Food Thread: Variety Is The Spice Of Life

anise-aroma-art-277253.jpg

Some of my favorite cooking is simple stuff; grilled steak, fried eggs, roasted chicken, Sautéed fish. There is a minimalist theme that runs through that list...the list of the seasonings required start and finish with salt (okay...pepper too...sometimes). It's technique and raw ingredients that drive the quality, but that is by no means the only or best cooking at Chez Dildo.

Sometimes I have a hankering for some maniacal 20-ingredient monstrosity that is, hopefully, a symphony of flavors that come not from the main ingredient -- finned or feathered or hoofed -- but some of the incredible range of flavors we have available to us in most supermarket spice aisles.

It is no wonder that the Spice Trade was a very big deal for a very long time in most of the world. Sure, we all know somebody who just doesn't give much of a shit about eating, and considers meal-time sort of like pulling up to the gas station to fill up. But most of us also love to have our tongues and noses tickled by pungent or spicy or sweet or sour or bitter flavors that compliment the foods we enjoy.

I have a 36 test-tube rack with herbs and spices in it, and that is just a start. Sometimes I will read a recipe and find some odd word in the ingredients, and discover that it is a spice or herb from Africa or Asia or South America that is used and enjoyed by tens or hundreds of millions of people...and I have never heard of it or tasted it! That's neat.

And even spices that are not for everyone (like cilantro) can, in some dishes work out really well.* I have mentioned before a dish at a local Chinese restaurant that is, seemingly, half cumin, half hot peppers and half sautéed lamb. It's ridiculously out of balance, except that it tastes wonderful!

Anyway, don't be intimidated by weird spices and odd combinations. Sure, some of them won't work for you, but you might discover something really pleasing and interesting.


*Except for bay leaf, which is grown in the crack of Satan's ass and is not meant for human consumption.

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From commenter "Miley, the Duchess" comes a very good question. Maintaining consistent grill or smoker temperatures for longer cooking times is a challenge, as everyone who has ever smoked brisket or pork butt or beef clod or lamb leg (do it! It's fantastic) knows all to well.

And every set-up is different, so that makes it entertaining. For instance, when I use my Weber Smokey Mountain (R2D2) I have to plan about 15°-20° hotter at the lid thermometer than the top rack surface, which is 15°-20° hotter than the bottom rack.

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I recently purchased a barrel-type charcoal grill (Char-Griller Wrangler model...). I'd really appreciate tips on how to utilize it for larger cuts of meat. ...I'm OK with surface grilling like steaks and salmon and veggies, but I would really appreciate tips on controlling the "oven" temperatures. Right now I'm in the process of curing this grill. It says to maintain 250F for two hours, then a second session of 200F for two hours.

It wants to be 400F, or more. I understand that more airflow means higher temps, so I closed the bottom (side) vent most of the way, and opened up the chimney. It's now dropped to just below 400F after half an hour. Maybe I used too much charcoal (about 3 lbs, started in one of those chimneys).

Looks like the variables are 1) amount of charcoal, 2) the level of the grill bed and 3) the airflow. I'm sure there are more fine-tuning tips.

Since we're kicking off the beginning of grill season, this might be of interest for other Horde grillers, too.

So...have at it! Tips and tricks and secrets for maintaining temps in a grill such as the one pictured.
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Gorgeous, and wow! That is quite a dark bake. I don't have the intestinal fortitude to try to get my sourdough boules that dark...

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Photo by Flo Maderebner
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Yes, yes...that's avocado toast, which is a hipster thing nowadays. But a nicely poached egg is a thing of beauty, and surprisingly difficult to get in restaurants. And that's understandable, because it is quite time sensitive.

bread-delicious-egg-704569.jpg
Photo by Daria Shevtsova
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I am a big fan of this kind of burger, because the beef is so obviously front-and-center. But...and this is a biggie, the meat has to be perfectly cooked and perfectly, messily, embarrassingly juicy. If you don't leave the table liberally covered in spray from the burger, the cook has not done his job.

beef-burger-burger-cheeseburger-2089717.jpg
Photo by Adrian Dorobantu
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Commenter "Tyler" sent this to me, and clearly he is a bit...off. Or is it just Nebraska?

As the Frogs say, "Chacun à son goût!" But this is just weird. Worcestershire? You Morons have strange tastes!

Got another recommendation for the cooking morons out there. Springtime in Nebraska calls for an awesome salsa when cooking out on the grill. This one caught my attention with the Worcestershire sauce and celery. Not the most logical combination but this has been a family favorite ever since we stumbled upon it in the Weber's Greatest Hits cookbook. Can't recommend that cookbook enough...everything is awesome there, especially the Grilled Shrimp and Orzo Salad recipe which I'll have to send soon! I usually add more Worcestershire than the recipe calls for but depends on your tolerance for the flavor. In my opinion, the recipe calls for too little to truly impact the flavor. Enjoy!

Santa Maria Salsa
Ingredients
2 pounds tomatoes, cored and chopped fine
2 tsp salt
2 jalapenos, stemmed, seeded and chopped fine
1 small red onion, chopped fine
1 celery stalk, chopped fine
1/4 cup fresh lime juice (2 limes)
1/4 cup fresh cilantro
1 garlic clove, minced
1/8 tsp dried oregano
1/8 tsp Worcestershire sauce

Preparation Steps
1. Toss tomatoes with salt in strainer and let drain for 30 min.
2. Toss drained tomatoes with jalapenos, onion, celery, lime juice, garlic, oregano and Worcestershire sauce in bowl.
3. Cover and let stand at room temp for about an hour.
[Recipe Source: Master of the Grill]

******

Food and cooking tips, triple-cream cheeses, young wild pigs, Venison Steak and Eggs (Swiped from Garrett), thick and fluffy pita good matzo brei (it's Passover!) and good tomatoes that aren't square, pale pink and covered with Mestizo E.coli: cbd dot aoshq at gmail dot com. Any advocacy of French Toast with syrup will result in disciplinary action up to and including being nuked from orbit.

Posted by: CBD at 04:00 PM




Comments

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1 I only need one spice: Lard.

Posted by: Michael Moore at April 21, 2019 04:05 PM (tVQUs)

2 Happy Easter and Happy Easter food.

Posted by: m at April 21, 2019 04:06 PM (5AuVV)

3
Leg of Lamb.

Wife had to ask butcher at local grocery if they had any Lamb. He had to check in the freezer for any. Yes, from New Zealand.

We don't do Lamb in this country anymore?

Posted by: Spun & Murky at April 21, 2019 04:07 PM (4DCSq)

4 You know you're not actually supposed to eat bay leaves, right? You fish them out after the dish is done and throw them away.

Posted by: bluebell at April 21, 2019 04:08 PM (aXucN)

5 Best spice: Szechuan peppercorn
Worst spice: cloves

Posted by: zombie at April 21, 2019 04:09 PM (5tb4C)

6 Wife had to ask butcher at local grocery if they had any Lamb. He had to check in the freezer for any. Yes, from New Zealand.

We don't do Lamb in this country anymore?
Posted by: Spun & Murky at April 21, 2019 04:07 PM (4DCSq)

I've never had much trouble finding American lamb here in the Bay Area.

Posted by: Surfperch at April 21, 2019 04:10 PM (tVQUs)

7 Ham needs to go in the oven shortly. Yes just boring ham...

Posted by: Rosasharn at April 21, 2019 04:10 PM (PzBTm)

8 7 Ham needs to go in the oven shortly. Yes just boring ham...
Posted by: Rosasharn at April 21, 2019 04:10 PM (PzBTm)

Tradition!

Posted by: Insomniac - Founder, Farmer Liberation Front at April 21, 2019 04:11 PM (NWiLs)

9 Worcestershire sauce and celery are good in Bloody Marys so why not salsa?

Posted by: kallisto at April 21, 2019 04:11 PM (RL/ur)

10 Seder turkey came out perfect. Very moist.

Mrs. Franpsycho's matzo caramel crunch was also well-received.

Posted by: San Franpsycho at April 21, 2019 04:11 PM (EZebt)

11 Bourbon glazed Ham, mashed sweet taters, asparagus and strawberries with cream for dessert.

But first, a martini at 5. One olive please.

Posted by: Hairyback Guy at April 21, 2019 04:12 PM (Z+IKu)

12 best spice: Turkish red pepper flakes (pul biber)

Goes on everything.

Posted by: m at April 21, 2019 04:12 PM (5AuVV)

13 You know you're not actually supposed to eat bay leaves, right? You fish them out after the dish is done and throw them away.

Posted by: bluebell at April 21, 2019 04:08 PM (aXucN)

Even we know this.

Posted by: Deer Everywhere, not eating from Bay Trees at April 21, 2019 04:13 PM (tVQUs)

14 Got two bay laurels ouside the kitchen door...best thing i ever did was planting them. Looking for the mediterraen variety...?

Posted by: Lone ranger at April 21, 2019 04:13 PM (KTOuB)

15 4 You know you're not actually supposed to eat bay leaves, right? You fish them out after the dish is done and throw them away.

Posted by: bluebell at April 21, 2019 04:08 PM (aXucN)

Or give them to the Pythia at Delphi to chew on.

Posted by: m at April 21, 2019 04:14 PM (5AuVV)

16 Interesting spice trivia:

Real cinnamon only comes from one place: Ceylon. And from there it was traded all over the world, even in antiquity. But the traders didn't want anyone to know from WHERE they got this amazing unique flavor, so for millennia they kept it secret under penalty of death; any cinnamon traders who blabbed where it came from risked ostracism and assassination -- so no one ever blabbed. For 1,500 years Europeans searched in vain for the source of cinnamon, to no avail. It wasn't until the early 1500s that Portuguese landed on the shores of Ceylon and FAZOOM discovered where cinnamon came from! In fact they reported they could smell the trees while still out at sea -- that's how they knew the had finally found the right spot. Until then, it was only through a long train of middlemen -- Indonesians, Indian, Persians, Arabs, North Africans -- who little by little brought it toward Europe, never revealing from who they got it earlier in the chain.

Posted by: zombie at April 21, 2019 04:14 PM (5tb4C)

17 Just counted, I have 9 different salt blends in the spice cabinet.

Oddly, they all have their use.

Posted by: Bitter Clinger at April 21, 2019 04:16 PM (cFNuH)

18 12 best spice: Turkish red pepper flakes (pul biber)

Goes on everything.
Posted by: m


Got a packet of that right now on my spice rack. Also have "Pilpilchuma," a Libyan spice combination that's very similar.

I've got WAY too many spices. Get 'em as sample packs.

Posted by: zombie at April 21, 2019 04:17 PM (5tb4C)

19 We got a smoker and we like it. At this point it has a fair amount of creastote in it.

Should we clean it? Is it necessary?

Posted by: Sally at April 21, 2019 04:17 PM (sBDDH)

20 Posted by: zombie at April 21, 2019 04:14 PM (5tb4C)

That must be old info.

Posted by: Sri Lanka at April 21, 2019 04:18 PM (2DOZq)

21 What is a good use for tumeric?

Posted by: navybrat, sometime commentater at April 21, 2019 04:19 PM (w7KSn)

22 Grill tips, I had a very cheap Drum Smoker and I was not happy with it. Got rid of it and made a UDS (Ugly Drum Smoker).

That said the trick for me to controlling temps is air intake. I try and match how much air is going in as to how much is leaving.

Posted by: Picric at April 21, 2019 04:20 PM (PknCp)

23 What is a good use for turmeric?

....

Soup!

Posted by: Bitter Clinger at April 21, 2019 04:21 PM (cFNuH)

24 Back to cinnamon:

These days, 95% of the spice identified as "cinnamon" is actually not real cinnamon, but a related species called "cassia." To the untrained palate, and to people who have never tasted real cinnamon, it's a close enough approximation that the average person doesn't even know the difference. But real actual "cinnamon verum" is sooooo good, very subtle yet overwhelming and smooth. Cassia-fake-cinnamon is more harsh and unsubtle and not exactly he same flavor. But cassia survives high temperatures, which is why it is sold and used in the west, because we use most cinnamon for baking. Cassia was renamed "Saigon Cinnamon" b some clever marketer, even though it isn't cinnamon, and to this day most people have only ever taste Saigon Cinnamon, not cinnamon verum, which is much more expensive and hard to find.

Posted by: zombie at April 21, 2019 04:22 PM (5tb4C)

25 I was given a bunch of tumeric a while back, someone told me it was good for what was ailing me.
Still have a lot of it.
I was sprinkling it on eggs for a while, which ruined the eggs...

Posted by: navybrat, sometime commentater at April 21, 2019 04:22 PM (w7KSn)

26 Spices!

Several years ago there was a Tall Ships festival in San Diego with old sailing ships from all over the world. They were open to tour and they were great. The one ship stood out by far -- the ship from Indonesia. Yes it was a cool looking square rigger but it had the scent of spices permeating everything. It was wonderful.

Posted by: DR.WTF at April 21, 2019 04:23 PM (aS1PU)

27 What is a good use for tumeric?

Posted by: navybrat, sometime commentater at April 21, 2019 04:19 PM (w7KSn)

I use it in things like chili or taco meet. It seems to work well in tandem with chili powders and cumin.

Posted by: Bert G at April 21, 2019 04:23 PM (OMsf+)

28 What is a good use for tumeric?

Posted by: navybra


Making your own homemade curry blend. Putting in homemade pickles. Staining your sink and pots permanently. Not much else.

Posted by: zombie at April 21, 2019 04:25 PM (5tb4C)

29
What is a good use for turmeric?

Homeopathic medicine?

Posted by: Spun & Murky at April 21, 2019 04:25 PM (4DCSq)

30 I do most of the cooking in my home. Only fair, since Mrs. Mahon did it for 20 years as our kids grew up.

Besides, I like cooking. She tolerated it.

but my favorite dinners are the ones where I grill some kind of meat and steam or sautee some veggies. Simple. And tasty.

If a meal requires more than half a dozen steps I get cranky.

Posted by: Pug Mahon at April 21, 2019 04:26 PM (PXJBj)

31 21 What is a good use for tumeric?
Posted by: navybrat, sometime commentater at April 21, 2019 04:19 PM (w7KSn)

It makes me sneeze.

Posted by: m at April 21, 2019 04:26 PM (5AuVV)

32 I just bought some Himalayan pink salt. Haven't tried it yet.

We made Easter dinner yesterday due to family logistics. Sauteed shrimp, a ton of veggies, and key lime pie with fresh berries for dessert. Nobody else wants a ham or scalloped potatoes so I go with the flow.

Posted by: JuJuBee at April 21, 2019 04:27 PM (aBR7R)

33 What is a good use for turmeric?

Homeopathic medicine?
Posted by: Spun & Murky at April 21, 2019 04:25 PM (4DCSq)

Rub a poultice of river mud and bee stingers on the afflicted area. Don't forget the cloves poked into an orange (to deflect the odor of bodily humors fleeing in terror).

Posted by: Pug Mahon at April 21, 2019 04:28 PM (PXJBj)

34 was given a bunch of tumeric a while back, someone told me it was good for what was ailing me.
Still have a lot of it.


....

Turmeric is prominent in curry blends.

I buy the fresh stuff at an Asian grocery and work it into a chicken curry with ginger, Szechuan peppercorns, coconut milk p, garlic and a few other odds and ends to serve over rice.

But you can put it in soups like butternut, pumpkin or other winter soups.

If you like curried chicken salad, it'll work there too.

Posted by: Bitter Clinger at April 21, 2019 04:28 PM (cFNuH)

35 If one of the gardener type people is here: what is the plant on the spoon with the pink salt? Looks kind of like a Christmas cactus, but I'm a plant illiterate.

I use whole bay leaves in the back of all my cabinets in the kitchen. For some reason, it keeps bugs away and out of dry goods. Even with my horrible housekeeping, I've never had bugs in the kitchen.

Posted by: mustbequantum at April 21, 2019 04:29 PM (MIKMs)

36 It's not a tumeric.

Posted by: Ahhnold Scwarzenegger at April 21, 2019 04:29 PM (H5knJ)

37 Tumeric or turmeric? Best thing about it is it turns rice a bright yellow.

Posted by: JuJuBee at April 21, 2019 04:29 PM (aBR7R)

38 21 What is a good use for tumeric?
Posted by: navybrat, sometime commentater at April 21, 2019 04:19 PM (w7KSn)

Giggles puts it in her handmade soap for my Psoriasis

Now to read the content

McGyver, Out

Posted by: McGyver at April 21, 2019 04:30 PM (gMngZ)

39 Pretty sure tumeric is one of the spices used in tandoori chicken (which is tasty).

Posted by: bear with asymmetrical balls at April 21, 2019 04:31 PM (H5knJ)

40 OT: Yudhishthira's Dice mentioned a new SL mosque attack on the last thread; here's a link for it:

https://preview.tinyurl.com/yx9k7gq3

Full report:

10.30 pm A petrol bomb attack on a mosque and arson attacks on two shops owned by Muslims are reported in two different parts of the country, police said.

Posted by: m at April 21, 2019 04:35 PM (5AuVV)

41 Can't make beef stew without bay leaves.

Posted by: JuJuBee at April 21, 2019 04:36 PM (aBR7R)

42 Buy some empty capsules from Vitamin cottage or online. Put your tumeric in the capsules for medicinal use. It is used in some curries and things in cooking I guess.

Posted by: PaleRider is simply irredeemable at April 21, 2019 04:36 PM (pAkRe)

43 Spices have their place, especially salt and pepper, but most of my seasoning comes from wetter sources. Onions, garlic, and shallots are what you find giving flavor to meat dishes in Rusty's pan.

Posted by: Rusty Nail at April 21, 2019 04:38 PM (2j6J5)

44 The media will spend more time on the mosque and the shops than the churches and the hotels.

Will the muslim women of Sri Lanka start wearing crosses in solidarity with their Christian sisters, like all those New Zealand Christian women donned hijabs?

Posted by: JuJuBee at April 21, 2019 04:40 PM (aBR7R)

45 Ham in the oven. Yay! Dishwasher emptied. Yay! Drinks made. Double yay! My tastes are simple.

Posted by: Rosasharn at April 21, 2019 04:40 PM (PzBTm)

46 Pepper? Sometimes?

I was willing to overlook the anti-syrup on French toast because we all have our little quirks, but casually dismissing cooking with pepper?

Have you no decency, sir!

Posted by: Blake - used vacation salesman at April 21, 2019 04:42 PM (WEBkv)

47 Worcestershire sauce had an interesting history, and like fish sauce, yields that lovely umami depth of flavor. I only recently found out that worcestershire (aka English sauce) sauce is popular around the world, and it contains anchovies.

Posted by: Dwight K. Shrute at April 21, 2019 04:42 PM (NMAzL)

48 A better, fuller, more recent Reuters report:

https://preview.tinyurl.com/yydc9jk7

Posted by: m at April 21, 2019 04:42 PM (5AuVV)

49 We don't do Lamb in this country anymore?

Posted by: Spun Murky at April 21, 2019 04:07 PM (4DCSq)

You must not have many muzzies where you live!

Posted by: Dwight K. Shrute at April 21, 2019 04:44 PM (NMAzL)

50 I leave BAY LEAVES BY THE BAY...

Posted by: sOME mORON at April 21, 2019 04:44 PM (k3N8X)

51 Hi, Kids! So, I've YUUUUGE newes

I'm a Grandpa (again) and only 29! It's a Boy, weighing in at 8Lbs, 10oz and 22 in long

Giggles is on a float trip to catch fishes on the Smith. They put in this am. I'm on my own for a few, but I'll pick her up at Eden Bridge when they pull out in 5 days. She also (I mentioned this before, but I'm bragging) is now using her GI Bill to attend the Auguste Escoffier School of Culinary Arts. She'll get to be called "Chef" when she's done in 19 months!

I built an AR-15 in 6.5 Grendel last week. I'm boresighting it and will zero it tomorrow.

McGyver, out

Posted by: McGyver at April 21, 2019 04:44 PM (gMngZ)

52 Lamb shanks in the oven as we speak. Anne Burrell's recipe...

Posted by: Additional Blond Agent, STEM guy at April 21, 2019 04:44 PM (7s3Gx)

53 I wrapped potatoes with bacon and smoked them for an hour at 220. Just turned the pellet grill up to 350, and will let the potatoes go another 45 minutes or so.

Meanwhile, I've got some good quality ribeye steaks covered with a decent rub ad ready for the gas grill.

Much as I like my pellet grill, nothing quite like tossing steaks on a 500 degree plus grill and getting them good and seared.

Posted by: Blake - used vacation salesman at April 21, 2019 04:45 PM (WEBkv)

54 Kidsharn makes amazing beef vegetable soup. Always uses two bay leaves. 9 times out of 10, they end up in Hubbysharn's bowl. I never have one show up in my bowl. What does it all MEAN?

Posted by: Rosasharn at April 21, 2019 04:46 PM (PzBTm)

55 Hello foodies.

My late lunch was lamb stew with taters and onions, and a touch of garlic and Moroccan spices. It was delish!

But I also made some asparagus that was sub-par. It was purple asparagus and I tried to cook it very quickly to preserve at least a hint of the color. No dice. Because it had big, girthy stalks, it required more cooking. Even liberal amounts of butter, salt, and lemon could improve it. Feh.


Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at April 21, 2019 04:46 PM (kQs4Y)

56 Posted by: McGyver at April 21, 2019 04:44 PM (gMngZ)

Congratulations multiple times!

Posted by: m at April 21, 2019 04:46 PM (5AuVV)

57 Oh and spread some old papers on the table or whatever when you fill the tumeric capsules. If you brush up the dry powder first and wipe throughly it doesn't stain. But I certainly prefer to fill capsules for a week or 2 of use and clean once vs trying to use it daily.

Posted by: PaleRider is simply irredeemable at April 21, 2019 04:47 PM (pAkRe)

58 liberal amounts of butter, salt, and lemon

Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at April 21, 2019 04:46 PM (kQs4Y)

"liberal"

I see the problem.

Posted by: m at April 21, 2019 04:47 PM (5AuVV)

59 43 Spices have their place, especially salt and pepper, but most of my seasoning comes from wetter sources. Onions, garlic, and shallots are what you find giving flavor to meat dishes in Rusty's pan.
Posted by: Rusty Nail at April 21, 2019 04:38 PM (2j6J5)
----------

Cooked onions are a staple at Che Blake.

Posted by: Blake - used vacation salesman at April 21, 2019 04:47 PM (WEBkv)

60 McGyver, out
Posted by: McGyver at April 21, 2019 04:44 PM (gMngZ)
------------

Congrats!

Posted by: Blake - used vacation salesman at April 21, 2019 04:48 PM (WEBkv)

61 Cooked onions are a staple at Che Blake.

Aromatics for the win...

Posted by: Additional Blond Agent, STEM guy at April 21, 2019 04:49 PM (7s3Gx)

62 For smoking: a barrel type smoker with an offset firebox makes temperature control pretty easy. Having said that, we got a big green egg a couple of years ago & that makes it even easier while consuming less fuel. Have barely used the barrel smoker since.
Did a 7 lb pork shoulder on the BGE last week. Maintained 300 degrees for 7 hours with almost no interaction. Meat came out perfect.

Posted by: Average Guy at April 21, 2019 04:49 PM (urBW4)

63 We are having asparagus with mentioned ham. Flipped around for about 5 minutes in a hot cast iron skillet with olive oil and kosher salt and pepper. Amazing. Oh, we baked bread today too. This is starting to sound pretty good...

Posted by: Rosasharn at April 21, 2019 04:49 PM (PzBTm)

64 I love a loaf that looks like the above, on occasion i do take it to that level but most peeps that taste my bread like it more like a brown.

Posted by: LoneRanger at April 21, 2019 04:50 PM (KTOuB)

65 I use bay leaf in soup when I make it in the crockpot . You're not suppose to eat the bay leaf.

Posted by: Puddleglum at April 21, 2019 04:51 PM (ZBHJH)

66 Not so much spices as herbs are my go to, except cinnamon which I can't see living without.

Posted by: Skip at April 21, 2019 04:51 PM (BbGew)

67 ThanX! m
And Giggles left me some porkbelly curing in the fridge to smoke later this week and turn into bacon She "made" me get a new smoker. It's got bluetooth so I can control it from the house

McGyver, letting the lab Out

Posted by: McGyver at April 21, 2019 04:51 PM (gMngZ)

68 I have another bunch of slender, elfin stalks of asparagus and a pack of proscutto. I will try again for another meal.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at April 21, 2019 04:51 PM (kQs4Y)

69 It was purple asparagus and I tried to cook it very
quickly to preserve at least a hint of the color. No dice.






Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at April 21, 2019 04:46 PM (kQs4Y)

I found that the purple color in veggies is unstable and there's no way to retain it through cooking (I had purple green beans years ago).

Posted by: Dwight K. Shrute at April 21, 2019 04:52 PM (NMAzL)

70 But I also made some asparagus that was sub-par. It was purple asparagus and I tried to cook it very quickly to preserve at least a hint of the color. No dice. Because it had big, girthy stalks, it required more cooking. Even liberal amounts of butter, salt, and lemon could improve it. Feh.


Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at April 21, 2019 04:46 PM (kQs4Y)

-----------

Eris, before the advent of the microwave for cooking fresh veggies, I used to us an old percolator coffee pot to cook asparagus. Cook the asparagus standing on end, stalks in water, maybe a third of the way up the stem. Covering the stems in water would help mitigate the toughness and the steam rising cooks the heads. Worked pretty well, from what I remember, though it's been a couple of decades since I tried it.

Posted by: Blake - used vacation salesman at April 21, 2019 04:52 PM (WEBkv)

71
You must not have many muzzies where you live!

Posted by: Dwight K. Shrute at April 21, 2019 04:44 PM (NMAzL)


Yay us. Plus the proximity to Texas' cattle country, really limited sheep farming hereabouts!

Posted by: Spun & Murky at April 21, 2019 04:52 PM (4DCSq)

72 Me Mum fresh from England and the battle of Britain asked the question. What's for dinner?
Ans: Turnup and lettuce... OLD SCHOOL!










Posted by: sOME mORON at April 21, 2019 04:53 PM (k3N8X)

73 Howdy from WeaselAcres! I have bologna, ham and cheese for sammiches. For three days!

Posted by: Weasel at April 21, 2019 04:53 PM (Ku980)

74 Not so much spices as herbs are my go to, except cinnamon which I can't see living without.
Posted by: Skip at April 21, 2019 04:51 PM (BbGew)

Cinnamon fascinates me. Depending on how it is used in recipes, it takes on wildly different smells and tastes. it can be bold, or subtle. Very cool, really.

Posted by: Pug Mahon at April 21, 2019 04:54 PM (PXJBj)

75 73 Howdy from WeaselAcres! I have bologna, ham and cheese for sammiches. For three days!
Posted by: Weasel at April 21, 2019 04:53 PM (Ku980)
------------

Okay, you've rations for WD, what are you going to eat?

Posted by: Blake - used vacation salesman at April 21, 2019 04:54 PM (WEBkv)

76 Blake, I did steam it with the ends partially in the water. Maybe it was just an indifferent bunch of asparagus.

Or maybe I'm a lousy cook.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at April 21, 2019 04:54 PM (kQs4Y)

77 And Fritos.

Posted by: Weasel at April 21, 2019 04:54 PM (Ku980)

78 73 Howdy from WeaselAcres! I have bologna, ham and cheese for sammiches. For three days!
Posted by: Weasel at April 21, 2019 04:53 PM (Ku980)

What kind of cheese?

Posted by: m at April 21, 2019 04:55 PM (5AuVV)

79 Most recipes I see tell you to remove the bay leaf, presumably to prevent anyone from accidentally eating it.

Posted by: Pug Mahon at April 21, 2019 04:55 PM (PXJBj)

80 Brother is making a Leg of Lamb tonight...

...cannot freaking wait.

I made stew for the first time yesterday and it was really, really darned-good. Even my Brother liked it. (Yes, I always want his opinion.)

Posted by: Slapweasel, White Enthusiast, Town Drunk at April 21, 2019 04:55 PM (Ckg4U)

81 BTW, BGEs are pretty pricey. Costco sells a kamodo style bbq that looks to be every bit as good as a BGE, for about $300 less.

Posted by: Average Guy at April 21, 2019 04:55 PM (urBW4)

82 Make Frito Pie, Weasel!

Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at April 21, 2019 04:55 PM (kQs4Y)

83 I've been nuking my asparagus for the last few years.

I have these oval Corelle plates I use for informal serving, and they are perfect for cooking asparagus.

I do not cut the woody ends off before cooking. I wash the spears and leave them wet. I lay them in a single layer on the plate pointing in the same direction. I season them. Then I cover with plastic wrap with the wrap tightly sealed on the woody end and open on the tip end.

Nuke for about 45 seconds on high and see if that's cooked enough for you. If not, just add some 30-second intervals until you are happy.

The water left over from washing steams the asparagus and the nuke energy cooks the spears from the inside.

It is much easier to cut off the woody part at the bottom after the asparagus is cooked.

Posted by: sunflower at April 21, 2019 04:56 PM (I54dk)

84 75 73 Howdy from WeaselAcres! I have bologna, ham and cheese for sammiches. For three days!
Posted by: Weasel at April 21, 2019 04:53 PM (Ku980)
------------

Okay, you've rations for WD, what are you going to eat?
Posted by: Blake - used vacation salesman at April 21, 2019 04:54 PM (WEBkv)
-------
WD stayed home to guard WeaselWoman. Miss them already.

Posted by: Weasel at April 21, 2019 04:56 PM (Ku980)

85 82 Make Frito Pie, Weasel!
Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at April 21, 2019 04:55 PM (kQs4Y)

Depends of what kind of cheese.

Posted by: m at April 21, 2019 04:56 PM (5AuVV)

86 Eris. - try sauteing asparagus in a hot pan. Takes a couple minutes and never bitter.

Posted by: Rosasharn at April 21, 2019 04:56 PM (PzBTm)

87 76 Blake, I did steam it with the ends partially in the water. Maybe it was just an indifferent bunch of asparagus.

Or maybe I'm a lousy cook.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at April 21, 2019 04:54 PM (kQs4Y)
-----------

Lousy cook? That I doubt. Indifferent asparagus? Well, if it is a millennial generation asparagus, most likely.

Posted by: Blake - used vacation salesman at April 21, 2019 04:56 PM (WEBkv)

88 Sunflower, I will try that.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at April 21, 2019 04:57 PM (kQs4Y)

89 Right now I am making a broth out of a couple of ham bones with meat. It's looking wonderful, and smells wonderful as well.

Posted by: Pug Mahon at April 21, 2019 04:57 PM (PXJBj)

90 Asspargrass composts very well, just in case it didn't turn out as you planned

Posted by: Skip at April 21, 2019 04:57 PM (BbGew)

91 Since moving down here to SC, I've had to begin my spice collection from scratch Costly. I just buy them as I need them, and already I have 30. Back in the day (when I made a lot of Indian food), I had over 80 varieties.
Thanks for the grilling component, CBD. I'd like to do a roast or pork shoulder, but dare not at this point. I have a lot to learn.
And congrats to McGuyver!

Posted by: Dwight K. Shrute at April 21, 2019 04:59 PM (NMAzL)

92 Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at April 21, 2019 04:57 PM (kQs4Y)

Forty-five seconds works for me and my wife, but I buy asparagus only when it is extremely slender and on sale.

Posted by: sunflower at April 21, 2019 04:59 PM (I54dk)

93 82 Make Frito Pie, Weasel!
Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at April 21, 2019 04:55 PM (kQs4Y)
-------
Well there's an idea!

Posted by: Weasel at April 21, 2019 04:59 PM (Ku980)

94 Off with the Dwight sock. *sigh*

Posted by: Miley, the Duchess at April 21, 2019 05:01 PM (NMAzL)

95 Asspargrass composts very well, just in case it didn't turn out as you planned
Posted by: Skip at April 21, 2019 04:57 PM (BbGew)

In my opinion, that's the only good use for asparagus.

Posted by: Surfperch at April 21, 2019 05:02 PM (tVQUs)

96 My sainted father hated bayleaf with a passion.

Yet my mother continually tried to sneak in just a tiny piece into a really good kidney stew she made.

(I think only the French eat kidneys any more)

But...more than once my Dad put a forkful of that stew into his mouth, grimaced and used his finger to extract that damning tiny piece.

Heh

Posted by: Noam Sayen at April 21, 2019 05:02 PM (ooMrJ)

97
Getting lazy in my old age, I have been doing pork shoulders in a countertop electric turkey roaster. They're about $50 at Walmart. I have had no complaints.

I find I don't miss the smoke flavor much on pork shoulders, but beef brisket is a different story. Brisket needs smoke or some very pungent seasoning because it frankly stinks. Next time I try brisket, I will wrap it in hickory or applewood smoked bacon.

Posted by: sunflower at April 21, 2019 05:03 PM (I54dk)

98 Remember, if you voted for Trump, the Prez of Penzey's Spices invited you to not buy from his company.

Posted by: Jinx the Cat at April 21, 2019 05:04 PM (FTlwv)

99 I never understood what in the world the bayleaf did for anything, my mother put them in all kinds of food and wife does as well. Since you can't eat it why put it in?

Posted by: Skip at April 21, 2019 05:05 PM (BbGew)

100 I plan on buying an Ohio-raised sweet bay laurel plant.
Yes, put leaves in the cupboards to discourage whatever crawlies you have around. They work wonders!

Posted by: Miley, the Duchess at April 21, 2019 05:05 PM (NMAzL)

101 Making scalloped potatoes, ham and cucumber salad. Apple turnovers for dessert. Sucks eating alone.

Went to the local greenhouse today, got caught in a hail storm. Temp dropped 20 degrees in 10 minutes. I got flowers tho.

Posted by: Infidel at April 21, 2019 05:05 PM (lwX7s)

102 ..."I'd like to do a roast or pork shoulder, but dare not at this point. I have a lot to learn."
-Posted by: Dwight K. Shrute at April 21, 2019 04:59 PM (NMAzL)

That's a freaking Pilgrimage I haven't even attempted. Of course, I only have a propane grill, as well as a fire-pit with a grate over it.

I'd like some sort of spit for that endeavor. Maybe I'll make one this year.

Posted by: Slapweasel, White Enthusiast, Town Drunk at April 21, 2019 05:06 PM (Ckg4U)

103 I use tumeric paste if I have poison ivy. Two days and its gone. I use it for wounds on my dogs and they are gone within a day. I also chipped a tooth and it hurt, so much that my face ached. Since it was the weekend and I am terrified of the dentist, I made tumeric paste and packed my cracked tooth with tumeric paste. It was fine within 24 hours, no pain, no throbbing, all fine. I also put it into my dogs food, seems to help with the arthritis.

Posted by: Abby at April 21, 2019 05:06 PM (SM/op)

104 Since you can't eat it why put it in?Posted by: Skip at April 21, 2019 05:05 PM (BbGew)

It imparts flavor indirectly. Nice when boiling shrimp, and lovely in stews. Easy to find it and remove it when the food is done.

Posted by: Miley, the Duchess at April 21, 2019 05:07 PM (NMAzL)

105 We did a non-traditional Easter meal. Lasagna! My poor daughter-in-law can no longer eat anything tomato (which she finds very distressing since she is full blooded Italian) but she was out of town visiting her parents we took advantage to make it for dinner and not have her silently weeping in envy.

Her plane lands in about half an hour and being a good MIL, I also made a ham and Sharkman's garlic-avocado mashed potatoes (delish!) so my son could some home for their evening Easter dinner.

We have leftovers for a week.

Posted by: cfo mom at April 21, 2019 05:07 PM (RfzVr)

106 I should add that the turkey roaster does an excellent job on turkeys. Plus you can throw the carcass in there after Thanksgiving or Christmas dinner, cover with water and a bit of apple cider vinegar, and simmer for a day to make a great turkey broth.

Wife bought me some silicone freeze trays with covers that make one-cup cubes. Great for storing the broth.

Those frozen broth cubes make a great celery/cabbage hot lunch in about twenty minutes in a stainless skillet on the stove.

Posted by: sunflower at April 21, 2019 05:08 PM (I54dk)

107 I'd like some sort of spit for that endeavor. Maybe I'll make one this year.

Posted by: Slapweasel, White Enthusiast, Town Drunk at April 21, 2019 05:06 PM (Ckg4U)

I was at a wedding where they roasted a whole pig on a stripped hickory sapling (no, it wasn't their first rodeo).

Posted by: Miley, the Duchess at April 21, 2019 05:08 PM (NMAzL)

108 Miley - my mother termed it the prize, so who ever got it won, what I never figured out

Posted by: Skip at April 21, 2019 05:08 PM (BbGew)

109 Posted by: cfo mom at April 21, 2019 05:07 PM (RfzVr)

Nightshade sensitivity?

Posted by: sunflower at April 21, 2019 05:09 PM (I54dk)

110 ..."Next time I try brisket, I will wrap it in hickory or applewood smoked bacon."
-Posted by: sunflower at April 21, 2019 05:03 PM (I54dk)

That's a good idea. You can also wet down your wood chips, wrap them in foil with open areas and let the smoke flavor come from there.

It is NOT as good as a smoker, but it will give a light smoke essence to the brisket.

There is also Liquid Smoke, but you'll have to figure out which brand. The best are actually condensed vapors with actual smoked wood.

Posted by: Slapweasel, White Enthusiast, Town Drunk at April 21, 2019 05:10 PM (Ckg4U)

111 I have a bay laurel plant too.

So, I have been packing up my meals for the backpacking trip next month. I always feel like I bring too much food. It's different this time since I'm staying in ketosis for the trip. A keto shake with covfefe in the morning, nut butter or salami & cheese for lunch, and a dehydrated keto meal for dinner. Bringing some jerky and whisp cheese crackers for snacks. 6 days this time.

Posted by: lin-duh in keto at April 21, 2019 05:11 PM (UUBmN)

112 Yes sunflower, I think that's it. She can't have peppers or even paprika, which is especially hard when it's snuck into so many things.

Posted by: cfo mom at April 21, 2019 05:13 PM (RfzVr)

113 I was probably 30 years old before I figured out asparagus and brussel sprouts were good.

My mother's preparation produced snot/slime-like spears and orbs that ruined my perception of them.

Not until I worked at a place with a chef that prepared them in another fashion did I realize they were actually edible by choice rather than under threat of being beaten with a belt.

Posted by: Bitter Clinger at April 21, 2019 05:13 PM (mhrg7)

114 Okay... The Wizard is here (Brother). I want to see how he hides the rabbits he pulls from the hat.

Posted by: Slapweasel, White Enthusiast, Town Drunk at April 21, 2019 05:13 PM (Ckg4U)

115 110 ..."Next time I try brisket, I will wrap it in hickory or applewood smoked bacon."
-Posted by: sunflower at April 21, 2019 05:03 PM (I54dk)

That's a good idea. You can also wet down your wood chips, wrap them in foil with open areas and let the smoke flavor come from there.

It is NOT as good as a smoker, but it will give a light smoke essence to the brisket.

There is also Liquid Smoke, but you'll have to figure out which brand. The best are actually condensed vapors with actual smoked wood.
Posted by: Slapweasel, White Enthusiast, Town Drunk at April 21, 2019 05:10 PM (Ckg4U)

I seem to recall Alton Brown demonstrating how to make liquid smoke.

Posted by: N.L. Urker, champion of Urkers everywhere at April 21, 2019 05:13 PM (JgA4k)

116 Miley - my mother termed it the prize, so who ever got it won, what I never figured out

Posted by: Skip at April 21, 2019 05:08 PM (BbGew)

It's the prize in and of itself

Posted by: Miley, the Duchess at April 21, 2019 05:14 PM (NMAzL)

117 Most recipes I see tell you to remove the bay leaf, presumably to prevent anyone from accidentally eating it.
Posted by: Pug Mahon at A



more of an issue of hiding the evidence.

Posted by: yankeefifth at April 21, 2019 05:15 PM (MTjB1)

118 Liquid smoke may seem like a cheat, but since I don't have my own beach on which to dig an imu, it's a vital ingredient in my crockpot kalua pork recipe.

Posted by: Rusty Nail at April 21, 2019 05:16 PM (2j6J5)

119 It's Pesach and I'll be eating matzoh, meat, veggies and little else for awhile.

Posted by: Yudhishthira's Dice at April 21, 2019 05:17 PM (5aX2M)

120 Posted by: Slapweasel, White Enthusiast, Town Drunk at April 21, 2019 05:10 PM (Ckg4U)

I've been meaning to try chips in foil to add smoke flavoring, but I really did not miss smokiness until I did the brisket and realized how badly it smelled.

It was not a spoiled smell. It was just unpleasant. It explains why brisket is usually smoked, corned, or treated with pink salt and encrusted in cracked black pepper.

I think an oil and crushed garlic rub might do the trick.

That stinky slow-roasted brisket was good eating while it lasted, though.

Posted by: sunflower at April 21, 2019 05:17 PM (I54dk)

121 Liquid smoke may seem like a cheat, but since I don't have my own beach on which to dig an imu, it's a vital ingredient in my crockpot kalua pork recipe.
Posted by: Rusty Nail at A



sure liquid smoke tastes great, however, there is no way that cannot be ridiculously unhealthy for you. you would be better off eating a cigarette before starting dinner.

Posted by: yankeefifth at April 21, 2019 05:18 PM (MTjB1)

122 Any time I've tried to cook a purple veggie whether potato, asparagus, or bell pepper, the color bleeds out.

Posted by: JuJuBee at April 21, 2019 05:18 PM (aBR7R)

123 I planted a bay tree (Laurus nobilus -- the mediterranean type) a few years ago after finding a nice one in a plant nursery and seeing a photo of an impressive 40 foot specimen. I love this plant for several reasons.

1. Hardy! It doesn't require more than one or two deep waterings per year.2. It is evergreen and very thick -- an excellent windbreak plant during winter. Tips freeze about 6-8 inches or so, prune those off and the tree looks fantastic for spring.
3. When a recipe calls for bay leaf, I snip off a twig with a few leaves and chuck it in there. Easier to retrieve than individual leaves.4. I have never observed a single pest or disease attack it.5. Deer don't even nibble it.6. It is ornamental enough that visitors routinely ask what it is. They are delighted to be sent home with a newspaper cone full of fresh branches.7. Decorative in the house too. I lay a nice branch out on an open shelf and it looks terrific. No discernable scent. Dries very slowly so it's ornamental for months. It also dries green. I am very suspicious of grocery store bottles full of brown leaves.8. It's a slowish but steady grower. It has the potential to soar as tall as a 5-story building.

Posted by: Mongerel at April 21, 2019 05:22 PM (6X9cM)

124 Doing the ham, mashed potatoes asparagus thing but going to twist it for dessert with a rhubarb rose water pistachio galette for dessert from the Splendid Table. The chef who gave the recipe is talented so hopefully good and I will probably add some of my lovely super sweet spring strawberries to it also.
https://tinyurl.com/y537m3re

Posted by: keena at April 21, 2019 05:24 PM (RiTnx)

125 not sure the difficulty of the 20 spice monstrosity is worth the difficulty, and the risk. your thought about elegant dishes dependent up on technique and quality ingredients would seem to be the reasonable way to go.

uber complicated dishes with lots of different ingredients and spices is similar to people wearing perfume because they did not bathe - you are trying to disguise the foundation.




Posted by: yankeefifth at April 21, 2019 05:25 PM (MTjB1)

126 Yankeefifth, carcinogen is just a fancy word for "flavor".

Posted by: Rusty Nail at April 21, 2019 05:25 PM (2j6J5)

127 glazed spiral sliced ham
fresh green beans tossed in butter
freshly baked rolls (still rising)
mashed potatoes and gravy from scratch

sadly, no jello salad :-(

Posted by: trapper's girl at April 21, 2019 05:25 PM (kwbNb)

128 Yankeefifth, carcinogen is just a fancy word for "flavor".
Posted by: Rusty Nail at A




lol, well, if you have to eat some liquid smoke is the one to eat. definitely agree that it tastes great.

Posted by: yankeefifth at April 21, 2019 05:26 PM (MTjB1)

129 Had matzoh with Passover dinner last night, but this morning I made biscuits with baking powder, because "He is Risen . . ."

Posted by: Trimegistus at April 21, 2019 05:26 PM (Q5Q0N)

130 Can you sous-vide asparagus?

Posted by: kallisto at April 21, 2019 05:27 PM (r6yYr)

131 Posted by: JuJuBee at April 21, 2019 05:18 PM (aBR7R)

....

You might try blanching them for a short period of time before shocking them in an ice water bath.

It can soften and cook the veg while maintaining the pigments.

Posted by: Bitter Clinger at April 21, 2019 05:27 PM (mhrg7)

132 the incredible range of flavors we have available to us in most supermarket spice aisles

My cooking tends toward the simpler side except when it comes to spices. Good spices will amaze your taste buds to no end.

Just try this: find the whole-version of your favorite spice (like black peppercorns), toast it in an unoiled pan for 2-3 minutes over low heat, and then grind in a dedicated spice grinder (NOT in your coffee grinder!). The difference is phenomenal.

I have an Asian market near me where I can get bagged whole-spice versions of common spice blends like garam masala. The fresh-ground version compared to the in-a-jar version is like a vivid color photo to a faded Polaroid. The same ingredients but a whole new universe of flavor.

Posted by: crisis du jour at April 21, 2019 05:27 PM (qVX10)

133 you would be better off eating a cigarette before starting dinner.

Posted by: yankeefifth at April 21, 2019 05:18 PM (MTjB1)

Or having an Islay malt...

And yet...


Posted by: CharlieBrown'sDildo at April 21, 2019 05:27 PM (wYseH)

134 127 fresh green beans tossed in butter

Posted by: trapper's girl at April 21, 2019 05:25 PM (kwbNb)

Steamed?

Posted by: m at April 21, 2019 05:28 PM (5AuVV)

135 Or having an Islay malt...

And yet...


Posted by: CharlieBrown'sDildo at A



yes, yes, I know. was suggesting the health benefits would be better if you ate the cigarette.

love the taste of liquid smoke but get the sense that it was skimmed off some superfund site and bottled.

Posted by: yankeefifth at April 21, 2019 05:29 PM (MTjB1)

136
Trying a food dehydrator to dry slices of the dog's meat roll so that it lasts longer on out-of-town show weekends. May take some practice. I'm sure the dogs will be happy to take any failures we have.

Posted by: Hadrian the Seventh at April 21, 2019 05:30 PM (LsBY9)

137 The Farmers Market Cafe in downtown Montgomery, Alabama has "Dr Pepper BBQ meatloaf" on their Thursday lunch menu. You have to be there when they open at 11AM for lunch. Sells out quick!

Posted by: Occasional Commenter at April 21, 2019 05:31 PM (Ezw/y)

138 I did secure some leftover ham and made ham salad for lunch tomorrow. I think I got everything, mayo, relish, onion, celery

Posted by: Skip at April 21, 2019 05:31 PM (BbGew)

139 CBD, I wouldn't use those red berries off a holly tree.

Posted by: Eromero at April 21, 2019 05:32 PM (qBNEP)

140 Flyers remove statue of Kate Smith?! This is not giving in to Soviet Justice Wanking, this is being filled with it. An inside job.

Posted by: t-bird at April 21, 2019 05:32 PM (1+J19)

141 I had a bread pudding dessert with bananas, chocolate, and Madagascar cinnamon. It was at Buddhakan in Philly years ago and I recall it like yesterday it was so good.

Posted by: kallisto at April 21, 2019 05:33 PM (r6yYr)

142 Posted by: kallisto at April 21, 2019 05:27 PM (r6yYr)

In my experience, sous vide for vegetables is not worth the trouble. You have to run the temperature up over 185 degrees to cook veggies.

I got an Anova immersion stick about five years ago and experimented with just about everything for a couple of years. The only things I use it on anymore is chicken (because of the salmonella risk) and fresh bratwurst. It also works great on frozen turkey breasts when those go on sale.

Steaks and chops are best with low-and-slow reverse-sear technique, and the countertop turkey roaster does an excellent job on collagen-rich cuts.

Posted by: sunflower at April 21, 2019 05:33 PM (I54dk)

143 It's a short hop from doing in Kate Smith in Philadelphia to opening the gulags for hate speach

Posted by: Skip at April 21, 2019 05:35 PM (BbGew)

144 another recipe i didn't get around to submitting for the cook book:
asparagus ala red
fresh asparagus, preferably thin, because it's more tender
place in skillet with water to cover, bring to a boil, then remove when just starting to get tender, place on warm plate, sprinkle with paramecium cheese, or paramecium/romano, or romano cheese to taste then cover.
(shaved melts better, if you GAF about presentation, but they taste the same)
dump the water, return the skillet to the flame, add in butter and garlic and saute until you're happy.

add lemon juice in equal amount to the butter/garlic, bring to a boil, pour on top of the waiting asparagus, then serve immediately.

Posted by: redc1c4 at April 21, 2019 05:35 PM (ER1jH)

145 Their objection to Kate Smith's songs isn't the racist past, it's the reference to God and America they really despise.

Posted by: Bitter Clinger at April 21, 2019 05:37 PM (mhrg7)

146 Spice.

Posted by: Stilgar at April 21, 2019 05:37 PM (xLZRe)

147
So when do we start removing Kluxer Robert Byrd's name from everything in West Virginia?

Posted by: Hadrian the Seventh at April 21, 2019 05:38 PM (LsBY9)

148 Voici, je suis arrive'.


So who is being the most wrong about Food and does s/he need additional chastisement?

Posted by: Bandersnatch at April 21, 2019 05:38 PM (fuK7c)

149 sprinkle with paramecium cheese

I think you mean parmesan.

As for aparagus, my favorite technique is to trim it up, liberally coat with olive oil, kosher salt (pepper optional) and grill on the kamado at about 450 deg. If you pull it off at the right time, the asparagus has a beautiful nutty flavor.

Posted by: Additional Blond Agent, STEM guy at April 21, 2019 05:38 PM (7s3Gx)

150 Broke Lenten sweet fast with a raspberry cheese danish. It tasted so sweet I could only eat half.

Posted by: kallisto at April 21, 2019 05:39 PM (r6yYr)

151 A few other great uses for the Anova immersion cooker:

1. Preseasoned pork tenderloins, cooked in the original packaging
2. Reheating carver hams in the original packaging
3. Defrosting in original packaging (use cold water and set the temp to minimum to prevent the heating element from coming on)

Posted by: sunflower at April 21, 2019 05:39 PM (I54dk)

152 148 Voici, je suis arrive'.

So who is being the most wrong about Food and does s/he need additional chastisement?
Posted by: Bandersnatch at April 21, 2019 05:38 PM (fuK7c)

There was a reference to "no jello salad" earlier in the thread.

Posted by: m at April 21, 2019 05:39 PM (5AuVV)

153 not sure eating food from someone whose autospeller suggests "paramecium" before "parmesean" is wise.


like dating someone whose autospeller suggests "sodomy" before "sodium", or does not suggest capitalization for "Peg."

Posted by: yankeefifth at April 21, 2019 05:41 PM (MTjB1)

154 Easter lunch was good, everyone's gone except one we have to take to the airport in an hour and a half, I feel like a tic and I'm eating candy out of someone's basket.

Posted by: bluebell at April 21, 2019 05:41 PM (aXucN)

155 Mongeral........Laurus nobilus...you are correct on this genus. I go cali type dont knowthe latinbut i know med type is more aromatic and presumably more flavorful.

Posted by: Lone Ranger at April 21, 2019 05:42 PM (KTOuB)

156 Easter lunch was good, everyone's gone except one we have to take to the airport in an hour and a half, I feel like a tic and I'm eating candy out of someone's basket.
Posted by: bluebell at A



you didn't ruin this dinner like Christmas dinner by making it the day before did you?

Posted by: yankeefifth at April 21, 2019 05:42 PM (MTjB1)

157 Probably will owed, but:

Both sears were great, both in ritual and food (BIRM). First night did a roulade of too round it's faux pesto, last night two turkey breasts, one smoked and one rotissed.

Fun part was timing, esp leading the seder while minding the grill and smoker.

Posted by: ibguy at April 21, 2019 05:43 PM (EHVbt)

158 There was a reference to "no jello salad" earlier in the thread.

Being a Not A Lutheran I lack standing to chastise on jello salad matters.

Posted by: Bandersnatch at April 21, 2019 05:43 PM (fuK7c)

159 flagellum

Posted by: sunflower at April 21, 2019 05:43 PM (I54dk)

160 I'm amazed I haven't seen any "the spice must flow" jokes yet.

Posted by: Bert G at April 21, 2019 05:44 PM (OMsf+)

161 flagellum
Posted by: sunflower at A



just the one? that does not seem like much of a meal.

Posted by: yankeefifth at April 21, 2019 05:44 PM (MTjB1)

162 you didn't ruin this dinner like Christmas dinner by making it the day before did you?
Posted by: yankeefifth at April 21, 2019 05:42 PM (MTjB1)
-----------

No, because I didn't cook Christmas dinner.

Posted by: bluebell at April 21, 2019 05:44 PM (aXucN)

163 Posted by: yankeefifth at April 21, 2019 05:44 PM (MTjB1)

Whipped, I guess.

Posted by: sunflower at April 21, 2019 05:44 PM (I54dk)

164 No, because I didn't cook Christmas dinner.
Posted by: bluebell at A



whew!

was it Thanksgiving then?

Posted by: yankeefifth at April 21, 2019 05:45 PM (MTjB1)

165 Ah! I see I missed #146.

Posted by: Bert G at April 21, 2019 05:45 PM (OMsf+)

166 I'm afraid paramecium cheese would make me flagellate, but I'm probably just being cilia.

Posted by: Bitter Clinger at April 21, 2019 05:45 PM (mhrg7)

167 Whipped, I guess.
Posted by: sunflower at A






Posted by: yankeefifth at April 21, 2019 05:45 PM (MTjB1)

168 for Miley's grill, there's a couple of things to do that will help control temps, but it's never going to be useful for smoking larger things like piggy shoulder/butt and briskets, because of its basic design.

airflow controls heat, but so does the amount of fuel burning at any one time. instead of lighting all 3#s of charcoal at once, place most of it on the grate, then put lit coals on top... there needs to be enough of them to light the others, but you don't want everything to catch immediately.

another thing you can do to keep the grill temp where you want it is to extend the stack down into the cooker with an appropriate diameter steel can with both ends opened. this keeps the heat down on the grill, and not just shooting out the top of the lid. this, of course, assumes you can remove the upper grill i see in the photos.

HTH!

Posted by: redc1c4 at April 21, 2019 05:46 PM (ER1jH)

169 My father(an engineer) built a fish smoking contraption using an old gas stove's oven with its thermostat, running flex pipe with a fan from the smoke box through the gas oven to maintain the proper temp of the smoke.

The engineering worked like a charm.

Posted by: davidt at April 21, 2019 05:46 PM (xLZRe)

170 was it Thanksgiving then?

Posted by: yankeefifth at April 21, 2019 05:45 PM (MTjB1)
----------

Hmmm, I do cook some things ahead for Thanksgiving like the pies and such, but never the turkey or stuffing or green beans, etc.

Yesterday I made a few things that taste better the next day, like cream of asparagus soup.

Posted by: bluebell at April 21, 2019 05:47 PM (aXucN)

171 I think you mean parmesan.

Posted by: Additional Blond Agent, STEM guy at April 21, 2019 05:38 PM (7s3Gx)
---
i think i was being silly...

Posted by: redc1c4 at April 21, 2019 05:48 PM (ER1jH)

172 >>>Steamed?

yes!

Posted by: trapper's girl at April 21, 2019 05:49 PM (kwbNb)

173 Easter Meal. I am so stuffed right now, I need the ol' constitutional nap. At least I think holiday naps are in the Constitution.

Posted by: Guy Mohawk at April 21, 2019 05:50 PM (r+sAi)

174 You can get real cinnamon from the Spice House:
https://www.thespicehouse.com/ ceylon-cinnamon-ground

I also have a jar of their ground rosemary, which I use for roast chicken:
https://www.thespicehouse.com/ rosemary-needles-ground

I brine a whole chicken cut into parts with rosemary, garlic and juice from a large lemon for about a half hour, and roast for 15 minutes at 450 and then at 375 until it's done.

Yes, I like simple recipes...

Posted by: Helena Handbasket - CNN is ridiculous bullshit at April 21, 2019 05:51 PM (0ReGO)

175 Getting lazy in my old age, I have been doing pork
shoulders in a countertop electric turkey roaster. They're about $50 at
Walmart. I have had no complaints.



I find I don't miss the smoke flavor much on pork shoulders, but
beef brisket is a different story. Brisket needs smoke or some very
pungent seasoning because it frankly stinks. Next time I try brisket, I
will wrap it in hickory or applewood smoked bacon.


Posted by: sunflower at April 21, 2019 05:03 PM

---

I do my pork shoulders and butts in a crock pot and then pull them apart and smother them in Sweet Baby Ray's sauce, cheap easy and no mess pulled pork.

I have had people offer to pay me to make it for them because they like it so much.

Posted by: The Great White Scotsman at April 21, 2019 05:52 PM (JUOKG)

176 McGuyver--Is your Bluetooth smoker a Masterbilt? If so, I would recommend extreme vigilance in using the Bluetooth controller. For some reason, if you are using the Bluetooth, the smoker will spontaneously and unpredictanly go into cremation mode and heat to around 900 degrees. No, I'm not kidding. Check the Amazon reviews if you doubt me. I still like my smoker, but never, ever use the Bluetooth.

For spices, I recommend Spice House. Penzey, the insane leftist, is a spinoff family member, but Spice House is the original business. Very supportive of our military and IMO better prices than Penzey's anyway.

Posted by: Art Rondolet of Malmsey at April 21, 2019 05:53 PM (S+f+m)

177 I came up with a good bagel workaround* this week. Stoppy Shoppy is not baking during the strike and good bagels are way over there two towns away.

So I employed Wasa crackers. Wasa crackers, despite containing seven grains, are nearly devoid of taste. They are architectural devices meant for conveying things that do taste good.

I put cream cheese, capers, red onions, and lovely wild caught smoked salmon on a Wasa and it's great.

BTW, you know what's really surprising? Nathan's sells horrible tasting lox. I know they're a hot dog company, but shouldn't lox be in their wheelhouse?

*(it turns out there is an awesome bagel place much closer)

Posted by: Bandersnatch at April 21, 2019 05:54 PM (fuK7c)

178 Nothing fancy today. Made rotini for the bro. Brought roast chicken and green salad to bf who was working on his lawn tractor all. day. long.

Posted by: kallisto at April 21, 2019 05:54 PM (r6yYr)

179 Kallisto, we had a dessert I think you would like. Almond pound cake, made with a pound of almond paste, and brushed with limoncello after baking. It's tender and delicious and very almondy.

Posted by: bluebell at April 21, 2019 05:56 PM (aXucN)

180
Astros making it interesting. Down 10-1 to the Rangers, it's now 11-8 going into the 9th.

Posted by: Hadrian the Seventh at April 21, 2019 05:56 PM (LsBY9)

181 i also grilled zucchini cut lengthwise into strips yesterday which had been tossed in evoo and garlic, s & p, served alongside dry rubbed ribeyes.

Posted by: trapper's girl at April 21, 2019 05:57 PM (kwbNb)

182 trapper's girl, that sounds delicious.

Posted by: bluebell at April 21, 2019 05:58 PM (aXucN)

183
Springer hits a leadoff homer. 11-9.

Posted by: Hadrian the Seventh at April 21, 2019 05:58 PM (LsBY9)

184 Oh, yeah. garbage disposal leaking.

Posted by: Infidel at April 21, 2019 05:58 PM (lwX7s)

185 Hadrian, I've missed you! Did you give us up for Lent?

Posted by: bluebell at April 21, 2019 05:59 PM (aXucN)

186 Turmeric: Sprinkle on chicken before oven roasting. Makes great yellow gravy for potatoes or rice.

Posted by: mustbequantum at April 21, 2019 05:59 PM (MIKMs)

187
Did you give us up for Lent?

Yes, and my music. Six weeks hard.

Posted by: Hadrian the Seventh at April 21, 2019 05:59 PM (LsBY9)

188 Posted by: The Great White Scotsman at April 21, 2019 05:52 PM (JUOKG)

I tried that a few times and couldn't get past the cooked-in-juices flavor/texture. Maybe I should try it with minimal seasoning to see if it works.

Posted by: sunflower at April 21, 2019 06:00 PM (I54dk)

189 179. bluebell that sounds exquisite. I'll be over around 9 tonite, leaving right now!

Posted by: kallisto at April 21, 2019 06:01 PM (r6yYr)

190 Posted by: Infidel at April 21, 2019 05:58 PM (lwX7s)

Hopefully it's ISE or Badger of recent enough vintage to be compatible with the bayonet adapter.

Spring the extra for the one with the stainless chamber.

Posted by: sunflower at April 21, 2019 06:02 PM (I54dk)

191
Oh, yeah. garbage disposal leaking.
=====

Almost 40 years, I have never been able to keep one working for longer than a few months. Next time a soninlaw wants to be helpful, I think it is time to get rid of the whole thing.

Posted by: mustbequantum at April 21, 2019 06:02 PM (MIKMs)

192 The ham is smelling good...

Posted by: Rosasharn at April 21, 2019 06:02 PM (PzBTm)

193 for Miley, and anyone else who wants a controlled charcoal burn.

https://www.smokingmeatforums.com/
ams/minion-method-explained-with-
tutorial.9300/

Posted by: redc1c4 at April 21, 2019 06:03 PM (ER1jH)

194 Posted by: The Great White Scotsman at April 21, 2019 05:52 PM (JUOKG)



I tried that a few times and couldn't get past the cooked-in-juices
flavor/texture. Maybe I should try it with minimal seasoning to see if
it works.


Posted by: sunflower at April 21, 2019 06:00 PM

---

I use no seasoning during the cook. Just the Sweet Baby Ray's at the end.


It's also important to get the fresh shoulders or butts that aren't 23% added ingredients.

Sams usually has the good ones in my area.

Posted by: The Great White Scotsman at April 21, 2019 06:03 PM (JUOKG)

195 The "Ronald Reagan was correct" thread has a "your article very is interestingness!" spam-link post at #274, if any COBs feel like taking some target practice...

Posted by: mikeski at April 21, 2019 06:03 PM (P1f+c)

196 Wow, Hadrian. Good for you. Welcome back.

Kallisto, hurray! I'm saving the last piece for you.

Posted by: bluebell at April 21, 2019 06:03 PM (aXucN)

197 I use tumeric for its placebo value.

Posted by: Regular joe at April 21, 2019 06:07 PM (6/uwW)

198 Hopefully it's ISE or Badger of recent enough vintage to be compatible with the bayonet adapter.

Spring the extra for the one with the stainless chamber.

Posted by: sunflower at April 21, 2019 06:02 PM (I54dk)


Hmm. In house I inherited. With a mirror and flashlight, it is a badger insinkerator. 1/2 hp, 2 yr warranty. I am sure it's much older that 2 yrs.

Posted by: Infidel at April 21, 2019 06:08 PM (lwX7s)

199 I'm developing a taste for lime Perrier. So refreshing!

Posted by: kallisto at April 21, 2019 06:12 PM (r6yYr)

200 176 Art Rondolet of Malmsey at April 21, 2019 05:53 PM (S+f+m)

Haven't experienced that yet and we've had it for about 9 months. I will keep an eye on it. I also make sure to use the meat probe, and check THAT with a pretty accurate meat thermometer

McGyver, Out

Posted by: McGyver at April 21, 2019 06:13 PM (gMngZ)

201 I have an older Pitts and Spitts smoker with the offset firebox and I'll usually get a chimney starter full of charcoal going to put down first and then my smoking wood on top as needed. I've learned to keep the temps fairly even by slightly opening and closing the firebox but on a long smoke like brisket and shoulders it's work. So much so that 10-11 hours is too much for me these days especially if I'm drinking beer, lol. Thinking of getting a little electric Smokin-it smoker. They only use 4 ozs. of wood and you set it up and leave it sealed up. I love my old Pitts and Spitts but I'm getting to where I don't want to fire it up because it's so much work.

Posted by: dartist at April 21, 2019 06:17 PM (K22Va)

202
Altuve walks with the bases loaded. 11-10 with two outs.

Posted by: Hadrian the Seventh at April 21, 2019 06:19 PM (LsBY9)

203 To save the planet you all have to stop eating. Like, just stop it now.

Posted by: AOC at April 21, 2019 06:22 PM (aBR7R)

204 I dropped Coke like a bad habit ( cola that is) but occasionally go for the flavored sparkling water for something different.

Posted by: Skip at April 21, 2019 06:24 PM (BbGew)

205 It can be pie time

Posted by: Skip at April 21, 2019 06:25 PM (BbGew)

206
Damn. Chirinos strikes out.

Posted by: Hadrian the Seventh at April 21, 2019 06:26 PM (LsBY9)

207 Regarding regulating temperature in a smoker, I've found that you get better (cleaner) smoke with more air flow to the firebox and regulating heat by closing off the chimney. I also use an wood/charcoal burning offset smoker, so my rig is different from yours.

Posted by: rudytbone at April 21, 2019 06:27 PM (zNgyC)

208 Skip another fizzy drink I'm liking is pomegranate or blueberry kombucha.

Posted by: kallisto at April 21, 2019 06:33 PM (Z9spM)

209 using the Minion method on my WSSM, i can run a stable stack temp of ~225* for 15-20 hours. lots of time to cook several butts or large briskets low and slow, the way G*d intended.

i have the charcoal ring, put a `1# coffee can with both ends removed in the middle, add charcoal all around it, then dump lit charcoal in the can, pull it out w/ channel lock pliers, put one, or both middle sections it w/ their meat, then wait until the temp settles down before going on to other things.

since all my probe thermometers are muerto, i just monitor the exhaust temp with a thermometer dropped in the exhaust and control the temp with the bottom vents: usually 2 closed all the way and one cracked open.

Posted by: redc1c4 at April 21, 2019 06:34 PM (ER1jH)

210 Infidel at April 21, 2019 05:05 PM (lwX7s)

Where in the he!! do you live?!?!?!?

Posted by: Grannymimi at April 21, 2019 06:34 PM (u5LFV)

211 Late to this thread. Beautiful evening on our patio. We are enjoying the first martinis since the start of Lent. Very tasty basic Bombay gin, (none of that sapphire stuff). Sharing a great cigar. Pork chops on the grill. Going to finish watching Ben Hur later. Easter Monday means no school tomorrow! A blessed Easter/Passover to all of you!

Posted by: Mrs. Leggy at April 21, 2019 06:36 PM (Vf4Y7)

212 Went to the local greenhouse today, got caught in a hail storm. Temp dropped 20 degrees in 10 minutes. I got flowers tho.
Posted by: Infidel at April 21, 2019 05:05 PM (lwX7s)

Must be what's heading towards my hacienda. I just got back from a walk. Sky to the west was black, rain drops hitting me now and again. Made it back in time not to get doused by rain, or mushed into a pink pulp by hail.

Posted by: Pug Mahon at April 21, 2019 06:37 PM (PXJBj)

213 207
Regarding regulating temperature in a smoker, I've found that you get
better (cleaner) smoke with more air flow to the firebox and regulating
heat by closing off the chimney. I also use an wood/charcoal burning
offset smoker, so my rig is different from yours.

I'd have to look but I think my chimney is choked down to 1/4 or half. the wood won't stay lit if I don't keep enough air going through it. Then it's a bitch to get started again. Once she's going for awhile temps stay pretty even because the firebox is 1/4 inch steel and the rest is pretty hefty so it holds heat. It's a bruiser. I also started using a duel probe thermometer after I found the dial one it came with was up to 40 degrees off.

Posted by: dartist at April 21, 2019 06:38 PM (K22Va)

214 Very tasty basic Bombay gin, (none of that sapphire
stuff).

Posted by: Mrs. Leggy at April 21, 2019 06:36 PM (Vf4Y7)

Agreed! Sapphire is awful. I'm not sure what the goal was, but it sure wasn't flavor.

Posted by: CharlieBrown'sDildo at April 21, 2019 06:41 PM (wYseH)

215 I hope that's Hungarian paprika in the pic.

Kalocsa or Szeged.

Accept no substitutes.

Posted by: Chef Miklos (or szakacs in Hungarian) at April 21, 2019 06:44 PM (QzkSJ)

216
PIE!

PIE'S COMIN'!

Posted by: For Skip at April 21, 2019 06:46 PM (aBR7R)

217 Very tasty basic Bombay gin, (none of that sapphire
stuff).
Posted by: Mrs. Leggy at April 21, 2019 06:36 PM (Vf4Y7)
Agreed! Sapphire is awful. I'm not sure what the goal was, but it sure wasn't flavor.
Posted by: CharlieBrown'sDildo at April 21, 2019 06:41 PM (wYseH)

Yup....I stick with Tanqueray myself. When you drink knottyhead, keep it ghetto, but not too ghetto.

Posted by: Hairyback Guy at April 21, 2019 06:50 PM (Z+IKu)

218 It's all a pack of lies!

It's all a lack of pies!

Posted by: JuJuBee at April 21, 2019 06:53 PM (aBR7R)

219 >> My poor daughter-in-law can no longer eat anything tomato
That's rough, especially for an Italian.

Posted by: 40 miles north at April 21, 2019 06:56 PM (o2vOl)

220 Jesus is waiting.

Posted by: Cosmic Charlie at April 21, 2019 06:59 PM (PUmDY)

221 Tanqueray and Tanqueray 10 taste better with lemon rather than olives. Hendricks tastes better with cucumber.

Posted by: Mrs. Leggy at April 21, 2019 07:00 PM (Vf4Y7)

222 >> Yes, yes...that's avocado toast,
Some of the young guys I work with eat food like that, but I don't get it. Avocado and poached eggs are for people with no teeth. What's next, pureed carrots?

Posted by: 40 miles north at April 21, 2019 07:03 PM (o2vOl)

223 Tanqueray and Tanqueray 10 taste better with lemon rather than olives. Hendricks tastes better with cucumber.
Posted by: Mrs. Leggy at April 21, 2019 07:00 PM (Vf4Y7)

Yup.....Hendricks is very nice, smooth and easy to drink.

A place near me in my AO makes a "Cutini" with it and cucumber something(liquor?) or other and a slice of cucumber.

Very refreshing.

Posted by: Hairyback Guy at April 21, 2019 07:03 PM (Z+IKu)

224 Thoroughly minced garlic kicks the heck out of the powder, though I'm not always motivated enough.

Cayenne is a great spice, I use it on everything. Not necessarily enough for much heat, if any, but it adds a boost to the flavor unlike anything.

Fresh Basil is key to a lot of recipes. Dried won't cut it, has to be fresh. It is one of the few herbs that can compete with Garlic.

Mexican Oregeno, for some reason I can't find the good stuff anymore. I mentioned this before. I had a jar for a long time, flourescent green, aromatic, finely powdered like flour. When I used it up, I went looking for more. It's all stringy stuff, and a pale imitation in flavor and color. It was just the stuff for Chili.

Posted by: Common Tater at April 21, 2019 07:03 PM (Cfzj6)

225 875 churches vandalized in one year in France. Hundreds murdered on Easter at churches in Sri Lanka. Years of persecution of Christians in Iraq and Syria. How long can people pretend this isn't a global anti-Christian pogrom?

Posted by: Yudhishthira's Dice at April 21, 2019 07:06 PM (5aX2M)

226 I dropped Coke like a bad habit ( cola that is) but occasionally go for the flavored sparkling water for something different.
Posted by: Skip at April 21, 2019 06:24 PM (BbGew)

I've tried la croix sparkling water - only flavor I really care for is coconut, and for some reason, when I drink it I get a bit of a headache.

Posted by: antisocialist at April 21, 2019 07:07 PM (2shuf)

227 NOOD - Gun thread.

Posted by: Calm Mentor at April 21, 2019 07:08 PM (9hJlZ)

228 On 60 Minutes right now, propaganda in full swing.

Still pushing the Russian crap.

Indicator of things to come.

Posted by: Miklos, with true Pravda at April 21, 2019 07:08 PM (QzkSJ)

229 I really don't understand the appeal of avocado toast, to be honest. Soft avocado, soft egg, soft toast. Yuck.

Posted by: antisocialist at April 21, 2019 07:09 PM (2shuf)

230 Drive On.

Posted by: Cosmic Charlie at April 21, 2019 07:13 PM (PUmDY)

231 Avocado and poached eggs are for people with no teeth.
-----
I prefer avocado, bacon, asparagus, and my egg fried. It's a great keto breakfast.

Posted by: lin-duh in keto at April 21, 2019 07:17 PM (UUBmN)

232 How long can people pretend this isn't a global anti-Christian pogrom?

Posted by: Yudhishthira's Dice at April 21, 2019 07:06 PM (5aX2M)

AND Jew pogrom!?!? Christ warned us as did Paul, etc. My niece and I were discussing this earlier vis-a-vis the Sri Lanka debacle. When will people wake up?!?!?

Posted by: Grannymimi at April 21, 2019 07:17 PM (u5LFV)

233 Made an easy-peasy ham today - 69 cent/lb loss leader for the win!
It was great! sweet potatoes and green beans with almonds and we were in heaven.
Just me and my wife and oldest daughter.. and a beeeyoooteeful almost 80 degree day here! with a nice breeze.. couldn't have asked for better!

Posted by: Chi-Town Jerry at April 21, 2019 07:55 PM (438dO)

234 I remain convinced that Bay Leaves do nothing, that they are a stone soup ingredient chefs use to seem mysterious and professional

Posted by: Christopher R Taylor at April 21, 2019 08:08 PM (39g3+)

235 Satan said, "I am the resurrection of the ass. Try my bay leaves, if you dare."

Posted by: Fritz at April 21, 2019 09:24 PM (LuPts)

236 "It's technique and raw ingredients that drive the quality"


Ah, but you see, the point of spices is you don't have to spring for the expensive "raw ingredients". I can make the best meals from mediocre cuts of meat because of the spice and marinade preparation (and that technique you mention). I made a great corned beef (for my first time) from a cheap piece of beef, because no one had brisket (that wasn't already corned).

Posted by: GWB at April 21, 2019 11:15 PM (7kVu3)

237 "is not meant for human consumption"


You do know you're supposed to take the bay leaf out after you cook?

Posted by: GWB at April 21, 2019 11:16 PM (7kVu3)

238 I can make the best meals from mediocre cuts of meat because of the spice and marinade preparation (and that technique you mention).

Some food is specifically built around that concept, like fajitas and chili. Take lousy meat and find a way to make it work anyway.

Posted by: Christopher R Taylor at April 21, 2019 11:43 PM (39g3+)

239 On your CharGriller, don't pile your charcoal; lat it out in a line and light one end, and let it burn into the line. That'll buy you more smoking time. When I light mine, I let it get up to about 300, then choke it back to where it's only got about an inch open on bottom, and a 1/4 inch on top, that settles the temp down to about 250 and will hold it there as long as there's fuel. Happy Grilling!

Posted by: David at April 22, 2019 05:33 AM (xK+pY)

240 If you like curry, seek out curry leaf. That powder they is not it. Must be fresh. Find it at specialty markets. The first time you smell a leaf you'll recognize the real essence of curry.

Posted by: Kyle Kiernan at April 22, 2019 08:23 AM (jLNZj)

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