Sunday Morning Book Thread 06-28-2015: The World Turned Upside Down [OregonMuse]


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Progress


Good morning to all of you morons and moronettes and bartenders everywhere and all the ships at sea. Welcome to AoSHQ's stately, prestigious, internationally acclaimed and high-class Sunday Morning Book Thread. The only AoSHQ thread that is so hoity-toity, pants are required. Or kilts. Serious you guys. Kilts are OK, too. But not tutus. Unless you're a girl.


Book thread TRIGGER WARNINGS for holding that Hillary! Clinton is the most corrupt politician since LBJ and the only thing keeping her from being laughed out of politics is an equally corrupt MSM, that government employees should not be allowed to vote due to the obvious conflict of interest, and the near absolute risibility of feminism.


Books are like mirrors: if a fool looks in, you cannot expect a genius to look out.
-J.K. Rowling


Yesterday, A Spooky Day

And not because of anything the Supreme Court did. No, June 27th is the date a very famous short story takes place. It starts out like this:

The morning of June 27th was clear and sunny, with the fresh warmth of a full-summer day; the flowers were blossoming profusely and the grass was richly green. The people of the village began to gather in the square, between the post office and the bank, around ten o’clock; in some towns there were so many people that [it] took two days and had to be started on June 26th ....”

Can you guess the story? I'll have the answer way down at the bottom of the thread. Note that the word in bracket is my replacement, the original words are a dead giveaway.


Someone Is Going To Have To Be A Hero

Here's a story that, in light of recent events, should be very familiar to us:

1. Church gets planted in San Francisco
2. Church hires musician to do the church music
3. Subsequently, it comes to light that said musician is a practicing homosexual
4. Musician is informed by the church that his lifestyle is not in accord with church doctrine
5. Musician tells church that he is not going to change
6. Musician is dismissed by church
7. Church gets sued for violation of local "gay rights" ordinance.

This might have happened just last week, but the series of events I'm referring to took place in 1978, nearly 40 years ago. It's detailed in the book
When the Wicked Seize A City written by the minister and his wife, Charles and Donna McIlhenny

WORLD magazine has excerpted an early chapter that you can read here. I read it back in the early days of the internet, and I'm talking sometime around 1997-1998, when it used to be available for free for online reading on the old iUniverse site (before that self-publishing company had been bought out by Author Solutions), and the McIlhennys ordeal made for frightening reading: vandalism, threatening phone calls, violent protests complete with property damage while officers from the SFPD stood around like potted plants, etc.

The pastor did not ask for this fight. Rather, it was thrust upon him as he was trying to follow the dictates of his conscience, informed by the Bible. And not only did he have to fight the homosexual activists in San Francisco who had sworn to destroy his church, but his decision to stand up placed him at odds with some members of his own congregation and denominational leaders who were frightened because of what might happen. I want to sympathize with them, but sometimes, someone has to step up and be a hero, because heroism is what the situation absolutely requires.

And, not a very long time from now, in according with a plan arranged by homosexual activists, predominantly, a white, evangelical church (note: it will not be a black church or a mosque) that refuses to marry homosexual couples will have its tax-exempt status threatened, citing this week's Obergefell decision as precedent. What is happening in that day is that that pastor, that church, whoever it is who is being bludgeoned by the lawfare while the MSM and the rest of the culture applauds, is being called upon to be heroes.

Of course, many don't want to be heroes. Fighting is hard and dangerous. And what's even worse, we have guys on our side who are telling us, once again, that this is not the hill to die on, that we just need to move on. To the next defeat.

SPOILER ALERT: there's good news and bad news here. The good news is that McIlhenny actually won his case, on 1st Amendment grounds. But the bad news is that the main reason for this is perhaps, uncharacteristically for the progressive strategy of endless lawfare, the musician dropped the subsequent appeal. So the usual outcome, i.e. the Kabuki theater of a more liberal appellate court pretending to uphold the law while sticking it to the wrongthinking defendant, never played out.

We're Doooomed!

You've got to like a review that starts out like this:

In the realm of science fiction, few things are as much fun to read about as the near extinction of the human race.

(Before I go on, I need to point out that the linked review contains a number of spoilers).

He's talking about the new one by Neal Stephenson, Seveneves, which you can purchase on Kindle for a whopping $16.99. The author of this review, John Derbyshire, late of NRO and now with Takimag, is certainly no stranger to doom, if his other book We Are Doomed: Reclaiming Conservative Pessimism is any indication.

I liked this bit:

So this first two-thirds of the book is in fact not so much science fiction as engineering fiction. There are no just-barely-imaginable scientific possibilities in play here, only Newtonian mechanics and a relentless press of technical problems large and small.

...because it touches on one of my pet peeves. What Derbyshire means by "engineering fiction" used to be called, before the popularity of Star Wars confused matters, simply "science fiction" and pretty much everyone knew what that meant. Science fiction used to have a precise meaning: when you take a social trend, or a piece of technology, or some other aspect or condition of our present time, and extend it out into the future, however long you wish, and then write about what that might look like, that is science fiction, in the strict and narrow sense.

This is the definition I first heard many years ago, and it stuck with me ever since.

Later on, this kind of got broadened out to, any novel or movie that takes place in the future is science fiction. I don't normally think of Ayn Rand's We The Living Anthem as science fiction, but I guess it kind of is, under either the narrow or broadened definition.

And then when Star Wars came out, it was anything with space ships and ray guns. But just because you have space ships and ray guns doesn't make it science fiction. And remember the classic Star Wars intro: "A long, long, time ago in a galaxy far, far aaway". So unlike actual science fiction with roots in the present, Star Wars, at the very outset, tells you it is completely divorced from everything you've ever known or experienced.

"Science fantasy" would be a better definition for this sort of thing. Not to be confused with the other kind of fantasy, the kind with hobbits, dragons, and swords. But in either case, you might as well be in a different universe for all that it matters. Of course, many fantasy stories actually do take place in alternate universes.

Personally, I like the so-called "engineering fiction", so described by Derbyshire. That's why I liked John Ringo's Hot Gate series, because he made the process of capturing an asteroid and turning it into an armored battle-station sound almost plausible, including how it all was going to be paid for. And this is my beef with the J.J. Abrams Star Trek reboots. The old series, particularly the original series, was good old-school science fiction. The guy who does the RedLetterMedia.com movie critiques pointed out (and demonstrated with TOS video clips) how all the scenes shot on the Enterprise conform to the ship's design that was determined in advance, so, for example, for Kirk and Spock to get from the shuttle bay to the bridge, the elevator they're in has to go sideways for awhile, and then up. But in the reboot, the elevator doors close, and then instantaneously open again at the bridge, and virtually no time has elapsed. Abrams wanted them on the bridge right then, and thus it happened, so shut up and no backtalk.

What has happened is that Abrams has made Star Trek a lot more like Star Wars. Doesn't mean they're bad movies, but I miss the old style.

And speaking of hard science, Derbyshire is a bit of an amateur mathematician, and has written a couple of books on the subject, Prime Obsession: Bernhard Riemann and the Greatest Unsolved Problem in Mathematics which he followed up with Unknown Quantity: A Real and Imaginary History of Algebra.

Thanks to longtime moron 'Hrothgar' for the Derbyshire review tip


And Speaking of Reviews

This is how is an English prof who does not like Kahlil Gibran but nevertheless had to write a review of the recently released Collected Works of Kahlil Gibran started out his review:

Expansive and yet vacuous is the prose of Kahlil Gibran,
And weary grows the mind doomed to read it.
The hours of my penance lengthen,
The penance established for me by the editor of this magazine,
And those hours may be numbered as the sands of the desert.
And for each of them Kahlil Gibran has prepared
Another ornamental phrase,
Another faux-Biblical cadence,
Another affirmation proverbial in its intent
But alas! lacking the moral substance,
The peasant shrewdness, of the true proverb.

Yeah, I was never much of a fan of Gibran, either, whose writings always had this kitschy, cheesy feel, like one of those black velvet Elvis paintings. but apparently he was quite an accomplished artist, especially in watercolor, and even studied in art schools in Paris. I never knew that.


Amazon Royalties: Tempest In Teacup?

It has been said, and I think this is an old wives' tale, that Russian authors used to be paid by the word, which is why Russian novels are so freakin' huge.

But, according to Reuters, Amazon is doing something similar:

Starting next month, the e-commerce giant will pay independent authors based on the number of pages read, rather than the number of times their book has been borrowed.

The move is aimed at authors enrolled in Kindle Direct Publishing platform - which lets authors set list prices, decide rights and edit the book at any time - and is applicable to ebooks made available via the Kindle Unlimited and Kindle Owners' Lending Library programs.

When I first heard about this, I thought this was for Kindle books purchased. But I was wrong:

The new method of payment doesn't apply to books that have been purchased but to those that are borrowed as part of Kindle Unlimited, which allows for - you guessed it - unlimited reading of KU books in exchange for a subscription fee...Amazon used to start paying royalties on the borrowed book once a reader got to 10% of the way through, but this was proving unfair to authors who wrote longer books. A reader perusing a short book reaches the trigger point for payment much faster than one reading an 800-page tome. The result was a flood of very short reads as authors spread their writing over as many books as possible.

The writer of the Guardian piece is afraid of how this will change the way authors write books, but from what she just said in the bit I quoted, writers are doing that already, i.e. making adjustments to maximize their income. What's wrong with that? If they're going to game the system under the new scheme, it will only be in a different way than they're gaming the system now.

So what do you moron authors think about this? Good? Bad? Meh? It seems to me these changes may mean that the myriad 99-cent Kindle short novels and novelettes out there may be go away soon.

And is that such a big deal?

Thanks you moron "mindful webworker" for the tip.


The WNBA Comes To Book Publishing

So, a few weeks ago, I snickered a bit at the progressive butthurt going on across the pond because of alleged "gender bias".

But there's not a progressive idea that some pinheads won't immediately run with:

Small press And Other Stories has answered author Kamila Shamsie’s provocative call for a year of publishing women to redress “gender bias” in the literary world.

So, their brilliant plan is, in 2018, they're not going to publish any books by men.

Tobler’s colleague Sophie Lewis, a senior editor at And Other Stories, said she expected the team would be “rescheduling male writers’ books for other years [and] digging harder and further than usual, in order to find the really good women’s writing that we want to publish” in 2018.

So the men will just have to wait until 2019. That'll show 'em. By the way, ladies, if this is truly a "gender bias" issue, you shouldn't have to look "harder and further than usual" to find quality women authors, they should be right there in front of you.

Now this is absolutely hilarious;

A small publisher, And Other Stories releases 10 to 12 new titles a year. “We’ve realised for a while that we’ve published more men than women,” said Tobler. “This year we’ve done seven books by men and four by women ... We have a wide range of people helping us with our choices, and our editors are women ... and yet somehow we still publish more books by men than women.

I can't stop laughing. This is an admission that women, or at least women in the publishing industry, desperately need to be saved from themselves. So rather than honestly ask themselves the obvious question 'why do we women prefer male authors?' they instead, being good progressives, immediately blame something else, someone else, anybody but them. And then they follow it up with an completely stupid and pointless gesture that solves nothing, and may even hurt them (lost profits).

It's kind of like those idiots who staged naked protests against the Iraq War. What was the point? Nobody was interested, nobody cared, nobody said, "OMG, look at all those naked protestors, let's stop the war right now." The war kept right on going.

Bless their hearts.

Thanks to the Political Hat for the tip.


Books By Morons

Another light week for e-mail, so here's a repeat:

Longtime lurker and infrequent commenter 'Farmer Bob' has written and published two mystery novels. The books follow the exploits of Fiddler O'Connell and his Uncle Emmett. Fiddler is a New Orleans defense attorney and Emmett is a hard boiled PI.

The first one is Termite Takedown. Here's a piece of the action:

Everybody knows Fiddler O'Connell doesn't do divorces, so of course he turns beautiful Trixi Vaughn away when the sugar baron's wife attempts to enlist him for the same, even with termites eating him out of house and home. But will he take her on as a client when later that night she is accused of murdering her soon-to-be ex...with his Uncle Emmett as her accomplice?

The adventures of Fiddler and Emmett continue in Flea Flicker:

Earvin San Miguel could catch a football like an all-pro. Now, courtesy of a killer, he's caught a bullet, and he's all-dead, Can Fiddler and Emmett catch the killer in time, or will their client, Carlos Menendez, catch a deadly hypodermic needle on death row?

Both are available on Kindle for $2.99.


___________

So that's all for this week. As always, book thread tips, suggestions, bribes, rumors, threats, and insults may be sent to OregonMuse, Proprietor, AoSHQ Book Thread, at the book thread e-mail address: aoshqbookthread, followed by the 'at' sign, and then 'G' mail, and then dot cee oh emm.

What have you all been reading this week? Hopefully something good, because, as you all know, life is too short to be reading lousy books.

(Answer: The story is, of course, The Lottery, by Shirley Jackson. A little background here)

Posted by: Open Blogger at 08:59 AM




Comments

(Jump to bottom of page)

1 Working on John Ringo "Live Free or Die" on the Kendell.

Posted by: Vic We Have No Party at June 28, 2015 09:01 AM (GpgJl)

2 Hi Vic, missed you on the book thread these past few weeks.

Posted by: OregonMuse at June 28, 2015 09:02 AM (AWijS)

3 RE Rise and Fall of the Roman Empire. I had heard so much about that as a major classic. I checked out the first volume from the library. The more I read the more it seemed that Gibbon was blaming the fall of the Roman Empire on the Christians. Not only did that seem like hogwash, but the empire did not actually "fall". It split up into component parts after they lost the source of wheat in North Africa.

Posted by: Vic We Have No Party at June 28, 2015 09:06 AM (GpgJl)

4 Reading A Confederacy of Dunces. So far it's a story of LIV's so I'm not seeing the humor thus far . What is excellent is the writing style. The author paints an immediate picture with his words.

Posted by: Cruzinator at June 28, 2015 09:06 AM (Q4pU/)

5 Scankles is MORE corrupt than LBJ.

Posted by: Vic We Have No Party at June 28, 2015 09:06 AM (GpgJl)

6 Why did a woman writer make Harry Potter male? Harriet Potter would have been betterer.

Posted by: Isis Dildoflag at June 28, 2015 09:08 AM (gwG9s)

7 Also rereading The Matarese Circle by Robert Lundum. He does or did write excellent spy novels.

Posted by: Cruzinator at June 28, 2015 09:09 AM (Q4pU/)

8 Never tell a homo that they are fired for being a homo.

Posted by: Grump928(C) at June 28, 2015 09:12 AM (rwI+c)

9 "Serious you guys. Kilts are OK, too. But not tutus. Unless you're a girl."


Real men wear tutus!

Posted by: Rahm "tiny dancer" Emanuel at June 28, 2015 09:13 AM (DOsEu)

10 So what do you moron authors think about this? Good? Bad? Meh? It seems
to me these changes may mean that the myriad 99-cent Kindle short novels
and novelettes out there may be go away soon.




I am old and set in my ways. It took me a long time to even go to e-books and now that is all I will ready. But when I want to read one I want the whole book from beginning to end. I don't like gimmicks and they never last.

Posted by: Vic We Have No Party at June 28, 2015 09:14 AM (GpgJl)

11 2
Hi Vic, missed you on the book thread these past few weeks.


Posted by: OregonMuse at June 28, 2015 09:02 AM (AWijS)

I thought I was here the week before last, but the rocking chair had me last Sunday.

Posted by: Vic We Have No Party at June 28, 2015 09:16 AM (GpgJl)

12 Vic, I've posted this link before. It is a Spanish Economist talking about what he sees as the principal reasons the Roman Empire collapsed.

Wheat from Egypt is part of it, but the major reasons are what splintered the society to begin with: Taxes, Bread and Circuses, and people "going Galt" to avoid predation by the government - and setting the grounds for feudalism.

https://www.mises.org/library/socialism-and-decivilization

Posted by: Kindltot at June 28, 2015 09:18 AM (3pRHP)

13 No, we are not doomed.

Posted by: Bruce With a Wang! at June 28, 2015 09:18 AM (iQIUe)

14 Finished up "Orphans Preferred" by Christopher Corbett, which looked at first like a history of the Pony Express - which, being that the actual transcontinental pony express service lasted only about a year - is a relatively thin book. Orphans is more of a look at the Pony Express from the outside and afterwards, as it were; accounts from people who saw it in action, (Mark Twain and Richard Burton the traveler) and whose who made a huge thing of it years later (Buffalo Bill Cody and other publicists) - but not actually much about the express riders themselves, their experiences, or how the whole enterprise was set up and run, which would have been interesting from a history wonk POV. There was more about the actual nuts and bolts of setting up and operating the express in Dan Rottenberg's Death of a Gunfighter, which was a bio of Jack Slade. So, Orphans Preferred gets a two-star review for me. OK, but not quite as advertised.
Speaking of reviews, the SA Indy Authors Festival facebook page posted a cartoon this week - cashier ringing up Kim Kardashian's "Selfish" and saying, "Every time someone buys a copy of Selfish, a real book dies." Another member recommended reading the one-star reviews on Amazon for Selfish, and they were hilarious. I felt better after skimming the first couple of pages of reviews - check them out, for vicious grins and giggles.

Posted by: Sgt. Mom at June 28, 2015 09:20 AM (95iDF)

15 Reading "Moonraker" by Ian Fleming.

Posted by: perdogg at June 28, 2015 09:20 AM (zbccc)

16 The Lottery. Now to check my work.

Posted by: olddog in mo at June 28, 2015 09:22 AM (BGCet)

17 Anna, if you show up, I'll have you know I'm reading "The Postman" because of your comments last week. About 80% through and it's pretty good. Next, I guess I'll have to go back and watch the movie to do the side by side!

Posted by: Hrothgar at June 28, 2015 09:23 AM (ftVQq)

18 Yes! And to celebrate my correct answer I will go grocery shopping in a tad and will eat like a king tonite.

Posted by: olddog in mo at June 28, 2015 09:27 AM (BGCet)

19
The result was a flood of very short reads as authors spread their writing over as many books as possible.




Well, there goes my 40 volume "The Cup Cake Bakery Owner Alpha'd by the Billion Werewolf" series down the tubes....

Posted by: Laurie David's Cervix at June 28, 2015 09:28 AM (kdS6q)

20 I knew it was "The Lottery" at once. Great writer, Shirley Jackson.

I'm reading Albert Speer's memoirs, "Inside the Third Reich". It's remarkable how many parallels to today's politics are there. Not a simplistic "Obama = Hitler" or "Liberals are mass murderers". But Speer's observations on how things operated in a criminal state.

In his early years after joining the Party, before he became Hitler's architect, he described going to a local Party meeting (I think in Mannheim, where he was living at the time). He was struck by the poor quality of the Party members. Ignorant, poorly educated, just generally unimaginative boors. He thought "You can never run a revolution with people like this!" But things trundled on just the same, because the bureaucrats of the Weimar state, who knew how to get things done, kept things running after the Hitler takeover. Speer said that in another generation, those people would have been gone, and government would be in the hands of those graduates of Adolph Hitler Schools he'd seen in Mannheim, and everything would have fallen apart eventually.

That's pretty much what's happened in this decade. The Baby Boomers were about the last people in America to get a decent education. Now they're leaving, and their impossibly ignorant children are taking over, with general breakdown and disorder as a result.

Posted by: Dr. Mabuse at June 28, 2015 09:31 AM (VBbCO)

21 What is happening in that day is that that pastor, that church, whoever
it is who is being bludgeoned by the lawfare while the MSM and the rest
of the culture applauds, is being called upon to be heroes.






But it will be the activists, supported by the government, big corporations and media who will be portrayed as brave heroes for taking on this evil bigoted church

Posted by: TheQuietMan at June 28, 2015 09:32 AM (DiZBp)

22
Patrick McNee is dead?

Posted by: Soothsayer's Lovin Spoonful at June 28, 2015 09:33 AM (5jPLo)

23 12 Wheat from Egypt is part of it, but the major
reasons are what splintered the society to begin with: Taxes, Bread and
Circuses, and people "going Galt" to avoid predation by the government -
and setting the grounds for feudalism.

https://www.mises.org/library/socialism-and-decivilization


Posted by: Kindltot at June 28, 2015 09:18 AM (3pRHP)


Most historians now have moved away from the "bread and circuses" explanation because it is too simplistic. Yes, it true, but the bread and circuses were more of a symptom than a cause. You have to ask yourself, what caused the movement to bread and circuses?

Rome was never a true Democracy and in the end it was a brutal dictatorship. And what lessons can we learn from this? We started with the bread and circuses in the early years of the 20th century under Wilson and by the time FDR was finished that was a major part of our economy. LBJ just made it worse.

And now we are reaping the whirlwind. I can see the US fragmenting just like Rome. The people in the South and in the heartland States like Kansas do NOT like the direction the megalopolises on the East and West coasts are taking us.

So now we must ask ourselves what caused the US to move to socialism.

Posted by: Vic We Have No Party at June 28, 2015 09:34 AM (GpgJl)

24 I'm wearing pants, but I am going commando.

This week's book is Harry Strauss' Battle of Salamis. Pretty decent.

Posted by: Skwerl at June 28, 2015 09:35 AM (0r09J)

25 Patrick McNee is dead?

Yep. Last week.

Posted by: Grump928(C) at June 28, 2015 09:35 AM (rwI+c)

26 You should have mentioned Derbyshire's and NRO's tangle with the racial hate mob in 2012, where he got eviscerated for a perfectly reasonable admission that parents need to address the issue of statisticaly off-the-chart black youth violence with their kids.
NRO fired Derbyshire as a sacrificial lamb.

Posted by: TexasJew at June 28, 2015 09:35 AM (lQn8Y)

27 I'm kinda surprised no one's mentioned how Derb was forced out of NRO after a candid contribution to that "national conversation on race" we're all supposed to be having (Take the headline and tag cum grano salis.) http://goo.gl/IFgPl8

Posted by: Flybrariman at June 28, 2015 09:35 AM (cXUkE)

28 I read The Well of the Unicorn by George Fletcher (actually a pseudonym for Fletcher Pratt). It is a fantasy novel in which the protagonist is a young man wanting to free his people from an oppressive duke and winds up, rather against his will, becomes a duke himself married to one of the emperor's daughters.

It was apparently a bit of a thought experiment for Pratt because he deliberately uses a rather Elizabethan vocabulary for the third-person narrator, besides for the characters. He also does not give any background and you have to learn as you read the book. For this reason, I think the book will reward a future re-reading since you have a better understanding of the world in which this tale takes place.

Very unusually for a book published in 1948, Pratt brings up sexuality and some of the characters are homosexual (the protagonist is not, however). Since the protagonist finds homosexuality rather distasteful, I don't think Pratt was trying to say, "Yay, gheys!" but wanted to write something very different from his usual books.

Posted by: Retired Buckeye Cop is now an engineer at June 28, 2015 09:35 AM (8+0sF)

29 You should have mentioned Derbyshire's and NRO's tangle with the racial hate mob in 2012, where he got eviscerated for a perfectly reasonable admission that parents need to address the obvious issue of statistically off-the-chart black youth violence with their kids.
NRO fired Derbyshire as a sacrificial lamb.

Posted by: TexasJew at June 28, 2015 09:36 AM (lQn8Y)

30 22


Patrick McNee is dead?

Posted by: Soothsayer's Lovin Spoonful at June 28, 2015 09:33 AM (5jPLo)

Yes, I posted a link in the morning news a few days ago.

Posted by: Vic We Have No Party at June 28, 2015 09:37 AM (GpgJl)

31 You mentioned JK Rowling, so this is totes relevant:

http://tinyurl.com/omhw9mg

(Woot link)

But I'm not admitting I actually bought one...


I'm almost out of Liturgical Mysteries...I'm on 11 of 12. More! I need more!!

Posted by: Mama AJ at June 28, 2015 09:37 AM (0xTsz)

32 Watch what you say about me.

Posted by: hillary the horrible at June 28, 2015 09:37 AM (JMb/Y)

33
small publisher "And Other Stories"


Well, let's see what they've got on the backlist. Real quote:

"Sworn Virgin" - Elvira Dones is among the best of Albanias writers and her publication in English is excellent news. Ismail Kadare Hana Doda is an ambitious literature student in cosmopolitan Tirana. Mark Doda is a raki-drinking, chain-smoking shepherd....

"Four thumbs up! Mainly because, like all Serbs, I have four thumbs."
- Hector (Serbian Sunday Review)

Posted by: Laurie David's Cervix at June 28, 2015 09:38 AM (kdS6q)

34 But it will be the activists, supported by the
government, big corporations and media who will be portrayed as brave
heroes for taking on this evil bigoted church


Posted by: TheQuietMan at June 28, 2015 09:32 AM (DiZBp)


All funded by YOUR tax dollars comrade, so it's really best that you "get on the bandwagon".

Posted by: Hrothgar at June 28, 2015 09:38 AM (ftVQq)

35 https://www.mises.org/library/socialism-and-decivilization

Posted by: Kindltot at June 28, 2015 09:18 AM (3pRHP)


Ha! The author of this piece has earned himself a stint in The Barrel. Somewhere toward the beginning, he forgot the close-italics tag.

Interesting article, though.

Posted by: OregonMuse at June 28, 2015 09:39 AM (AWijS)

36 Book I received for Father's Day (from the wife, the kids got me nothing as usual. Well, I got a couple texts....):

How to Be a Guilty Parent by Glenn Collins.

Don't need a book on that. I already know what I did. But, she got it for me because it has "illustrations by Gahan Wilson." Yay!

---

Another volume Milady dragged home from the thrift store, looks, from the title, like a Men-Mars Women-Venus type theme.

His Brain, Her Brain - How Divinely Designed Differences Can Strengthen Your Marriage

I do like the suggested theme in the subtitle. Would be nice if the differences would quit undermining us.

But I only mention it because of the cover illustration: One incandescent lightbulb, one pigtail compact flourescent bulb.

So, I say to Milady, this suggests that men's brains give good bright light, and are practical, while women's are poorly lit, and potentially poisonous if broken?

Posted by: mindful webworker - but, but, politics! supremes! obama! at June 28, 2015 09:39 AM (4Utw1)

37 I haven't read any books this week, but this came up on the morning thread.

Here is a link to Leonard Peikoff's book "The Ominous Parallels", which was published in 1983.

https://tinyurl.com/pc5j5cg

I have read it, and it shows that the movement of America towards a Nazi-like regime has deep roots. It didn't just happen all of a sudden.

Posted by: rickl at June 28, 2015 09:39 AM (sdi6R)

38 Oh, and I'm reading a couple books by Peter Grant (Bayou Renaissance Man dot blogspot dot com.

I'd say they fit in the "engineering science fiction" category. Lots of detail, but not in an annoying way. Seems needed, not superfluous, IYKWIM.

Posted by: Mama AJ at June 28, 2015 09:40 AM (0xTsz)

39 My book hero Nate Romanowski.

Faloner, badass and lover.

Posted by: redenzo at June 28, 2015 09:40 AM (JMb/Y)

40 We'll have a true "national dialogue" about race when we examine how incredibly fucked up much of black society is.

The peaceful Christianity we saw in Charleston after the murders is becoming an outlier.

Posted by: TexasJew at June 28, 2015 09:41 AM (lQn8Y)

41 Just read Jay Allan's latest Crimson Worlds book, "Into the Darkness." Love the Crimson Worlds series. Delicious mil-space-fi mind candy.

Posted by: Agent J at June 28, 2015 09:41 AM (LfFy0)

42 The Lottery by Shirley Jackson

Posted by: gail at June 28, 2015 09:42 AM (CQT1j)

43 More speculation on the reasons for the fall of Rome:

https://ricochet.com/sunday-morning-decline-and-fall/

Posted by: Lizzy at June 28, 2015 09:42 AM (NOIQH)

44 That's pretty much what's happened in this decade.
The Baby Boomers were about the last people in America to get a decent
education. Now they're leaving, and their impossibly ignorant children
are taking over, with general breakdown and disorder as a result.

Posted by: Dr. Mabuse at June 28, 2015 09:31 AM (VBbCO)


If it's not on an app or screen a lot of them are useless. These two beta males at work practically need to call someone when they need a light bulb changed.

Posted by: TheQuietMan at June 28, 2015 09:43 AM (DiZBp)

45 26 You should have mentioned Derbyshire's and NRO's tangle with the racial hate mob in 2012,

I deliberately avoided this, as I thought it would distract from the point I was trying to make.

However, I will say this: I generally like the NRO crowd, they've got a lot of good writers, but there are some places they simply refuse to go. And I think Derb should've realized this.

Posted by: OregonMuse at June 28, 2015 09:46 AM (AWijS)

46 NRO fired Derbyshire as a sacrificial lamb.





Posted by: TexasJew at June 28, 2015 09:36 AM (lQn8Y)

It was with great difficulty at the time, that I managed to obtain a copy Derbyshire's article of advice to his children since even the internet didn't seem to be cooperative in letting me search for or download it.
After I read it, I had a really bad feeling (and a correct one as it is turning out) that censorship was only a short step away, because there was nothing inflammatory or bigoted in the article, it truly was a decent intelligent and accurate set of fatherly advice worth heeding then and even more so in these days of Obama/Holder/Lynch enhanced racial "diversity".

Posted by: Hrothgar at June 28, 2015 09:46 AM (ftVQq)

47 Yay book thread!

I've been reading What I Saw in America by G. K. Chesterton this week. Kind of scary the current trends he called clear back in 1922. One of the most striking insights is his realization that the nanny state would be the inevitable result of radical feminism because women are used to being tyrants in their own homes and getting into politics would allow them to become tyrants in everyone else's homes. The chapter "Fads and Other Problems" was also sadly on target for the news of this week.

Also made some pretty significant progress on Loyal Valley: Captives this weekend. Truth be told, I kind of needed to hide out in the 1870s for a few days... but also, writing certain parts of this storyline has been highly entertaining. And I haven't even introduced the special snowflake character yet. Eeheehee....

Question for the Horde: If you had to recommend that someone read only one chapter from de Tocqueville's Democracy in America, what would it be? (Have to get my syllabus finalized this week--ack!)

Posted by: Elisabeth G. Wolfe at June 28, 2015 09:47 AM (iuQS7)

48 "We the Living" is not science fiction in any way, shape, or form. It is a drama about a love triangle that takes place in the immediate aftermath of the Russian Revolution, during the first years of communist rule.

The author of this thread might be thinking of "Atlas Shrugged," which, although it is not strictly sci-fi, has some sci-fi elements, particularly the motor at the heart of the story. Again, though, it's more of a straight drama than science fiction.

Posted by: Demosthenes at June 28, 2015 09:47 AM (u35xj)

49 Dropping in to ask for some advice from the horde. I've just finished up a novel about a man who runs a marathon. It cuts between the present and his training for said event and the events of his life that made him the man he was.

So two questions. Before going the self-publishing route again, should I hit up publishers or agents first? Most of what I read suggested the former for unpublished writers. If I try my hand with a publisher, any recommendations on who to choose based on the novel's content. Any other advice is welcome.

Posted by: Paul at June 28, 2015 09:51 AM (n+82F)

50 Oh, and I'm reading a couple books by Peter Grant (Bayou Renaissance Man dot blogspot dot com.

I like Grant's science fiction. Also, he used to be a chaplain working in federal prisons and the book he wrote from his experiences 'Walls, Barbed Wire, and Souls' (or something like that) is quite an eye-opener.

Posted by: OregonMuse at June 28, 2015 09:51 AM (AWijS)

51 Writing to pick the same nit as Demosthenes--We the Living is pure historical fiction; Atlas Shrugged has some sci-if elements. You also might have been thinking of Anthem, which is in the future and dystopian, but has no technological excitement.

Posted by: Brian at June 28, 2015 09:52 AM (I8DlU)

52 "We the Living" is not science fiction in any way, shape, or form

Of course, you're right. The Rand story I was thinking about is "Anthem". Thank you for the correction, I will update the thread accordingly.

Posted by: OregonMuse at June 28, 2015 09:52 AM (AWijS)

53 Derbyshire was also criticized for being one of the first to publicly question the benefits afforded to the 9-11 victims and families.

Posted by: Cruzinator at June 28, 2015 09:52 AM (Q4pU/)

54 Paper maps.

If you have a country filled with folks who can't use a paper map, your doom clock is ticking.

Book rec.: The Circuit: Executor Rising by Rhett C. Bruno.

Posted by: eman at June 28, 2015 09:54 AM (MQEz6)

55 never could get into either Stephenson or Gaiman. rub me the wrong way for some reason.

Posted by: Bigby's Knuckle Sandwich at June 28, 2015 09:54 AM (Cq0oW)

56 That's pretty much what's happened in this decade.
The Baby Boomers were about the last people in America to get a decent
education. Now they're leaving, and their impossibly ignorant children
are taking over, with general breakdown and disorder as a result.

Posted by: Dr. Mabuse at June 28, 2015 09:31 AM (VBbCO)
Yes, indeed, the "we don't keep score because it might hurt someone's feelings / everybody wins a prize" generations are taking over, with predictable results.Not to let the boomers off the hook - they raised these feral children.

Posted by: cool breeze at June 28, 2015 09:55 AM (6Cu7i)

57 12 Vic, I've posted this link before. It is a Spanish Economist talking about what he sees as the principal reasons the Roman Empire collapsed.

Wheat from Egypt is part of it, but the major reasons are what splintered the society to begin with: Taxes, Bread and Circuses, and people "going Galt" to avoid predation by the government - and setting the grounds for feudalism.

https://www.mises.org/library/socialism-and-decivilization

--

Wow. What a great and scary analysis. I'm bookmarking it.

Posted by: @votermom at June 28, 2015 09:55 AM (cbfNE)

58 As for what I'm reading, I'm just about done with the first of the Game of Thrones series. I finally broke down and had to see what all the fuss was about. I figure at the pace I'm reading I'll have the set complete by September. It's grisly, but not as bad as advertised, unless it gets bloodier as the series progresses. The writing is good, but he's no Tolkien.

Posted by: Paul at June 28, 2015 09:55 AM (n+82F)

59 I'm quite the witty writer but my politics are screwed up.

Posted by: Anne Lamott at June 28, 2015 09:57 AM (gwG9s)

60 Huh. And you can get Anthem for free on Kindle. Is it that old that it's now in the public domain?

Posted by: OregonMuse at June 28, 2015 09:57 AM (AWijS)

61 Morning all

Shitty day outside

Posted by: Nevergiveup at June 28, 2015 09:58 AM (/tNwW)

62 And now we are reaping the whirlwind. I can see the
US fragmenting just like Rome. The people in the South and in the
heartland States like Kansas do NOT like the direction the megalopolises
on the East and West coasts are taking us.

So now we must ask ourselves what caused the US to move to socialism.
Posted by: Vic We Have No Party at June 28, 2015 09:34 AM (GpgJl)


Buying votes and amassing a mob of followers to intimidate political opponents.


Posted by: Kindltot at June 28, 2015 09:58 AM (3pRHP)

63 I adopted two kittens shortly after reading "We the Living", and named them Kira and Leo.

Posted by: rickl at June 28, 2015 09:59 AM (sdi6R)

64 Paul: spoiler alert - it gets bloodier. Personally, I enjoyed the first three books immensely, then the series disintegrated into a mass of subplots and unnecessary characters. YMMV.

Posted by: PabloD at June 28, 2015 09:59 AM (shhRM)

65 "So, their brilliant plan is, in 2018, they're not going to publish any books by men."


Good. I am way behind in the stack of books I want to read. Including a couple of those thousand pagers from Neal Stephenson.

Posted by: Obnoxious A-Hole at June 28, 2015 10:00 AM (QHgTq)

66 Paul, have you read Larry Correia's advice?

Monster Hunter Nation dot com isn't coming up right now, but there was, and hopefully soon will be again, a post right at the top re writing for a living. I don't remember if he talked about your question exactly...

Posted by: Mama AJ at June 28, 2015 10:01 AM (0xTsz)

67 Thanks Mama AJ. I'm sure I can find it if I use my google fu.

Posted by: Paul at June 28, 2015 10:03 AM (n+82F)

68 The Lottery is progressive bullshit.

Posted by: Johnny at June 28, 2015 10:04 AM (WvGsS)

69 Thanks for the Book Thread ON!

I've watched 2eps of Jonathan Strange & Mr Norrell now and I'm really liking it.
The actor playing Mr. Not tell is so good - I am feeling great sympathy for the character. In the book I never cared about him.

Posted by: @votermom at June 28, 2015 10:05 AM (cbfNE)

70 Boy oh boy did I remember that line from "The Lottery". Didn't even have to scroll to the bottom of the thread. I believe it was in my junior high literature book. Can't remember what year though. Ninth grade, maybe? Anyway, I remember reading that story and being truly disturbed. It upset my sheltered, sunny view of life as it was meant to do. I thought hard about what it would mean to live in a society like that. Very scary and, surprise, surprise, kind of prophetic. By the way, do the public schools even teach real literature anymore?

Posted by: Tuna at June 28, 2015 10:06 AM (JSovD)

71 All right! The SpaceX webcast has started!

Here we go!

http://www.spacex.com/webcast/

Posted by: rickl at June 28, 2015 10:06 AM (sdi6R)

72 64 Paul: spoiler alert - it gets bloodier. Personally, I enjoyed the first three books immensely, then the series disintegrated into a mass of subplots and unnecessary characters. YMMV.

--

I agree. The series was clearly building up towards a certain climax but the writer seems to be chickening out.
At this rate the series will end with winter being defeated by global warming and grayscale cured by obamacare.

Posted by: @votermom at June 28, 2015 10:10 AM (cbfNE)

73 This week I finished reading Seveneves by Neal Stephenson. I liked it, but not as much as all the other works of his that I have read. The story is great, but there are a lot of pages about space ship architecture.

Posted by: Zoltan at June 28, 2015 10:11 AM (lFkeD)

74 Posted by: eman at June 28, 2015 09:54 AM (MQEz6)

And those maps in cursive, totally useless!

Posted by: Hrothgar at June 28, 2015 10:12 AM (ftVQq)

75 never could get into either Stephenson or Gaiman. rub me the wrong way for some reason.

Posted by: Bigby's Knuckle Sandwich at June 28, 2015 09:54 AM (Cq0oW)

Try Zodiac or Cryptonomicon, if you can't get into those don't bother with Stephenson.

Posted by: Hrothgar at June 28, 2015 10:14 AM (ftVQq)

76 The Lottery is progressive bullshit.

How so?

Posted by: OregonMuse at June 28, 2015 10:14 AM (AWijS)

77 72

"At this rate the series will end with winter being defeated by global warming and grayscale cured by obamacare."

LOL. Only if Martin can get his fat lazy fingers to finish the series. You ought to send him your idea. Might cure his writer's block.

Posted by: Tuna at June 28, 2015 10:15 AM (JSovD)

78 I am currently working my way through Gen. Phil Sheridan's memoirs.
A very headstrong man, very focused on his work, and appears very driven.

I would not wonder if he were both deeply respected and deeply hated by his peers and superiors.

(next is probably Sherman)

Posted by: Kindltot at June 28, 2015 10:16 AM (3pRHP)

79 Posted by: Kindltot at June 28, 2015 10:16 AM (3pRHP)

I'm sure you've read American Caesar already?

Posted by: Cruzinator at June 28, 2015 10:17 AM (Q4pU/)

80 T minus 4

Posted by: Kindltot at June 28, 2015 10:17 AM (3pRHP)

81 78
My husband is working his way through the Sherman biography and enjoying it immensely.

Posted by: Tuna at June 28, 2015 10:18 AM (JSovD)

82 have done, Hrothgar. can't stand em

Posted by: Bigby's Knuckle Sandwich at June 28, 2015 10:19 AM (Cq0oW)

83 Go, baby, go!

Posted by: rickl at June 28, 2015 10:22 AM (sdi6R)

84 We are The Generals!

Posted by: General Wm. T. Sherman Jr. High at June 28, 2015 10:22 AM (gwG9s)

85 I've watched 2eps of Jonathan Strange Mr Norrell now and I'm really liking it. The actor playing Mr. Not tell is so good - I am feeling great sympathy for the character. In the book I never cared about him.

I've downloaded all the episodes available thus far, but haven't watched them, yet. Mrs. Muse and I have about 2 more series in the queue to watch before we get to that one. But it's on my list, and I'm glad you told me about it.

Posted by: OregonMuse at June 28, 2015 10:22 AM (AWijS)

86 One of the most striking insights is his realization that the nanny state would be the inevitable result of radical feminism because women are used to being tyrants in their own homes and getting into politics would allow them to become tyrants in everyone else's homes.

It's true. Something something hyper-emotional insanity something consequences be damned.

Posted by: 98ZJUSMC Staring at the Lake in the rain at June 28, 2015 10:23 AM (CFcIt)

87 That didn't look good.

Posted by: rickl at June 28, 2015 10:24 AM (sdi6R)

88 Why was Noah not a woman in a same-sex marriage? Why did s/he/it not load the ark with two of every animal of the same sex? Why did they not sell sex toys and lubricants on the ark? It would have been such a beautiful gesture toward gender equality and inter-species expressions of intimacy, during that Biblical Global Warming Crisis in Genesis.

Posted by: Tatted Lesbian Transexual Pope at June 28, 2015 10:24 AM (mTo/m)

89 Oh well. You win some, you lose some.

Posted by: rickl at June 28, 2015 10:25 AM (sdi6R)

90 no, it didn't. spacex rocket go boom.

Posted by: Anachronda at June 28, 2015 10:25 AM (o78gS)

91 75 never could get into either Stephenson or Gaiman. rub me the wrong way for some reason.

Posted by: Bigby's Knuckle Sandwich at June 28, 2015 09:54 AM (Cq0oW)

--

Never liked Stephenson. I find Gaiman readable but disturbing.

Posted by: @votermom at June 28, 2015 10:25 AM (cbfNE)

92 have done, Hrothgar. can't stand em

Posted by: Bigby's Knuckle Sandwich at June 28, 2015 10:19 AM (Cq0oW)

Too bad, as I have found him to be pretty good with interesting technical diversions, but I can understand, he's a bit of an acquired taste!

Posted by: Hrothgar at June 28, 2015 10:26 AM (ftVQq)

93 Go, Dog. Go!

Posted by: P.D. Eastman at June 28, 2015 10:26 AM (CFcIt)

94 No, haven't read anything on MacArthur.

Posted by: Kindltot at June 28, 2015 10:26 AM (3pRHP)

95 Much has been made in comparing the fall of the Roman Empire to contemporary U.S. I would say that a better parallel would be that of the collapse of the Republic in late B.C. and its transformation into the Empire. The Senate had become corrupt, bribery was rampant, the government too ineffective and in many ways useless.

Civil war resulted (which we have not seen yet, but highly possible) until Augustus set things straight.

Posted by: Libra at June 28, 2015 10:26 AM (GblmV)

96 Well, Elon just made himself a BFRC. (That's Big Fucking Red Cloud for the uninitiated). Oh well, their luck was bound to run out sooner or later. Nobody ever said launching rockets was routine...

Posted by: The Oort Cloud - Source of all SMODs at June 28, 2015 10:27 AM (AYY6Y)

97
I'm waiting for the last episode of Shtisel, an Israeli mini series about a Haradi family. I didnt know that wives keep their hair covered even in bed. Not sure why. They take off the wig and put on one of those grannie hats.

Posted by: Bruce With a Wang! at June 28, 2015 10:28 AM (iQIUe)

98 A funny, c/o chrissy on Polination

We lost the 6th book in the series...
http://bit.ly/lost-nr6

Other books funnies on the page that came from:
http://bit.ly/pn-books

Posted by: mindful webworker - I only read it for the pictures at June 28, 2015 10:28 AM (4Utw1)

99 I read "The Last Days of Marilyn Monroe" by Donald Wolfe. I don't know if it's true but I can definitely see Robert Kennedy having someone murdered to protect the Kennedy family. The book is very sympathetic to Marilyn and very chilling.

Posted by: Notsothoreau at June 28, 2015 10:28 AM (g6yUI)

100 The Senate had become corrupt, bribery was rampant, the government too ineffective and in many ways useless.
...
Posted by: Libra at June 28, 2015 10:26 AM (GblmV)



For a minute there, I thought you were talking about McConnell and Obama.

Posted by: Hrothgar at June 28, 2015 10:28 AM (ftVQq)

101 SPACE X FALCON 9 JUST EXPLODED SHORTLY AFTER LIFTOFF...

Posted by: tbd at June 28, 2015 10:28 AM (UhiWu)

102 I just finished The Man In the High Castle by Philip K. Dick and quite liked. I had read a number of his short stories which ranged from brilliant to meh and which frequently had O. Henry type surprise endings but I had never read one of his novels. This is an alternate history in which the Axis won WWII. Surprisingly perhap the mos sympathetic character is the Japanese trade minister to the puppet government of the Pacific States of America and this despite being given in moments of anger to referring to a certain national/racial group as "stupid barbarian yank eu humans." Perhaps I should warn that the ending leaves many plot points hanging. It's more a look at society than an action adventure.

Posted by: The Great White Snark at June 28, 2015 10:28 AM (LImiJ)

103 90 no, it didn't. spacex rocket go boom.

Posted by: Anachronda at June 28, 2015 10:25 AM (o78gS)


It blowed-up real good.

Posted by: SCTV at June 28, 2015 10:29 AM (CFcIt)

104 Was there a Roman middle class? Plenty of merchant class. But it seems that unless you were super rich, living in Rome was terrible. Just nasty smells and garbage and the danger of fires. Hot, overcrowded, and stinky.

Posted by: Bruce With a Wang! at June 28, 2015 10:30 AM (iQIUe)

105 85 cool!
Also, this is the 2nd time I've tried disabling autocorrect so I don't get typos like that anymore. Geeze. Mr Not tell indeed!

Posted by: @votermom at June 28, 2015 10:31 AM (cbfNE)

106 I am reading Co. Aytch by Sam R Watkins, it is the story of a foot soldier during the civil war and he really has some "Twainesque" flavor to his writing. I'm reading it online through fullbooks.com

Posted by: FCF at June 28, 2015 10:31 AM (kejii)

107 Was there a Roman middle class? Plenty of merchant
class. But it seems that unless you were super rich, living in Rome was
terrible. Just nasty smells and garbage and the danger of fires. Hot,
overcrowded, and stinky.

Posted by: Bruce With a Wang! at June 28, 2015 10:30 AM (iQIUe)


But the important thing is there were super rich and they lived well (for the times). The rest were just peasants and (gasp) slaves.

Posted by: Hrothgar at June 28, 2015 10:32 AM (ftVQq)

108 What's with the video blackout right after the rocket blew up?

Posted by: Alf767 at June 28, 2015 10:32 AM (mhUhP)

109 Reading Victor Klemperers diary, "I will bear witness", and I'm struck by a couple things. One is how he and his social circle spend their time discussing whether the Nazi regime will last or not, all the while he and his friends circle the drain and more and more of their freedom is curtailed. They don't realize the light at the end of the tunnel is the train that will take them to the camps and their end. Scary how it reminds me of now.

Then also, he seems to constantly compare Nazism to Bolshevism and concludes that they are the same. Yet he became hard-core communist after the end of WWII. Didn't he read his own diary?

I'm also curious why all the attention seems to be paid to the Nazi's during the 1930's and not what's happening in the USSR. Well, guess that's a rhetorical question really.

Posted by: Last at June 28, 2015 10:33 AM (8HiDF)

110 86 One of the most striking insights is his realization that the nanny state would be the inevitable result of radical feminism because women are used to being tyrants in their own homes and getting into politics would allow them to become tyrants in everyone else's homes.

It's true. Something something hyper-emotional insanity something consequences be damned.
-------------------------------------------------------
Boy howdy. This.

Posted by: uhhhuh at June 28, 2015 10:33 AM (L7EVq)

111 96 Well, Elon just made himself a BFRC. (That's Big Fucking Red Cloud for the uninitiated). Oh well, their luck was bound to run out sooner or later. Nobody ever said launching rockets was routine...
Posted by: The Oort Cloud - Source of all SMODs at June 28, 2015 10:27 AM (AYY6Y)


I think they had something like 18 successful launches in a row, which is practically unheard of for a new launch vehicle. But something was bound to happen sooner or later.

This has serious implications for the ISS, though.

Cygnus failed, Progress failed, and now SpaceX failed. They're not getting any resupply now.

Posted by: rickl at June 28, 2015 10:33 AM (sdi6R)

112 The Rowling quote is from Schopenhauer.

Posted by: mycherrysamores at June 28, 2015 10:33 AM (k1Zq7)

113 Continuing with my reading about chess rules, notation and the VERY beginning of strategy. It is fun taking on new subjects and, frankly, the mental exercise is beneficial.

Elisabeth G. Wolfe mentioned earlier this week Chesterton's "All Things Considered", a collection of essays from 1915 or thereabouts. As far as I've read, they are insightful, disturbingly pertinent to the present, and witty. I have been known to laugh out loud at some of the humor.

Posted by: JTB at June 28, 2015 10:33 AM (FvdPb)

114 Elon, you should have saved the fireworks for next weekend.

Posted by: Sum Ting Wong, Ho Lee Fuk & Bang Ding Ow at June 28, 2015 10:33 AM (gwG9s)

115 103 90 no, it didn't. spacex rocket go boom.
Posted by: Anachronda at June 28, 2015 10:25 AM (o78gS)
It blowed-up real good.
Posted by: SCTV at June 28, 2015 10:29 AM (CFcIt)


I'm assuming from the light-hearted way in which you all are reporting this failure that there were no casualties. i.e. it wasn't a manned flight?

Posted by: OregonMuse at June 28, 2015 10:34 AM (AWijS)

116 Hero. The chief moral and public hero in my lifetime was Andrew Breitbart. He embodied what to me are the characteristics of a hero in rare consolidation: joy, shrewdness, ability to see and name dark forces that others can only sense and cannot name, fearlessness in face of the mob, robust and indomitable liberalness. To be a moral hero today (the only kind I'm talking about; physical heroes are far more common) means you will have to stand alone in a raging storm for a long time, longer than most men can stand. Politicians generally cannot do this. It isn't in their psychological codex. We need a hero right now like never before.

Posted by: rrpjr at June 28, 2015 10:34 AM (s/yC1)

117 It was just past 2 minutes into the flight, close to staging. Indeed I thought that was happening with the plume it was giving off. But nothing was said about staging, the plume got bigger, then the pieces started falling. Whole lot of quiet on the audio feed. No doubt it will take them a while to figure out what went wrong.

Posted by: The Oort Cloud - Source of all SMODs at June 28, 2015 10:34 AM (AYY6Y)

118 108
The camera was embarrassed?

Posted by: Tuna at June 28, 2015 10:35 AM (JSovD)

119 Posted by: The Great White Snark at June 28, 2015 10:28 AM (LImiJ)

A few people around here enjoyed it.....Not I!

I found the language stilted, the character development odd, and the characters themselves almost childlike.

But some of his other stuff is good.

Posted by: CharlieBrown'sDildo at June 28, 2015 10:35 AM (Zu3d9)

120 I misremembered--the point about radfems is in the chapter "Fads and Other Problems." Here's what GKC says:

There is a sort of underbred history going about, according to which women in the past have always been in the position of slaves. It is much more to the point to note that women have always been in the position of despots. They have been despotic because they ruled in an area where they had too much common sense to attempt to be constitutional. You cannot grant a constitution to a nursery; nor can babies assemble like barons and extort a Great Charter. Tommy cannot plead a Habeas Corpus against going to bed; and an infant cannot be tried by twelve other infants before he is put in the corner. And as there can be no laws or liberties in a nursery, the extension of feminism means that there shall be no more laws or liberties in a state than there are in a nursery. The woman does not really regard men as citizens but as children. She may, if she is a humanitarian, love all mankind; but she does not respect it. Still less does she respect its votes. Now a man must be very blind nowadays not to see that there is a danger of a sort of amateur science or pseudo-science being made the excuse for every trick of tyranny and interference. Anybody who is not an anarchist agrees with having a policeman at the corner of the street; but the danger at present is that of finding the policeman half-way down the chimney or even under the bed. In other words, it is a danger of turning the policeman into a sort of benevolent burglar. Against this protests are already being made, and will increasingly be made, if men retain any instinct of independence or dignity at all. But to complain of the woman interfering in the home will always sound like complaining of the oyster intruding into the oyster-shell. To object that she has too much power over education will seem like objecting to a hen having too much to do with eggs. She has already been given an almost irresponsible power over a limited region in these things; and if that power is made infinite it will be even more irresponsible. If she adds to her own power in the family all these alien fads external to the family, her power will not only be irresponsible but insane. She will be something which may well be called a nightmare of the nursery; a mad mother. But the point is that she will be mad about other nurseries as well as her own, or possibly instead of her own. The results will be interesting; but at least it is certain that under this softening influence government of the people, by the people, for the people, will most assuredly perish from the earth.

Mind you, as an 'ette, I *like* being able to vote. But Chesterton has a point here.

Posted by: Elisabeth G. Wolfe at June 28, 2015 10:35 AM (iuQS7)

121 We (the US) has moved toward what we call Socialism in three stages:

1) the early progressives of the 20th century fomented resentment of the new very rich who appeared from the Gilded Age. This actually was started by Teddy Roosevelt (a Republican! Zounds!) but carried to a climax (first phase) by Woodrow Wilson (the Federal Reserve, a permanent progressive income tax, WWI and the draft - to save the world for Democracy).
Most of the move toward Socialism was always described in messianic terms. The first phase climaxed with Women's Suffrage and Prohibition (women being tyrants outside the home).
The Roaring 20's kind of ameliorated this temporarily, and we could have gone back to a a healthier society in time, but then came

2) The Great Depression, and again, original sin was by....Herbert Hoover (a Republican, dammit!). The "wonder boy" (as Coolidge called him privately) ushered in things that would prolong the Depression, and also usher in FDR, who began the second stage of Socialism in America: the Government as nanny and big brother. The NRA (not the gun guys, the National Recovery Administration), public works of all kinds, the Tennessee Valley Authority, a host of alphabet agencies, Social Security, and finally climaxing with.....WWII and another draft.
Truman was a socialist democrat too, and tried to bring about nationalized healthcare, but the momentum of the New Deal was finally wearing out.

Again, the '50's were a respite from 20 years of socialist growth (well, except to the Interstate highway project, etc.) and could have led to a return to a healthier society, but then came the 60's,

3) The third wave of Socialism...social justice. Not that this was neglected before, but most of the first two waves were about economics (which were driven by social justice). The third wave was all about social justice outcomes.

Interesting that all the good social justice outcomes (civil rights and desegregation, which was moving naturally from the 1950's) and the bad (urban renewal, wrecking cities and white flight to the suburbs) from the 60's were again climaxed by....a war...in Viet Nam and a draft which was unpopular. The War in Viet Nam actually sank LBJ, and ushered in Nixon, who probably made a lot of the social engineering of LBJ actually work. I think Nixon was a Republican, too.

There's no one book about all of this that really tells the story. There was a book by Philip Lash called "Dealers and Dreamers" about the inside of the New Deal under FDR and how much knife-fighting there was (and Lash was a Democrat), which goes nicely with "The Forgotten Man" by Amity Schlaes. Lash (Democrat ) mocked Carter in the 1970's, as Carter was largely ignorant of the heritage within the Democrat Party of the New Dealers.


I think now we are in the fourth wave of socialism, which we could call "the intimidation wave" (which occurred in all the previous waves also), but the highlight is the coersive nature of Obamaism (protected by Black Democratium) and the willingness of the Media to be willing sycophants to this (because they smell the permanent power and position to be gained). It is now about getting the populous to be completely submissive to the government will, and criminalizing any who resist (speaking out is resisting). And again, this all appeared before. And aided by rollover Republicans.

Posted by: Bossy Conservative....outlaw in America at June 28, 2015 10:36 AM (+1T7c)

122 And no, it was not a manned flight. Another supply ship to the ISS. And yes, first Cygnus, then Progress, now SpaceX. Everybody having problems right now.

Posted by: The Oort Cloud - Source of all SMODs at June 28, 2015 10:36 AM (AYY6Y)

123 Love the book quotes and have read the whole Potter series. But with the possible that I'm not getting it but when I read something I may not become a genus but hope that I've learned something.

Posted by: Skip at June 28, 2015 10:36 AM (kTWpM)

124 This just in: Spaceflight is hard.

If it was easy, everybody would be doing it.

Posted by: rickl at June 28, 2015 10:36 AM (sdi6R)

125 Rocket went boom?

$Ow!! (Must be nice to have that kind of money to play with.)

Should have saved it for the 4th.

Posted by: mindful webworker - up in smoke? at June 28, 2015 10:36 AM (4Utw1)

126 I should have had Lucky Charms for breakfast not Kaboom.

Posted by: Elon Muskrat at June 28, 2015 10:36 AM (gwG9s)

127 Well, HuluPlus has a *wonderful* section of clips from MSNBC, celebrating the success of "Marriage Equality."

If these assholes don't institute a way for me to customize the feed they're gonna go the way of cable into the 'cancel' file.

Posted by: Pappy O'Daniel at June 28, 2015 10:37 AM (oVJmc)

128 Posted by: Kindltot at June 28, 2015 10:26 AM (3pRHP)

I would highly recommend if you are interested in Military biographies. Written by William Manchester who was not a fan of MacArthur but is a positive portrayal in my opinion.

Posted by: Cruzinator at June 28, 2015 10:37 AM (Q4pU/)

129 I haven't read this but it's a book about books. When Books Went To War by Manning. It seems both the publishing houses and the U.S. government printed millions of cheap books for WWII soldiers which rescued some books from oblivion and distracted the soldiers.

Posted by: The Great White Snark at June 28, 2015 10:37 AM (LImiJ)

130 "I'm assuming from the light-hearted way in which you all are reporting this failure that there were no casualties. i.e. it wasn't a manned flight?"

Correct. Just supplies and a couple of experiments.

Posted by: despair at June 28, 2015 10:37 AM (J6suc)

131 Comment was made that range safety may have blown rocket up, not clear what went wrong prior to that but flame pattern was clearly disturbed. Seemed to go wrong prior to staging. I have a bad feeling that some human error may have occurred although no evidence just hunch and hard to see what intervention could have happened. Now they are saying data stopped at 2:19 which is more than 30 sec before staging.

Posted by: Ray Van Dune at June 28, 2015 10:38 AM (c41Rr)

132 Continuing with my reading about chess rules, notation and the VERY beginning of strategy.

When I first learned how to read the English Descriptive chess notation when I was about 10 years old, and I discovered I could now actually READ those previously indecipherable chess books, I felt that the secrets of the universe were revealing themselves unto me.

There is nothing quite like the exhilaration of a small boy.

Posted by: OregonMuse at June 28, 2015 10:38 AM (AWijS)

133 130 "I'm assuming from the light-hearted way in which you all are reporting this failure that there were no casualties. i.e. it wasn't a manned flight?"

Correct. Just supplies and a couple of experiments.
Posted by: despair at June 28, 2015 10:37 AM (J6suc)


And a new docking adapter.

Posted by: rickl at June 28, 2015 10:38 AM (sdi6R)

134 ""Science fantasy" would be a better definition for this sort of thing."

Actually, the term you're looking for is probably "space opera."

Posted by: SDN at June 28, 2015 10:39 AM (MMdfW)

135 I'm also curious why all the attention seems to be paid to the Nazi's during the 1930's and not what's happening in the USSR. Well, guess that's a rhetorical question really.
Posted by: Last at June 28, 2015 10:33 AM (8HiDF)

=============
I'm still amazed how many people Martha Dodd effed. Even her KGB handlers told her to cool it. She refused. If she had gone to live in Russia as she wanted to, they wd have sent her to the gulag.

The idiot she married was the one who was pals with Valerie J's dad.

http://spartacus-educational.com/Martha_Dodd.htm

Posted by: Bruce With a Wang! at June 28, 2015 10:40 AM (iQIUe)

136 SpaceX will figure this out quickly enough.

Like I said, 18 successful launches in a row for a brand-new system is practically unheard of.

It's interesting that the failure happened after Max-Q.

Posted by: rickl at June 28, 2015 10:41 AM (sdi6R)

137 Who ever recommended "hard luck hank screw the galaxy" Thank you soo much it's very good love the Humor, if you get the Audio version they do a good job of bringing the story to life. I really Love the dry humor, I really need this type of fun read and I laugh out loud several times.

Posted by: Patrick From Ohio at June 28, 2015 10:43 AM (CxEX+)

138 "At this rate the series will end with winter being defeated by global warming and grayscale cured by obamacare."

LOL. Only if Martin can get his fat lazy fingers to finish the series. You ought to send him your idea. Might cure his writer's block.
Posted by: Tuna at June 28, 2015 10:15 AM (JSovD)



I don't think it's writer's block, so much as this:


I had a friend who was a writer who had some success as a second tier SF author and was steadily working her way toward first tier.

Then James Cameron's company bought the movie rights to one of her books and she sort of lost her mind.

Of course the movie never happened, but being stuck in development hell meant she got paid, I think, every two years for them to retain the rights.

The sum was smallish (around $30K) but enough that she more or less lost interest in writing books because she could easily live on that.

Then thinking she was on the verge of greatness-
she blew up her contract and bought back her novel from the publishing company over some very silly thing( I think the cover design) and set about trying to adapt it for the screen.

As well as adapting all her other books for the screen.

And that was pretty much it for her as a writer-

She went from being a hard-scrabble but prolific writer of books to a (relatively) non-productive writer of screenplays that nobody wanted.

Because the money and acquisition of a little bit of acclaim was so easy.

Then the JC's company lost interest and the money stopped.

Just that little brush with Hollywood was enough to destroy her as a productive author-

how much more so must it be for Martin with the large sums of money and near universal acclaim.


You should always dance with those what brought you-

if you want to continue dancing.

But sometimes it's hard.

Posted by: naturalfake at June 28, 2015 10:44 AM (KUa85)

139 So, the terrorist stopped to pray and a cop put two bullets in him. And he loved to breakdance and soccer.

Posted by: Bruce With a Wang! at June 28, 2015 10:46 AM (iQIUe)

140 how much more so must it be for Martin with the large sums of money and near universal acclaim.





You should always dance with those what brought you-



if you want to continue dancing.



But sometimes it's hard.



Posted by: naturalfake at June 28, 2015 10:44 AM (KUa85)


I don't think it was HBO. Jordan had the same problem. He had a beginning, and an end, but didn't seem to have the middle figured out. He's been winging it this whole time, and can't seem to wrap things up.

Posted by: Colorado Alex at June 28, 2015 10:47 AM (10ydV)

141 Speaking of Russian history I did not learn the specifics until recently that Czar Nichols And King George were first cousins and great friends. Well until George refused to give his cousin sanctuary. Also cousins with Emperor Wilhelm who they disliked. WWI was just a family squabble I guess.

Great book on the subject, Three Royal Cousins.

Posted by: Cruzinator at June 28, 2015 10:48 AM (Q4pU/)

142 Ray Van Dun: I have a bad feeling that some human error may have occurred...

Heh. Like, what are the alternatives? Barring intentional sabotage or being struck by thunderbolt, it's all human, and since we know it works when done right, the only remaining conclusion was something wasn't done right.

Probably forgot to carry the 1.

Posted by: mindful webworker - this actually is rocket surgery at June 28, 2015 10:48 AM (4Utw1)

143 137 Who ever recommended "hard luck hank screw the galaxy" Thank you soo much it's very good love the Humor, if you get the Audio version they do a good job of bringing the story to life. I really Love the dry humor, I really need this type of fun read and I laugh out loud several times.

-
I liked his speech just before he leaves on his suicide mission.

Posted by: The Great White Snark at June 28, 2015 10:48 AM (LImiJ)

144 It's interesting that the failure happened after Max-Q

It's Bush's fault. And the Confederate flag.

Posted by: OregonMuse at June 28, 2015 10:48 AM (AWijS)

145 Imo one of the problems GRRM has with GoT is that he created a character that is his avatar. That's distracted and sidelined him from the actual story.

Posted by: @votermom at June 28, 2015 10:50 AM (cbfNE)

146 144 It's interesting that the failure happened after Max-Q

It's Bush's fault. And the Confederate flag.


It did not bear the Rainbow Flag. It had to be destroyed.

Posted by: despair at June 28, 2015 10:52 AM (J6suc)

147 I foresee the end result of the same-sex marriage ruling being the separation of church and state marriage. The problem has always been that once the government "partnered" with religious organizations on the documenting and regulating of marriages, they got a say as to the definition. That worked for a long time, but no longer.

I didn't see a way to untangle this until someone mentioned the other day that religious organizations which do not recognize same-sex marriage are eventually going to be sued due to the fact that they are acting as an agent of the government. That's when I realized that it is the churches with religious objections, and in particular, the clergy who have been licensed by the State to perform weddings, who will be forced to either perform same-sex weddings or GIVE UP their privileges to perform them (as Boston Catholic Charities adoption services did when forced to place children in same-sex homes). In the case of marriage, they will obviously not have to actually stop performing the services, but they will become religious services only.

Posted by: Formerly known as Skeptic at June 28, 2015 10:52 AM (5z6T9)

148 NOOD for those so inclined.

Posted by: Y-not at June 28, 2015 10:54 AM (RWGcK)

149 32 .. MamAJ, Have you read the "Christmas Cantata" by Schweizer? It was the book that got me started on the Liturgical Mystery series but it isn't always included in the 1 though X lists.

BTW, I should have included Chesterton's "What I Saw In America" in my comment above. The man's writing is a treasure.

Posted by: JTB at June 28, 2015 10:55 AM (FvdPb)

150 That is a horrifying life, Bruce.

Posted by: Infidel at June 28, 2015 10:56 AM (2LVOe)

151 Carter was largely ignorant

Yep. You can stop right there.

Posted by: 98ZJUSMC Staring at the Lake in the rain at June 28, 2015 10:57 AM (CFcIt)

152 Actually, the term you're looking for is probably "space opera."

Maybe. However I think that 'science fiction' and 'space opera' are not mutually exclusive terms.

I'd have to think about this for awhile. Avoiding the obvious subjectivity in defining these terms is difficult.

Posted by: OregonMuse at June 28, 2015 10:57 AM (AWijS)

153 if you want to continue dancing.
But sometimes it's hard.


That's a very interesting story, naturalfake, thank you for posting it. I may find some way to use it in a subsequent book thread, so I hope you won't mind when I do.

Posted by: OregonMuse at June 28, 2015 11:01 AM (AWijS)

154 Any morons interested in writing a biotech fiction book?

The combination of the development of CRISPR biotechnology for gene editing and the identification of gene mutations associated with homosexuality suggests a fictional piece that predicts the societal cage match between the Left and Right.

Posted by: scrood at June 28, 2015 11:06 AM (3b9U4)

155 what I really hate about JK Rowling is that she needs to write another book I hate how she is making back stories for some of her Characters, Just write another book already.

Terms of Enlistment, funny how he writes about the welfare rats and all they want is food and TV.

I really think in the Future if people have a chance to leave and colonize another planet It will be the religious that will leave enmass because of the Gov and the Namnys

Posted by: Patrick From Ohio at June 28, 2015 11:09 AM (CxEX+)

156 138
I agree. Before he got the HBO contract I read lots of he had been spending all his time doing personal appearances and sci fi conventions. I think he lost his way forward way before HBO happened. Now he has a whole group of fans who haven't read the books, will never read the books and are relying on HBO to finish the series for him. Why bother writing? Tell HBO what the end is and let them do the work. Pity.

Posted by: Tuna at June 28, 2015 11:10 AM (JSovD)

157 145 Which character do you consider GRRM's self-insert? I can't spot an obvious Marty Stu, unless you're talking about Samwell Tarly, which I can't exactly see...

Posted by: Mitch H. at June 28, 2015 11:12 AM (9dWup)

158 have a bad feeling that some human error may have occurred...

I should have be more precise... I meant during the conduct of the launch including range safety. No evidence but a hunch.

Posted by: Ray Van Dune at June 28, 2015 11:15 AM (c41Rr)

159
There is nothing quite like the exhilaration of a small boy.


Posted by: OregonMuse at June 28, 2015 10:38 AM (AWijS)




Amen.

Posted by: Harry Reid at June 28, 2015 11:15 AM (yxw0r)

160 I knew the answer to the short story quiz without peeking!

Truly a haunting story. I believe there was a film made of this years ago. Not a great film, but as I recall, the last scene shows the lady who was selected in the lottery looking up and seeing her child getting ready to throw a stone at her. Awful.

Posted by: RM at June 28, 2015 11:16 AM (fRppw)

161 Posted by: OregonMuse at June 28, 2015 11:01 AM (AWijS)

Use away!

Posted by: naturalfake at June 28, 2015 11:19 AM (KUa85)

162 Yeah, Gibbons is definitely anti-Christian.

That reminds me of a sci-fi story about a guy who builds a time machine to save Rome from collapsing. He sends back material on steam engineering, etc. to give them a head start on technology and to stop the barbarians. The characters spend time trying to stop him but fail. Then one guy points out that the guy had already succeeded and it didn't matter. Rome had the ability to do all sorts of things like steam power but was wedded to slavery and never moved beyond it.

Posted by: Not Loved Time to be Feared at June 28, 2015 11:20 AM (nRvEn)

163 141--Czar Nicholas and King George weren't just cousins--they resembled each other enough to look like twins. And Geoege really screwed Nicky by not taking him in when the Commies were hunting him. George feared that a wave of ant-Monarchy feeling would sweep Europe and he would be next. He was wrong, but who really knew at the time?
WW1 was a colossal fuck-up and the effects are still being felt to this day.

Posted by: JoeF. at June 28, 2015 11:22 AM (aDnvW)

164 Read "Adios America" this week. I know many here are not Coulter fans, but she footnotes everything. A fast read, and it depressed me more than any of the other crap that happened this past week or so, which is saying something.

I challenge anyone to read it and not walk away convinced America as we once knew it is doomed.

Posted by: RM at June 28, 2015 11:22 AM (fRppw)

165 160 I knew the answer to the short story quiz without peeking!

Truly a haunting story. I believe there was a film made of this years ago. Not a great film, but as I recall, the last scene shows the lady who was selected in the lottery looking up and seeing her child getting ready to throw a stone at her. Awful.
Posted by: RM at June 28, 2015 11:16 AM (fRppw)
What book is this

Posted by: Patrick From Ohio at June 28, 2015 11:22 AM (CxEX+)

166 "It was with great difficulty at the time, that I
managed to obtain a copy Derbyshire's article of advice to his children
since even the internet didn't seem to be cooperative in letting me
search for or download it.
After I read it, I had a really bad
feeling (and a correct one as it is turning out) that censorship was
only a short step away, because there was nothing inflammatory or
bigoted in the article, it truly was a decent intelligent and accurate
set of fatherly advice worth heeding then and even more so in these days
of Obama/Holder/Lynch enhanced racial "diversity".


Posted by: Hrothgar at June 28, 2015 09:46 AM (ftVQq)"

For anybody else who is having trouble finding John Derbyshire's "The Talk", here's a link:

http://tinyurl.com/p2odtje

Posted by: Obnoxious A-Hole at June 28, 2015 11:25 AM (QHgTq)

167 If churches pay taxes so be it--it'll just be less money for their busybody missions work--probably not a bad thing.

And if the GOP ever gets the WH, it can yank the tax exemption of countless black churches for any number of corrupt practices, is only it has the stones.

Big if, there....

But we'd have the delightful spectacle of watching the lefty Catholic Church either bow down to its government master and marry teh gays or pay massive tribute.

A condign punishment.

Posted by: Bildung at June 28, 2015 11:26 AM (PK//T)

168 132 ... OM, Yes! I've started learning the English descriptive method as well since some of the older books used it. I prefer the algebraic style because it is easier for me. But the English method is fun, sort of like dealing with Victorian literature: familiar but different.

I did get the opening to The Lottery. I was surprised because I haven't read it since 8th grade, circa 1965. But that story stays with you. It was my introduction to Jackson, which explains why I was so delighted with her "Raising Demons" and "Life Among The Savages". Talk about versatility as a writer!

Posted by: JTB at June 28, 2015 11:28 AM (FvdPb)

169 Being forced to pay taxes would be a big hit to churches, but I don't see how that happens. They just have to fall back to their core principles and eschew any non-religious activities and there is no hook to deny them their non-profit status.

Posted by: Formerly known as Skeptic at June 28, 2015 11:30 AM (5z6T9)

170 157 145 Which character do you consider GRRM's self-insert? I can't spot an obvious Marty Stu, unless you're talking about Samwell Tarly, which I can't exactly see...

--

Tyrion

Posted by: @votermom at June 28, 2015 11:31 AM (cbfNE)

171 Tangled Webs

What's wrong with more open non-citizen worker policies has a lot to do with matters like welfare and minimum wage and withholdings and unions and... If the dogpile of tyrannies were gone, there's not (so much) a system to exploit. A simplistic statement of a complex tangle of bad laws regarding citizenship and employment.

Bad laws cause more bad laws and then become self-referencing arguments for keeping the bad laws. Drug prohibitions lead to property confiscations and privacy violations, even when no drugs are involved, for another simple example.

And so with my subject here, Marriage and Family Life.

What difference does it make to The Government who is married to whom, etc.? Well, tax laws which favor or disfavor being married must define marriage. And, welfare which takes into account the family status must define family. Or re-define it, depending how the political winds blow. (Trying to keep this relatively succinct, more long comment than blog post, but that's the gist.)

Under limited government, there will still be a need for some sort of family arbitration, "because of the hardness of your hearts." But, just as people may make contracts privately and then turn to judges when disputes arise, so would failed-family disputes over property and custody fall to an impartial arbitrar which has no interest in how you got into that mess in the first place.

It is not the courts and Congress, after all, who should be "ruling" in matters of matrimony; not the regulators and bureaucracies who should define family. It is the moral and spiritual community, extended family and tribe if you will, which should be guiding young people into good relationships, discouraging aberrant behaviors, and sustaining them throughout their marriages. This is the true familial community, which the "takes-a-village" Communist would have replaced by tyranny.

There are good, strong families who create more generations of good families, not without problems, but with just that kind of spiritual unity which helps them deal with problems and resolve them well. The ones I know of all are dedicated to being part of the greater family headed up by Our Father.

(Wrap this up, guy.) Okay, no magic formula for achieving this. No tricks to eliminating the current clusterfluke of intertangled tyrannies. Just the same old same old: take this gospel, live it, let your light shine, tell the world, bearing in mind many will hate you and persecute you.

(tl;dr Post? Don't post? Post? Don't post?)

Posted by: mindful webworker - post at June 28, 2015 11:31 AM (4Utw1)

172 I gave up on sci-fi years ago. I cut my teeth on Smith, Asimov, Heinlein. Loved a quote about Heinlein that he told adventure stories in a believable future. Liked space opera, space westerns. But when they decided to junk the science, I skedaddled.

This week in the reading list - Thirty-three Years of Running in Circles by Rand Mintzer, Poverty Creek Journal by Thomas Gardner. Reviews at my website. Slowly working my way through the Hugo nominees.

Posted by: Long Running Fool at June 28, 2015 11:35 AM (/A5gb)

173 Chris Squire has died. I've never been the biggest Yes fan--I like some of their early stuff--but the man was an incredible bass player.

Posted by: JoeF. at June 28, 2015 11:36 AM (aDnvW)

174 Squire was only 67 but leukemia got him in the end. TIP, Chris.

Posted by: Bruce With a Wang! at June 28, 2015 11:39 AM (iQIUe)

175 OM, your working definition of what makes sci-fi "science" fiction works for me too. Good enough.

There's a website that does a very credible job of looking at new science/technology and trying to tie that to specific books/authors that wrote about it before it happened.

http://www.sciencefictionprediction.com/

Warning: You can get sucked into a black hole of info there.

I have a lot of favorite hard sci-fi authors, but one I haven't seen mentioned here is Charles Sheffield (25 June 1935 - 2 November 2002), an English-born mathematician, physicist and science-fiction author.

Posted by: GnuBreed at June 28, 2015 11:41 AM (Z15Iw)

176 Loved Heinlein's Citizen of the Galaxy, really liked the part where nobody believes him about how he was a slave, because slavery does not exist, it's soo true it exists now and nobody gives a shit

Posted by: Patrick From Ohio at June 28, 2015 11:43 AM (CxEX+)

177 RIP. I cant effin type.

Posted by: Bruce With a Wang! at June 28, 2015 11:44 AM (iQIUe)

178 Friday's ONT had references to Louis L'Amour books and how enjoyable they are as stories and morally instructive. That prompted me to re-read "Ride the River", one of the Sackett series. I now have a list of half a dozen of his books I need to read this summer.

Like many of us, I use my reading (and hobbies) for diversion and distraction from all the news and other social ills. I can't live in a constant, volcanic rage. If I can't solve the problems (and I can't), I can at least keep them from ruining the good things in my life. Positive stories from L'Amour and beautiful writing from Wodehouse, Chesterton, Lewis, Tolkien, Haggard, etc., definitely help.

Posted by: JTB at June 28, 2015 11:45 AM (FvdPb)

179 >>MamAJ, Have you read the "Christmas Cantata" by Schweizer? It was the book that got me started on the Liturgical Mystery series but it isn't always included in the 1 though X lists.

Oh, that's why there seemed to be two number 11s when I was looking at lists of the series...

I was assuming I hadn't had enough coffee.


Yes, it was marvelous, wasn't it?

Posted by: Mama AJ at June 28, 2015 11:45 AM (0xTsz)

180 I can't get behind saying that Tyrion is a self-insert or Marty Stu; he doesn't perform the actions of a Mary Sue, and he doesn't really resemble the author in any particular, unless Martin had a much more ramshackle childhood than I've heard. Tyrion more strongly resembles Steve Stirling in that way - not that Stirling's books aren't full of author appeals and so forth in their own way.

What Tyrion *is* is an audience-sympathy-seeking guided missile. He's an Ender Wiggins, a Miles Vorkosigan. A plucky, clever, bookish little guy who thinks rings around the bullies. That's designed to appeal to the typical reader of fantasy/space opera/science fantasy. Cynical, yes, but not a Marty Stu.

Posted by: Mitch H. at June 28, 2015 11:47 AM (9dWup)

181 178 Positive stories from L'Amour and beautiful writing from Wodehouse, Chesterton, Lewis, Tolkien, Haggard, etc., definitely help.

Posted by: JTB at June 28, 2015 11:45 AM (FvdPb)

I have every book that LL ever wrote, including that latest one Amazon has been pushing.

Posted by: Vic We Have No Party at June 28, 2015 11:48 AM (GpgJl)

182 "104
Was there a Roman middle class? Plenty of merchant class. But it seems
that unless you were super rich, living in Rome was terrible. Just nasty
smells and garbage and the danger of fires. Hot, overcrowded, and
stinky.

Posted by: Bruce With a Wang! at June 28, 2015 10:30 AM (iQIUe)"

I believe that in the early days of the Roman republic there was a pretty significant group of yeoman farmers who made up most of the army. There were also a lot of small artisan shops making stuff. As time went on, the farmers could not compete with the latifundia and the small shops could not compete with large business full of slaves so the Roman citizens went on the dole.

Posted by: Obnoxious A-Hole at June 28, 2015 11:50 AM (QHgTq)

183 John Ringo needs to finish the Hot Gate series, he just stopped.

I am about ready to give up on the Royal Ark series, not the first three but the ones exploring his universe.

I will say it again Check out The Lost Regiment and Destroyer men both deal with being transported to different worlds on is a Civil War Regiment the other book is a WWII Destroyer and how the handle it.

Posted by: Patrick From Ohio at June 28, 2015 11:51 AM (CxEX+)

184 169 There is no hook to deny them tax-exempt status, but they will do it anyway. We are no longer a country that lives under the rule of law. Fascism at its best brought to us by The Ruling Party of progressive Dems and Repubs.

Posted by: Zoltan at June 28, 2015 11:51 AM (lFkeD)

185 Great book post.

The Lottery is new to me.

Wikipedia says people wrote the author, lots of hate mail, then later, most people wanted to know where the towns are the Lottery takes place so they can go there and watch.

And that's FUNNY!

And then referred to the Simpsons as the most famous sitcom.

It's an odd Wikipedia piece.

Posted by: bour3 at June 28, 2015 11:53 AM (5x3+2)

186 Chris Squire has died. I've never been the biggest Yes fan--I like some of their early stuff--but the man was an incredible bass player.
Posted by: JoeF. at June 28, 2015 11:36 AM (aDnvW)

174 Squire was only 67 but leukemia got him in the end. TIP, Chris.
Posted by: Bruce With a Wang! at June 28, 2015 11:39 AM (iQIUe)


How sad.

Great bass player.

I guess Yes is truly dead now.

I'm glad I saw them last summer.


Funny, Squire and the new singer were by far the most active and "into it" at that show.

They really interacted with the audience and at least appeared to be having fun.

As far as I could tell, Squire's musicianship hadn't suffered at all due to age.

Unlike some I could mention....


Anywho, great musician, truly unique sound-

Godspeed, Chris Squire. I got a huge amount of joy from your music.

RIP

Posted by: naturalfake at June 28, 2015 11:55 AM (KUa85)

187 184 Point taken.

Posted by: Formerly known as Skeptic at June 28, 2015 11:57 AM (5z6T9)

188 180 Tyrion as Marty Stu:

Underestimated genius judged by his appearance, constantly unappreciated etc etc. Tremendous appetites.

Posted by: @votermom at June 28, 2015 11:57 AM (cbfNE)

189 What book is this
Posted by: Patrick From Ohio at June 28, 2015 11:22 AM (CxEX+)


'The Lottery' short story. If you want to read it, I linked to a .pdf doc of it at the end of the book thread where I posted my answer.

Posted by: OregonMuse at June 28, 2015 12:00 PM (AWijS)

190 Vic ... What is that latest L'Amour book you mentioned?

I have an acquaintance who was injured and lost part of the use of one arm. His wife got him a Kindle because he couldn't hold a physical book at the time. He uses L'Amour stories to help him get through the rehab and keep his spirits up.

Posted by: JTB at June 28, 2015 12:04 PM (FvdPb)

191 #175, thanks for the link, GnuBreed, I took one look at it and I had to fight not to click on anything else on that site, since I would be here all day clicking links like a monkey on crack.

Just like you said.

And thanks for the ref. to Charles Sheffield, whom I have never heard of. I need to find out more about him.

Posted by: OregonMuse at June 28, 2015 12:05 PM (AWijS)

192 I believe that in the early days of the Roman
republic there was a pretty significant group of yeoman farmers who made
up most of the army. There were also a lot of small artisan shops
making stuff. As time went on, the farmers could not compete with the
latifundia and the small shops could not compete with large business
full of slaves so the Roman citizens went on the dole.


Posted by: Obnoxious A-Hole at June 28, 2015 11:50 AM (QHgTq)


That seems oddly familiar

Posted by: TheQuietMan at June 28, 2015 12:08 PM (DiZBp)

193 168 132 ... OM, Yes! I've started learning the English descriptive method as well since some of the older books used it. I prefer the algebraic style because it is easier for me. But the English method is fun, sort of like dealing with Victorian literature: familiar but different.

In some of the really old books, it's all spelled out. So, for example, for White's first move, you may read "Pawn to King's 2nd sq." And under the Black column, for Black's first move, it will say, "the same." Heh.

It does give one an appreciation of algebraic notation, though.

Posted by: OregonMuse at June 28, 2015 12:16 PM (AWijS)

194 Reading "Blacklisted By History", the Joe McCarthy saga.
By George, I'm beginning to think this McCarthy fellow was right!

Posted by: Buzzy Krumhunger at June 28, 2015 12:19 PM (bfJXM)

195 ... But that story stays with you. It was my introduction to Jackson, which explains why I was so delighted with her "Raising Demons" and "Life Among The Savages". Talk about versatility as a writer!
Posted by: JTB at June 28, 2015 11:28 AM (FvdPb)
___________


As far as 20th c writers, she has to be among the hidden gems. Her prose is so spare it is poetry. "Life Among the Savages" has to be one of my all-time favorites.

Posted by: mustbequantum at June 28, 2015 12:20 PM (MIKMs)

196 190
Vic ... What is that latest L'Amour book you mentioned?



I have an acquaintance who was injured and lost part of the use of
one arm. His wife got him a Kindle because he couldn't hold a physical
book at the time. He uses L'Amour stories to help him get through the
rehab and keep his spirits up.

Posted by: JTB at June 28, 2015 12:04 PM (FvdPb)

It's a short novel but only $1.99

http://amzn.to/1RIUx8L

Posted by: Vic We Have No Party at June 28, 2015 12:26 PM (GpgJl)

197 Listened to the audiobook of The Accidental tourist by Anne Tyler, which was made into a movie with William Hurt, Kathleen Turner and Geena Davis. A couple splits when their son is murdered, and they struggle to put their lives back together. Pretty good book (and movie), fun well-written story with good believable characters.

Posted by: waelse1 at June 28, 2015 12:29 PM (aDT8I)

198 I did the Kindle unlimited thing briefly, and it seems their choice was very limited. One has unlimited access to their limited selection ... unless I was missing something. I searched for a few books of interest and found none of them.

Not sure if I just did the trial period, think I paid for one month, but got no notice I was being billed. They'd like you to sign up for the trial and then remember a year later, you're being billed $10/month.

Posted by: Illiniwek at June 28, 2015 12:35 PM (8bK1p)

199 I'm late to the thread, but read The Martian by Andy Weir this week. About to be released ( and likely ruined as movie with Matt Damon ). Fun summer read. Good back story on how Weir self published first on blog, then Amazon via Kindle, then Random Hse published book and then screen rights followed soon after.... and 12 months later, movie is made. Crazy.

Posted by: Yip at June 28, 2015 12:43 PM (e7T6D)

200 Vic ... Thanks for the link on L'Amour. I'll check it out.

Got a trip planned to the used book store later today or tomorrow for several L'Amour books I never got to and to replace some lost to water damage a few years ago. Fortunately, my complete set of the Sackett stories is intact. Too bad L'Amour bever got to do a Sackett story for the American Revolution, as he hoped. It would have been interesting.

Posted by: JTB at June 28, 2015 12:50 PM (FvdPb)

201 Gays really need to ask themselves what will happen when the "live and let live" attitude that most Americans have had goes away, as it will if they keep bullying and pushing people around.

I don't think they will like the answer.

Posted by: Titus Quinctius Cincinnatus at June 28, 2015 01:03 PM (TRDE0)

202 Yesterday was one of those 'required' reading days. Very dark so that a reading lamp is a necessity and a driving, hard rain that precludes any outside activity. Even the ball game on TV was washed out. Nothing better than to brew some good tea, settle in the recliner and start reading. Ahhh!

Later in the day, a little bourbon replaces the tea.

Posted by: JTB at June 28, 2015 01:09 PM (FvdPb)

203 Bruce With a Wang! thanks for the link to the Martha Dodd bio. It's pretty amazing - not only because of Dodd's extensive slutting around but because I'm always astounded by those 30's Commies who actually visited Stalin's USSR and still kept the faith. This Commie whore and her idiot husband lived in Prague for decades and, I take it, never said, "Shit this Communism stuff really doesn't work very well, does it?" Talk about religion.

It's satisfying to see she died in 1990, so she lived long enough to watch her world falling apart.

*Sigh* Ah, 1990. When it looked like Communism was being consigned to the ash heap of history.

Posted by: Donna &&&&&& V. (brandishing ampersands) at June 28, 2015 01:13 PM (+XMAD)

204 Reading "Wool" by Hugh Howdy.

Apocalyptic drama which so far doesn't have any gay themes , which is a minor miracle for a modern novel.

Posted by: Sharkman at June 28, 2015 01:22 PM (rXB/r)

205 Posted by: Donna &&&&&& V. (brandishing ampersands) at June 28, 2015 01:13 PM (+XMAD)
==================
Her slutting around was massive. Didnt matter age, looks, etc. She screwed them. When she wrote her book, she wanted to use some letters by the embassy secretary. He refused. She said she wd use them anyway. He sais if she did, he wd write his own book about how she turned the embassy library into a brothel.

I read a Wm. Shirer book where he gushed over her. It was odd b/c after reading her book, I didnt see her as some brilliant writer/mind. I think old Bill screwed her, too.

You dont hear what happened to her son. At the time of he death he was living in Prague. I have a vague recollection that he may have had some sort of mental illness.

I think Martha Dodd wd make a hilarious musical comedy. Between Embassy Sheets!

Posted by: Bruce With a Wang! at June 28, 2015 01:40 PM (iQIUe)

206 If churches pay taxes so be it--it'll just be less money for their busybody missions work--probably not a bad thing.

Someone here pointed out to me that it will be the property taxes on large churches on prime real estate in places like NYC and LA that will do the damage. They will lose their actual churches when they can't afford to pay the tax, which will probably be made retroactive out of pure spite.


Posted by: Tammy al-Thor at June 28, 2015 01:49 PM (BVDFs)

207 204 Reading "Wool" by Hugh Howdy.
--
Is it good?
My library has it.

Posted by: @votermom at June 28, 2015 01:51 PM (cbfNE)

208 I have, and have read, Derbyshires 'Doomed', 'Prime Obsession', and 'Unknown Quantity'. With apologies, Derbyshire is not '... a bit of an amateur mathematician', he is by academic background a mathematician.

I can recommend all three books. 'Unknown Quantity' is a particularly good read. 'Prime Obsession' is an undertaking that would be difficult for those without a good grounding in mathematics.

'Doomed'....., well...., you will not feel better after you have read it. It is brimful of examples of the way that the Left is marching through civilized society. It does provides a lot of factual fodder to dump on Proggies heads. Derbyshire really is a great writer.

Posted by: Mike Hammer, etc., etc. at June 28, 2015 01:55 PM (F2IAQ)

209 Just ordered 'When the Wicked Seize a City'. $3.86 (used) with free shipping. ABE Books. Several copies there: http://tinyurl.com/me9wvuw

Posted by: Mike Hammer, etc., etc. at June 28, 2015 01:59 PM (eeTCA)

210 If churches pay taxes so be it--it'll just be less money for their busybody missions work--probably not a bad thing.
---------------

Oops. Sorry..., thought this was the Book Thread.

But since you brought it up...., I would be curious to know exactly which churches and which 'busybody missions' you speak.

Posted by: Mike Hammer, etc., etc. at June 28, 2015 02:02 PM (F2IAQ)

211 Wool is quite good, votermom.

Posted by: Sharkman at June 28, 2015 02:23 PM (rXB/r)

212 I LOATHE "The Lottery."

I read it in High School and still have the scars. Many years later, I am an aspiring science teacher and was subbing in a local district. Due to a lack of English subs, I was called in to cover an English teacher. Her very vague lesson plan was to teach "The Lottery."

My mind reeled and panic ruled. But I, being the dedicated professional that I am (and desperate for a full-time job in that district), manned-up, re-read the story, came up with a bunch of discussion questions and jumped in.

When I next saw the teacher, she complimented me on the questions, saying that I did a better job than she did.

Funny how that works out.

Posted by: LochLomondFarms at June 28, 2015 02:48 PM (vEYcI)

213 210

Pretty much any of them--a lot of this missions work has degenerated into junketerring combined with SJWism.

It'll be too bad for the dwindling committed churches that sincerely try to help the poor starving kids--but just add that to Leftism's body count.

And who knows, churches might grow stronger as the are forced to focus on the core mission of soul winning and as they steel themselves to battle the government instead of being co-opted by it.

And maybe a whole lot more out of that collection plate will go to directly influencing conservative policy, since they're no longer tax-exempt, and a whole lot less will flow to propping up hopeless third world shit holes, including domestic Democrat enclaves.

Posted by: Bildung at June 28, 2015 02:55 PM (PK//T)

214 210

Pretty much any of them--a lot of this missions work has degenerated into junketerring combined with SJWism.

It'll be too bad for the dwindling committed churches that sincerely try to help the poor starving kids--but just add that to Leftism's body count.

And who knows, churches might grow stronger as the are forced to focus on the core mission of soul winning and as they steel themselves to battle the government instead of being co-opted by it.

And maybe a whole lot more out of that collection plate will go to directly influencing conservative policy, since they're no longer tax-exempt, and a whole lot less will flow to propping up hopeless third world shit holes, including domestic Democrat enclaves.

Posted by: Bildung at June 28, 2015 02:55 PM (PK//T)

215 I officially quit an author this week - Anne Perry. I've been reading her mysteries for years but I'd been slowing down and got quite a bit behind on her Charlotte & Thomas Pitt series and Inspector Monk series. Earlier this year the FOL store was trying to clear out their mysteries - 5 for $1 - and there were a bunch of Anne Perry mysteries in really good condition, so I snatched them up. I read one of them this week and realized that even though the mystery was pretty good, it just didn't compensate for the writing, which has become tedious with too much detail. She's been writing both of these series for a long time and I used to love them, but I've really had to force myself through the last three or four of them and I finally decided I'd had enough. It was hard to do and I'm still feeling disloyal, but life is too short to read bad books.

Posted by: biancaneve at June 28, 2015 03:24 PM (vP4/o)

216 I officially quit an author this week - Anne Perry. I've been reading her mysteries for years but I'd been slowing down and got quite a bit behind on her Charlotte & Thomas Pitt series and Inspector Monk series. Earlier this year the FOL store was trying to clear out their mysteries - 5 for $1 - and there were a bunch of Anne Perry mysteries in really good condition, so I snatched them up. I read one of them this week and realized that even though the mystery was pretty good, it just didn't compensate for the writing, which has become tedious with too much detail. She's been writing both of these series for a long time and I used to love them, but I've really had to force myself through the last three or four of them and I finally decided I'd had enough. It was hard to do and I'm still feeling disloyal, but life is too short to read bad books.

Posted by: biancaneve at June 28, 2015 03:24 PM (vP4/o)

217 I officially quit an author this week - Anne Perry. I've been reading her mysteries for years but I'd been slowing down and got quite a bit behind on her Charlotte & Thomas Pitt series and Inspector Monk series. Earlier this year the FOL store was trying to clear out their mysteries - 5 for $1 - and there were a bunch of Anne Perry mysteries in really good condition, so I snatched them up. I read one of them this week and realized that even though the mystery was pretty good, it just didn't compensate for the writing, which has become tedious with too much detail. She's been writing both of these series for a long time and I used to love them, but I've really had to force myself through the last three or four of them and I finally decided I'd had enough. It was hard to do and I'm still feeling disloyal, but life is too short to read bad books.

Posted by: biancaneve at June 28, 2015 03:25 PM (vP4/o)

218 I officially quit an author this week - Anne Perry. I've been reading her mysteries for years but I'd been slowing down and got quite a bit behind on her Charlotte & Thomas Pitt series and Inspector Monk series. Earlier this year the FOL store was trying to clear out their mysteries - 5 for $1 - and there were a bunch of Anne Perry mysteries in really good condition, so I snatched them up. I read one of them this week and realized that even though the mystery was pretty good, it just didn't compensate for the writing, which has become tedious with too much detail. She's been writing both of these series for a long time and I used to love them, but I've really had to force myself through the last three or four of them and I finally decided I'd had enough. It was hard to do and I'm still feeling disloyal, but life is too short to read bad books.

Posted by: biancaneve at June 28, 2015 03:25 PM (vP4/o)

219 I officially quit an author this week - Anne Perry. I've been reading her mysteries for years but I'd been slowing down and got quite a bit behind on her Charlotte & Thomas Pitt series and Inspector Monk series. Earlier this year the FOL store was trying to clear out their mysteries - 5 for $1 - and there were a bunch of Anne Perry mysteries in really good condition, so I snatched them up. I read one of them this week and realized that even though the mystery was pretty good, it just didn't compensate for the writing, which has become tedious with too much detail. She's been writing both of these series for a long time and I used to love them, but I've really had to force myself through the last three or four of them and I finally decided I'd had enough. It was hard to do and I'm still feeling disloyal, but life is too short to read bad books.

Posted by: biancaneve at June 28, 2015 03:25 PM (vP4/o)

220 215 - 219 Well...., that was emphatic.

Seriously, a quintuple. Rare, rare thing.

Posted by: Mike Hammer, etc., etc. at June 28, 2015 04:01 PM (F2IAQ)

221 But since you brought it up...., I would be curious to know exactly which churches and which 'busybody missions' you speak.

Posted by: Mike Hammer, etc., etc. at June 28, 2015 02:02 PM (F2IAQ)


The Catholic Church for one has been quite busy dragging Somalis here by the thousands. They are mean as a rule and not in the least bit interested in assimilating to anything but welfare. The absolute worst of every bad Muslim stereotype you can think of.

The Catholic Church also do a lot of advocating for illegals and are behind the " No Such Thing as an Illegal Human" and "Sanctuary City" movements. They are real big proponents of Social Justice.

I'm sure there are plenty of Protestant churches involved in similar well intended but disastrous activities.

Posted by: Tammy al-Thor at June 28, 2015 04:01 PM (BVDFs)

222 I'm sure there are plenty of Protestant churches involved in similar well intended but disastrous activities.
Posted by: Tammy
----------------

I do not doubt that, but I wonder if they are the rule, rather than the exception. By far, most emergency shelters, emergency food programs, recovery programs, battered women's shelters, and veterans rescue programs (here, at least) are run by the churches.

We are perhaps not emblematic, but can't be too different than other locations.

Fold the churches, and all of those things go away..., or get rolled into the (shudder) government's hands.

Note that those programs are funded by the contributions of the church congregations. There is absolutely no way that property taxes collected on the current church properties (were they placed on the tax rolls) could pay for those same services.

Posted by: Mike Hammer, etc., etc. at June 28, 2015 04:11 PM (F2IAQ)

223 Surer ain't much book on this book thread.

Posted by: Vic We Have No Party at June 28, 2015 04:21 PM (GpgJl)

224 "How so?
Posted by: OregonMuse at June 28, 2015 10:14 AM (AWijS)"

It's written to subvert adherence to tradition, which stands as a bulwark against progressive cultural engineering. Once tradition is sufficiently in doubt they can more easily replace the previous culture with their own.

Posted by: Johnny at June 28, 2015 04:36 PM (WvGsS)

225 I've advocated RICOing the Catholic Church for years.

In addition to its insufferable political moralizing and outright law breaking (remember when it funneled money to the IRA?), let's not forget it is also a pedophile ring.

So far as Catholic social services go, again--these prop up largely Democrat constituencies, so who cares?

I hear Hamas is big in the social services thing too.

Posted by: Bildung at June 28, 2015 04:43 PM (PK//T)

226 "let's not forget it is also a pedophile ring.

Posted by: Bildung at June 28, 2015 04:43 PM (PK//T)"

Gay ring. Like all gay rings they have the odd pedophile but the scandal mostly involved gay priests having sex with young teens which is illegal and immoral but not pedophilia.

Posted by: Johnny at June 28, 2015 05:22 PM (WvGsS)

227 The Catholic Church also do a lot of advocating for illegals and are behind the " No Such Thing as an Illegal Human" and "Sanctuary City" movements. They are real big proponents of Social Justice

I remember they were also front and center on that whole "No Nukes" bullshit back in the 80s, the KGB engineered "peace" movement.

Also very pro-union, and pro big government

IOW, aside from a couple of social issue exceptions, the Roman Catholic Church is basically a big, left-wing organization.

Posted by: OregonMuse at June 28, 2015 05:23 PM (AWijS)

228 Gay ring. Like all gay rings they have the odd pedophile but the scandal mostly involved gay priests having sex with young teens which is illegal and immoral but not pedophilia.

Exactly. Calling it a "pedophile" problem is to miss the mark. The RCC seminaries have been cranking out homosexual priests for decades and the results have been horrific.

Posted by: OregonMuse at June 28, 2015 05:26 PM (AWijS)

229 219 @ ...even though the mystery was pretty good, it just didn't compensate for the writing, which has become tedious with too much detail.

I've gone through the same reaction to Ann Rule's true crime books. She always used to write EVERYONE's back story but had a way of balancing it with the unfolding of the murder investigation so it didn't seem intrusive. Now it just comes across as endless paragraphs of padding. Honestly, I don't CARE about the cute way Deputy Constable Plod's parents met during the War, and where they bought their first house and when they moved to Spokane. It's just too much meandering detail that's forgotten as soon as it's read, because it has nothing to do with the real story we want to learn about.

Posted by: Dr. Mabuse at June 28, 2015 05:31 PM (VBbCO)

230 The RCC seminaries have been cranking out homosexual priests for decades and the results have been dreadful.


Posted by: OregonMuse at June 28, 2015 05:26 PM (AWijS)


Not actually a new problem. There's a treatise by Bernard of Clarivaux--I think it's De conversione ad clericos (On Conversion, To the Clergy)--in which he points out that a number of seminaries were pushing abstinence from sex with women but, rather than teaching the Biblical principle that "it is better to marry than to burn," were teaching that gay sex was okay and thereby corrupting a lot of young men. Bernard was Not Happy about this state of affairs and argued against it quite forcefully.

Posted by: Elisabeth G. Wolfe at June 28, 2015 05:34 PM (iuQS7)

231 I think it's probably just because Ann Perry has been getting old. She's in her mid-seventies now. The writing has definitely declined. I still read her stories to visit with the characters, not so much for the stories anymore.

Posted by: @votermom at June 28, 2015 06:06 PM (cbfNE)

232 Ann Perry has been getting old. She's in her mid-seventies now. The writing has definitely declined.

I've had the same problem with Lillian Jackson Braun's last few books. The mystery wound up taking a back seat to "Qwill's life is a soap opera." IIRC, though, she announced that The Cat Who Had Sixty Whiskers is her last, which is kind of a relief.

Posted by: Elisabeth G. Wolfe at June 28, 2015 06:25 PM (iuQS7)

233 There has been Space Opera, hard science fiction and...everything else for a long time. Space Opera has probably always been the most popular. Really, while Heinlein was capable of writing "hard", "Starship Troopers" is basically Space Opera.

Ray Bradbury? Sometimes called a fantasist but still part of the Science Fiction tradition.

A. E. Van Vogt? Outright magic there, despite being considered a science-fiction writer and appearing in Astounding Science Fiction.

"Star Wars" did nothing: Movie sci-fi has always been magic. Sometimes it works, sometimes it doesn't, but you can count the number of "hard" sci-fi movies on the fingers of NO hands.

Posted by: blake at June 28, 2015 07:13 PM (m3P2y)

234 Just to clarify, "hard" sci-fi is when you make a scientifically plausible explanation for a bit of technology, and explore the ramifications of that.

But in order to make that explanation, you have to have an audience who =understands= it, understands why it's plausible, and understands the implications you're drawing from it.

Which is why there will never be any BIG movie sci-fi. "Let's have a drug that makes you super-powered" or "What if TIME really were MONEY?" is so much less alienating.

This, by the way, is why sci-fi is almost always =wrong=. Even writers don't really understand the science =and= engineering =and= human nature well enough to get it right.

Which, intriguingly, could lead to an interesting discussions about the parts of "Brave New World" and "1984" that are right.

Posted by: blake at June 28, 2015 07:18 PM (m3P2y)

235 226,227,228,230

Good points all

Posted by: Bildung at June 28, 2015 07:28 PM (PK//T)

236 The seminaries don't crank out gay priests; you get a proportionately larger amount of gay priests when you don't allow married priests, because you're narrowing down the pool you can choose from.

Mike, most fundamental Protestant churches ( the kind I grew up in) tend to send members as missionaries, rather than drag refugees here.

And yes, it's the same in my neck of the woods, as far as shelters and such. All volunteers, and almost all done through the local churches. Including the local Catholic church, which does great work.


Posted by: Tammy al-Thor at June 28, 2015 07:39 PM (BVDFs)

237
I love Gibbon's in spite of his disdain for the early Church. Just picked up a good antidote - Paul Johnson's "History of Christianity."
The Roman empire ended when the people living there were no longer interested in living under it. They became indifferent to whether or not the barbarians conquered. The thinking was that at least there wouldn't be the tax farmers sucking off them. Of course, the Dark Ages proved that wrong as trade routes, cities, and population all collapsed under the anarchy..
Damned if you do and damned if you don't.

Posted by: Whitehall at June 28, 2015 09:41 PM (6wF0x)

238 The seminaries don't crank out gay priests; you get a proportionately larger amount of gay priests when you don't allow married priests, because you're narrowing down the pool you can choose from.

I've heard conservative Catholics complaining for the last decade how "pink" some of their major seminaries are turning, so yeah, I think homosexuals have decided they've found a new institution to corrupt, and so they've settled in for a long stay.

Posted by: OregonMuse at June 28, 2015 10:05 PM (AWijS)

239 "The Alto Wore Tweed..." series, which I bought based on a recommendation here, is very good. I am enjoying it quite a bit. Murder mystery, satire, and political commentary, and the 3rd book stronger than the 1st. The author has constructed a North Carolina town with a very solid sense of space and the citizens in it.

Light reading, not "hard-boiled," so don't go to it for tough-guy action, etc. But for a nice light read, these are so far very fine.

Thanks!

Posted by: Wry Mouth at June 28, 2015 10:18 PM (GMFsH)

240
Casanova's first job as a young manwas as a priest-in-training assigned to a powerful cardinal. The fact that he was considered a "startling handsome man" by no less than Frederick the Great had nothing to do with it.
His other interests precluded a long-term career in the priesthood.

Posted by: Whitehall at June 28, 2015 10:49 PM (6wF0x)

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