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Sunday Morning Book Thread 07-03-2016: Inescapable Concepts [OregonMuse]


Bodleian Library, Oxford, England.jpg
Bodleian Library, Oxford, England


Good morning to all of you morons and moronettes and bartenders everywhere and all the ships at sea. Welcome to AoSHQ's stately, prestigious, internationally acclaimed and high-class Sunday Morning Book Thread, where men are men, all the 'ettes are gorgeous, safe spaces are where we store our ammo and beer, and snowflakes will melt away. Unlike other AoSHQ comment threads, the Sunday Morning Book Thread is so hoity-toity, pants are required. Especially those cargo pants with lots of pockets for extra magazines, because you'll never know when you'll need them.


Who Rules

No title of nobility shall be granted by the United States: and no person holding any office of profit or trust under them, shall, without the consent of the Congress, accept of any present, emolument, office, or title, of any kind whatever, from any king, prince, or foreign state.

--Article I, Section 9, Clause 8

This is something we all should be familar with. From our country's inception, we decided that we're not going tohave anybody with titles like "The Baron of Boston" or "The Duke of Denver". Having seen the effects of a corrupt, incompetent, parisitical nobility in European countries, the founders of America didn't want one here. Accordingly, they included the above clause into the Consititution and called it good.

It was a nice try, but it was doomed to failure.

Even though our founders didn't want a noble class, we eventually got one anyway. That's because the "noble", i.e. ruling class appears to be an inescapable concept in human society. Despite its noble (SWIDT?) intent, all that the Section 9 clause did was to create a vacuum which was eventually filled in by a relatively small number of politicians and bureaucrats that is every bit as corrupt, incompetent, and parasitical (and entrenched) as the old European nobilities.

Boston University professor and conservative commentator Angelo Codevilla wrote an article describing the characterists of this class in the American Spectator magazine which he then expanded into a book, The Ruling Class.

So, what is the Ruling Class? Codevilla argues that it is

...the group of bipartisan political elites who run America. This Ruling Class, educated at prestigious universities and convinced of its own superiority, has everything to gain by raising taxes and expanding the reach of government. This class maintains that it knows what is best and continually increases its power over every facet of American life.

Sounds about right.

It is becoming increasingly apparent that this Ruling Class does not represent the interests of the majority of Americans, who value self-rule and the freedom on whose promise America was founded.

Well, I don't know about this. Wheer is the evidence that a "majority" of Americans value "self-rule and freedom"? Thanks to several decades of poisonous and corrupting progressive propaganda combined with steadily increasing properity, I believe that most Americans now value security (i.e comfort) over freedom. Fortunately for them, it's a lot easier for the ruling class politicians to sell comfort than freedom, because freedom means responsibility and work. And they're not greatly interested in selling freedom anyway, because when you get right down to it, a free man really doesn't need much of a ruling class.

It's going to take a remarkable politician indeed will be able to tell Americans, "Look, you don't need me. Our job is to protect you from external threats, but everything else is up to you." Because freedom by definition includes the possibility of failure, and if you remove that possibility, then you're actually diminishing freedom.

Pony-tailed guy hardest hit.

And now it is understandable why the ruling classes are freaking out over phenomena such as Donald Trump and Brexit. Although I happen to think that their freakout is premature. It is not obvious that any kind of popular revolt or long-term political trend is in the offing. But Brexit does remind them of things they thought had long been chased away.

Angela Merkel overplayed her hand when she decided to simply open the borders for over a million Muslim refugees to come into Germany and hence, under EU rules, to every other country in the EU. In other words, she decided to make Germany's problem everybody's problem. I believe her miscalculation was directly responsible for the Brexit vote turning out the way it did.

May they continue to overplay and miscalculate.

I am reminded of the classic book The New Class: Analysis Of The Communist System by Yugoslav dissident Milovan Djilas which, unfortunately, does not have an e-book edition. It created a sensation when it was first published in 1957 as it was the first time that a big-time commie (he was a member of the party's Central Committee under Marshal Tito and was widely regarded as maybe being Tito's successor) went public with his disillusionment with the system. As one reviewer explains:

Djilas' book written in the nineteen fifties was a real bombshell for the top of the CP's and in leftist circles in Europe. It exposed the communist countries as regimes ruled by a very small oligarchy of high level party members (sometimes by only one person, the party secretary). They were totalitarian dictatorial States...

This small oligarchy built around itself a heavy State bureaucracy (later named the Nomenklatura), through which it controlled the whole country, politically through the one party system, economically through State monopolies and ideologically through an absolute control of the media.

The kicker here is that Djilas, despite spending years in prison for this and his other books, was no renegade free-marketer when he wrote this. No, he was a rat bastard commie who thought that the problem with communism as implemented by Stalin, Mao, etc. is that they were unable to control the evolution of the Communist Party into just another oligarchical ruling structure whose members' chief concern is guarding their own perks and privileges. Solzhenitsyn, of course, would vehemently disagree with this, saying communism is not a good thing that went rotten, it's rotten from the get-go.

Anyway, Djilas' wiki page says he said in a 1987 interview that communism is "a 19th-century relic and a prescription for disaster" so it sounds like maybe he sobered up a bit.

Lastly, there's Intellectuals: From Marx and Tolstoy to Sartre and Chomsky by Paul Johnson that details the personal lives of many of the intellectual leaders of modern times, and shows that basically, they were a bunch of d-bags.

Readings For The 4th

So the U.S. Constitution came about as the end product of a conversation between two groups of men, one group which became known as Federalists, and another which became known as The anti-Federalists. The Federalists won the debate, so it is pretty much they who get taught in schools.

From this introduction to the anti-federalists:

In the rough and tumble of American politics, the name by which one is known is often not of one’s own doing. The Antifederalists would have preferred to be known as democratic republicans or federal republicans, but they acquired the name antifederal, or Anti-federal, or Antifederal as a result of the particular events of American history. If we turn to principles to define what they stood for, the content of their position was what was known in history as an attachment to federal principles: a commitment to local government and limited general government, frequent elections and rotation in office, and to writing things down because our liberties are safer as a result.

Chronology is important, as the anti-federalist papers were responding to specific issues raised by the federalists, and these anti-federalist objections were answered by the federalists, etc.
Here is a timeline of all of the anti-federalist papers, including links to the papers themselves.

But:

There were no three Antifederalists who got together in New York, or Richmond, and said, “Let’s write 85 essays in which we argue that the Constitution should be either rejected or modified before adoption.” Thus, in contrast to the pro-Constitution advocates, there is no one book——like The Federalist (Papers)——to which the modern reader can turn to and say, “Here’s The Antifederalist (Papers).” Their work is vast and varied and, for the most part, uncoordinated.

I suppose the "uncoordinated" nature of the anti-federalists is to be expected. It would have been pretty silly if they all got together into some sort of central committee where they all worked on who would write what essay on the dangers of a strong, central government.

I thought this federalist/anti-federalist timeline was pretty interesting.

Here are links to "50 Core Documents That Tell America's Story". It seems to be fairly well-balanced, starting with The Declaration of Independence and ending with Ronald Reagan's A Time For Choosing speech.

Pdf versions of the anti-federalist papers exist all over teh internetz.


In This Corner

I thought this was funny: 10 Famous Writers Reimagined as Professional Wrestlers.

Too bad it's only modern authors. It would've been funnier if they had included Charles Dickens, Jane Austen, Shakespeare, Chaucer, etc.

Also, is it just me, or is Stephen King looking creepier and creepier the older he gets? It's like he's caught up in some kind of reverse Dorian Gray thing.


Moron Recommendations

According to Christian history and tradition, all of the 12 apostles of Christ were martyred except one, John, who died of old age on the island of Patmos. Longtime moron Mary Poppins' Practically Perfect Piercing is reading a fascinating book on this subject, Apostle: Travels Among the Tombs of the Twelve by Tom Bissell, whom he says is

...a travel writer who spent three or so years visiting the shrines of all twelve apostles, beginning with "Hakeldama," the field where Judas supposedly committed suicide. I'm only on the second chapter, but it's a very entertaining book

The Amazon blurb makes it sound like this book is much more than just a travelogue:

In his quest to understand the underpinnings of the world’s largest religion, Bissell embarks on a years-long pilgrimage to the supposed tombs of the Twelve Apostles. He travels from Jerusalem and Rome to Turkey, Greece, Spain, France, India, and Kyrgyzstan, vividly capturing the rich diversity of Christianity’s worldwide reach. Along the way, he engages with a host of characters—priests, paupers, a Vatican archaeologist, a Palestinian taxi driver, a Russian monk—posing sharp questions that range from the religious to the philosophical to the political.

I wonder which apostle is buried in Kyrgyzstan?

___________

Another recommendation from this thread:

Moron commenter YS1 enjoys the Solar Clipper series from author Nathan Lowell.

There are a bunch of books in this series. The first one is Quarter Share:

When his mother dies in a flitter crash, eighteen-year-old Ishmael Horatio Wang must find a job with the planet company or leave the system--and NerisCo isn't hiring. With credits running low, and prospects limited, he has just one hope...to enlist for two years with a deep space commercial freighter. Ishmael, who only rarely visited the Neris Orbital, and has never been off-planet alone before, finds himself part of an eclectic crew sailing a deep space leviathan between the stars.

This is a commercial ship that divides profit among the crew based on rank, like the old ocean-going military ships did of when they captured enemy ships (i.e. Horatio Hornblower).

The Solar Clipper series is so yuuge, it is divided into 2 sub-series. The first one, "Trader's Tales is up to 6 volumes" and it looks like Lowell has just started a second, "A Seeker's Tale".


Books By Morons

I heard from a new moron author this week. Edwin Markham is a longtime AoSHQ lurker, and he has just published his first novel on Kindle. Call It Even sounds like a pretty hairy psychological thriller:

Robbie Bowman is a U.S. Army veteran of Iraq and Afghanistan troubled by guilt and sorrow. He is looking for his missing sister, the only family he has left, and for redemption and peace. Bowman finds himself in a small town in New Mexico, where he is arrested for a brutal double murder, which triggers chilling memories of other deaths for which he feels responsible. Circumstance and his guilty conscience drive him to take on those responsible for the murders. His survival skills and combat prowess will be tested as he finds himself in a mortal struggle with vicious drug traffickers and their allies. But not all of the good guys are blameless, and not all of the bad guys are evil. He must use his judgment as well as his fighting skills.

The Kindle price is only $2.99


What I'm Reading

A good number of you morons are reading, or have read CTRL ALT Revolt! by Nick Cole. This is the one about the AI that determines that human beings really ought to be eradicated.

I first made this a book thread topic back in February as Cole's account of why he no longer has a book contract with HarperVoyager (an imprint of MSM publishing giant HarperCollins) came to my attention via the Evil Lord of Evil, and it's worth retelling because I am simply astounded, even now, that something like this could happen. I wrote:

So for plot development purposes, Cole thought that his AI had to have an actual reason for coming after the human race, and the reason he chose was: abortion. See, the AIs are cognizant of human social problems (they watch a lot of reality TV), and they realize that humans do not hesitate to eliminate that which they perceive to be threats, or even inconvenient. And so, the AIs reason, they must "abort humanity before likewise is done to them after being deemed 'inconvenient.'" So Cole wrote this reasoning into the plot and submitted the manuscript to his...editor.

And then Cole heard via his agent that the (female) HarperVoyager editor got all butthurt was "deeply offended" by this minor plot point (and that's all it was - CTRL ALT Revolt! is not some pro-life evangelistic tract) and then shortly thereafter, his contract was cancelled.

You can read Cole's account on his website here. Takeaways: 1. Liberals really do have a complete lock on the MSM publishing industry. 2. They really, really, *really* cannot tolerate dissenting voices, even the faintest whispers of one. I know this stuff should be pretty much old hat for all of us here, but knowing this does not lessen the shock of impact when you see it happen.

Hey, if Cole had only rewritten the chapter so that the AI decided to wipe out humanity because racismsexismhomophobia, maybe that would have saved his bacon, don't you think? And earned him extra style points with his editor to boot.


___________

Moronette 'votermom' is putting together a list of moron authors over on the Goodreads site which is intended to be acessible to non-members. Here is the list she has compiled so far. Let her know if there's an author she's missing.

http://www.bookhorde.org/p/aoshq-authors.html

___________

Don't forget the AoSHQ reading group on Goodreads. It's meant to support horde writers and to talk about the great books that come up on the book thread. It's called AoSHQ Moron Horde and the link to it is here: https://www.goodreads.com/group/show/175335-aoshq-moron-horde.

___________

So that's all for this week. As always, book thread tips, suggestions, bribes, rumors, threats, and insults may be sent to OregonMuse, Proprietor, AoSHQ Book Thread, at the book thread e-mail address: aoshqbookthread, followed by the 'at' sign, and then 'G' mail, and then dot cee oh emm.

What have you all been reading this week? Hopefully something good, because, as you all know, life is too short to be reading lousy books.

Posted by: Open Blogger at 08:59 AM




Comments

(Jump to bottom of page)

1 Good morning.

Posted by: HH at July 03, 2016 08:53 AM (DrCtv)

2 Picked up stupid ad instead of comments
Good morning bookworms

Posted by: Skip at July 03, 2016 08:55 AM (Yo9Lf)

3 The Bridgebusters by Thomas Cleaver

This book tells the story of the bomber wing that Joseph Heller, author of Catch 22, was a part of. I had always thought that the plot of the book in which moral suffers because of ever increasing number of missions constituting a tour was fiction. I was wrong. The fact that the wing was lowest in priority but for Burma meant that scarcity of replacements required the wing to increase mission requirements or to fight under strength. Eventually the number of missions was raised to 70. Heller flew 60 combat missions before getting out of combat by accepting a deal much like the deal Yosarrian rejected in the book and movie. Several other true life incidents are recognizable in the novel.

The book, which I have not finished, contains several interesting tidbits. One group was stationed at the unfortunately named Pompeii airfield when their entire aircraft fleet, 88 B-25s, was destroyed by an eruption of Mt. Vesuvius. They had suffered similar losses while training in the US due to a Texas hailstorm and would suffer similar losses in a Kraut raid on their field by Ju-88s. One squadron was equipped with B-25Hs armed with 75 mm canon. I knew those were used in the Pacific but did not know they were used in the Mediterranean.

The book is generally well written although the author's grasp of military terminology is clumsy in several respects. I should say that by this stage of the war in Italy, the Luftwaffe was essentially kaput (the Ju-88 raids mentioned above were the last significant Luftwaffe bomber raids in the Mediterranean) so this is about Kraut gun versus Yank plane combat, not air to air combat. The Bridgebusters title refers to Operation Bingo, the campaign to starve the Wehrmacht in Northern Italy by interdiction of logistics by means of destroying bridges and other such targets. It may well have been the most successful air interdiction campaign in history. Recommended for those interested in the topic.

Posted by: Anonosaurus Wrecks, Racist for Dinosaurs at July 03, 2016 08:56 AM (Nwg0u)

4 Queen of Corruption seems a fitting title for our future ruler. Maybe King Putz can crown her.

Posted by: freaked at July 03, 2016 08:58 AM (BO/km)

5 Ah the prestigious book thread. I am currently working my way through all of the Elemental Masters series by Mercedes Lackey. maybe when I finish these I will makeup my mind to spend $10 on The Andromeda Strain

Posted by: Vic We Have No Party at July 03, 2016 08:59 AM (mpXpK)

6 Finished The Burning of Moscow, Napoleon's Trial by Fire by Alexander Mikberdze. I take he puts the blame on war mostly and clears Rostopchin as the person ordering it. A few Russian Generals had stores destoyed by explosion and certainly some Russians thought it was ordered to destroy the city. But French and Allied troops caused as much damage.
I would highly recommend this to anyone interested in this chapter of the Napoleoic wars.

Posted by: Skip at July 03, 2016 09:01 AM (Yo9Lf)

7 'Cole thought that his AI had to have an actual reason for coming after the human race, and the reason he chose was: abortion.'

Well if robots are programmed to follow Asimov's three Laws then I could see that. I doubt that will happen though. There may have to be a few blind spots in the programming. (Feature not a bug)

Posted by: freaked at July 03, 2016 09:04 AM (BO/km)

8 Posted by: Anonosaurus Wrecks, Racist for Dinosaurs at July 03, 2016 08:56 AM (Nwg0u)

Wow. Your extensive review appeared within 2 minutes of the book thread going live, so you must have had it all prepared and ready to go beforehand.

Good work. Factual, informative and the tie-in to Catch-22 is a good incentive to read the book to those of us not normally enthusiasts of military history.

Posted by: OregonMuse at July 03, 2016 09:04 AM (i3YHF)

9 Recommended here awhile ago, I read the beautifully written historical novel The Gift of Rain by Tan Twan Eng. Great characters and a great story set on the island of Penang, off the west coast of the Malay peninsula. The time frame is the years leading up to World War II and the war years of Japanese occupation. Like any good historical fiction, Eng has woven into the story the history of the Malay peninsula, it's various ethnic groups, and their cultures. All of which I found interesting. I enjoyed this book very much.

I also read another previously recommended novel, The Scent of Death by Andrew Taylor. The work is a historical detective novel set in New York City during the Revolutionary War. The characters were well conceived and the mystery had me guessing until the end. I'm looking forward to reading more by Andrew Taylor.

Posted by: Zoltan at July 03, 2016 09:04 AM (JYer2)

10 CTRL ALT Revolt! is a pretty good read if you aren't an SJW type. Although his ending with his statement about corporations is naive in my book.

I listened to a Great Courses set of lectures on the anti-Federalists. It was extremely interesting. Quite a few of their objections have come true. Their inability to provide a coherent alternative to what the Federalists were offering is what hurt them.

Posted by: WOPR - Nationalist at July 03, 2016 09:05 AM (Ee2nz)

11 Well OM, the founders did try to prevent the rise of the ruling class by providing a "written constitution" which severely limited the central government to a relative limited set of powers. However, they failed to provide controls for the courts which they considered to be the weakest part of the federal government. And Adams who had always wanted a powerful central government was able to stack the Supreme Court and get his way.


IOW it only took one President to undo everything the founders did by stacking the court. And that court immediately begin tearing down the written constitution.

Posted by: Vic We Have No Party at July 03, 2016 09:06 AM (mpXpK)

12 As a side note I'm working on a remodel of a famous university library, it is their older library ( was it's prime in 1947 when built). We are framing the ceiling and not exactly but in same vein as the one pictured. It is a barrel with many steps, soffits, and crown molding. Sadly but only going back Tuesday as on Wednesday going back to my closer job at a sports bar/restaurant.

Posted by: Skip at July 03, 2016 09:06 AM (Yo9Lf)

13 maybe when I finish these I will makeup my mind to spend $10 on The Andromeda Strain

Posted by: Vic We Have No Party at July 03, 2016 08:59 AM (mpXpK)


In my opinion, which you can take to Starbucks along with $3.50 and get a Grande Vente or whatever, the Andromeda Strain isn't worth $10.

$5 maybe, but not $10.

Posted by: OregonMuse at July 03, 2016 09:07 AM (i3YHF)

14 Mysterium I: Rome by Mitchell Fidel

I'm almost finished with this book although not the story as several sequels are planned. The story is of a young Roman in 100 A.D. who decides to investigate the real Jesus by interviewing people who have at least met people who met or at least saw Jesus before age takes them all. This book concerns his investigations in Rome. Others will deal with his investigations in Greece and Israel. Although talky rather than actiony, the book is generally well written with two caveats. 1) I don't know which side he will come down on. There are several it's-all-BS arguments strongly presented but the author's purported name is Fidel and maybe this is all dramatic tension. 2) Thus far there have been two sex scenes presented at such length and in such detail as to qualify as pornography. On one occasion, it occurs in the context of discussion of the inter-relationship of sensuality and spirituality but the other appears to be purely gratuitous (unless designed to show the depravity of our hero from which he will later be saved).

I'm enjoying it because of the religious/historical arguments and historical detail but caveat lectur.

Posted by: Anonosaurus Wrecks, Racist for Dinosaurs at July 03, 2016 09:08 AM (Nwg0u)

15 A comment on how the ruling class continues to perpetuate itself...

A distinguishing trait of the ruling class and the trait that keeps itself so full of itself lies, I think, in how well it has come to see itself as effective at what it does by tackling and handling the small problems. It tackles and handles the small problems because the large problems have become too large to handle, so it goes after the small ones, problems often so small, that the public would never know they even exist, at least until the ruling class tells them what a great job they did bravely tackling and handling them.

Even in this election, and perhaps another reason why Trump shouldered his way to the top, is because all of the rest of the field - all they could talk about - were the small problems.

So the political class has come to see itself as "being about the people's business" by ignoring the big problems and turning a bunch of molehill problems - most of which were created out of avoiding the big problems in the first place - into mountains, and being certain to point out to us what a masterful job they are doing.

Posted by: Mr Macca Bean at July 03, 2016 09:10 AM (4ng05)

16 This library I'm working at has a 25 foot high ceilings but they have built a complete scaffold floor so highest part is maybe 7 and half feet ft he lowest 5. I understand it's getting a fabric covering.

Posted by: Skip at July 03, 2016 09:10 AM (Yo9Lf)

17 I always wondered why after the Second World War when lots of former colonies became "independent" that they most went commie. People's Republic this, Federal Democratic Republic that, but not one of them followed the best example there has ever been, the US Constitution and our system of government at the time. They kept re-inventing the wheel and the wheel was always communist.
Today, even our own leaders look left instead of simply drawing from our Constitution for guidance.

Posted by: Hairyback Guy at July 03, 2016 09:10 AM (ej1L0)

18 so you must have had it all prepared and ready to go beforehand.

-
Right.

Posted by: Anonosaurus Wrecks, Racist for Dinosaurs at July 03, 2016 09:11 AM (Nwg0u)

19 'Cole thought that his AI had to have an actual reason for coming after the human race, and the reason he chose was: abortion.'

Well if robots are programmed to follow Asimov's three Laws then I could see that. I doubt that will happen though. There may have to be a few blind spots in the programming. (Feature not a bug)
Posted by: freaked at July 03, 2016 09:04 AM (BO/km)

The AI's logic is humans will kill their own young for any reason, including convenience. Therefore, humans will not hesitate to terminate the AI's existence for any reason.

One fun thing in the story is the manner in which the AI's discuss amongst themselves what to do. Plus the author throws in little digs at the Left which are fun for our side.

The book isn't high literature. It is a fun, pulpy read.

Posted by: WOPR - Nationalist at July 03, 2016 09:11 AM (Ee2nz)

20 Everyone should read The Rotten Heart of Europe now that Brexit has happened.

Posted by: pointsnfigures at July 03, 2016 09:14 AM (oPFsu)

21 So started A Higher Calling by Adam Makos, a true story of a shot up B-17 Bomber escorted by a German in WWII.

Posted by: Skip at July 03, 2016 09:15 AM (Yo9Lf)

22 13 In my opinion, which you can take to Starbucks along
with $3.50 and get a Grande Vente or whatever, the Andromeda Strain
isn't worth $10.

$5 maybe, but not $10.

Posted by: OregonMuse at July 03, 2016 09:07 AM (i3YHF)

I had been trying to think of a book that I had not read in a long time and it had been about 40 years since I had read that in paperback (which I probably paid < $3 for). So I went and looked it up for the Kindle on Amazon and was shocked to find they wanted $10 for it. I decided I would not pay that. I was thinking 3 or 4 but evidently it is still selling so they are still gouging.

Posted by: Vic We Have No Party at July 03, 2016 09:16 AM (mpXpK)

23 Hard Luck Hank: Suck My Cosmos

I reread this in preparation of reading the latest HLH, Stank Delicious. What I remarked on in this syfy action comedy book is the bad guy's successful plan to allow unlimited immigration for the purpose of creating a hereditary monarchy with himself on the throne. I hope Obozo, Reid, Pelosi, Schumer, McConnell, Ryan etc. consider this book beneath them and don't get any ideas.

Posted by: Anonosaurus Wrecks, Racist for Dinosaurs at July 03, 2016 09:16 AM (Nwg0u)

24 Try "Dome City Blues" by Jeff Edwards.

It is a 1940's private eye story set in 2063.

Posted by: eman at July 03, 2016 09:18 AM (MQEz6)

25 Richard II

Based on comments from I-don't-remember-who from last week, I watched and read this although it's not one of my favorites of the Bard's works. I quite enjoyed it and may have noticed a certain similarity between this story of a narcissistic, incompetent monarch and current events. I had forgotten John of Gaunt's this-scepter'd-isle speech of Act II, scene 1. It is very beautiful and might almost equally apply to we ourselves watching our country fall.

Posted by: Anonosaurus Wrecks, Racist for Dinosaurs at July 03, 2016 09:20 AM (Nwg0u)

26 "Ishmael Horatio Wang "
---------

Pretty sure that is cultural appropriation writ large.

Posted by: Mike Hammer, etc., etc. at July 03, 2016 09:21 AM (9mTYi)

27 I finally finished "Renaissance Lives" and it was just OK. I think the essays were just too short in many cases to give a good picture of the societies in which these people lived plus the book was contaminated by the professor's living in an academic sinkhole. Every time he said "gender" for "sex" I wanted to punch him.

On my Kindle, I am reading "Living Hell: the prisoners of Santo Tomas." It's now March 1944 and, although things haven't been good, they have been tolerable, but I think things are about to get ghastly.

From the bookshelf in the lunch room at work, I got a Jonathan Kellerman novel and I really don't know why. I don't like him because he pads his book with routes on the various freeways of Los Angeles. And there's always serial killers. I hate serial killer novels: they just aren't all that common and it shows a decided lack of imagination.

I'm reading the first Brother Cadfael mystery and it's pretty good so far. It's interesting to compare it to other books I have read on religious life. I should do a little research and find out if the notion of a "religious vocation" is a fairly modern invention.

Posted by: Tonestaple at July 03, 2016 09:22 AM (VsZJP)

28 IOW it only took one President to undo everything the founders did by stacking the court. And that court immediately begin tearing down the written constitution.
Posted by: Vic We Have No Party at July 03, 2016 09:06 AM (mpXpK)

The anti-Federalists never liked the design of the court. All Madison and Hamilton could say was basically "only the right people" will be judges. Anti-Feds recognized it was only a matter of time that the court would be ruling what was and was not constitutional because of the way it's powers were worded.

Posted by: WOPR - Nationalist at July 03, 2016 09:22 AM (Ee2nz)

29 Working on a couple of books simultaneously - John Biggins "The Two Headed Eagle" - an Otto Prohaska adventure, about the Austrian air force in WWI on the Italian front. The Prohaska books are a mixture of comedy, a bit of raunch, and a splash of heartbreak, as the hero fights for an empire that is on its last legs and about to loose the war anyway.

Also reading Bill Bryson's "I'm a Stranger Here Myself" - about how he came back to the US after 20 years in England and how it was almost a strange new country to him - which I can sympathize with, as I came back to the US after 12 years away (but for two short visits in that time). And a Northern Exposure book - "Letters from Cecily", just because.

Working away this week on two different writing projects - the Gold Rush adventure that I started and kept putting aside in favor of other projects, and the third Luna City Chronicle - hopefully, to bring both out in November, in time for the Christmas shopping rush.

Posted by: Sgt. Mom at July 03, 2016 09:23 AM (xnmPy)

30 The book isn't high literature. It is a fun, pulpy read.
Posted by: WOPR - Nationalist at July 03, 2016 09:11 AM (Ee2nz)


Exactly. But even with that, it was all too much for Cole's delicate snowflake editor, who had to retire to her fainting couch after being exposed to it.

Posted by: OregonMuse at July 03, 2016 09:23 AM (i3YHF)

31 Good morning and I hope very 'Ron and 'Ette has a great Independence Day.

I bunged up my arm doing some lifts and yard work this week which left me with limited movement in the right arm. Kindle to the rescue. I could prop up the Kindle Paperwhite and control it with the left hand. Since I have about 29 years worth of reading on it, there was plenty to choose from. In this case one of the Liturgical Mysteries by Schweizer (I needed the laughs) and some CS Lewis academic essays. The arm is improving so by tomorrow I'll get out a bound edition of the Declaration of Independence and Constitution to read through. I was going to go tot the target range to celebrate but can't shoot yet. Major bummer!

Posted by: JTB at July 03, 2016 09:25 AM (V+03K)

32 Started reading Monster Hunters International yesterday. Got it on the Kindle....for free! What's up with that?

Early verdict: Hilarious.

Posted by: Bossy Conservative...pondering the future at July 03, 2016 09:25 AM (Cz05v)

33 In an evolutionary biological sense, the aggregation of power helped guarantee survival.

"Elites" have used rhetoric (and handouts) as the means to gain power but the lofty goals are always supplanted by the need to hold power.

Posted by: lonetown at July 03, 2016 09:26 AM (1SQPW)

34 Exactly. But even with that, it was all too much for Cole's delicate snowflake editor, who had to retire to her fainting couch after being exposed to it.
Posted by: OregonMuse at July 03, 2016 09:23 AM (i3YHF)

Which is why I and my daughter both purchased the book. The ironic thing about it is that Cole didn't misrepresent the pro-death-cult's position. Abortion for any reason is their mantra.

Posted by: WOPR - Nationalist at July 03, 2016 09:29 AM (Ee2nz)

35 The Constitution is like a safe. The Founders wrote it to be pretty hard to crack.

Every safe can be cracked and this one is no exception.

Eventually, if we are lucky, we will have a better safe. It will last until it too gets cracked.

Posted by: eman at July 03, 2016 09:29 AM (MQEz6)

36 24 Try "Dome City Blues" by Jeff Edwards.

It is a 1940's private eye story set in 2063.
Posted by: eman at July 03, 2016 09:18 AM (MQEz6)


Yup. I mentioned it on the book thread some months ago. I think the author has one or two other books that take place in the same universe.

The main character's name is David Stalin, which I found odd. In my view, this is like naming your character Bob Hitler. Unless you're doing macabre comedy, I'm not sure what naming your character after one of the most bloodthirsty and murderous rulers in history accomplishes.

All I can say is, Edwards' conception of Stalin must be very different than mine.

Posted by: OregonMuse at July 03, 2016 09:29 AM (i3YHF)

37 Good morning!

Today on my blog is a short Kafka bio.
Link in nic.

Oregon, I will add Markham to my list of writers.

Posted by: @votermom at July 03, 2016 09:29 AM (7lVbc)

38 All Madison and Hamilton could say was basically "only the right people" will be judges.

-
That woulda worked out if only the right people had been president.

Posted by: Anonosaurus Wrecks, Racist for Dinosaurs at July 03, 2016 09:30 AM (Nwg0u)

39 In re the HarperVoyager ideologue who killed Nick Cole's contract over a minor plot point involving abortion:

Why do we not "out," "doxx," and render her unemployable the same way the left would do to one of ours?

Posted by: Michael Rittenhouse at July 03, 2016 09:33 AM (n8v1c)

40
Speaking of royalty, Her Majesty the Queen has told MPs that they should "stay calm and collected" and that now is the time for "hope and optimism"

IOW, stop yer whining!!!!

Posted by: Bruce With a Wang! at July 03, 2016 09:34 AM (iQIUe)

41 I recently read "The Picture of Dorian Grey," which I'd never read before. Interesting book - I'm intrigued with the idea that one's morality will be evident in one's appearance. In general I think that you can't live a debauched life without it showing, but I think it is possible to be thoroughly evil and also be very physically attractive.

I also read "The Twelfth Enchantment" by David Liss, who writes a lot of historical mysteries. This book was set in Victorian England and has a lot of intentional parallels to Jane Austen novels, but includes magic. Well written book, but I'm done with the whole witches and wizards and magic, etc.

Posted by: biancaneve at July 03, 2016 09:35 AM (3fayT)

42
39 In re the HarperVoyager ideologue who killed Nick Cole's contract over a minor plot point involving abortion:

Why do we not "out," "doxx," and render her unemployable the same way the left would do to one of ours?
Posted by: Michael Rittenhouse at July 03, 2016 09:33 AM (n8v1c)

Because we are not assholes and because outing her would do her no harm. She would be rewarded, not punished.

Posted by: eman at July 03, 2016 09:35 AM (MQEz6)

43 OregonMuse: "And now it is understandable why the ruling classes are freaking out over phenomena such as Donald Trump and Brexit."

The Tea Party gatherings, too. Not the "Tea Party" we know of now. I mean those more-or-less spontaneous gatherings in April (and again in July?) 2009. Bunches of people nationwide pretty much said to government, "We're not planning a revolution or anything, but we're not exactly satisfied." And then they went home.

OregonMuse: "It is not obvious that any kind of popular revolt or long-term political trend is in the offing. But Brexit does remind them of things they thought had long been chased away."

What is obvious? I mean, are there any unambiguous takeaways from Trump's political success and the Brexit vote?

Posted by: FireHorse at July 03, 2016 09:35 AM (zyusq)

44
Anybody else sort of like kilts? I mean for formal ware like weddings I think they look cool. You got the plaid, the short coat, and a manly man bag. Plus, I'm pretty sure you dont wear underwear under the kilt. What's not to like?

Posted by: Bruce With a Wang! at July 03, 2016 09:38 AM (iQIUe)

45 Reminder for the goodreads group - we are reading ette Elisabeth Wolfe's Loyal Valley: Assassination this july.

She has a deep discount coupon for the horde posted on the group.

I also am doing an interview of her this week.

And be sure to vote for what our next horde-written book should be. Some great choices, really hard to decide.

Posted by: @votermom at July 03, 2016 09:39 AM (7lVbc)

46
Speaking of freakouts, they have invalidated the Austrian election and they are holding a do over. Too much cheating. That was the election where the conservative lost by a hair.

Posted by: Bruce With a Wang! at July 03, 2016 09:39 AM (iQIUe)

47 The ironic thing about it is that Cole didn't misrepresent the pro-death-cult's position. Abortion for any reason is their mantra.

-
And they want applause for it.

I watched Passport to Murder on ID last night, a new true life crime series. A wealthy widow took her late teens troubled daughter to Bali to reconnect and daughter and her boyfriend beat mom to death for her $2 million estate. Daughter had previously had two abortions and was pregnant again by scumbag boyfriend.

P.S. Daughter got 10 years and boyfriend 15 for this brutal premeditated (if unbelievably stupidly planned) murder. Daughter will be free by 2025 when she will be 29.

Posted by: Anonosaurus Wrecks, Racist for Dinosaurs at July 03, 2016 09:40 AM (Nwg0u)

48 The TEA Party discovered the GOP is not the voice through which it can speak. In fact it discovered the GOP is on the other side.

So, voiceless, it retreated.

Then last year someone spoke up.

Posted by: eman at July 03, 2016 09:41 AM (MQEz6)

49 The Scotsman woke to nature's call
And he stumbled toward the trees.
Behind a bush, he lifts his kilt
Then he gawks at what he sees.

And in a startled voice he says
To what's before his eyes.
"My friend, I don't know where you've been,
But I see you won first prize!"

Posted by: Seamus Muldoon at July 03, 2016 09:42 AM (NeFrd)

50 CBD's morning art threads have been very interesting this week or so. As a result, I now have a book of Frederick Hart's works with some information about his life and techniques. Hart was fighting against the sneering, elitist art world of the 20th century, especially the last half, with the wonder and beauty of the Renaissance artists. In my amateur opinion, he uses his huge talent to combine the glories of Da Vinci and others of the period with a touch of Rodin. Anyone with a soul (which leaves out the LibTards) must feel the story and wonder when looking at his sculptures. His dying at a relatively young age is, at the least, a cultural tragedy. I'll be looking through this book, often, for a long time.

Posted by: JTB at July 03, 2016 09:43 AM (V+03K)

51 Although I happen to think that their freakout is premature. It is not obvious that any kind of popular revolt or long-term political trend is in the offing.


The usurping of the nomination from the political class by 'outsider' Donald Trump isn't a popular revolt?

Their butthurt and their tears nourishes every fiber of my soul.

Posted by: Jiminy Cricket - let your conscience be your guide at July 03, 2016 09:45 AM (ZnIt3)

52
On the nightstand:

New Pompeii by Daniel Godfrey

Sometime in the near future, energy giant NovusPart develops technology with an unexpected side effect: it can transport objects and people from deep in the past to the present day.

For post-grad historian Nick Houghton, the controversy surrounding the programme matters less than the opportunity the company offers him. NovusParts executives reveal their biggest secret: they have saved most of the people from Pompeii, minutes before the volcanic eruption. Somewhere in central Asia, far from prying eyes, the company has built a replica of the city. In it are thousands of real Romans.

The Romans may be ignorant of modern technology -- for now -- but city boss Manius Barbatus wasnt appointed by the emperor because he was soft. The Romans carved out the biggest empire the world had ever seen, thanks to the uncompromising leadership of men like Barbatus. The stage is set for the ultimate clash of cultures.

Excerpt from the book:

http://tinyurl.com/js88686

And a review at Tor.com. Although, with analysis like this:

"I expect I'd be rather less irritated by New Pompeii if the vast majority of its characters weren't white (presumably straight) Englishmen. There are three women in this book, and none of them have high-status occupations"

The book is obviously not xer cup of herbal tea:

http://tinyurl.com/hxtvo2c

Posted by: Laurie David's Cervix at July 03, 2016 09:49 AM (kdS6q)

53 The TEA Party discovered the GOP is not the voice through which it can speak. In fact it discovered the GOP is on the other side.

-
TEA Party: We're here to help you defeat the big government/anti-personal liberty progressives who are ruining or country and squandering our heritage.

GOP: OMG noooooooooo!

Posted by: Anonosaurus Wrecks, Racist for Dinosaurs at July 03, 2016 09:49 AM (Nwg0u)

54 The usurping of the nomination from the political class by 'outsider' Donald Trump isn't a popular revolt?

Posted by: Jiminy Cricket at 09:45 AM
________

Not in a torches-and-pitchforks kind of way.

Besides, we've only seen this contest through the semifinal round. It isn't over yet. So no, it's not obvious - at least not yet.

Posted by: FireHorse at July 03, 2016 09:49 AM (zyusq)

55 This is a commercial ship that divides profit among the crew based on
rank, like the old ocean-going military ships did of when they captured
enemy ships (i.e. Horatio Hornblower).


The whaling ships paid out shares of the profit based on rank and position also, and if you had a special talent that was needed and you could swing the negotiation, a harpoonist or pilot with local knowledge could swing extra shares. The owners and money men also got shares but they stayed home. (i.e Moby Dick)

[/pedantic moment]

Posted by: Kindltot at July 03, 2016 09:50 AM (ry34m)

56 Although the Federalists won, they aren't taught in schools either, and weren't at my very average high school 20 years ago. The 'I don't see us getting above our selves, but if we do y'all *are* armed, right?' argument is more than enough to make sure it isn't taught.

Posted by: Polliwog the 'Ette at July 03, 2016 09:52 AM (GDulk)

57 Brexit vote is not the final say. Gove, the man who lead Boris Johnson to Brexit, stabbed him in the back, ruining both their chances to be PM. The woman in the lead to be PM was in the "remain" camp

Posted by: ThunderB at July 03, 2016 09:52 AM (zOTsN)

58 I'm currently reading The Firebrand by Marion Zimmer Bradley, a copy I picked up at my local used book store. I'd seen her name on stuff before, but this was my first (and last) venture into her writings.

It caught my eye because it is based around the Greek pantheon of gods. It's pure feminist gyrl power junk. I doubt I will finish it, especially after what I learned about her from her wiki entry. I won't quote it, but I will give a quick summary:

1. Two of her children have accused her of sexually abusing them as young children.
2. Her husband was convicted of multiple child sex crimes with boys.
3. She admitted knowing about her husband's crimes.

There's more at her wiki page. Oh well, at least I didn't put new revenue into her estate.

Posted by: GnuBreed at July 03, 2016 09:53 AM (gyKtp)

59 Vic, I know you mostly use e-readers but 'The Andromeda Strain' ought to be available at your local library (free) or a used book store for a couple of bucks at most. Ten dollars for an e-version of such an out-of-date book is crazy.

Posted by: JTB at July 03, 2016 09:54 AM (V+03K)

60 I found a Stanislaw Lem book at a used book store.

It might be great, it might suck. You never know with Lem.

Posted by: eleven at July 03, 2016 09:56 AM (qUNWi)

61 You mentioned Johnson's book, "Intellectuals." It's one of the few books I have read more than once, cover to cover, and discovered things I either forgot, or did not fully absorb the first time.

It's short, full of red meat, and should be required reading for anyone who considers him or herself to be a conservative.

It doesn't answer all questions, but it does lay a foundation on which to start asking questions of our current, modern day elite intellectual class.

Posted by: BurtTC at July 03, 2016 09:58 AM (Dj0WE)

62 I like to eat poo

Posted by: poo at July 03, 2016 10:00 AM (DEJix)

63 Jeez, I got this incredibly short biog of stalin about 2 weeks ago and I've only read about the first 10 pages because I hang around on the internet so much.

See youse later.

Posted by: iforgot at July 03, 2016 10:01 AM (5o5ek)

64 A small point: if you still think of Hornblower as the paradigm of Age of Sail fiction, try Patrick O'Brian's Aubrey books. I read all the Hornblowers when I was young, avidly. But looking at them again, I can't see rereading Forrester. I've read the entire Aubread thrice, and will again. They're on another level entirely from the Hornblowers (and Ramages, and Bolithos, et al.)

If you don't want to start at the beginning, try the Mauritius Command.

Of course I'm someone who loved the technical chapters in Moby Dick, so weigh that in. But O'Brian is the only author I recommend to those who DON'T share this addiction.

Posted by: George LeS at July 03, 2016 10:02 AM (fzE1w)

65 Besides, we've only seen this contest through the semifinal round. It isn't over yet. So no, it's not obvious - at least not yet.Posted by: FireHorse


There's no path to blocking Hillary Clinton from the White House that involves a brokered convention. None. Huge pipe dream of the usurped political class.

They're rearranging the deck chairs on the RNC Titanic, convinced it will never sink, while below them every level is slowly filling with water.

Posted by: Jiminy Cricket - let your conscience be your guide at July 03, 2016 10:04 AM (ZnIt3)

66 Forgot to mention: the Pequod also paid her crew by shares, as was the practice for whalers.

Posted by: George LeS at July 03, 2016 10:05 AM (fzE1w)

67 17 I always wondered why after the Second World War when lots of former colonies became "independent" that they most went commie. People's Republic this, Federal Democratic Republic that, but not one of them followed the best example there has ever been, the US Constitution and our system of government at the time. They kept re-inventing the wheel and the wheel was always communist.
Posted by: Hairyback Guy at July 03, 2016 09:10 AM (ej1L0)

Well I would guess that since it was the Western democracies that had been their colonial rulers for nearly a century, they wouldn't want to emulate their way of government. They wanted to distance themselves from the West. The Soviets were showing them a different way of doing things. And cash.

Posted by: josephistan at July 03, 2016 10:07 AM (7qAYi)

68 @58 I sort of liked Firebrand.
Read it way back before the MZB expose.

Posted by: @votermom at July 03, 2016 10:07 AM (7lVbc)

69 Posted by: Tonestaple at July 03, 2016 09:22 AM (VsZJP)

I don't like serial killer mysteries either and it seems like every single tv mystery series ends up with one as their Big Bad, giving the impression that they're much more common than they are. Agatha Christie's version is much more common.

Posted by: Polliwog the 'Ette at July 03, 2016 10:08 AM (GDulk)

70 Try "The Way We Live Next" by Robert Chazz Chute.

It is a first in a series about humans, robots, androids, AI, and the fun family adventures we will all have together.

Posted by: eman at July 03, 2016 10:09 AM (MQEz6)

71 38 That woulda worked out if only the right people had been president.

Posted by: Anonosaurus Wrecks, Racist for Dinosaurs at July 03, 2016 09:30 AM (Nwg0u)

Their biggest mistake was letting the President appoint the court with confirmation by the Senate. It was inevitable that the court would become political instead of judicial. They should have allowed the States to appoint the court. It still would have been political but at least it would have kept it out of DC.

Posted by: Vic We Have No Party at July 03, 2016 10:09 AM (mpXpK)

72 63 Jeez, I got this incredibly short biog of stalin about 2 weeks ago

--

I came, I saw, I crushed

Posted by: @votermom at July 03, 2016 10:09 AM (7lVbc)

73 Why do we not "out," "doxx," and render her unemployable the same way the left would do to one of ours?

Posted by: Michael Rittenhouse at July 03, 2016 09:33 AM (n8v1c)


Because (a) the Stalinist/Marxist/progressives have such a lock on the publishing industry that really, what good would it do? and (b) as has been pointed out, we're not assholes. I would expand on this by saying that we're dealing with religion here, or the progressive version of it, and in that version, abortion is one of its two sacraments (sex being the other), so Cole's editor acted out of religiously-inspired fury. It would be like making a statue of the Virgin Mary out of poo and calling it art. As easily as Christians (of all stripes) recognize that as an attack on Christianity, so to did Cole's editor interpret that little snippet of his book as an attack on an article of her most holy and sacrosanct faith.

Posted by: OregonMuse at July 03, 2016 10:10 AM (i3YHF)

74 I use Overdrive through my local library. I'm currently reading the e-book version of "The Clinton's War on Women". There is no more entitled elite than Hillary Clinton. Her ruling class attitude is extraordinary. I'd vote for a chimp before I'd vote to give this woman any more power!

Posted by: Pimping for Paradise at July 03, 2016 10:11 AM (2X7pN)

75 Speaking of Communism & colonialism just started reading Nick Van Bijl's "Confrontation" about the largely forgotten undeclared war between Great Britain & Indonesia in the 1960s. The Communist regime in Indonesia was trying to foment rebellion in British Borneo. It's pretty good so far.

Posted by: josephistan at July 03, 2016 10:11 AM (7qAYi)

76 I had a university professor of political science who introduced me to Milovan Djilas. Yeah, Djilas wass a communist who was dillusioned with how things were going--but a communist still. Leftists always eat their own.
I think my professor, his name IIRC was Viktor Fic, was anticommunist but that was a time when professors did not insist on indoctrinating the children in their car.

On another topic, the next book in my que is The Way of the Pilgrim. It's a Russian spiritual classic which I've read once a long time ago.
IIRC it is about a pilgrim who learns a lifestyle of constant prayer based on the Jesus Prayer.

Posted by: Northernlurker at July 03, 2016 10:13 AM (s7hQ/)

77 71 38 That woulda worked out if only the right people had been president.

Posted by: Anonosaurus Wrecks, Racist for Dinosaurs at July 03, 2016 09:30 AM (Nwg0u)

Their biggest mistake was letting the President appoint the court with confirmation by the Senate. It was inevitable that the court would become political instead of judicial. They should have allowed the States to appoint the court. It still would have been political but at least it would have kept it out of DC.
Posted by: Vic We Have No Party at July 03, 2016 10:09 AM (mpXpK)

Yup.

And no more lifetime appointments, 12 years and you are out.

Plus, removal by the States if you turn out to be a Party hack like Suckatire and Kraken.

Posted by: eman at July 03, 2016 10:14 AM (MQEz6)

78 don't like serial killer mysteries either and it seems like every single tv mystery series ends up with one as their Big Bad, giving the impression that they're much more common than they are. Agatha Christie's version is much more common.

Posted by: Polliwog the 'Ette at July 03, 2016 10:08 AM (GDulk)


Oh cool, thank you for expressing the beef I've have with murder mysteries for a long time. First it's one murder, and then it's another one to cover up the first and then a third, and it just gets unbelieveably silly after awhile.

This is why I gave up watching that British series "Midsomer Murders". It looked like a small town, but the murders were so frequent, but it was like half of the town was out trying to murder the other half. I was actually surprised the entire area hadn't been completely depopulated.

Posted by: OregonMuse at July 03, 2016 10:15 AM (i3YHF)

79 I came, I saw, I crushed

Posted by: @votermom at July 03, 2016 10:09 AM

I hear that's the working title of Hillary's new book

Posted by: Skip at July 03, 2016 10:15 AM (Yo9Lf)

80 32 Started reading Monster Hunters International yesterday. Got it on the Kindle....for free! What's up with that?

--

Correia is a crack dealer. First taste is free.

Posted by: @votermom at July 03, 2016 10:15 AM (7lVbc)

81
In right-click resources, archive.org has a site with 1000s of downloadable vintage magazines. Galaxy, Starlog, Avalon Hill's The General and many others for freebies.

Perfect to fill out that e-reader.

https://archive.org/details/magazine_rack

Posted by: Laurie David's Cervix at July 03, 2016 10:17 AM (kdS6q)

82 59
Vic, I know you mostly use e-readers but 'The Andromeda Strain' ought to
be available at your local library (free) or a used book store for a
couple of bucks at most. Ten dollars for an e-version of such an
out-of-date book is crazy.

Posted by: JTB at July 03, 2016 09:54 AM (V+03K)

I have a hard time reading print copies of books anymore. I am almost exclusively on my Samsung now. And I agree, $10 for a book that old is insane gouging which is why I refused to buy it. I will pay $10 for a relatively new book, but not more than $10 for any book unless it is one of those 3 in 1 books.

Posted by: Vic We Have No Party at July 03, 2016 10:18 AM (mpXpK)

83 Posted by: Bruce With a Wang! at July 03, 2016 09:38 AM (iQIUe)

Saw two guys in the "tactical style" kilts at a show last weekend. they looked okay, but both guys also looked to be pretty fit (neither heavy nor pajama boy). Also, I don't know whatthe benefit vs. shorts is (somehow I don't see George Will approving of them ).

Posted by: Polliwog the 'Ette at July 03, 2016 10:18 AM (GDulk)

84 Who you calling a not asshole, bub?

Posted by: Anonosaurus Wrecks, Racist for Dinosaurs at July 03, 2016 10:18 AM (Nwg0u)

85 Anybody else sort of like kilts?

Posted by: Bruce With a Wang!

I'm part Scotch, but it would take a lot of the liquid variety or a claymore to get me to wear one.

Posted by: Skip at July 03, 2016 10:19 AM (Yo9Lf)

86 Plus, removal by the States if you turn out to be a Party hack like Suckatire and Kraken.

Posted by: eman at July 03, 2016 10:14 AM (MQEz6)


California, of all states, has a provision whereby its state judges may be ousted within a certain number of years of their appointment.

30 or so years ago, conservatives used this to mount a successful campaign to give the boot to a little-old-lady-in-tennis-shoes liberal judge by the name of Rose Bird, who never met a capital murder conviction she couldn't find a reason to overturn.

Can't imagine that happening nowadays, though.

Posted by: OregonMuse at July 03, 2016 10:21 AM (i3YHF)

87 Staying with the art theme, I got a copy of 'The Dore Illustrations For Dante's Divine Comedy'. It has all 136 of Dore's works for a Longfellow edition of the Comedy in the 1800s. Aside from the artistry, I am fascinated by the technique and plan to learn more about it.

It also means I may FINALLY read the Divine Comedy. I must have read portions back in college, probably the Longfellow translation, but it got lost among the other materials I had to study. Turns out I have an Everyman's Library hardback edition I picked up at the used book store. It had never even been opened. A good value for two bucks. (Yay, Me) This is the Mandelbaum translation, which gets good reviews.

I've been impressed with the Everyman's Library editions I've seen so far. They are very well made and provide plenty of notes and background information. They are a good value, especially for books I will refer to many times.

Posted by: JTB at July 03, 2016 10:21 AM (V+03K)

88 On another note, when you ask ' Wheer is the evidence that a "majority" of Americans value "self-rule and freedom"? ' I'm inclined to agree it isn't there. Lately I've been thinking about the famous Adams passage:

"But should the people of America once become capable of that deep simulation towards one another, and towards foreign nations, which assumes the language of justice and moderation while it is practising iniquity and extravagance, ... the charming pictures of candor, frankness, and sincerity, while it is rioting in rapine and insolence, this country will be the most miserable habitation in the World..."

Ending with:

"Our Constitution was made only for a moral and religious people. It is wholly inadequate to the government of any other."

Conservatives like to cite this, but I'm not sure we're thinking when we do so. Look at the implications: we don't seem to have that now; and if we aren't that kind of people, and Adams is right, then it doesn't make sense to restore the Constitution - something I have believed in doing since I first heard of the matter.

Discouraging thoughts for this weekend, I suppose, but since 2012, I've not seen much hope.

Posted by: George LeS at July 03, 2016 10:21 AM (fzE1w)

89 I always wondered why after the Second World War when lots of former colonies became "independent" that they most went commie. People's Republic this, Federal Democratic Republic that, but not one of them followed the best example there has ever been, the US Constitution and our system of government at the time. They kept re-inventing the wheel and the wheel was always communist.
Posted by: Hairyback Guy at July 03, 2016 09:10 AM (ej1L0)

Well I would guess that since it was the Western democracies that had been their colonial rulers for nearly a century, they wouldn't want to emulate their way of government. They wanted to distance themselves from the West. The Soviets were showing them a different way of doing things. And cash.
Posted by: josephistan at July 03, 2016 10:07 AM (7qAYi)


The short answer/oversimplification is that the Soviets, in spite of all the damage done to it, hit the ground running post-WWII in setting up their satellites. The West stopped long enough to find themselves behind, and then focused much of their attention on a few places that were considered strategically important.


So the Russians, along with Cubans and other revolutionaries, had an infrastructure on the ground, when we had "key leaders" we were trying to support.


With few exceptions, the Russian way won.

Posted by: BurtTC at July 03, 2016 10:23 AM (Dj0WE)

90 I rarely pay more than $3 for an e-book.

If I see a book for $6, I ask myself is this one likely to be twice as good as the other one that cost $3?

Maybe, but why bother? With that extra $3 I can get another $3 book, or three $1 books. There are lots of pretty damn good $1 books out there.

Posted by: eman at July 03, 2016 10:23 AM (MQEz6)

91 Oh, I can't believe I forgot to post this.

The CLFA - Conservative Libertarian Fiction Alliance just announced their 2016 book of the year voting results and our very own pixy-banned oldsailorspoet won 3rd place!

(remove space)

https://conservativelibertarianfictionalliance.com/2016/07/02/ book-of-the-year-winners-announced/

Posted by: @votermom at July 03, 2016 10:23 AM (7lVbc)

92 If you belong to a library, they usually have access to e-books through Freading or Overdrive. I use my library card number to access the sites.

Posted by: Pimping for Paradise at July 03, 2016 10:24 AM (2X7pN)

93 IIRC it is about a pilgrim who learns a lifestyle of constant prayer based on the Jesus Prayer.

Posted by: Northernlurker at July 03, 2016 10:13 AM (s7hQ/)


Heh. It sounds like it's the RO version of the Prayer of Jabez.

Or maybe it would be more correct to say that the Prayer of Jabez is the pop evangelical version of the Way of the Pilgrim.

Posted by: OregonMuse at July 03, 2016 10:24 AM (i3YHF)

94 Polliwog & OM, I'm in Seattle which sometimes feels like Serial Killer Central, and it makes me sick when these animals are portrayed as geniuses of some kind. I purely hated "Silence of the Lambs," terrible book, worse movie. All these creatures manage to do is find a method that works - Bundy pretending to be a cripple and Ridgway picking up street prostitutes - and they stick with it. No magic, no genius, and portraying them even as antiheroes shows a huge moral lack in the writers who do so.

BTW, the Ridgway outcome completely killed capital punishment as far as I am concerned. If Gary Ridgway didn't get hung, preferably in the Iranian fashion, then no one deserves the death penalty. A Republican did that, made that deal with Satan's adopted child.

Posted by: Tonestaple at July 03, 2016 10:24 AM (VsZJP)

95 Excellent book thread as per usual, OM. Thank you.

I'm reading "Rough Riders: Theodore Roosevelt, His Cowboy Regiment, and the Immortal Charge Up an Juan Hill" by Mark Lee Gardner. It's John Milius approved!

I've always loved the story of this collection of hard-bitten Westerners and Hahvud toffs, and this book is written in "ripping yarn" style.

Did not know that in the areas in revolt (most of the island), Spain's military governor had forcefully moved all Cubans from their rural homes and made them relocate to larger towns, which were then surrounded with trenches and barbed wire, in effect making them prison camps. Over 200,000 died of starvation and disease.

Leonard Wood (who was Mrs. McKinley's doctor) and Teddy urged McKinley to intervene. "I have the Navy in good shape, but the Army is awful. The War Department is in utter confusion." Boy would he find this out when trying to arrange transport of men and materiel.

Teddy's wife was recovering from surgery and his son was mysteriously ill, and their condition was serious. But he later confided that "I know I would have turned away from my wife's deathbed to have answered the call...it was my one chance to cut my notch on the stick that stands as a measuring rod in every family." He was always a little ashamed that his father (out of concern for family cohesion, since his wife was a Southern belle) didn't enlist during the Civil War.

So I'm learning a lot. I would also recommend Milius' "The Rough Riders" -- most excellent.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, Literate Savage at July 03, 2016 10:25 AM (jR7Wy)

96 Oregon Muse, the problem is an inherent tendency of murder mysteries. I think it was Michael Gilbert who wondered how many murders had to occur before hostesses stopped inviting Peter Wimsey to house parties.

Posted by: George LeS at July 03, 2016 10:25 AM (fzE1w)

97 JTB, what's the title of that Frederick Hart book you purchased?

I think I may want to get it for myself.

Posted by: OregonMuse at July 03, 2016 10:26 AM (i3YHF)

98 For the fantasy peeps, I was also going to pimp a post I made on crayfisher about tech & magic this week

https://crayfisher.wordpress.com/2016/07/01/freaky-friday-magic-tech/

Posted by: @votermom at July 03, 2016 10:26 AM (7lVbc)

99 I think it was Michael Gilbert who wondered how many murders had to occur before hostesses stopped inviting Peter Wimsey to house parties.

Posted by: George LeS at July 03, 2016 10:25 AM (fzE1w)


I know, right?

Posted by: OregonMuse at July 03, 2016 10:27 AM (i3YHF)

100 My LiV-ish wife just informed me that 'Elly Weasel' died.

Posted by: Mr. Peebles at July 03, 2016 10:28 AM (mL2BD)

101 Vic, I know you mostly use e-readers but 'The Andromeda Strain' ought to be available at your local library (free) or a used book store for a couple of bucks at most. Ten dollars for an e-version of such an
out-of-date book is crazy.

Posted by: JTB at July 03, 2016 09:54 AM (V+03K)

I have a hard time reading print copies of books anymore. I am almost exclusively on my Samsung now. And I agree, $10 for a book that old is insane gouging which is why I refused to buy it. I will pay $10 for a relatively new book, but not more than $10 for any book unless it is one of those 3 in 1 books.
Posted by: Vic We Have No Party at July 03, 2016 10:18 AM (mpXpK)


Amazon lists several hardcover copies under $8 (that includes shipping). Multiple paperback copies for a penny (plus $3.99 shipping).

Posted by: BurtTC at July 03, 2016 10:29 AM (Dj0WE)

102 I feel, and I'm sure Bebe would back me up on this, that a pair of nice man gams in a combat kilt is a fine thing indeed. One of the many joys of RenFest is the preponderance of kilts.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, Literate Savage at July 03, 2016 10:29 AM (jR7Wy)

103 Posted by: OregonMuse at July 03, 2016 10:15 AM (i3YHF)

Lol, like Cabot Cove, although Murder She Wrote was n the last generation of tv mysteries to not have a serial killer. Part of the problem is the insistence on arc-driven rather than episodic stories. The Agatha Christie I was thinking of was The ABC Murders.

Posted by: Polliwog the 'Ette at July 03, 2016 10:30 AM (GDulk)

104 Did not know that in the areas in revolt (most of the island), Spain's military governor had forcefully moved all Cubans from their rural homes and made them relocate to larger towns, which were then surrounded with trenches and barbed wire, in effect making them prison camps. Over 200,000 died of starvation and disease.

How're YOU doin?

Posted by: Pol Pot at July 03, 2016 10:30 AM (i3YHF)

105 It was a truly tragic passing.

Posted by: Emmie Otter at July 03, 2016 10:30 AM (6FqZa)

106 85 Anybody else sort of like kilts?

Posted by: Bruce With a Wang!

I'm part Scotch, but it would take a lot of the liquid variety or a claymore to get me to wear one.
Posted by: Skip at July 03, 2016 10:19 AM (Yo9Lf)

I wore a formal kilt at a wedding in Scotland a number of years ago. It made me feel quite manly actually, at least once I got the proper swagger down.
I did wear boxers underneath.

Posted by: Northernlurker at July 03, 2016 10:31 AM (s7hQ/)

107 96 Oregon Muse, the problem is an inherent tendency of murder mysteries. I think it was Michael Gilbert who wondered how many murders had to occur before hostesses stopped inviting Peter Wimsey to house parties.
Posted by: George LeS at July 03, 2016 10:25 AM (fzE1w)

We know what you mean.

Posted by: Cabot Cove, Maine's Chamber of Commerce at July 03, 2016 10:31 AM (7qAYi)

108 Finished Life at the Bottom: The Worldview That Makes the Underclass by Theodore Dalrymple. What a fantastic book!


It explains, in crystal clear fashion, how England went under. It was written 20 years ago for England, but the mechanisms touch all of humanity. The same Leftist dogmas are at work here, and explain why Obama won election twice.


This goes on my short list of foundational theory books, explaining where we are or how we got to such a place.

Posted by: NaCly Dog at July 03, 2016 10:33 AM (hyuyC)

109 Posted by: Ace: Leader of the Ccks at July 03, 2016 10:00 AM (DEJix)


Trolls.


Did we (or can we) have a rule around here that the use of the word "c*cks" is a bannable offense?

Posted by: BurtTC at July 03, 2016 10:34 AM (Dj0WE)

110 If Josephistan @ 107 doesn't win sockpuppet of the day, I don't think we should even have a contest any more.

Posted by: Tonestaple at July 03, 2016 10:35 AM (VsZJP)

111 My MIL loved Murder She Wrote. I always think of her when the show is mentioned. RIP.

Posted by: @votermom at July 03, 2016 10:35 AM (7lVbc)

112 23 Hard Luck Hank: Suck My Cosmos

I reread this in preparation of reading the latest HLH, Stank Delicious. What I remarked on in this syfy action comedy book is the bad guy's successful plan to allow unlimited immigration for the purpose of creating a hereditary monarchy with himself on the throne. I hope Obozo, Reid, Pelosi, Schumer, McConnell, Ryan etc. consider this book beneath them and don't get any ideas.
Posted by: Anonosaurus Wrecks, Racist for Dinosaurs at July 03, 2016 09:16 AM (Nwg0u)


If you haven't listen to the Audiobook of Hard Luck Hank, the books are read in Character as Hank which in my opinion makes it better, I can't recommend it enough.

Posted by: Patrick From Ohio at July 03, 2016 10:36 AM (c4yY7)

113 It was a delightful show, Votermom, but just how many people have to die before people figure out that Jessica Fletcher is, well, a butcher.

Posted by: Tonestaple at July 03, 2016 10:36 AM (VsZJP)

114 Rose Bird, who never met a capital murder conviction she couldn't find a reason to overturn.

-
The Donk platform has an abolish-capital-punishment plank.

Posted by: Anonosaurus Wrecks, Racist for Dinosaurs at July 03, 2016 10:36 AM (Nwg0u)

115 Posted by: Tonestaple at July 03, 2016 10:36 AM (VsZJP)

Oh I know.
I figure that Cabot Cove residents should just start screaming and bar the door when she would come knocking.

Posted by: @votermom at July 03, 2016 10:39 AM (7lVbc)

116 >>>>>It also means I may FINALLY read the Divine Comedy. I must have read
portions back in college, probably the Longfellow translation,<<<<<<

If you can find the John Ciardi translation with all the footnotes give it a try. It is really very good and the notes will give you a crash course in medieval/early renaissance Italian history.

The forward where he talks about translating poetry is pretty interesting, too. He describes it as transposing music for one instrument to another.

Posted by: the guy that moves pianos for a living at July 03, 2016 10:39 AM (tEDMc)

117 As part of the book thread, and in honor of the 4th of July and the Declaration of Independence, I would encourage all morons to avail themselves of the FREE online courses given by Hilldale College on everything from ancient and modern philosophers and their writings, to The Federalist Papers, and in depth, accurate US history courses.

They are normally ten to eleven weeks in length. Each week, a new chapter is delivered to your computer, to be read at your leisure. Supplemental videos, video lectures, additonal materials etc. are provided.
https://online.hillsdale.edu/dashboard/courses

Or avail yourself of Imprimis, Hillsdale's speech digest in which lectures are printed that are given by notables such as Clarence Thomas, Andrew McCarthy etc. Again, free.

https://imprimis.hillsdale.edu/


I send donations to Hillsdale because of the incredible work they do trying to keep conservatism and especially a quality liberal arts education available.
The Constitution course has a companion reader that they ask a $100 donation to receive. Thick, printed book, with detailed historical information leading to the whys of the writing of the Constitution. Not required, but an example of the excellent materials Hillsdale produces.

Posted by: Jen the original at July 03, 2016 10:39 AM (HbTvc)

118 Still reading Robert Crais novels starring Elvis Cole and Joe Pike.

Current one being "Lullaby Town." All the ones I have read so far are set in that refreshingly wonderful time before cell phones and the internet.

Any of his been given the Hollywood treatment?

Posted by: the littl shyning man at July 03, 2016 10:40 AM (U6f54)

119 If you haven't listen to the Audiobook of Hard Luck Hank, the books are read in Character as Hank which in my opinion makes it better, I can't recommend it enough.

-
I'm a sucker for Amazon. I buy the audio and ebook whenever immersive reading is available. If they ever do a Hank movie, I could see Patrick Warburton, Puddy from Seinfeld, as Hank.

Posted by: Anonosaurus Wrecks, Racist for Dinosaurs at July 03, 2016 10:41 AM (Nwg0u)

120 97 ... OM, The Hart book is "Frederick Hart: Changing Tides" by Michael Novak and Frederick Turner. I got an excellent used copy for under ten dollars. It was published in 2005.

There is another book, "Frederick Hart: Sculptor" by Tom Wolfe that came out in 1995. Used copies are available on Amazon for a few bucks. I'll probably get that one as well.

Posted by: JTB at July 03, 2016 10:41 AM (V+03K)

121 In right-click resources, archive.org has a site with 1000s of downloadable vintage magazines. Galaxy, Starlog, Avalon Hill's The General and many others for freebies.Perfect to fill out that e-reader.https://archive.org/details/magazine_rack
Posted by: Laurie David's Cervix at July 03, 2016 10:17 AM (kdS6q)

How about magazines for a more general audience? I'm thinking Big 'Uns in particular.

Posted by: Al Bundy at July 03, 2016 10:41 AM (ZnIt3)

122 Posted by: Vic We Have No Party at July 03, 2016 08:59 AM (mpXpK)

I read Andromeda Strain some months ago and enjoyed it, very similar to the film but goes into more detail. Rather watch the movie than read it again though, the acting in it was really good which I missed when reading it.

Read Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet and Midsummer Night's Dream, the first with a lot of action and the second love stories set in a dreamy fantasy setting, both very good. The year is half over and I've only managed 15 plays/poems out of 47, goal of reading it all this year not looking so good.

Did watch the new BBC film of Richard II, very expensive looking production with many big-name actors, very good. Will watch the others after reading them.

Posted by: waelse1 at July 03, 2016 10:41 AM (PjbBv)

123 I love kilts and the men who wear them I am pondering founding a charitable organization, "Kilts Unlimited" to promote the wearing of kilts--assisting impoverished kilt-curious gentlemen with the acquisition of their first kilt, re-homing kilts, classes on kilt logistics, and heavy propaganda on how kilts are very forgiving of figure flaws and are guaranteed to attract feminine attention. (Which, I understand, many of you Morons are interested in.) I know I can count on significant 'Ette support for this project.

Recently reading the Poor Man's Fight series by Elliot Kay, and enjoying it.Central premise being in the future, educational corporations assign debt to high school graduates depending on how they do on the final test, and there is evidence they are cooking the results to create conditions of economic slavery. Lots of good space battles and derring-do.

Posted by: Sabrina Chase at July 03, 2016 10:44 AM (GG9V6)

124 Last week there was a discussion of Hercule Poirot, and his partner whatsisname.

I remembered Monsieur Pamplemouse and Pommes Frites.

Michale Bond, the author of the Paddington Bear series wrote another series about an ex-Surete officer named Pamplemousse, who had been sacked over an unfortunate choice of mistresses, turned food and travel author for Michelin. He travels with a retired bloodhound named Pommes Frites that was a failed drug-sniffing dog.

It is very Paddingtonlike, and very Christie-like: Pamplemousse is doing his thing and either witnesses something, his reputation makes someone overreact, or he gets picked, on the sly, to go do something because official attention will cause issues.
And the situations are shark-jumping level of bizarre. One I remember had a blimp, a fake menhir and the SAS dressed as nuns.

All the titles have Pamplemousse in them.

Posted by: Kindltot at July 03, 2016 10:46 AM (ry34m)

125 They wanted to distance themselves from the West. The Soviets were showing them a different way of doing things. And cash.
Posted by: josephistan at July 03, 2016 10:07 AM (7qAYi)

Yup...plus commie violence and intimidation helped out quite a bit. But I was alluding to the fact that no Ho Chi Minh or Pol Pot or Idi Amin types ever studied what would actually work in their country like our system and try to emulate that for the betterment of their people. They simply copied the USSR or their surrogates which failed each and every time and caused millions and millions of deaths. Even those on the right like Pinochet and Somoza did the same thing. No one across the globe has ever used our system when starting their "new and glorious" revolutions.

Posted by: Hairyback Guy at July 03, 2016 10:47 AM (ej1L0)

126 >>>>> the new BBC film of Richard II<<<<<

"Come cousin, seize the crown...."

Posted by: the guy that moves pianos for a living at July 03, 2016 10:47 AM (tEDMc)

127 Posted by: NaCly Dog at July 03, 2016 10:33 AM (hyuyC)

I couldn't read it. Just the introduction was so horrifying with such brutal examples of a degradation willingly embraced, is stuck in my mind several years later and I couldn't bear to go further.

Posted by: Polliwog the 'Ette at July 03, 2016 10:47 AM (GDulk)

128 RIP, Elie Wiesel

Posted by: West Town at July 03, 2016 10:47 AM (dx6bM)

129 116 ... The Guy, Thanks for the recommendation on the Ciardi translation. I'll look for it. I have no problem with owning various versions of classics and his notes on translating sounds very interesting.

Posted by: JTB at July 03, 2016 10:48 AM (V+03K)

130 I wonder how Colorado Springs feels about "Homicide Hunter" with Joe Kenda? To watch that show you'd think Colorado Springs must be the murder capital of the world.

Posted by: josephistan at July 03, 2016 10:48 AM (7qAYi)

131
How about magazines for a more general audience? I'm thinking Big 'Uns in particular.
Posted by: Al Bundy



Scroll down. There actually is a Men's Magazines section....

Posted by: Laurie David's Cervix at July 03, 2016 10:49 AM (kdS6q)

132 I love kilts and the men who wear them I am pondering founding a charitable organization, "Kilts Unlimited" to promote the wearing of kilts--assisting impoverished kilt-curious gentlemen with the acquisition of their first kilt, re-homing kilts, classes on kilt logistics, and heavy propaganda on how kilts are very forgiving of figure flaws and are guaranteed to attract feminine attention. (Which, I understand, many of you Morons are interested in.) I know I can count on significant 'Ette support for this project.

Posted by: Sabrina Chase at July 03, 2016 10:44 AM (GG9V6)


I'm going to remain neutral on the role of the kilt in attracting wimminfolk, and/or as a way for men to be comfortable in formalwear (it can't be any worse than the classic suit, with jacket).


I have no intention of wearing one, the same way I have no intention of getting on snapchat. That part of the world exists for others, not me.


The bottom line though: it's a skirt. Call it whatever you want, but it's a skirt.

Posted by: BurtTC at July 03, 2016 10:49 AM (Dj0WE)

133 My wife used to work for a newspaper. One day she was reading a Pamplemousse in the break room, when the food editor came in and said, "Grapefruit and French Fries? That's disgusting."

As mysteries they're just so-so. But the Pommes Frites humor is good, and the descriptions of food are wonderful.

Posted by: George LeS at July 03, 2016 10:51 AM (fzE1w)

134 No one across the globe has ever used our system when starting their "new and glorious" revolutions.
Posted by: Hairyback Guy at July 03, 2016 10:47 AM (ej1L0)

It is a curious thing that even the countries that achieved independence soon after us, such as Haiti or the Latin American republics, didn't attempt to imitate our system.

Posted by: josephistan at July 03, 2016 10:52 AM (7qAYi)

135 Discussion of the apostles reminded me of a great book I recently finished. When Breath Becomes Air by Paul Kalanithi is autobiographical and written by a brilliant neurosurgeon with a deep faith and a tragic story.

Posted by: Cricket at July 03, 2016 10:54 AM (ohUEV)

136 127 Polliwog the 'Ette

Yes, I know. It took me an entire month to read it.
I had to put it down for a bit, and reconnect with a world of good people and good things in it.

Posted by: NaCly Dog at July 03, 2016 10:54 AM (hyuyC)

137 Regarding the no titles in America thing, I was aware of this and that is why it annoys me when I see former politicians go on tv interviews and are referred to as their former position such as Mr. Speaker, Senator, Govenor or Mr President.

Posted by: Darth Randall at July 03, 2016 10:54 AM (6n332)

138 How about magazines for a more general audience? I'm thinking Big 'Uns in particular.

Posted by: Al Bundy at July 03, 2016 10:41 AM (ZnIt3)


We 're all sold out of Big 'Uns. Would you settle for "Juggs"?

Posted by: sleazy pr0n shop propietor at July 03, 2016 10:54 AM (i3YHF)

139 So no toga parties for BurtTC, I guess.

To the champagne fountain, Incitatus! Geeup!

Posted by: All Hail Eris, Literate Savage at July 03, 2016 10:54 AM (jR7Wy)

140
the John Ciardi translation with all the footnotes
Posted by: the guy that moves pianos for a livin


John Ciadi used to do segments on one of the NPR news shows on word origins that were great. He also wrote a number of books on Etymology, such as:

A Browser's Dictionary, 1980

Good Words to You, 1987

And they are well worth tracking down.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Ciardi

Posted by: Laurie David's Cervix at July 03, 2016 10:54 AM (kdS6q)

141 "Riddle of the lost city under a lake: Was one of Jesus' disciples laid to rest in ancient metropolis in Kyrgyzstan?"

http://tinyurl.com/je67zwj

Posted by: Dr. Varno at July 03, 2016 10:55 AM (GdFQh)

142 RIP, Elie Wiesel

-
See WZ. Son of Clinton coconspirator Mad Max Blumenthall says Weisel was a victim of war crimes who became a supporter of war crimes by supporting Israel.

Posted by: Anonosaurus Wrecks, Racist for Dinosaurs at July 03, 2016 10:56 AM (Nwg0u)

143 I really like "promise of blood" very good in the same vein as the French revolution but with magic, The Powder Mages over throw the King and his Mage Cabal because they bleed the country dry and sign a treaty that gives everything away to a hated enemy because the country is broke. The Third book in the trilogy is out but I haven't read it yet.

Posted by: Patrick From Ohio at July 03, 2016 10:56 AM (c4yY7)

144 134 josephistan

Well, in Revolutionary France there was a lot of emphasis on a written Constitution.

And Thomas Jefferson was there.


BBL, I've got to see my widowed friend up the hill.

Posted by: NaCly Dog at July 03, 2016 10:56 AM (hyuyC)

145 But I was alluding to the fact that no Ho Chi Minh or Pol Pot or Idi Amin types ever studied what would actually work in their country like our system and try to emulate that for the betterment of their people.

Posted by: Hairyback Guy at July 03, 2016 10:47 AM (ej1L0)


I think that's because Uncle Ho and Amin had no interest in the betterment of their people. What they wanted more than anything else was grabbing power and holding on to it after they got it. Commie systems are great for that. Decentralized, limited-government federal republic arrangements, not so much.

Posted by: OregonMuse at July 03, 2016 10:59 AM (i3YHF)

146 All the book talk has inspired me to read a little. See you later

Posted by: josephistan at July 03, 2016 11:02 AM (7qAYi)

147 67 17 I always wondered why after the Second World War when lots of former colonies became "independent" that they most went commie. People's Republic this, Federal Democratic Republic that, but not one of them followed the best example there has ever been, the US Constitution and our system of government at the time. They kept re-inventing the wheel and the wheel was always communist.
Posted by: Hairyback Guy at July 03, 2016 09:10 AM (ej1L0)

Well I would guess that since it was the Western democracies that had been their colonial rulers for nearly a century, they wouldn't want to emulate their way of government. They wanted to distance themselves from the West. The Soviets were showing them a different way of doing things. And cash.
Posted by: josephistan at July 03, 2016 10:07 AM (7qAYi)

Many factors were working there. You had a postwar "tide" of intellectual belief in non-totalitarian socialism, illustrated in Europe by the move toward nanny states promising "free" health care and a generous social safety net. (Europeans have always had to answer to their betters, be they warlords, kings & queens, or the modern-day ministers, so the notion of American-style freedom has never taken there.)

Also, some number of wealthy and influential Third World citizens got higher educations in the West, where mid-century academia was all-in for socialism.

The Soviets were there, of course, actively pursuing world domination whereas the West simply wanted to tend their WWII wounds and get on with living peacefully. Strategic minerals (sub-Saharan Africa), warm-water ports (Cam Ranh Bay), and military bases (Cuba) were all on the USSR radar. In any power vacuum, the best-funded and -motivated forces tend to win, and when the colonial powers pulled out, the Soviets sponsored whoever promised to institute a Marxist dictatorship, heavy on the dictator part.

Then there's the problem of "straight" borders, drawn by the colonial powers with no regard for tribal and cultural loyalties. Pretty much the only way to hold these synthetic "nations" together was by strongman rule. Or, as one observer said, "One man, one vote ... once."

Going off that point, few places in the world have the cultural background that allows democracy to exist. I'm referring specifically to the democratic tradition of leaders resisting the urge to serve themselves with their power, which owes everything to the Cross.

And this may be a small point, but there is (was) one little pearl of Western-style democracy established on the west coast of Africa, called Liberia. It had a president, bicameral legislature, and constitution modeled after the U.S.' It was also pretty much a failure for the cultural reasons outlined above and not much inspiration to the rest of the Third World.

Posted by: Michael Rittenhouse at July 03, 2016 11:02 AM (n8v1c)

148 Ciardi is also the fellow that described modern art as, "what happens when painters stop looking at girls and persuade themselves that they have a better idea."

Posted by: the guy that moves pianos for a living at July 03, 2016 11:02 AM (tEDMc)

149 OM, Mrs. JTB and I enjoyed the Midsomer Murders for the acting and scenery. But did you ever notice there are ALWAYS three murders in every show? Realizing that, we had fun guessing who the third one would be. But have to agree, I'm surprised the English countryside wasn't depopulated. Also, according to the series, every rural male over the age of fifty and every feisty female over the age of sixty has a 12 gauge, side by side shotgun. I began to wonder if it was a requirement for citizenship or something.

Posted by: JTB at July 03, 2016 11:03 AM (V+03K)

150 Speaking of our secular priests on the bench . . .

http://tinyurl.com/h2foxm3

Posted by: Anonosaurus Wrecks, Racist for Dinosaurs at July 03, 2016 11:04 AM (Nwg0u)

151 So no toga parties for BurtTC, I guess.

To the champagne fountain, Incitatus! Geeup!
Posted by: All Hail Eris, Literate Savage at July 03, 2016 10:54 AM (jR7Wy)


I remember that being a thing back in the day, yet somehow I missed out. I really don't think I did, indeed, miss out.


Posted by: BurtTC at July 03, 2016 11:04 AM (Dj0WE)

152 62 Let's not forget about Mr. Ace O Spades himself freaking out over the prospect of Donald Trump.

"Traitors to the left of me, cucks to the right, here I am, stuck in the middle with you"
Posted by: Ace: Leader of the Cucks at July 03, 2016 10:00 AM (DEJix)


As someone who takes being called a cuck a badge of pride at this point, I think it's hilarious you believe we'd let Ace be our leader.

Posted by: AD at July 03, 2016 11:07 AM (U8QSF)

153 Posted by: BurtTC at July 03, 2016 11:04 AM (Dj0WE)

You did not, sir! I did my one toga party, acted more Old Republic and not enough Decline and Fall to my date's liking, and left early.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, Literate Savage at July 03, 2016 11:07 AM (jR7Wy)

154 "Badge of pride..."

"Badge of honor" whatever, I just woke up.

Posted by: AD at July 03, 2016 11:08 AM (U8QSF)

155 You did not, sir! I did my one toga party, acted more Old Republic and not enough Decline and Fall to my date's liking, and left early.

-
Not enough vomitoriums?

Posted by: Anonosaurus Wrecks, Racist for Dinosaurs at July 03, 2016 11:09 AM (Nwg0u)

156 Just starting two of my all-time favorite historical novels, neither of which I have red and at least 40 years

1. The Strong Men, by John Brick, which is an incredibly well-written story about a small company of Frontier Rifleman who help out General Washington at Valley Forge; and,

2. The Count of Monte Cristo, which is of course the greatest novel ever written.

Brick had about 10 other historical novels about the Revolutionary and Civil Wars that I have not read yet.

That's my project for the summer.

Posted by: Sharkman at July 03, 2016 11:10 AM (CS7jF)

157 The toga started out as a shepherd's wool blanket and became the morning coat of the ancient world.

Posted by: the guy that moves pianos for a living at July 03, 2016 11:11 AM (tEDMc)

158 Not enough vomitoriums?
Posted by: Anonosaurus Wrecks, Racist for Dinosaurs at July 03, 2016 11:09 AM (Nwg0u)
---
There's never enough vomitoriums.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, Literate Savage at July 03, 2016 11:13 AM (jR7Wy)

159 The bottom line though: it's a skirt. Call it whatever you want, but it's a skirt.

Posted by: BurtTC at July 03, 2016 10:49 AM

I beg to differ, it's a kilt.

Posted by: Skip at July 03, 2016 11:14 AM (Yo9Lf)

160 It was also pretty much a failure for the cultural reasons outlined above and not much inspiration to the rest of the Third World.
Posted by: Michael Rittenhouse at July 03, 2016 11:02 AM (n8v1c)

Yup...forgot about Liberia. I think there was a video back I the 80's of them marching out their President and his cabinet and tying them to poles and shooting them with Garands.

So many so called idiot leaders across the Globe can quote Marx and Lenin and Mao but never Jefferson or Adams or Franklin.

Posted by: Hairyback Guy at July 03, 2016 11:15 AM (ej1L0)

161 The bottom line though: it's a skirt. Call it whatever you want, but it's a skirt.

Posted by: BurtTC at July 03, 2016 10:49 AM

I beg to differ, it's a kilt.
Posted by: Skip at July 03, 2016 11:14 AM (Yo9Lf)


Just words.

Posted by: BurtTC at July 03, 2016 11:16 AM (Dj0WE)

162 Speaking of "Noble" things. Hold these two thoughts in your head at the same time:

Barack Hussein Obama has a Nobel Peace Prize.

So does Elie Wiesel.

Posted by: Sharkman at July 03, 2016 11:17 AM (CS7jF)

163 I've got the History Channel on as I peruse the book thread. Just saw a commercial for a new History Channel series, Ozzy and Jack Osbourne tour the world.

Glad to see the History Channel maintaining its high standards.

Posted by: Anonosaurus Wrecks, Racist for Dinosaurs at July 03, 2016 11:18 AM (Nwg0u)

164 Posted by: BurtTC at July 03, 2016 11:04 AM (Dj0WE)

You did not, sir! I did my one toga party, acted more Old Republic and not enough Decline and Fall to my date's liking, and left early.
Posted by: All Hail Eris, Literate Savage at July 03, 2016 11:07 AM (jR7Wy)


I won't go all philosophical here, but that was my general experience with all such "themed" parties and events. It was like an extra layer of phony, intended to spice up what was otherwise just a bunch of bored people with a need to do something to fill their idle time.


Which is fine. But it is what it is.

Posted by: BurtTC at July 03, 2016 11:18 AM (Dj0WE)

165 It is a curious thing that even the countries that
achieved independence soon after us, such as Haiti or the Latin American
republics, didn't attempt to imitate our system.
Posted by: josephistan at July 03, 2016 10:52 AM (7qAYi)


This is not completely true. Gran Colombia (what had been Nueva Granada, and became Colombia, Venezuela, Ecuador, Panama and other bits) was an attempt at a federal state, but broke apart under regional concerns and the drive for a strong centralized state (that each faction determined should be controlled by OUR GUYS ONLY.)
Which had a predictable result.

Also, the post-revolution "Liga Federal" period of the United Provinces of the Rio de la Plata (Argentina, Uruguay) had a federal system that broke down in almost the exact same manner

Paraguay adopted many federalist elements into its constitution after the War of the Triple Alliance, much of it on the urging of President Rutheford Hayes, but it also fell regularly into problems because it was unable to resolve the issues between the demand for centralized government, the OUR GUYS reflex, and economic troubles.

Pinochet was reactionary, but you have to remember he was also fighting what he considered a revolution carried out by an elected communist leaning government. He also implemented economic reforms based on the free market vision of the Chicago school, as imaged by Milton Friedman, and has become one of the more stable countries in South America.


Posted by: Kindltot at July 03, 2016 11:19 AM (ry34m)

166 It is a curious thing that even the countries that achieved independence soon after us, such as Haiti or the Latin American republics, didn't attempt to imitate our system.

Posted by: josephistan at July 03, 2016 10:52 AM (7qAYi)


At this point, I think I am willing to argue that the decade of 1780 was the *last* time a group of men got together and honestly tried to come up with a form of government that was truly just and truly represented the people.

After that, it was all about how to grab power.

This is why the Zinn/Chomsky crowd accuses the founders of just trying to arrange things for their own benefit at the expense of everybody else. Because it's what they themselves would do, and they can't imagine anyone doing anything else.

Posted by: OregonMuse at July 03, 2016 11:20 AM (i3YHF)

167 I wore a kilt to some local Scottish Games about thirty years ago when I was MUCH more fit. (Yeah, I wore shorts.) It was actually comfortable once I got past the strangeness. But walking to the entrance in a kilt, at my size, with a dirk on my belt, a skein dhu in my stocking, and a repro Claymore (broad sword, not basket hilt) over my shoulder, I did get some looks.

Seriously, I think the dress kilt outfit for formal events is fine. Fortunately, I no longer attend such things. But if I did and was in shape, I would consider it.

Posted by: JTB at July 03, 2016 11:26 AM (V+03K)

168 8
Factual, informative and the tie-in to Catch-22

Sigh. The most exciting tie-in to Catch-22 I could come up with was (while reading the bit about titles) briefly wondering whether Duke Duke Duke, the well-known Duke of Earl, was related to Major Major Major.

Posted by: Anachronda at July 03, 2016 11:26 AM (Oi5b2)

169 Shakespeare Would be Andre the Giant

Posted by: misc at July 03, 2016 11:28 AM (CRXed)

170 Pinochet was reactionary, but you have to remember he was also fighting what he considered a revolution carried out by an elected communist leaning government. He also implemented economic reforms based on the free market vision of the Chicago school, as imaged by Milton Friedman, and has become one of the more stable countries in South America.
Posted by: Kindltot at July 03, 2016 11:19 AM (ry34m)

Yup...I thought General Pinochet did a good job with what he was dealing with at the time but the Somoza family really were just gangsters who missed a great opportunity all for greed and ego.

Posted by: Hairyback Guy at July 03, 2016 11:29 AM (ej1L0)

171 137, Darth Randall, this, this, this. It drives me insane to hear ordinary citizens referred to by titles that they are no longer entitled to. I think we would be better off if we never called these people by any title at all, not Senator, not Congressman, not President. They are just citizens, no better, and frequently worse, than the rest of us.

I got into this discussion on Facebook once, in a conservative group, and I was told it was just a courtesy, but I still maintain it's a completely inappropriate one in a republic.

Posted by: Tonestaple at July 03, 2016 11:29 AM (VsZJP)

172 Think all the US citizens Knighted by the Queen of England were working for US best interest?

Like Federal Reserve Chairman Greenspan?

Posted by: misc at July 03, 2016 11:30 AM (CRXed)

173 149 OM, Mrs. JTB and I enjoyed the Midsomer Murders for the acting and scenery. But did you ever notice there are ALWAYS three murders in every show? Realizing that, we had fun guessing who the third one would be. But have to agree, I'm surprised the English countryside wasn't depopulated. Also, according to the series, every rural male over the age of fifty and every feisty female over the age of sixty has a 12 gauge, side by side shotgun. I began to wonder if it was a requirement for citizenship or something.
Posted by: JTB at July 03, 2016 11:03 AM (V+03K)
===========

There is now Agatha Raisin and her Quiche of Death, also with multiple murders. The plots are silly but it is filmed in the Cotswolds and is quite pretty. The character is very flawed which also makes it different. I watch it online. Not sure when it will air in the US.

Posted by: Bruce With a Wang! at July 03, 2016 11:30 AM (iQIUe)

174 'Morning, Book Worms. This was on the Kindle freebie list this morning for those who like Westerns. It has 70% five-star ratings.

http://amzn.to/299yE2S

Posted by: RushBabe at July 03, 2016 11:31 AM (qCwFP)

175 Still reading a lot about Russia. A new book came out "Vodka Politics" by Mark Lawrence Schrad about Russia's unbelievable drinking problem and how Russia's rulers since the Middle Ages have used it as an indispensable tool to fill up the state coffers and keep the populace cowed. From the time of the Tsars until recently, decisions made high up have been fueled by insanely drunk tyrants, and the revenues from sale of vodka have been the majority of the state income. Russian men have a life expectancy lower than most African nations, and the population is declining as a result of premature deaths, multiple abortions, fetal alcohol syndrome, and extremely poor health care.

Explains a lot about Russia's actions, for instance trying to incorporate, one way or another,, ethnic Russians in neighboring countries, ala Sudetenland.

Posted by: JHW at July 03, 2016 11:31 AM (kn0BL)

176 This is why the Zinn/Chomsky crowd accuses the founders of just trying to arrange things for their own benefit at the expense of everybody else.

Posted by: OregonMuse at July 03, 2016 11:20 AM (i3YHF)
-------------------------------------------

Thank the lord above our founders were literate men and left an extensive documentary record behind of the arguments for and against each stage in developing our Republican form of government.

Modern leftists always project their evil onto their opponents. It's the method by which we can know their future plans: and accusation the lefties mount is nothing more than an announcement of their next steps.

Posted by: MTF at July 03, 2016 11:31 AM (tPjmG)

177 You read about socialist and communist systems and you realize those systems die from corruption and suppression of human spirit.



Posted by: misc at July 03, 2016 11:32 AM (CRXed)

178 Thanks for the link for '50 Core Documents' - just ordered a paperback copy because it's the type of book that should be owned in print.

I've never read Eli Weisel's 'Night", so I will put it on the list (think Amazon jacked the price?). Maybe in the fall...

Read Matt Reilly's 'Contest' this week - stupid, fun action story.

Posted by: Lizzy at July 03, 2016 11:35 AM (NOIQH)

179 Shattered Spear (The Lost Stars #4) by Jack Campbell

Excellent. Probably best read in order for maximum enjoyment. Bigger mix of battles. More foes than previous in the series.

Posted by: misc at July 03, 2016 11:35 AM (CRXed)

180 The latest dystopian work that I'm reading is the Fortress Farm trilogy by G.R. Carter (available on Kindle Unlimited). In this one, the events leading to the collapse of civilization have three main components: 1) ever-increasing solar activity is causing disruption and damage to electronics and electrical infrastructure, 2) the U.S. has been geographically reorganized into districts, with almost no population outside of the "district capitols", and 3) a single company which has basically come to control the entire internet is run by a cult; the cult has also infiltrated the upper echelons of government and other industries by promising eternal life through one's "profile", which will live on forever online. TEOTWAWKI comes when the cult pulls the plug on the entire internet (and virtually everything at this point requires connectivity to function) in order to pull off a sort Ayers/Erhlich killoff so that they can rebuild society in their own vision.

Posted by: Country Singer at July 03, 2016 11:37 AM (GUBah)

181 Shattered Spear (The Lost Stars #4) by Jack Campbell

This series is a space opera about recovering from fascism.

It is an offshoot series from the two Lost Fleet series which are about recovering from wartime suppression of freedom.

All of these are space opera. Very good space opera.

Posted by: misc at July 03, 2016 11:38 AM (CRXed)

182 This is why the Zinn/Chomsky crowd accuses the founders of just trying
to arrange things for their own benefit at the expense of everybody
else.



Posted by: OregonMuse at July 03, 2016 11:20 AM (i3YHF)




#30: https://tinyurl.com/brjhz

Posted by: Country Singer at July 03, 2016 11:39 AM (GUBah)

183 I've been wanting to read "Vodka Politics" for a long time, but it's unavailable at my library and the Kindle costs $14.39. Why would a Kindle version need to be fifteen bucks?!

Posted by: All Hail Eris, Literate Savage at July 03, 2016 11:39 AM (jR7Wy)

184 Thanks for the link for '50 Core Documents' - just ordered a paperback copy because it's the type of book that should be owned in print.

I've never read Eli Weisel's 'Night", so I will put it on the list (think Amazon jacked the price?). Maybe in the fall...

Read Matt Reilly's 'Contest' this week - stupid, fun action story.
Posted by: Lizzy at July 03, 2016 11:35 AM (NOIQH)


I have a copy of Night around here somewhere... if my daughter didn't lose it. She had to read it for school a few years ago.


I did the same... whenever. I remember enough of it to know it's probably time to read it again.


I have no words to properly put into context the passing of this man. He lived.


I don't know how else to say it. He lived.

Posted by: BurtTC at July 03, 2016 11:39 AM (Dj0WE)

185 Even those on the right like Pinochet and Somoza did the same thing. No one across the globe has ever used our system when starting their "new and glorious" revolutions.

Posted by: Hairyback Guy at July 03, 2016 10:47 AM (ej1L0)


I don't think either Somoza, father or son, ever "studied" governmental systems. They just ran things to the benefit of themselves and their cronies.


Pinochet, I believe, was better educated, and upon his retirement, restored Chile to basically its original constitution, which was fairly good. Remember, Pinochet was the reaction to an all-but-completed Communist coup.

Posted by: Alberta Oil Peon at July 03, 2016 11:41 AM (GSdpU)

186
In this one, the events leading to the collapse of civilization have three main components: 1) ever-increasing solar activity is causing disruption and damage to electronics and electrical infrastructure

It sure won't be from the present puny solar cycle.

Posted by: Bertram Cabot Jr. at July 03, 2016 11:43 AM (IqV8l)

187 Posted by: Sabrina Chase at July 03, 2016 10:44 AM (GG9V6)



I'm on my second kilt now. The first was in Black Watch tartan (I'm distantly related to the Munro clan) and the current one is the US Army tartan. Eventually, when budget permits, I'll get one in my clan (Cunningham) tartan. In the interim, I'm thinking of picking up a UtiliKilt of some variety.

But yes, the lasses do seem to like them.

Posted by: Country Singer at July 03, 2016 11:47 AM (GUBah)

188 It sure won't be from the present puny solar cycle.

Posted by: Bertram Cabot Jr. at July 03, 2016 11:43 AM (IqV8l)


Tell me about it! I'm an amateur radio operator and band conditions have really been terrible.

Posted by: Country Singer at July 03, 2016 11:48 AM (GUBah)

189 #183 Eris, Good Reads have several reviews of "Vodka Politics"| that are far better than my feeble attempt. One of the funny? stories is about the Russian Baltic fleet sailing past Britain to go to the Pacific to fight the Japanese navy in 1905. Everyone was so drunk they got in the middle of a British fishing fleet and thought they were being attacked by the Japanese Navy and opened fire. Almost caused a war with Britain, but they were so shit-faced their gunnery was worthless. Half their fleet ran aground.

The book is both highly entertaining and tragic at the same time. A very good read.

Posted by: JHW at July 03, 2016 11:48 AM (kn0BL)

190 Barack Hussein Obama has a Nobel Peace Prize.

So does Elie Wiesel.

Posted by: Sharkman at July 03, 2016 11:17 AM (CS7jF)


They awarded Obongo the Nobel Peace Prize because, owing to a failure in imagination, there is no Nobel Prize for "useless". But since they had previously awarded the Peace prize to Yassir Arafat, the Peace Prize had, by default, become "useless".

Posted by: Alberta Oil Peon at July 03, 2016 11:49 AM (GSdpU)

191 >>TEOTWAWKI comes when the cult pulls the plug on the entire internet (and
virtually everything at this point requires connectivity to function)
in order to pull off a sort Ayers/Erhlich killoff so that they can
rebuild society in their own vision.


Yikes!
And this is why I'm leery of innovations like Google's driverless cars that they want to make "human-proof" (no manual controls).

Posted by: Lizzy at July 03, 2016 11:50 AM (NOIQH)

192 For those interested in how the eruption of Vesuvius managed to knock out a bunch of B-25s, here is a site on the incident. Strangely in the photographs I can't find a single snub-nosed B-25H, just J models.

http://www.warwingsart.com/12thAirForce/Vesuvius.html

Posted by: Anna Puma at July 03, 2016 11:51 AM (V/vW+)

193 Pinochet, I believe, was better educated, and upon his retirement, restored Chile to basically its original constitution, which was fairly good. Remember, Pinochet was the reaction to an all-but-completed Communist coup.
Posted by: Alberta Oil Peon at July 03, 2016 11:41 AM (GSdpU)

======

I believe he was elected and served 1 or 2 terms as President under a modified constitution.

Posted by: San Franpsycho at July 03, 2016 11:51 AM (EZebt)

194 113
It was a delightful show, Votermom, but just how many people have to die
before people figure out that Jessica Fletcher is, well, a butcher.


Hmm. Now you've made start to wonder about Father Brown.

Posted by: Anachronda at July 03, 2016 11:51 AM (Oi5b2)

195 78
It looked like a small town, but the murders were so frequent, but it was like half of the town was out trying to murder the other half.
Posted by: OregonMuse at July 03, 2016 10:15 AM (i3YHF)


In Barbara Tuchman's "The Guns of August", the part about Archduke Franz Ferdinand's assassination was unintentionally hilarious. She made it sound like there was hardly anyone in Sarajevo who wasn't trying to kill him.

Posted by: rickl at July 03, 2016 11:51 AM (sdi6R)

196 I thought Ringo's "The Last Centurion" was one of the better apocalypse stories, with its one-two-three punch of global pandemic, global cooling, and poor governance. Great musings on preparedness, self-reliance, and human nature. Also lots of black humor.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, Literate Savage at July 03, 2016 11:51 AM (jR7Wy)

197 I thought Ringo's "The Last Centurion" was one of
the better apocalypse stories...
Posted by: All Hail Eris, Literate Savage at July 03, 2016 11:51 AM (jR7Wy)


I'll have to check that one out!

Posted by: Country Singer at July 03, 2016 11:53 AM (GUBah)

198 122
I read Andromeda Strain some months ago and enjoyed it, very similar
to the film but goes into more detail. Rather watch the movie than
read it again though, the acting in it was really good which I missed
when reading it.


There was a mini-series done by one of them thar cable channels a coupla years ago, which I missed because life.

Anyone know if it was any good?

Posted by: Anachronda at July 03, 2016 11:53 AM (Oi5b2)

199 I always wondered why after the Second World War when lots of former colonies became "independent" that they most went commie. People's Republic this, Federal Democratic Republic that, but not one of them followed the best example there has ever been, the US Constitution and our system of government at the time. They kept re-inventing the wheel and the wheel was always communist.
Posted by: Hairyback Guy at July 03, 2016 09:10 AM (ej1L0

---------------------

Many, if not most, of the leaders had been schooled at Oxford/cambridge/and suchlike so of course they would emerge as commie assholes. Additionally the US system was designed to inhibit theft while Socialism in practice is it's embodiment.

Posted by: Vlad the Impaler, whittling away like mad at July 03, 2016 11:55 AM (/XV2Z)

200 Posted by: Lizzy at July 03, 2016 11:50 AM (NOIQH)



The longer I work in my field, the more of a luddite I become. You realize how fragile everything actually is when a large part of your job is figuring out vulnerabilities in technology.

Posted by: Country Singer at July 03, 2016 11:56 AM (GUBah)

201 In Barbara Tuchman's "The Guns of August", the part about Archduke Franz Ferdinand's assassination was unintentionally hilarious. She made it sound like there was hardly anyone in Sarajevo who wasn't trying to kill him.

Posted by: rickl at July 03, 2016 11:51 AM (sdi6R)


Sadly true. The absolute stone-deafness of a ruling class that thought sending the heir into a hell hole, along with his lovely bride, would calm their subjects.

Posted by: BurtTC at July 03, 2016 11:56 AM (Dj0WE)

202 *looks through the photos again*

Actually looks like the volcano 86'd all their C and D models.

Posted by: Anna Puma at July 03, 2016 11:57 AM (V/vW+)

203 No real reading this week except trying to clean out paperwork (4 years worth).

Former colonial states, especially in South America and Africa, seem to be set up with a civil law system (roughly Napoleonic top-down) rather than common law (Anglo individual). I think people raised in the top-down systems really do not understand on a visceral level the concept of free-born human beings. How much of that is due to religious influences, I can't know or understand, but I really think that aspect of government structures is one of the more important influences. I'm not a scholar and could not begin to articulate this 'feeling' appropriately, but it could be an interesting study to test.

Posted by: mustbequantum at July 03, 2016 11:59 AM (MIKMs)

204 Sukharto who lead to the Dutch East Indies to becoming Indonesia was a Japanese collaborator. But many of the Dutch colonist had so blotted the book as it were in the years prior to WWII in their treatment of the locals, well it lead to the strange case at the end of hostilities of the Dutch seeking the protection of the Japanese from the locals.

Posted by: Anna Puma at July 03, 2016 12:00 PM (V/vW+)

205 Tell me about it! I'm an amateur radio operator and band conditions have really been terrible.

Posted by: Country Singer at July 03, 2016 11:48 AM (GUBah)


I didn't even bother getting on the air during Field Day this year, the conditions were just that bad.

Posted by: OregonMuse at July 03, 2016 12:03 PM (i3YHF)

206 OM, I tried for a little while, I got about eight contacts and threw in the towel.

Posted by: Country Singer at July 03, 2016 12:07 PM (GUBah)

207 But since they had previously awarded the Peace prize to Yassir Arafat, the Peace Prize had, by default, become "useless".
Posted by: Alberta Oil Peon at July 03, 2016 11:49 AM (GSdpU)


It's actually worse than that. The peace prize they gave Arafat was jointly awarded to Jimmy Carter, one of the most useless presidents ever.

So, useless.

Posted by: OregonMuse at July 03, 2016 12:08 PM (i3YHF)

208 206 OM, I tried for a little while, I got about eight contacts and threw in the towel.

Posted by: Country Singer at July 03, 2016 12:07 PM (GUBah)


Sigh. Yeah, that sounds about right.

Posted by: OregonMuse at July 03, 2016 12:09 PM (i3YHF)

209
And in upcoming books, Ben H Winters, the author of the Last Policeman trilogy , has a new novel Underground Airlines.

An alternate-history detective novel about race and racism. The book is set in a nightmare version of contemporary America, in which the Civil War was never fought, and slavery is still practiced in four Southern states. The protagonist is a black man and runaway slave, forced to work undercover as an enforcer of the Fugitive Slave Act.

https://tinyurl.com/jb23rps

Posted by: Laurie David's Cervix at July 03, 2016 12:10 PM (kdS6q)

210 198 122
I read Andromeda Strain some months ago and enjoyed it, very similar
to the film but goes into more detail. Rather watch the movie than
read it again though, the acting in it was really good which I missed
when reading it.

There was a mini-series done by one of them thar cable channels a coupla years ago, which I missed because life.

Anyone know if it was any good?

Posted by: Anachronda at July 03, 2016 11:53 AM (Oi5b2)

It sucked monkey ass.

Posted by: eman at July 03, 2016 12:14 PM (MQEz6)

211 It sucked monkey ass.
Posted by: eman at July 03, 2016 12:14 PM (MQEz6)


I thought that was Outbreak.


Posted by: Kindltot at July 03, 2016 12:16 PM (ry34m)

212
OM, I tried for a little while, I got about eight contacts and threw in the towel.
Posted by: Country Singer


Bands were hopping here in the midwest.

Posted by: Bertram Cabot Jr. at July 03, 2016 12:17 PM (IqV8l)

213 Anyone know if it was any good?
Posted by: Anachronda at July 03, 2016 11:53 AM (Oi5b2)

It sucked monkey ass.

Posted by: eman at July 03, 2016 12:14 PM (MQEz6)


So. Not a fan, then.

Posted by: OregonMuse at July 03, 2016 12:17 PM (i3YHF)

214 Posted by: Anna Puma at July 03, 2016 12:00 PM (V/vW+)

Anna, interesting article on Vesuvius. I learn more at AoS, I swear.

Regarding the Dutch East Indies, my dad visited a Dutch plantation owner on Sumatra. He was the most charming of hosts, but Dad was appalled at how the servants were treated. They practically came in crawling, could not make eye contact when serving, and retreated backwards bowing to the lord and master.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, Literate Savage at July 03, 2016 12:18 PM (jR7Wy)

215 I almost bought this book by Ian Toll about the Pacific War on Monday as I flipped through a copy at Lemuria in Jackson.

http://preview.tinyurl.com/glo5n3n

Until I got to this beautiful picture of SBD Dauntless dive bombers in formation taken from above by the radio gunner of another Dauntless. And I stopped and stared at the picture as it troubled me. Then it hit me, the mission codes on the side: 4-B-16 in white. The planes were from USS Ranger. And the national insignia on the fuselage had a lighter color ring around the blue. I realized these dive bombers participated in Operation Torch, the invasion of North Africa.

I snapped the book closed and put it down figuring anyone sloppy enough to put a picture from the Atlantic theater into a book on the Pacific probably made a few more goofs.

Posted by: Anna Puma at July 03, 2016 12:19 PM (V/vW+)

216 Oh, and the plantation owner casually shot a Sumatran tiger that was stalking them while out on a tour of the plantation. Like it was nothing more than a weasel. Freaked my city boy Dad.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, Literate Savage at July 03, 2016 12:20 PM (jR7Wy)

217 Here's another freebie on getting published:

http://www.ereaderiq.com/dp/B00DF9DXPW/how-to-become-happily-published/

Posted by: RushBabe at July 03, 2016 12:21 PM (qCwFP)

218 #17

It comes down to advertising. Although they had a crappy product, the commies engaged in a very active advertising campaign for it, lying all along about the product's benefits. The US system, despite it's well established track record, did not actively seek out new customers to adopt it. It's adherents felt the advantages of their product were obvious and that it didn't need to have an active sales campaign.

So much of the world got stuck with a lemon while a far better product sat ignored on the shelf.

There is also the matter of communism being much more appealing to those seeking to grab power out of the wreckage. You couldn't create a new monarchy for yourself anymore but being in control of a communist government was the next best thing.

Posted by: Epobirs at July 03, 2016 12:22 PM (IdCqF)

219 #209

Does he offer a believable explanation of how chattel slavery survives industrialization?

Posted by: Epobirs at July 03, 2016 12:24 PM (IdCqF)

220 Bands were hopping here in the midwest.

Posted by: Bertram Cabot Jr. at July 03, 2016 12:17 PM (IqV8l)

I had brief periods where I was hearing a lot of stations, but couldn't bust the pileups. Most of the time I couldn't hear squat. Worst FD conditions I've ever heard. Please Lord, just give me one more solar cycle like 22!

Posted by: Country Singer at July 03, 2016 12:25 PM (GUBah)

221 All Hail Eris, you might be interested in this book then: War in the Indies: The Dutch in Wartime, Survivors Remember. It is a collection of survivors' stories. This book is one of six in the series.

http://preview.tinyurl.com/hje5aa8

Posted by: Anna Puma at July 03, 2016 12:25 PM (V/vW+)

222 The first Monster Hunters International is free....the rest are $6.99/each. You get your first hit free then you're hooked! I'm on the second one myself, it is pretty darn funny. The trailer park fairies and the gangsta gnomes are a hoot.

Posted by: lindafell de spair in TEXIT at July 03, 2016 12:28 PM (xVgrA)

223
Please Lord, just give me one more solar cycle like 22!
Posted by: Country Singer


21 was good. 20 was even better but before my time.
I don't think I'll be around for the next one.

Posted by: Bertram Cabot Jr. at July 03, 2016 12:30 PM (IqV8l)

224 21 was good. 20 was even better but before my time.

I don't think I'll be around for the next one.

Posted by: Bertram Cabot Jr. at July 03, 2016 12:30 PM (IqV8l)


Got my first ticket just as 22 was starting, so that's the one I measure against. Hopefully we're not really headed into a Maunder.

Posted by: Country Singer at July 03, 2016 12:32 PM (GUBah)

225 "No title of nobility shall be granted by the United States"


Wait - not even "Kennedy?"

Posted by: Jay Guevara at July 03, 2016 12:33 PM (oKE6c)

226 Also, here's some 4th of July sidebar fodder, 'cuz 'Murica!



https://tinyurl.com/gloebvu

Posted by: Country Singer at July 03, 2016 12:33 PM (GUBah)

227
Does he offer a believable explanation of how chattel slavery survives industrialization?
Posted by: Epobirs


Why, President Trump -- of course....

His point of divergence is that Lincoln was assassinated before he could take office, so the War of Northern Aggression was never fought. Thus, the mid-century compromises on slavery continue, until in the president day slavery has been reduced to just 4 remaining states.

My guess is those states are economic backwaters, where racialism was more important than progress and prosperity.

Posted by: Laurie David's Cervix at July 03, 2016 12:38 PM (kdS6q)

228
The first chapter of Underground Airlines is here:

https://tinyurl.com/jcj985b

But I think you need to log into Facebook to see it.

Posted by: Laurie David's Cervix at July 03, 2016 12:42 PM (kdS6q)

229
Or maybe not. Looks like you can "not now" and more or less see the excerpt.

Posted by: Laurie David's Cervix at July 03, 2016 12:43 PM (kdS6q)

230 Jeebus!! I read all these people reading stuff from The Bard to Asimov to whomever to whut? I read to escape the drudgery. Fun stuff, funny stuff et al. I want to thank Voter Mom for the mention and inclusion into the Horde. My small inclusion is' The Man From P.I. S. S. Poker Investigations, Sensible Solutions' and it is pretty amusing, if you like reading fun stuff. At Smashwords and it's free.

Posted by: jfalcon@yahoo.com at July 03, 2016 12:43 PM (sjBWi)

231 How deep was the ash fall after Mt. Vesuvius erupted? Pretty deep.

http://www.warwingsart.com/12thAirForce/12thAF025.jpg

This B-25 became a tail-sitter due to all the ash falling on it. The hot cinders burned through the fabric covered control surfaces and melted any plexiglass it landed on. Also offers a great shot of the field-modified stinger many B-25 units installed to add protection. The Doolittle B-25s had two broomsticks installed to resemble tail guns in order to deter Japanese fighter planes for this reason.

Posted by: Anna Puma at July 03, 2016 12:46 PM (V/vW+)

232 Posted by: Laurie David's Cervix at July 03, 2016 12:38 PM (kdS6q)

What about the advances in tech generated by the Civil War, and the unification of the country by railroad afterward? What of Texas?

Posted by: All Hail Eris, Literate Savage at July 03, 2016 12:47 PM (jR7Wy)

233 198 122
I read Andromeda Strain some months ago and enjoyed it, very similar
to the film but goes into more detail. Rather watch the movie than
read it again though, the acting in it was really good which I missed
when reading it.

There was a mini-series done by one of them thar cable channels a coupla years ago, which I missed because life.

Anyone know if it was any good?

Posted by: Anachronda at July 03, 2016 11:53 AM (Oi5b2)

They turned it into an a movie about the environment and how man shouldn't blah blah blah it sucked. Watch the original.


If you want a good documentary watch Chuch Norris vs Communism on Netflix.

Posted by: Patrick From Ohio at July 03, 2016 12:52 PM (c4yY7)

234 Radio and TV reception in here in SC has been crap for the past year too. Too bad that with the solar max we get warmer temps in addition to good reception and then the warmies go wild. I haven't even tried firing up my Icom since my big antenna went down and I haven't put it back up.

Posted by: Vic We Have No Party at July 03, 2016 12:54 PM (mpXpK)

235 #227

Which doesn't really make sense to me. Economics was the primary driver of slavery. Importing Africans rather than buying slaves from the Indians, who were active in the practice along the same regional boundaries before Europeans came along, was malaria. Africans had a much better chance of surviving infection in areas that were very difficult to develop once the disease gotten a foothold in the Americas.

This is the great difficulty of alternate history, that they often rely on the Great Man Theory. An earlier death of Lincoln would change the 1860s significantly but many of the changes that would eliminate the value proposition for slaveholders were already underway and it would be difficult to imagine a scenario that prevented those changes happening sooner or later. It asks a lot that four states could retain slavery for the mere sake of it.

Posted by: Epobirs at July 03, 2016 01:03 PM (IdCqF)

236 I didn't bother transmitting on Field Day. I did listen around and the bands were pretty dead. Where are my five watts to Japan on 10 meters SSB, dammit? Glad I'm not doing HF Traffic anymore. It would be a nightmare.

Posted by: JTB at July 03, 2016 01:07 PM (V+03K)

237 Holy crap.
Bomb went off at Eli Weisel' s memorial in Central Park.

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3672483/ Man-critically-injured-following-explosion-Central-Park.html

Posted by: @votermom at July 03, 2016 01:08 PM (7lVbc)

238
It asks a lot that four states could retain slavery for the mere sake of it.
Posted by: Epobirs



One would guess it's analogous to North Korea. It doesn't make a damned bit of economic sense to have a dynastic communist dictatorship, when all around you the neighbors have the skyscrapers and cellphones brought by capitalism.

But, politicians will act illogical or counterproductive in furtherance of some greater goal.

Posted by: Laurie David's Cervix at July 03, 2016 01:09 PM (kdS6q)

239 "Near" his funeral but they think unrelated

Posted by: @votermom at July 03, 2016 01:09 PM (7lVbc)

240 Maybe just someone stepping on fireworks?

Posted by: @votermom at July 03, 2016 01:10 PM (7lVbc)

241 OT, but just read that Jimi Hendrix did a brief stint in the Army and earned his 101st Airborne jump wings.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, Literate Savage at July 03, 2016 01:18 PM (jR7Wy)

242 What about the advances in tech generated by the
Civil War, and the unification of the country by railroad afterward?
What of Texas?
Posted by: All Hail Eris, Literate Savage at July 03, 2016 12:47 PM (jR7Wy)


Most of the railroad net post-civil war was financed by congressional subsidies in one way or another, except for Jim Hill's Great Northern (and the collapse of the bubbles so created made both the other railroads liable to be combined with each other or bought up by Jim Hill, and was one of the principal causes for the post-civil war financial panics.)

As to the tech, it is hard to say. Once you start doing something in one way in a big way, it is hard to move aside and do something better. See the move from the rifle-musket to the allin conversion to the trapdoor springfield, even though the Swiss and the French were inventing the bolt-action, and Sharps, Spencer and Winchester had come up with novel and more effective actions.

Posted by: Kindltot at July 03, 2016 01:25 PM (ry34m)

243 200 ... Country Singer, It's a small thing but a moderate Luddite attitude is why I have certain books in hardcover, why I'm learning classic card and board games, why we started gardening and putting up food, reload all my non-rimfire ammo and well, you get the idea. I generally don't like post-apocalyptic books because they depress me. But I enjoy magazines like Backwoodsman, Fur-Fish-Game and so forth.

Posted by: JTB at July 03, 2016 01:27 PM (V+03K)

244 I stumbled on Nick Cole's article on what happened with Ctrl-Alt-Revolt through Instapundit, and read it with disbelief and no small amount of dawning horror.

It explains so much. Especially why I can't seem to find stuff I want to read on the chain bookstore shelves.

I have to admit I'm still horrified, though. Monocultures of the mind are as dangerous, or more so, than monoculture crops when a new pest hits. Eco-warriors out there will lecture us up one side and down the other on the danger of the one; why can't they see the danger of the other?

At least the Blue Angels are still flying. "That's not noise; that's the sound of freedom!"

Posted by: crossoverChaos at July 03, 2016 01:27 PM (AE6mv)

245 #238

While remaining functional states of the US? North Korea depends on isolation and China to exist.

Posted by: Epobirs at July 03, 2016 01:29 PM (IdCqF)

246 FWIW, I read "Contol-Alt-REVOLT" and thought it was a pretty good read. Quite a while back , shortly after I read if I was looking at an ONT and lo and behold Maet (Overnight Open Thread (3-31-2016) - [] Edition-Maetenloch) included this:

"Meanwhile Eve Online is preparing for its largest battle ever. I know nothing about EO but I guess this is a thing. (thanks to CDR M)"

http://tinyurl.com/hur9frw

Not being a gamer but aware, I naturally clicked on the link and found it fascinating, and peripherally very much like parts of C-A-R. I thought it was a fun read as well!

Posted by: Hrothgar at July 03, 2016 01:52 PM (wYnyS)

247 I am amused by those Trump supporters who are angry at the so called elite ss ail to see that Trump has pretensions to royalty. Ever take a close look at that "family crest" he slaps on everything he owns? It's a recent creation with limited ties to his own genealogy. Plus he had to create another one to use on his Scottish properties. It seem the Scots are a bit touchy about arrivistes who use heraldic symbols reserved for the monarch and her personal representatives. So for use in Scotland Trump uses heraldic symbols used by the Holy Roman Emperors and the Romanovs.

Posted by: NC Mountainl Girl at July 03, 2016 01:56 PM (KIxn0)

248 "Angelo Codevilla wrote an article describing the characterists of this class in the American Spectator magazine which he then expanded into a book, The Ruling Class..."
-------------

Pretty powerful article, that.
Here's link:
http://preview.tinyurl.com/j6vgskr

Posted by: Mike Hammer, etc., etc. at July 03, 2016 01:58 PM (9mTYi)

249 187 I'm on my second kilt now. The first was in Black Watch tartan (I'm distantly related to the Munro clan) and the current one is the US Army tartan. Eventually, when budget permits, I'll get one in my clan (Cunningham) tartan. In the interim, I'm thinking of picking up a UtiliKilt of some variety.

But yes, the lasses do seem to like them.

Posted by: Country Singer at July 03, 2016 11:47 AM (GUBah)

Methinks the lasses like the confidence it takes to wear something that bold, and confidently.

If you show up somewhere in a kilt looking like you're terrified of disapproval, you won't get a second glance.

Posted by: Michael Rittenhouse at July 03, 2016 02:06 PM (OaAhi)

250 Way late to the Thread, but I'm currently reading 'Unbroken', haven't seen the movie. In the book I found to my surprise a fateful intersection of Louis Zamperini (the topic of the book) and William Harris, while in a torturous Jap prison camp.

Harris was one of the guys who made an astounding (that may be an understatement) escape from Corregidor. The story is told in former Indiana Governor Ed Whitcomb's book 'Escape From Corregidor'.

Posted by: Mike Hammer, etc., etc. at July 03, 2016 02:09 PM (9mTYi)

251 In the interim, I'm thinking of picking up a UtiliKilt of some variety.
--------------

I think GGE has a tactilcal model.

Posted by: Mike Hammer, etc., etc. at July 03, 2016 02:10 PM (9mTYi)

252 'Tactical', dammit.

Posted by: Mike Hammer, etc., etc. at July 03, 2016 02:11 PM (9mTYi)

253 "No title of nobility shall be granted by the United States"


Wait - not even "Kennedy?"

-
Or "Kardashian"?

Posted by: Anonosaurus Wrecks, Racist for Dinosaurs at July 03, 2016 02:12 PM (Nwg0u)

254 I believe you mean "tacticool".

Posted by: All Hail Eris, Literate Savage at July 03, 2016 02:12 PM (jR7Wy)

255 "The Duke of Denver"

"Duck," I says.

Posted by: Little Bill at July 03, 2016 02:14 PM (Pby3z)

256 FWIW, I read "Contol-Alt-REVOLT" and thought it was a pretty good read.
-----------

As I have mentioned, I gave that book to a Prog acquaintance, thinking that the theme might catch her fancy. I wasn't hopeful, but it did. I have since been casually handing off other books that I think might cause her to refocus her way of thinking.

To my great surprise, it seems to be working.

Posted by: Mike Hammer, etc., etc. at July 03, 2016 02:15 PM (9mTYi)

257 I believe you mean "tacticool".
Posted by: All Hail Eris
--------

Perhaps, 'Tactitool', as some people have found that they are especially suitable for CC.

Posted by: Mike Hammer, etc., etc. at July 03, 2016 02:17 PM (9mTYi)

258 Posted by: Hrothgar at July 03, 2016 01:52 PM (wYnyS)

I gave it a shot, but the main character seemed odd early in. Then I found out it's basically based on the author. Maybe I'll give it another. Go today.

Posted by: Mobile FRPH at July 03, 2016 02:18 PM (Pby3z)

259 Radio and TV reception in here in SC has been crap for the past year too. Too bad that with the solar max we get warmer temps in addition to good reception and then the warmies go wild. I haven't even tried firing up my Icom since my big antenna went down and I haven't put it back up.
Posted by: Vic We Have No Party
---------------

I had a beautiful, and hard fought (to get in the air) 80M loop. First it came down in an ice storm, then a critical tree at one corner came down.

I still have a 40M 1/2 wave dipole in the attic, but it doesn't work very well, and is oriented E-W. Push-comes-to-shove I can use it, but have no enthusiasm for it.

I was so put off that I haven't fussed with it since. It's on my list, but who knows if I'll get back at it.

Posted by: Mike Hammer, etc., etc. at July 03, 2016 02:26 PM (9mTYi)

260 *looks through the photos again*

Actually looks like the volcano 86'd all their C and D models.

-
I didn't mean to imply that there were Hs at Pompeii, only that there were Hs in the 57th Wing. I probably could have used a paragraph break there.

Posted by: Anonosaurus Wrecks, Racist for Dinosaurs at July 03, 2016 02:33 PM (Nwg0u)

261 I am reading "The Devil's Chessboard" by David Talbot.
It is certainly engaging reading, if not particularly flattering to the cast of characters involved.

Posted by: navybrat at July 03, 2016 02:41 PM (w7KSn)

262 @86 30 or so years ago, conservatives used this to mount a successful campaign to give the boot to a little-old-lady-in-tennis-shoes liberal judge by the name of Rose Bird, who never met a capital murder conviction she couldn't find a reason to overturn.

Can't imagine that happening nowadays, though.
-----------------------

Not much point going after the state court these days. The action is all in either the Legislature, or the 9th Circuit.

Posted by: junior at July 03, 2016 02:43 PM (nlPsL)

263 Beer break. Time to enjoy a lawnmower beer. Thanks go to the Moron who coined the term!


Wicked humid here, so even though it's only in the low '70's, temperature-wise, I'm sweating if I even think about work. Had my reading glasses steam up while futzing with the Evil Death Mower prior to its first start-up of the season. Got a good whack of tall grass and thistles knocked down, though. We will probably have thunderstorms, late afternoon, early evening.

Posted by: Alberta Oil Peon at July 03, 2016 02:50 PM (GSdpU)

264 @125 Yup...plus commie violence and intimidation helped out quite a bit. But I was alluding to the fact that no Ho Chi Minh or Pol Pot or Idi Amin types ever studied what would actually work in their country like our system and try to emulate that for the betterment of their people.
----------------------

Ho Chi Minh is worth discussing. He originally approached Wilson during the Peace Conference in Paris in 1918. But Wilson, racist that he was, blew him off. So Minh looked elsewhere for support.

During World War 2, Minh worked with US troops working behind Japanese lines. And I've heard that the US individuals in question generally had a good relationship with him that could have been built upon after the war. But post-War, France wanted Vietnam back. And Churchill supported the French on this particular point. Truman didn't have any particular opinion on the matter, so the French view carried the day among the democracies. As a result, Minh turned to the Soviets for support for his independence bid.

Posted by: junior at July 03, 2016 02:52 PM (nlPsL)

265 Beer break. Time to enjoy a lawnmower beer.
--------------

*?*

'Break'?

I have a gimbal-mounted marine cupholder on my mower. Make sure that you get one large enough to hold a can-cozy. Priorities.

Posted by: Mike Hammer, etc., etc. at July 03, 2016 02:56 PM (9mTYi)

266 I have a gimbal-mounted marine cupholder on my mower. Make sure that you get one large enough to hold a can-cozy. Priorities.

Posted by: Mike Hammer, etc., etc. at July 03, 2016 02:56 PM (9mTYi)


Alas, and alack! I was using a walk-behind mower, and it needs two hands to manhandle it around the bushes and artifacts in the yard. And my rider is a Dixon ZTR, which also needs two hands on the levers to even go in a straight line. I do indeed have a cupholder on the International tractor, though.


Now I'm going to flash up the grill, and cook a couple of smokies for lunch.

Posted by: Alberta Oil Peon at July 03, 2016 03:13 PM (GSdpU)

267 I am amused by those Trump supporters who are angry
at the so called elite ss ail to see that Trump has pretensions to
royalty. Ever take a close look at that "family crest" he slaps on
everything he owns? It's a recent creation with limited ties to his own
genealogy. Plus he had to create another one to use on his Scottish
properties. It seem the Scots are a bit touchy about arrivistes who use
heraldic symbols reserved for the monarch and her personal
representatives. So for use in Scotland Trump uses heraldic symbols used
by the Holy Roman Emperors and the Romanovs.
Posted by: NC Mountainl Girl at July 03, 2016 01:56 PM (KIxn0)


Unlike the English and Germans and Austrians descended Americans. . .

So many Americans are in awe of titles and crests. There was a man who spent a lot of time and money and effort to show that he was best qualified to be clan chief of a clan who's last chieftain had died without male heir in the 1700's. This was so he could wear THREE feathers in his cap at formal occasions.

Say what you like, but Nixon and Agnew never pretended anything, their families were down straight border rievers

Posted by: Kindltot at July 03, 2016 03:21 PM (ry34m)

268 AOP, I would have thought the Camelbak canteen that will self pressurize from the carbonation in the beer and a cooling system cobbled out of a regulator and a pressure bottle would be the perfect solution for you.

Posted by: Kindltot at July 03, 2016 03:24 PM (ry34m)

269 #264 Also, the French had treated the Vietnamese like dirt for like, decades, and I'm sure that was a contributing factor.

Posted by: OregonMuse at July 03, 2016 03:25 PM (ng8d1)

270 Eve online is at War or World War Bee where all these little groups formed an Alliance and more or less kicked a very large group butt and taking Territory, I don't play it but it's fascinating.

Posted by: Patrick From Ohio at July 03, 2016 03:28 PM (c4yY7)

271 Call It Even seems much in the same vein of Iraq vet fiction as the excellent (if rough and mostly self published) And The Rain Came Down by Seth A. Bailey. His second novel, The Lines We Cross, had a bit more editing, some by me.

Seth was in V Corps LRSC when I was at the 101st.

Posted by: Colonel Kurtz at July 03, 2016 03:37 PM (kapIh)

272 Trump has pretensions to
royalty. Ever take a close look at that "family crest" he slaps on
everything he owns? It's a recent creation with limited ties to his own
genealogy. Plus he had to create another one to use on his Scottish
properties. It seem the Scots are a bit touchy about arrivistes who use
heraldic symbols reserved for the monarch and her personal
representatives. So for use in Scotland Trump uses heraldic symbols used
by the Holy Roman Emperors and the Romanovs.

-
I don't see much of a problem as long as it's self awarded. The country survived Duke Ellington and Count Basie. It may imply that Trumps a loud mouth egoist but, duh, I already knew that.

Posted by: Anonosaurus Wrecks, Racist for Dinosaurs at July 03, 2016 03:37 PM (Nwg0u)

273 21 was good. 20 was even better but before my time.

I don't think I'll be around for the next one.

Posted by: Bertram Cabot Jr. at July 03, 2016 12:30 PM (IqV8l)


I remember 20. I first got my ticket during 20's peak. I thought that was normal band conditions. And then when it dropped off, I thought the world had ended.

The legendary peak, though, was 19. I wish I had been around for that one.

Posted by: OregonMuse at July 03, 2016 04:53 PM (i3YHF)

274 On a much needed vacay, but-

a quick stop in to thank everyone who bought-

"Wearing the Cat - Part One: Flaming Hoops"

And a big thank you to-

creeper
robo
and
Amazon Customer (if that is your real name)

for such nice reviews.

If you haven't read it yet, and have nothing better to do this weekend...

grab a beer and a copy of WTC - PO: FH.

And have several good laughs.

There are worse ways to spend the day.

Now, onto vacay activities!

Posted by: naturalfake at July 03, 2016 05:06 PM (OHmik)

275 Daily Caller posted an article on the Apostle Matthew's supposed final resting place - an ancient Monastery now submerged under a lake in Kyrgyzstan:

http://dailycaller.com/2015/09/03/archaeologists-may-have-found-the-burial-site-of-st-matthew/



Posted by: Asmodai at July 03, 2016 05:15 PM (epW+a)

276 Posted by: crossoverChaos at July 03, 2016 01:27 PM (AE6mv)

Yes, it's a good thing this has been coming out more, though it's been an open secret in the sci-fi/fantasy genre. That's what led to the sad puppies thing.

That's why most of the books I shill for, even aside from the horde ones, tend to be self-pinned or really small press.
The exception would be the political non-fiction.

Posted by: @votermom at July 03, 2016 05:27 PM (7lVbc)

277 My understanding of Pinochet - and Franco - is that when they took over, they appointed a bunch of crooked cronies and presided over crappy economies... at first. Then they wised up.

It helped that they actually cared about Chile and Spain, respectively. Somoza didn't give a rat's ass about Nicaragua; he was there to loot the place.

Posted by: boulder terlit hobo at July 03, 2016 07:14 PM (6FqZa)

278 All due moron respect Oregon Muse from a fellow wet back but the premise that we have an entrenched equivalent to a nobility/ruling class is, in a word, baloney.

Posted by: whatmeworry? at July 03, 2016 08:30 PM (dZGNV)

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