated for technology but human nature remains the same. Rather un-PC in places (read: realistic).

I'll plug Fallen Angels yet again for showing the unintended consequences of Luddite Squishitude.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at December 04, 2016 01:38 PM (EnKk6)

379 I started to read THE LIONS GATE by Steven Pressfield, and I watched some documentaries about the Six Day war and I stumbled upon a book " Foxbats Over Dimona" it's about how the Soviets were going to bomb the Nuclear program at Dimona in Isreal by using the cover of the Arab war with Israel. If not for the successful bombing of the Egyptian airfields the Soviet bomber had to turnered back. The book sounds fascinating and I will let you know how it is.

Posted by: Patrick From Ohio at December 04, 2016 01:40 PM (dKiJG)

380 378 I'll plug Fallen Angels yet again for showing the unintended consequences of Luddite Squishitude.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at December 04, 2016 01:38 PM (EnKk6)

I loved that book just because of that attack on the liberals. Of course it implied that there was an impact of human behavior in global weather.

Posted by: Vic We Have No Party at December 04, 2016 01:42 PM (mpXpK)

381 I read SPQR I: The King's Gambit by John Maddox Roberts.

Thanks
for this. In checking it out I came aross a firewalled WSJ 5 Best
Historical Mystery Novels review by David B. Rivkin Jr. I am newbie in
reading this field. They all looked interesting with well credentialed
authors. Had a heck of a job trying to transfer the info so here is very
short version. The review date was February 27, 2010. Hope they are not
the See Spot Run versions of the genre.

Alexandria, Lindsey Davis 1st c. Rome Detective Falco. Many of you have read this series I think.

A Morbid Taste for Bones, Ellis Peters. Brother Cadfael 12 c. Monk

The Emperor's Pearl , Robert H. Van Gulik Judge Dee is a busy magistrate in 7th c. China

Slayer of Gods, Linda S. Robinson. Ancient Egypt Lord Meren, as chief security officer for Pharoah Tutankhamun 14th c. BC

Fire Kimono , Laura Joh Rowland, Samuraii detective Sano Ichiro turn of 18th century Japan.


Posted by: gracepc at December 04, 2016 01:12 PM (OU4q6)
=====Great list!I would add Steven Saylor and Robert Graves. Oh, and Eco (Name of the Rose).

Posted by: mustbequantum at December 04, 2016 01:42 PM (MIKMs)

382 Who wrote Fallen Angels?
Thanks

Posted by: Patrick From Ohio at December 04, 2016 01:43 PM (dKiJG)

383 379
I started to read THE LIONS GATE by Steven Pressfield, and I watched
some documentaries about the Six Day war and I stumbled upon a book "
Foxbats Over Dimona" it's about how the Soviets were going to bomb the
Nuclear program at Dimona in Isreal by using the cover of the Arab war
with Israel. If not for the successful bombing of the Egyptian airfields
the Soviet bomber had to turnered back. The book sounds fascinating and
I will let you know how it is.

Posted by: Patrick From Ohio at December 04, 2016 01:40 PM (dKiJG)

There was a real report of soviet pilots flying Egyptian marked Migs in that war initially. We set condition Z and went to a flank bell headed for the region because of that. If it had no ended as quick as it did we probably would have launched against those Migs.

Posted by: Vic We Have No Party at December 04, 2016 01:45 PM (mpXpK)

384 120 Y'all should check out Sarah A. Hoyt's Amazon and Kindle pages. Grab a book or two to help cover her medical adventure.

Posted by: Richard McEnroe at December 04, 2016 01:46 PM (Kucy5)

385 382
Who wrote Fallen Angels?

Thanks

Posted by: Patrick From Ohio at December 04, 2016 01:43 PM (dKiJG)

Available for the Kindle for $5.99

Larry Niven, Jerry Pournelle, and Michael Flynn.

Posted by: Vic We Have No Party at December 04, 2016 01:47 PM (mpXpK)

386
I loved that book just because of that attack on the liberals. Of course it implied that there was an impact of human behavior in global weather.
Posted by: Vic We Have No Party at December 04, 2016 01:42 PM (mpXpK)
---
That the effects of a maunder minimum were accelerated by the reduction in emissions!

Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at December 04, 2016 01:55 PM (EnKk6)

387 Here's a topic we are talking about on the goodreads group -what's the best book you read in 2016?

Wow. That's a great one! My entry is a tie. It's between I Let You Go, by Clare Mackintosh or Orphan X, by Greg Hurwitz. Someone please correct me if I'm wrong, but I vaguely remember one or both of these being optioned for a movie.

Posted by: SandyCheeks (formerly RushBabe) at December 04, 2016 02:06 PM (joFoi)

388 229
Am I the only one on the entire internet who has never read Tolkien? I
started "The Hobbit" in college, but lost interest after 30 pages.

Posted by: rickl - THE MEDIA IS LYING TO YOU at December 04, 2016 11:09 AM (sdi6R)

Never read Tolkien. Never saw Lord of the Rings. I do remember long ago in CA my software engineer neighbors had two dogs -- great dogs -- Gandalf and Tolkus. I inquired about the origin of the names -- OMG. I am surprised our relationship developed as well as it did after that moment. Probably because the dogs, their two, and my Roxanne (Old English named after the Police song) became best buddies and spent the days together going through the hole in the fence into my yard and the dog door into my home. Good days, good days.

Posted by: gracepc at December 04, 2016 02:06 PM (OU4q6)

389 Here's a topic we are talking about on the goodreads group -what's the best book you read in 2016?

The Confessions of Al Capone, by Loren D Estleman. The FBI hires a man who went through the seminary but never became a priest to infiltrate the dying Al Capone's home as a confessor and learn secrets of the organization and info on rising mob stars. So much amazing era mob stuff, so well written.

Posted by: Christopher R Taylor at December 04, 2016 02:13 PM (39g3+)

390 Posted by: SandyCheeks (formerly RushBabe) at December 04, 2016 02:06 PM (joFoi)
---
Girl, you gotta exfoliate!

I just read Hurwitz's YA novel The Rains, which joins a couple different tropes nicely. He's a screenwriter and I could see this as episodic t.v.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at December 04, 2016 02:14 PM (EnKk6)

391 As usual, I'm late to the party. But this is why I love the horde:

13 Armand Hammer? What kind of a name is that??? Sound fake to me.

Posted by: Heywood Jablome at December 04, 2016 09:10 AM (QlyN5)

Posted by: SandyCheeks (formerly RushBabe) at December 04, 2016 02:14 PM (joFoi)

392 Very late to thread. Thanks Oregon Muse for all the shout outs. Cup runneth over and such.

With Cook's Starfisher trilogy already remember threads of Wagner's Ring Cycle are interwoven.

Glad and relieved Sarah Hoyt is still among the un-zombies.

In-fidel's GAZ had a SPAZ?

The Hobbit movies jumped the shark for me when in amongst the goblins they had the crazy CGI runaway mine-cart scene from Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom.

For NaNoWriMo, one of the things a participant would win along with the 50% off Scrivener is free access to a James Patterson lecture.

Posted by: Anna Puma at December 04, 2016 02:37 PM (91BdQ)

393 The Hobbit movies jumped the shark for me when in amongst the goblins they had the crazy CGI runaway mine-cart scene from Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom.

The bunny sled did it for me. Radagast the retard, apparently unable to comprehend that "lead them away from the hobbit" means "don't continually swing past them over and over."

Posted by: Christopher R Taylor at December 04, 2016 03:00 PM (39g3+)

394 Starfisher trilogy was one of my fav's. The last book Star's End was great with the story line of fighting an never ending war against a creation of alien killers run amok roaming thru the galaxy. Kinda reminded me of the Fred Saberhagen series about the "beserker wars."

Posted by: morigu at December 04, 2016 03:15 PM (gU+/s)

395 Speaking of Armand Hammer and Books....

I always assumed that the villain of "Gorky Park" by Martin Cruz Smith. (played by Lee Marvin in the movie)-

was supposed to be a much less pajama-boyish version of Armand Hammer.


The first two books of that series were excellent but the fall of the Berlin Wall and "end" of the Cold Waar really took the air out of that storyline despite the fact that Smith is an excellent writer.

-
Another great book/bad movie story.

Posted by: Anonosaurus Wrecks, This Is the Dawning of the Age of the Trumpius! at December 04, 2016 03:26 PM (Nwg0u)

396 LATE RESPONSE:

244 Votermom: Did you see my link in #82 of the EMT?
Posted by: rickl - THE MEDIA IS LYING TO YOU at December 04, 2016 11:20 AM (sdi6R)



I went back and checked.
Leftists are disgusting. Ugh.

Posted by: Deplorable votermom @vm on Gab at December 04, 2016 04:38 PM (Om16U)

397 And I think that religious types are especially vulnerable to this line of baloney because of the biblical admonitions to help the poor and needy.

Quite the slap here against us religious types. Sure, we are to "love our neighbors as ourselves". But first and foremost is to love God above all else. And God demands perfection. Helping the needy does nothing toward one's salvation and justification before God. As has been put "God does not need your good works; but your neighbor does." You kiss your wife because you love her; not because there is a document somewhere that says that you must. We do our works out of love for God, not out of building up merit or brownie points.

Having a religion that encourages us to help the poor and needy does not make us susceptible to any particular dogma, since this aid to our neighbor is secondary to achieving righteousness before God. That's what it is all about, after all.

Posted by: LCMS Rulz! at December 04, 2016 06:06 PM (o7l6R)

398 "A rebel in a small ship is running from a large star cruiser. His ship is damaged and can't continue so he bails out onto a small asteroid."

The rebel was a spy (don't think he was a rebel spy but I can't be sure). The star cruiser was armed with more than 100 missiles. His ship wasn't damaged but couldn't out run the cruiser. The person telling the story was the Captain of the cruiser. That was a surprise reveal at the end. I'm almost positive it was Asimov. Spy in spacesuit picked up transmissions and thought he could figure positions out if he had more knowledge of physics.

Posted by: Ok at December 04, 2016 07:35 PM (zFpSK)

399 I was wrong. AC Clark Hide and Seek
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hide-and-Seek_%28short_story%29

Posted by: Ok at December 04, 2016 07:39 PM (zFpSK)

400 Out: To Kill a Mockingbird

In: Jenny Has 3 Trans-gender-fluid Mommies
(at this particular moment)

Posted by: Al Bundy at December 04, 2016 08:00 PM (7tIwF)

401 My #372 It's BARBARA Reynolds, not Dorothy. Sheesh. I am losing it.

Posted by: Miss Sippi at December 04, 2016 10:35 PM (ByoS/)

402 I love everything Piper Donovan.

Posted by: Mutt at December 05, 2016 08:52 AM (l1Qmx)

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