Sunday Morning Book Thread 08-09-2015: Lost Children of the Empire [OregonMuse]


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Good morning to all of you morons and moronettes and bartenders everywhere and all the ships at sea. Welcome to AoSHQ's stately, prestigious, internationally acclaimed and high-class Sunday Morning Book Thread. The Sunday Morning Book Thread is the only AoSHQ thread that is so hoity-toity, pants are required. Or kilts. Assless chaps don't count. Serious you guys. Kilts are OK, though. But not tutus. Unless you're a girl.


Book thread MULTIPLE TRIGGER WARNINGS for the moral necessity of using nuclear weapons on Japanese cities, of shooting rioters and firing incompetent public school teachers, and of not supporting any social arrangement other than the traditional nuclear family.


A good novel tells us the truth about its hero; but a bad novel tells us the truth about its author.
-Gilbert K. Chesterton


So Where Did The Children Go?

In the late 70s/early 80s, the country went through kind of a panic over missing children, mainly due to the attendant publicity surrounding the disappearances of Etan Patz and Adam Walsh. They started putting photos of missing children on milk cartons, and, in fact, Patz's photo was the first one ever used for this purpose. But, as horrific as these crimes were, they're extremely atypical. "Stranger danger" is mostly misplaced concern, as the vast majority of missing children are the result of custody battles or other problems at home.

But what if children did go missing, thousands and thousands of them, and nobody knew where they were, and nobody wanted to talk about them, and they were mostly just forgotten?

Actually, this really happened. Rounding up orphans, "street" kids, and other unwanted children and packing them off to colonial destinations was a policy implemented by the British government for many years:

The practice of sending poor or orphaned children to English and later British settler colonies, to help alleviate the shortage of labor, began in 1618, with the rounding-up and transportation of one hundred English vagrant children to the Virginia Colony.

I never knew anything about this until I discovered the book Oranges and Sunshine by Margaret Humphreys, which was a $1.99 special via Bookbub earlier this week:

In 1986 Margaret Humphreys, a British social worker, investigated a woman's claim that at the age of four she had been put on a boat to Australia by the British government. At first thinking it incredulous, Margaret discovered that this was just the tip of an enormous iceberg. Up to 150,000 children, some as young as three years old, had been deported from children's homes in Britain and shipped off to a "new life" in distant parts of the British empire, right up until 1970. Many were told that their parents were dead, and parents often believed that their children had been adopted in Britain.

I'm about a third of the way into the book and Humphreys found out that many of these children were told they were being sent to "a nice family" in Australia, but that turned out to be, get this, a lie. Instead, they were just dumped into crappy orphanages, where they were worked hard, fed little, and made to endure beatings and even sexual abuse, far away from anything they ever knew.

Since then, others have written books on this hitherto "forgotten" story of Britain's unwanted children.

Humphreys' book concentrates on the children who were sent to Australia. Many others were sent elsewhere, such as Canada. A book that details the Canadian migrant children is The Little Immigrants: The Orphans Who Came to Canada by Kenneth Bagnell.

A more general book on this subject is Lost Children of the Empire: The Untold Story of Britain's Child Migrants by Philip Bean and Joy Melville, which tells

...the remarkable story of the Childs Migrants Trust, set-up in 1987, to trace families and to help those involved to come to terms with what has happened.But nothing can explain away the connivance and irresponsibility of the governments and organizations involved in this inhuman chapter of British history.

The Childs Migrants Trust was actually set up by Margaret Humphreys, which she discusses in Oranges and Sunshine.

Also The Home Children by Phyllis Harrison covers much of the same territory.

The takeaway here is that there is simply no substitute for the intact traditional family. Meaning, when children are removed from the protection of an intact traditional family, the chances of bad things happening to them, of being mistreated and abused in whatever situation they find themselves placed in, go way, way up.

I remember back in the day when then-VP Dan Quayle was pilloried by the liberal intelligentsia for daring to suggest that single motherhood was a bad idea ought not to be encouraged. I remember how they all screamed and jabbered like howler monkeys in their hatred and ridicule of him.

But then the liberal Atlantic magazine acknowledged that no, actually, Quayle was right.

The Washington Post agreed.

The TV actress Candice "Murphy Brown" Bergen stood aside and watched her liberal friends punch and kick Quayle around, but then 10 years later, after all the hubbub was safely in the past, admitted he was right.

At least she will never be accused of being courageous.

The author of the Atlantic piece, Barbara Dafoe Whitehead, later expanded her arguments into a book-length treatment, The Divorce Culture: Rethinking Our Commitments to Marriage and Family.

Quayle's infamous "Murphy Brown" speech can be read here, and I agree with the coward Candice Bergen: it's actually quite good. Here's an excerpt:

So, I think the time has come to renew our public commitment to our Judeo-Christian values in our churches and synagogues, our civic organizations and our schools. We are, as our children recite each morning, one nation under God. That’s a useful framework for acknowledging a duty and an authority higher than our own pleasures and personal ambition. If we live more thoroughly by these values, we would live in a better society. For the poor, renewing these values will give the people the strength to help themselves by acquiring the tools to achieve self-sufficiency, a good education, job training, and property. Then they will move from permanent dependence to dignified independence. Shelby Steele, in his great book, The Content of Our Character, writes “Personal responsibility is the brick and mortar - power. The responsible person knows that the quality of his life is something that he will have to make inside the limits of his fate. The quality of his life will be pretty much, will pretty much reflect his own efforts.”

Leftists hate this sort of talk. They absolutely hate it. It just drives them into psychosis.

And on a final note, I'm sure you'll all be thrilled to know that Obama is finally on board with the whole "killing human beings and harvesting their body parts is bad" thing. He's apparently discovered that it's being done by people who aren't his political allies, so now he feels free to criticize it.

Anniversary

70 years ago this week, the world entered the "atomic age" with the detonation of nuclear weapons that leveled two Japanese cities and brought WWII to a screeching halt. Truman's decision has been endlessly debated over the years. Like most, if not all, of you morons, I believe there's no question he made the right call. And, this being the book thread, my reasons take the form of books, books that I culled from ArthurK's "Thank God For The Atomic Bomb" thread earlier this week.

First up, The Rape of Nanking: The Forgotten Holocaust Of World War II by Iris Chang. For those who don't know the story:

In December 1937, in what was then the capital of China, one of the most brutal massacres in the long annals of wartime barbarity occurred. The Japanese army swept into the ancient city of Nanking (Nanjing) and within weeks not only looted and burned the defenseless city but systematically raped, tortured, and murdered more than 300,000 Chinese civilians.

Chang's book is a brutal, sickening account that serves, if nothing else, as a reminder to us now of why the Japanese Empire just needed to be obliterated.

My second argument is With the Old Breed: At Peleliu and Okinawa, Eugene Sledge's first-hand account of those battles. Okinawa was Peleliu magnified by 10, and Operation Olympic/Downfall/Coronet, the Allied plans for the invasion of the Japanese home islands, would have been Okinawa magnified by 100:

The Japanese planned an all-out defense of Kyūshū, with little left in reserve for any subsequent defense operations. Casualty predictions varied widely, but were extremely high. Depending on the degree to which Japanese civilians would have resisted the invasion, estimates ran up into the millions for Allied casualties.

And that's just the Allied casualties. More information on these Allied operations can be found in Downfall: The End of the Imperial Japanese Empire by Richard B. Frank.

My last argument is Quartered Safe Out Here: A Harrowing Tale of World War II by George MacDonald Fraser, author of the Flashman novels. Of which moron commenter 'jay hoenemeyer' remarks:

The last chapter is an account of his argument with a guy on a plane who thought the bomb some sort of atrocity. Fraser at war's end was to return to combat as a platoon leader and knew, as most of his mates did, that all the war that was left was Japan. His argument is passionate but well reasoned. As I recall his last point was that had he invaded Japan, it was likely his grandchildren would not have been born.

So there you have it. If you're interested in hearing the other side, The Decision to Use the Atomic Bomb by Gar Alperovitz appears to contain all the arguments adduced by the pacifists and revisionists.


R.I.P. Robert Conquest

Dude was 98 years old and pretty much right about everything:

...his seminal study of the Stalinist purges, The Great Terror, which first appeared in 1968, when establishing the facts about a closed society was as much a matter of decryption and deduction as of research and recordation. (The book would be reissued in 1990, and then in 2007, as a "reassessment" which mainly reassessed just how prescient and correct the author had been before the opening of the Soviet archives).

The Great Terror is, even today, the definitive work on Stalin's murderous purges.

The Harvest of Sorrow: Soviet Collectivization and the Terror-Famine is a history of the systematic destruction of agriculture in the USSR (in particular in the Ukraine) by Joseph Stalin.

And I thought that his works on Soviet history and politics, magnificent as they are, are all Conquest did.

But I was wrong.

He also wrote poetry (Demons Don't, Penultimata, among others), and novels (A World of Difference and The Egyptologists (with Kingsley Amis))

I found this anecdote from his wikipedia page amusing:

Soon after his expulsion from the Soviet Union, Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn met with Conquest, asking him to translate a 'little' poem of his into English verse. This was "Prussian Nights" - nearly two thousand lines in ballad metre - published in 1977

Wow. Available from Amazon, but not as an e-book.


“Right Turn ONLY” Anthology Looking For Contributors

The CLFA (Conservative Libertarian Fiction Alliance) is looking to publish an anthology with PiR8 Productions and Media of stories that incorporate, highlight, or otherwise integrate one or more of the rights, ideas or items brought up in the Declaration of Independence or US Constitution's Bill of Rights, or stories embodying the loss of those rights and ideals, as well as the consequences.
Authors who are interested in contributing can find details here:

http://www.conservativebiker.com/right-turn-only-anthology/

Thanks to moron commenter BornLib for the tip.


This Will Make You Weep

Or, more precisely, green with envy. Author J.K. "Harry Potter" just turned 50 this week. And do you know how much she's worth? Go on, take a guess.

You really don't want to know, but I'm going to tell you, anyway:

Rowling had an estimated net worth of more than $1 billion in 2014, according to the Sunday Times' UK Rich List—a combination of the writer's impressive book sales and, in no small part, to the success of the "Harry Potter" films.

That's pretty impressive. I haven't checked, but Rowling may be the only person in the billionaire's club who got there because she was an author.

Now this I did not know:

If record-breaking novels and films aren't enough for Rowling's legion of fans—more than 5.04 million followers on Twitter and 4.3 million likes on Facebook—there's always a visit to The Wizarding World of Harry Potter.

With locations currently in Orlando, Florida, and Osaka, Japan, and another headed to Hollywood, Potterheads have ample opportunities to sip on a $6 Butterbeer and bask in all that Rowling helped create.

Looks like she's giving the Disney empire a run for its money.

I am probably the only person on the planet who hasn't read any of the Harry Potter books, so I have no idea what "butterbeer" is. But whatever it is, it sounds terrible.


Young Adult Books

I usually don't mention YA books on the book thread because I am not familiar enough with the genre enough to screen out the ones that shove the feminist or LBGTXYZBBQ agenda into the reader's face. But from this article about new YA fiction, Ink and Ashes by Valynne E. Maetani caught my eye:

Some secrets are meant to stay hidden; some secrets are too dangerous once uncovered. Claire Takata's dad died of a heart attack when she was six, at least that’s what her mother told her. But then Claire finds a letter in her stepfather’s desk that reveals more: He was a member of the yakuza, the Japanese mafia. In search of answers, Claire and her best friend Forrest continue to snoop, but they’re beginning to attract the attention of someone who wants these secrets to stay buried, and will do anything to keep them so.

Which actually sounds like it might be good.

Another new YA novel that sounds interesting is The Dead House by Dawn Kurtagich.

From the author's web site:

Part-psychological thriller, part-urban legend, this is an unsettling narrative made up of diary entries, interview transcripts, film footage transcripts and medical notes. Twenty-five years ago, Elmbridge High burned down. Five people were killed and one pupil, Carly Johnson, disappeared. Now a diary has been found in the ruins of the school. The diary belongs to Kaitlyn Johnson, Carly’s identical twin sister. But Carly didn’t have a twin . . .

Re-opened police records, psychiatric reports, transcripts of video footage and fragments of diary reveal a web of deceit and intrigue, violence and murder, raising a whole lot more questions than it answers.

This one won't be available until September 15th.


___________

So that's all for this week. As always, book thread tips, suggestions, bribes, rumors, threats, and insults may be sent to OregonMuse, Proprietor, AoSHQ Book Thread, at the book thread e-mail address: aoshqbookthread, followed by the 'at' sign, and then 'G' mail, and then dot cee oh emm.

What have you all been reading this week? Hopefully something good, because, as you all know, life is too short to be reading lousy books.

Posted by: Open Blogger at 09:07 AM




Comments

(Jump to bottom of page)

1 So much to read, so little time.

Posted by: Colin at August 09, 2015 09:09 AM (+ZK9k)

2 Stranger Danger: Being a small child in a small town, so much freedom. No one said to avoid strangers, stay home all day, don't walk here and there...I even walked to school!!

Posted by: Colin at August 09, 2015 09:12 AM (+ZK9k)

3 Trump/Quayle 2016?

Posted by: Jean at August 09, 2015 09:12 AM (w5jBN)

4 Good Morning Book thread. I missed it last week.

Posted by: Vic at August 09, 2015 09:13 AM (GpgJl)

5 Howdy, print mavens.

I was going to joke about that picture, "That kid's not lost. He's just [something amusing goes here]," but then I read about the lost children and no punch line came to me.

Posted by: mindful webworker - one word at a time at August 09, 2015 09:14 AM (EAA/O)

6 Reading Turtledove's "Bombs Away," the first in a new "Hot War" alternate history series. The premise is that atomic weapons are used in the Korean War, leading to retaliatory actions by the various power blocks.

I haven't read Turtledove in at least 15 years, but all is very familiar. Some authors like W E B Griffin and the late Robert B. Parker use formulas in plotting their books but also include plot twists and non-formula characters. Not Turtledove. Very, very predictable.

Halfway though it and I guess I'll finish it, but I won't look for the follow-ons. Amazon gives it 3.5 stars

Posted by: doug at August 09, 2015 09:15 AM (pObMl)

7 Don't you dare tell me about the importance of family, DAD!

Posted by: Dack Thrombosis at August 09, 2015 09:16 AM (oFCZn)

8 Ah the "missing children" fable. I recall years ago when this was going on I got into an argument with my boss at lunch. He made the outrageous claim that there were 50K missing children. I asked him how many of those did he actually know. He said none. So I said did you know anyone who was killed in Vietnam. He said yes.


Since both were 50K you would think you would know some of those missing children eh? He shut up.

Posted by: Vic at August 09, 2015 09:16 AM (GpgJl)

9 My 10 & 11 year olds have been reading Turtledove's Crosstime Traffic series. Good stuff in there, from the snippets I've picked up. When your ten year old says - Communism would suck its a winner.

Posted by: Jean at August 09, 2015 09:18 AM (w5jBN)

10 doug, Crosstime Traffic is Turtledove's young adult series.

Posted by: Jean at August 09, 2015 09:20 AM (w5jBN)

11 Currently reading The Victorian city : everyday life in Dickens' London by Judith Flanders.

Together with How to be a Victorian : a dawn-to-dusk guide to Victorian life by Ruth Goodman I have a good overview of that era.

As a species we have made some progress. Some.

Next up:
Ministers at war: Winston Churchill and his war cabinet by Jonathan Schneer and Five Days in London: May 1940 by John Lukacs.

Posted by: NaCly Dog at August 09, 2015 09:20 AM (u82oZ)

12 Or, more precisely, green with envy. Author J.K. "Henry Potter" just turned 50 this week.


What a coincidence. I am re-reading that entire series this week.

Posted by: Vic at August 09, 2015 09:20 AM (GpgJl)

13 I thought we were at 40M missing kids.

Posted by: Jean at August 09, 2015 09:20 AM (w5jBN)

14 I definitely second "The Quartered Safe Out Here" book as required reading. Fascinating read of a time long gone!

Also read some fluff this week "Suspect" by Robert Crais. Combination of dogs, police work, and a murder. I enjoyed it immensely.

I had never heard of Crais until I was reading a Jack Reacher book on a Gulf coast beach. The guy who ran the beach umbrella concession came by and said to me that if you like Lee Childs you'll probably like Robert Crais. Darn if he wasn't right.

Also reading "Chaos" by Glieck, and "Hard Bite" (due to last week's BT).


Posted by: Hrothgar at August 09, 2015 09:21 AM (ftVQq)

15 And the whole Murphy Brown crap was another lie by the media-- Lefties went out incensed and enraged that Quayle had attacked this poor single mother!

Murphy Brown was FICTIONAL. She didn't get pregnant accidentally, it took a bunch of writers and producers and editorial meetings to do it and take the stand.

Quayle's criticism was about NORMALIZING DETRIMENTAL BEHAVIOR. The Libs tried to make it an attack on a victim, nevermind that the victim was PRETEND.

Posted by: Pappy O'Daniel at August 09, 2015 09:22 AM (oVJmc)

16 Anna, I started watching "The Postman" but got interrupted part way through so my critical comparative review is still in the works!

Posted by: Hrothgar at August 09, 2015 09:23 AM (ftVQq)

17 Quayle's criticism was about NORMALIZING DETRIMENTAL
BEHAVIOR. The Libs tried to make it an attack on a victim, nevermind
that the victim was PRETEND.


Posted by: Pappy O'Daniel at August 09, 2015 09:22 AM (oVJmc)

In a gentler time, that was also recognized as "defining deviancy down".

Posted by: Hrothgar at August 09, 2015 09:24 AM (ftVQq)

18 I finished the last two books of the Lensman series. What fun! Especially when Doc Smith is doing a parody of his own style. I ordered a compendium edition of the four Skylark books as my old copies are falling apart. More inconsequential reading and enjoyment.

Posted by: JTB at August 09, 2015 09:24 AM (FvdPb)

19 Just starting Bruce Schneier's "Data and Goliath: The Hidden Battles to Collect Your Data and Control Your World." Highly recommended, as are all his books.

From the flyleaf: "Much of this [data collection] is voluntary; we cooperate with corporate surveillance because it promises us convenience, and we submit to government surveillance because it promises us protection. The result is a mass surveillance society of our own creation."

Part One: The World We're Creating -- "data as a by-product of computing," corporate surveillance, analytics, and government surveillance

Part Two: What's At Stake -- political and economic liberty, privacy, and security

Part Three: What To Do About It -- principles, solutions for government, solutions for corporations, solutions for the rest of us, and more

This might be of particular interest to those considering installing Microsoft Windows 10/Cortana/Bing, as Microsoft is following on in the footsteps of Apple's Siri assistant, Amazon's Alexa (Echo device and more forthcoming) and Google's Now feature (aka "OK, Google"). All of these voluntarily trade off privacy for convenience.

Microsoft used to have a "Scroogled" ad campaign criticizing Google on privacy. Windows 10, on the other hand, has a default opt-in on using Cortana/Bing assistance and collecting all your data. Amazon and Apple have also seen the success of the Google model and are emulating it, with a loss of privacy.

As the saying goes "If you're not paying for something, you're not the customer; you're the product being sold."

Of course any info that Microsoft, Google, Amazon, and Apple collect can be provided to the government, should the government request it. Microsoft admits this in the Windows 10 EULA.

Make your convenience/privacy trade-off choices with an understanding of the risks and benefits.

Posted by: doug at August 09, 2015 09:25 AM (pObMl)

20 Reading The White Company by Arthur Conan Doyle, you know, that Sherlock guy. Pretty good although, at least in the Kindle version there are no quotation marks. Can be confusing, but hey, its cheap.

Posted by: countrydoc at August 09, 2015 09:26 AM (3nRFS)

21 Of course any info that Microsoft, Google, Amazon,
and Apple collect can be provided to the government, should the
government request it. Microsoft admits this in the Windows 10 EULA.



Make your convenience/privacy trade-off choices with an understanding of the risks and benefits.



Posted by: doug at August 09, 2015 09:25 AM (pObMl)

But not to worry, the government won't request ever your commercial data unless you are suspected (of thought crimes or crimes against the state) and will carefully safeguard it with the latest OPM security measures.

Posted by: Hrothgar at August 09, 2015 09:29 AM (ftVQq)

22 Posted by: Vic at August 09, 2015 09:16 AM (GpgJl)


You know there is an official FBI data base of reported missing children? It has over 400,000 reports. Granted some could be multiple runaways by the same kid.

Posted by: Cruzinator at August 09, 2015 09:30 AM (cJswI)

23 Just finished Way of Sorrows by Jon Steele... the finale of the Angelus trilogy. Dang, that guy can write.

Any books that involve Swiss chocolate, good angels fighting rebel angels, and internet porn are a-okay with me. And that's what these got.

Posted by: Motown Mope- now in the ATX at August 09, 2015 09:30 AM (24c3y)

24 Finishing up Earth: An Introduction to Physical Geology by Tarbuck and Lutgens. I started it because my daughter is studying Petroleum Engineering and my ego would not let me be completely ignorant. Petty, I know. Still it was actually quite a fun read and I learned a whole lot from it.

As always when buying textbooks, get the immediate previous edition. Means the difference between a $200 book and a $20 one. Textbooks are a ripoff.

Posted by: countrydoc at August 09, 2015 09:31 AM (3nRFS)

25 Just found out that Spenser Quinn, who writes the Chet and Bernie series of mysteries, has written a kids book along the same lines. The title is "Woof" and is told all from the dog's point of view. Mrs. JTB and I really enjoy the Chet and Bernie books, so I reserved "Woof" at the library. I was pleased that all four copies were checked out and there was a waiting list. It means youngsters are reading something besides vampires, werewolves and zombies.

Posted by: JTB at August 09, 2015 09:32 AM (FvdPb)

26 " my daughter is studying Petroleum Engineering"

Something I hope to say someday ...

Posted by: Jean at August 09, 2015 09:35 AM (w5jBN)

27 Milady is the voracious reader of the house. I managed to get her to break out of lurking - sort-of* - and write about her current read for today's book thread. I just read what she wrote, and, I don't know about you, but I'd like to see more reviews from her.

*I say sort-of because I'm sending in her review for her.

Something appropriate for this weekend. -mindful
___________________________

I've been reading "The Girls of Atomic City: The Untold Story of the Women Who Helped Win World War II"

This is the story of Oak Ridge, Tennessee, a town created during the war for the sole purpose of trying to enrich Uranium and send it on to Los Alamos where it could be made into a bomb. Well, I'm pretty sure that's what they were doing. Being only half way through the book I feel like one of the girls in the story: I have my suspicions of what's going on. Unlike them, I can talk about it.

Denise Kiernan, the author, does a good job of mixing the personal stories of various women in many different kinds of jobs with the scientific and technical aspects of "The Project". There are several pages of pictures, including then and now pics of three of the women.

This is a very compelling story. I've been somewhat aggravated to have so much going on in my life at the moment that I can only read a few pages each evening when I should already be asleep.

Aside from the story itself, this book is making me think about how much has changed since the war. Some of these girls seem much younger than the average 16-20 year old today. I don't know, maybe they seem older, now that I really think about an average 20 year old. They didn't really know what they were doing, just that it would help to win the war. That was enough for them.

I can't help but wonder what these women must think as they watch our government work as hard as they can to turn nuclear weapons over to the mullahs in Iran. These young girls may not have known exactly what they were doing, but they evidently knew more and cared more about protecting the security of our nation than most of the people in Washington today.

__________________________

mindful here: If I did this right, this link should go to the book on Amazon, including Ace's kickback tag.
http://bit.ly/girls-atomic

Posted by: Milady Webworker - the better half at August 09, 2015 09:35 AM (EAA/O)

28 Anyone interested in pushing back against the creeping nanny state encroachments on parenting and childhood (at least as many of us knew it) should check out freerangekids.com.

Posted by: cool breeze at August 09, 2015 09:36 AM (6Cu7i)

29 Yay, Book Thread!

I'm writing, honest. Or I will be once I finish breakfast.

Survived radio interview, with nice call-in from OSP, even! *Plus*, got another invite from a different show! So I guess I didn't suck too hard.

Current bus book: A Hymn Before Battle. Finished Free-wrench, a fairly decent steampunk NaNoWriMo novel. I was a bit disappointed until I learned this was written in a month and basically a first book, then I was impressed. Good worldbuilding.

Any of the literary Horde planning to go to Worldcon this month? We should have some kind of Moron gang-sign so we can identify each other.

Posted by: Sabrina Chase at August 09, 2015 09:37 AM (GG9V6)

30 22 You know there is an official FBI data base of
reported missing children? It has over 400,000 reports. Granted some
could be multiple runaways by the same kid.

Posted by: Cruzinator at August 09, 2015 09:30 AM (cJswI)

My analogy still stands. If there were that many "missing children" everybody would know at least one. My thought is that the overwhelming majority of those FBI reports are children that have been taken by a parent who lost custody and decided they would take them anyway. I don't consider those "missing". They know who has them.

Posted by: Vic at August 09, 2015 09:38 AM (GpgJl)

31 Once I finish the geology book I will continue with my redo of college. I was a Math/Physics major who pissed away his college years. Always planned to go back and do it properly. Since that was in the early 80's (good God!, I'm old!) I started with high school. Finished Trig. My next book will be Geometry Book I: Planimetry. This was THE textbook for Communist Block countries for many decades. I had bought a modern geometry book, Geometry by Jurgenson, et al. I now understand the gloom of Common Core critics. It was the most popular textbook, and utter trash. Completely did away with proofs from axioms. In fact, its darn hard to get an axiomatic geometry textbook these days, hence the retreat to the classics.

Posted by: countrydoc at August 09, 2015 09:38 AM (3nRFS)

32 Still waiting for the movie version of one of my favorite books, American Assassin by Vince Flynn. They've been talking about it since 2012. I think they are delaying it because of political correctness which if so, the edits will make it suck.

Posted by: Cruzinator at August 09, 2015 09:39 AM (cJswI)

33 That business of Obama getting on his high horse against those chopping up and harvesting people who aren't his political allies in the US is just one more disgusting thing about him. It's only bad if they aren't donating to the Democrat party.

Listened to Bernard Cornwall's Agincourt, which is a very entertaining historical fiction about Henry V's battle of Agincourt, using the story of a fictional archer who was very good with the longbow. These archers would use longbows to shoot thousands of arrows into enemy camps causing death and chaos, allowing Henry V to defeat a much larger French foe. Cornwall makes it a pretty thrilling tale, will have to check out more of his works.

Listened to the fantasy Nine Princes in Amber by Roger Zelazny, which was pretty good. In the first part a man wakes in a hospital bed remembering nothing of his life, and gets into some verbal sparring matches trying to get to the truth. He then journeys to the land of Amber thinking he should rule there. Pretty wacky but fun story, especially the first half, will probably continue the series.

Read Hard Bite by Anonymous-9, which is sort of like what if Dexter were a paraplegic, aided by a monkey sidekick. I enjoyed it and will check out the series.

Posted by: waelse1 at August 09, 2015 09:40 AM (oAK6v)

34 @9,10 Jean -- Turtledove is consistent in depicting the evils of Communism and National Socialism. He also shows the moral dilemmas of Allied commanders during war.

Lots to recommend about Turtledove's command of history and his personal philosophy.

Just don't read too many or you'll forget which one you're reading... ;-)

I did like his alien lizard series.

Posted by: doug at August 09, 2015 09:40 AM (pObMl)

35 Mindful, Please encourage the lady to post more of her reviews. Today's was just great and dealt with my mother's generation during WW II.

Posted by: JTB at August 09, 2015 09:40 AM (FvdPb)

36 Finally, I continue to read David Jeremiah's book, Heaven On Earth. It is a study on the book of Ecclesiastes. Ecclesiastes has been called "a gospel for atheists. The is very good and very readable. Designed to be read a chapter a day for a month. Each chapter is about 15 minutes long. In fact, the author explicitly says not to read more. The point is to meditate on each chapter.

Posted by: countrydoc at August 09, 2015 09:42 AM (3nRFS)

37 Thanks for the great work Oregon. The book thread is about as close to books as I get now.



Not sure why, but many years ago I simple lost interest. Sad. I still read some on my kindle, but my intake of news sources and blogs sort of overwhelms me.

Posted by: Nip Sip at August 09, 2015 09:44 AM (0FSuD)

38 Thanks to the folks that recommended lighter fare for reading last week. Finished the first Wodehouse. Now I need to line up some more. Fun.

Also finished Naomi Benaron's Running the Rift. Billed as a running book, it isn't. If you are interested in a great historical fiction of the lead-up to the Rwandan genocide, it's excellent.

Second the motion to check out freerangekids.com - the grandkids of the Long Running Fool are being raised free range much to the angst of the rest of the ninny population of the college town in which the grandkids live. My daughters are quite strong-minded ladies, though, and have no problem pushing back.

Posted by: Long Running Fool at August 09, 2015 09:46 AM (/A5gb)

39 OT, but itis about culture... Really, the lyrics are superb!

Anthony Mason, on the CBS "Sunday Morning" program has a wonderful profile on musician Jason Isbell.

If this is too late for your time zone, check out the CBS web site for a clip. They usually put up clips later.

If you aren't familiar with Isbell, check him out on youtube.com

Posted by: doug at August 09, 2015 09:46 AM (pObMl)

40 This is not my first attempt at college redo. I have done Calculus twice and freshman Mechanics 3 times. But it is the first time I've tried to be systematic about it. Hopefully, I'll have more commitment to it this time around.

Posted by: countrydoc at August 09, 2015 09:48 AM (3nRFS)

41 About to start Saint Augustine's "Confessions" and also peruse a 1960 BUPERS manual for Navy indoc.

Ooh, movies about to start

Posted by: All Hail Eris at August 09, 2015 09:49 AM (BKV7y)

42 Question: "Father Brown" books by G. K. Chesterton.

I caught a few episodes of the BBC series. While I don't care for the actor portraying Father Brown, the premise is interesting.

Are the books worthwhile?

Posted by: doug at August 09, 2015 09:50 AM (pObMl)

43 27 Posted by: Milady Webworker - the better half at August 09, 2015 09:35 AM (EAA/O)
-----------

Thanks for the recommendation, Milady. And JTB, a good book about women of that generation is "We Band of Angels: The Untold Story of the American Women Trapped on Bataan" by Elizabeth Norman.

Posted by: Hoplite Housewife at August 09, 2015 09:50 AM (VMKPX)

44 13 I thought we were at 40M missing kids.

Posted by: Jean at August 09, 2015 09:20 AM (w5jBN)


She shoots! She scores!

Posted by: OregonMuse at August 09, 2015 09:50 AM (6Yjmn)

45 OM you aren't the only one that hasn't read the potter books. I haven't read any or seen any of the movies either.

Posted by: Mr. Mxyzptlk at August 09, 2015 09:52 AM (kHJ3a)

46 Ian Douglas, Semper Mars. HOO AH!

This is the first part of a trilogy, in which space explorers discover ancient ruins around the Solar System, and then the United States Marine Corps goes off to secure 'em.

This book claims to have come out in the late 1990s, after Stargate; but the sequel has a credit to 1990, which is before it. Either way, the 1990s pop-culture shines through: this was when everyone was getting in a tizzy about the Fourth Dynasty pyramids in Egypt, that they might have been a lot earlier and, some thought, built by aliens. It is here widely implied that the five-sided hillock on Mars and the "Face on Mars" were also built by aliens. But who cares? The author himself treats all this alien tech as a MacGuffin - at least in this book.

So instead what we got here is a tiff between the US and the UN over who "owns" all this stuff. The US (with Russia) has fallen out with the European-led UN; the UN is doing mischief against US interests, not least demanding a Hispanic plebescite in the Southwest. The US, more worried about Mars, send over a bunch of Marines. As it turns out, the US has sent them just a LITTLE too late. So the UN promptly seizes control of the Mars base and ships most of the Marines off to a remote outpost. The UN at the same time takes over the International Space Station, starts bombing the US, and also sparks that Southwest rebellion. Can the Marines get back to base in time to deliver a badly-needed propaganda boost? (This part is consciously based on the historical march across North Africa - "shores of Tripoli".)

One nit I wonder if it's worth picking, is that the State Department here seems like a fifth-column for the UN. Some might say today (Moldbug at least had said it) that State is more like the UN's first column, or at least second. This was true even in the 1990s; dude, it was true in the 1940s. I'm not sure how the US could have done anything useful with so many UN-friendly Internationalists in the national civil-service. Was there a purge? The author, I think, should have explained what was done about the bureaucrats, either before the action or (better) during.

Besides that, I did like the battle-scenes, in deep space and in Mars' low-gravity and thin-atmo. If you get a hole in your suit, you're pretty well boned.

And Semper Mars may well be the most moron-friendly book I've ever read. There's sex in 3-D (pro tip - mopping up afterward = icky), there's American power (from when that was still a thing) and there's beer; although not all enjoyed at the same time. Many LOLz were had over here reading this stuff. Speaking of beer, there could be a drinking game based on how often you will want to shout "hoo ah" at the book when the Marine protagonists get stuff done.

Posted by: boulder terlit hobo at August 09, 2015 09:53 AM (K6nQG)

47 Not sure why, but many years ago I simple lost interest. Sad. I still read some on my kindle, but my intake of news sources and blogs sort of overwhelms me.

Posted by: Nip Sip at August 09, 2015 09:44 AM (0FSuD)


Right. Several years ago, I had to make a conscious effort to break away from the mouse-clicking and web surfing, set aside some time, and get some reading done. I encourage you to do the same.

My attention span had deteriorated to that of a gnat.

Posted by: OregonMuse at August 09, 2015 09:54 AM (6Yjmn)

48 After the fluff of the Lensman series I went in the opposite direction for the last few days. My copy of the 1599 Geneva Bible arrived. Although I have looked up a few things in the Douay bible Mrs. JTB brought to the marriage, I have never 'done' bible study. To my surprise, I will have to learn to read and understand scripture, not just have my eyes pass over (no pun intended) the words. The version I have, the Patriots edition, has modernized spelling but has been careful to retain the original wording. I appreciate the scholarship that entailed.

The story behind the Geneva Bible is also interesting. This edition has decent sized type but the marginalia can get tiny, by necessity. I'm keeping a good magnifying glass handy for the sake of my aging eyes.

Thanks to all who provided Biblical passages last week to help me deal with the PP horrors. I looked them up and they did help.

Posted by: JTB at August 09, 2015 09:57 AM (FvdPb)

49 Are there any good YA books that deal with high fantasy? I'm looking for something like George Martin, but not Rape Rape Martin.

Posted by: boulder terlit hobo at August 09, 2015 09:57 AM (K6nQG)

50 J.K. "Harry Potter" was well served by the editors of her early books. After book 4 the series lost its way. Book 6 was interesting but book 7 wasn't. Think the Star Wars prequels. She turned something extraordinary into a average or below YA. Note that if Harry and friends had not meddled in the first 4 books things would have been better analogous to "Raiders of the Lost Ark" (as pointed out by Amy of "Big Bang Theory").

Posted by: Huggy at August 09, 2015 09:58 AM (PGh+Q)

51 Posted by: countrydoc at August 09, 2015 09:48 AM (3nRFS)

I have a Hydraulics and Fluid Mechanics book I have been wanting to start/study but keep finding excuses, like the SBT, to leave it on the shelf!

Posted by: Hrothgar at August 09, 2015 10:01 AM (ftVQq)

52 I hate to support Rowling because she's gone the SJW route. Of course, she can afford to with her money. However, we do enjoy the earlier HP books (absolutely agree with Huggy's assessment at 50, which goes for the movies, too)

That said,I thought the Harry Potter sections at Universal Studios are extremely well done. For any Potter fans heading to London, I highly recommend taking the Warner Brothers Studio Tour at Leavesden.

Posted by: Hoplite Housewife at August 09, 2015 10:02 AM (VMKPX)

53
Ian McShane is joining GOT, by the way.

Posted by: Bruce With a Wang! at August 09, 2015 10:03 AM (iQIUe)

54 Please change my entry if someone notices J.K. "Henry Potter" would be more meaningful as J.K. "Harry Potter". :-)

Posted by: Huggy at August 09, 2015 10:04 AM (PGh+Q)

55 Read "Hard Bite" and "Bite Harder" by Anonymous 9 (saw them recommended here, IIRC.) Touching story about a paraplegic man and his service monkey. Okay, so there's serial killings and such involved... Also "Mists of the Miskatonic," short stories by Al Halsey, and "Beyond the Mountains of Madness," a good anthology of stories in the tradition of "At the Mountains of Madness," the last one actually being pre-Lovecraft and perhaps a major part of his inspiration for his own work of Antarctic horror. I can't get enough mythos.

Posted by: Agent J at August 09, 2015 10:05 AM (ueOgE)

56 The other notable thing about Quayle is that Le Affair Potatoe was a setup by the scrunt teacher.

She told him the class was practicing words phonetically and gave him a cue card with it spelled phonetically so he correctly told the child not to forget the e.

I think that was the moment that crystalized the fact that conservatives should always apply their hidden Fox Mulder and trust no one.

Posted by: Kreplach at August 09, 2015 10:05 AM (WVvzl)

57 Speaking of George MacDonald Fraser, I'm reading a non-fiction book about the borders between England and Scotland, 1500-1600 (or thereabouts) called "The Steel Bonnets: The story of the Anglo-Scottish Border Reivers".

The forward is funny, as he mentions that at the inauguration of Richard Nixon in 1969, Johnson, Nixon and Billy Graham are all on the podium, and all were descendants of the reivers. Graham in particular is a famous (infamous) border name. Kinmont Willy Graham was a notorious and successful thief and murderer. He mounted some legendary raids.

Posted by: Bossy Conservative...a rube in America at August 09, 2015 10:06 AM (+1T7c)

58 Mornin' everyone. Good write-up. A good book to add on teh Japs and the need to nuke them is Retribution by Max Hastings. He writes of the nature of our fight with Japan that was so very different than the European theater and the "easy" decision to bomb Japan as soon as the bombs were viable and available. Basically... the Japs had it coming.

I really cannot stand the idea that the US were horrid for bombing Japan and that nukes were beyond the pale, bad. Most kids today probably just intuit this line of thinking, even from going to the Smithsonian or other big museums where our betters have decided to warp the brains and collective memory for their American-hating ideology.

Posted by: Yip at August 09, 2015 10:07 AM (e7T6D)

59 I can forgive her for being a SJW but I can never forgive her for killing Hedwig. Will never read a book by her again.

Posted by: Huggy at August 09, 2015 10:07 AM (PGh+Q)

60 Quartered Safe Out Here is a wonderful book. I wished I hadn't loaned out my copy to a friend.
I read it because I had gone through his McAuslan books, General Danced at Dawn, The Sheik and the Dustbin, and McAuslan in the Rough. These were fictionalized accounts of Fraser's experience in the post-WWII British Army in North Africa, on occupation duties.

Posted by: Kindltot at August 09, 2015 10:08 AM (3pRHP)

61 She told him the class was practicing words
phonetically and gave him a cue card with it spelled phonetically so he
correctly told the child not to forget the e.

Posted by: Kreplach

Talk about a fart in a whirlwind. I have seen potatoe spelled both ways in my life, on labels of potatoe/potato bags, no less. The trivial and idiotic in our culture. No wonder we're losing.

Posted by: Bossy Conservative...a rube in America at August 09, 2015 10:08 AM (+1T7c)

62 I read all the Potter books and agree the first3 or 4 were the best. I was curious about all the hoorah I was hearing. Rowling is a political idiot but the Potter books acted as a springboard for a lot of youngsters to read more, and better, books. I learned that many kids went on to read the Hobbit and LOTR, classics like 'Treasure Island', even some of the Heinlein juveniles after whetting their taste for the written word with the Potter books.

Posted by: JTB at August 09, 2015 10:11 AM (FvdPb)

63 Stranger Danger is the State taking your kids. The horror stories out of foster care prove that.

Posted by: @votermom at August 09, 2015 10:12 AM (cbfNE)

64 Not only was Murphy Brown fictional, she was a multi-millionaire. I recall when the controversy was going on, I came across an article on the salaries of big-name national news news anchors, including Diane Sawyer. Judging from that Murphy Brown had to be pulling down in the range of $3-6 million a year. A 1%-er before the term was coined.

Rather different circumstances than the average woman considering single motherhood.

Posted by: Epobirs at August 09, 2015 10:13 AM (IdCqF)

65 Took my kid to Wizarding World of Harry Potter despite my not having any prior knowledge of Potter, it was still pretty awesome as far as theme parks go. I preferred the Simpsons part of Universal (the park with WWOHP) but it was still pretty cool. The Harry potter part is the only theme park area that completely submersed you, there is no sign of the other bits of the park once you enter it.

Posted by: Rory at August 09, 2015 10:14 AM (fsN5v)

66 # 46, I really enjoyed the first two books of that series, the rest were more variable in quality, but worth doing for the overall storyline.

I do wish he'd finished his similar but much shorter Foreign Legion treatment.

Posted by: Graves at August 09, 2015 10:15 AM (3MEXB)

67 The power of the MFM.Quayle is stupid and Joe Biden is funny old uncle Joe.Guam is going to tip over,the flag has been planted on Mars and the US has 57 states and none of those statements brought ridicule from the media.

Posted by: steevy at August 09, 2015 10:18 AM (sPO3u)

68 As far as bombing Japan. I grew up in a navy town and there were plenty of sailors and marines still serving who would have been part of an invasion force. There was no doubt about their attitude: thanks be to God for sparing them that nightmare and to Harry Truman for using the bombs.

Posted by: JTB at August 09, 2015 10:20 AM (FvdPb)

69 I've been reading The Spanish Civil War by Stanley Payne. There are several similarities with our current situation. 1) The majority of people weren't paying attention and didn't care. 2) The left had the system rigged such that the left won whether the left won or not. 3) As the joys of socialism failed to materialize, the left's policies became ever more radical. 4) Leftist mob violence and crimes were not punished while the right were punished for imaginary crimes or for the crimes of the left. Finally there was one murder too many and Spain was at war with itself.

Posted by: The Great White Snark at August 09, 2015 10:20 AM (E5wsF)

70 #54, thank you, Huggy, you got it wrong, because I got it wrong, so I fixed both.

Posted by: OregonMuse at August 09, 2015 10:21 AM (6Yjmn)

71 64 It wasn't about the character having the means.It was about the message it sent to impressionable viewers.

Posted by: steevy at August 09, 2015 10:22 AM (sPO3u)

72 Another vote for Quartered Safe Out Here ... and also GMF's McAuslan series of short stories about British Army life immediately after WWII. Laugh out loud funny.
I will always regret that GMF didn't live long enough to give a full account of Flashman's adventures in the American Civil War ... in which (from mentions in the other books) Flashy fought on both sides.
I'm working on a couple of book projects for the Teeny Publishing Company, so haven't gotten all that much farther in my own reading. About halfway through "A Weekend in September" - which is a collection of first-hand accounts of the Galveston Hurricane. It was put together in the mid-1950s by John E. Weeks, when many survivors of the hurricane were still alive. Quite good, quite horrifying, reading of the aftermath.

Posted by: Sgt. Mom at August 09, 2015 10:23 AM (95iDF)

73 Wow.....My mother's 1st cousin married a man who was an orphan in England.

He was sent to Australia when he was five. He had a shitty few years, but eventually everything worked out.

Enlisted in 1939 and fought his way across the Pacific and then the Mediterranean. He ended up in Palestine where he met and married my mom's cousin.

He's still alive and kicking! Lives in Colorado with his wife of 65 years.

Posted by: CharlieBrown'sDildo at August 09, 2015 10:25 AM (Zu3d9)

74 I think Eisenhower came out against the bombings.I don't know if it was political or if he was simply ignorant of the facts being immersed in the war against Germany.

Posted by: steevy at August 09, 2015 10:26 AM (sPO3u)

75 I read The Black Count this week, by Tom Reiss. I wrote an extended review on Goodreads, but then I found an even better one by someone else at the same site

http://tinyurl.com/qy8eoau

Basically its got a ton of historical information about a fascinating man, and its very interesting but... the author did a lot of speculation, got a bit too involved in his story, and was a bit too apologetic and starry-eyed about the French Revolution.

Posted by: Christopher Taylor at August 09, 2015 10:27 AM (39g3+)

76 I second the Robert Crais recommendation. The Elvis Cole/Joe Pike novels just get better and better.

Bernard Cornwell also has a series of historical fiction set in the British Army during the Napoleanic (sp) Wars. Sharpe's Eagle, Sharpe's Battle, etc. British TV made a series of movies out of them, starring Sean Bean. (So if you're sick of seeing Sean Bean die on screen, he's the hero in these and not the villain.)

Posted by: Oschisms at August 09, 2015 10:28 AM (ZsN9X)

77 I think Eisenhower came out against the bombings.

Ike was very sensitive about harming civilians and infrastructure, and I think he didn't care for the idea of a huge bomb slaughtering an entire city on principle.

Its an objectively ghastly concept, just on its own, without any historical context or understanding of the alternatives.

Posted by: Christopher Taylor at August 09, 2015 10:31 AM (39g3+)

78 George McDonald Fraser could be a very funny man (well you'd expect that of the author of the Flashman series). He was born in Cumbria (just below the Scottish border) and went on to be a newspaperman in Glasgow, before turning to writing novels. But in "Quartered Safe Out Here", he was a young enlisted man, who'd been selected for officer training. Wartime brings a broad mix of different classes in the enlisted ranks. Fraser was a young upper middle class guy serving with a bunch of working men, coal miners etc. The book is a short one, but there are some fascinating discussions about what the rankers expected after the war--Britain was going to change--they weren't fighting for a continuation of the old ways.

But in the midst of all this the young Fraser observes, "Scottish troops--they'll fight well if led by white men."

Posted by: Comanche Voter at August 09, 2015 10:32 AM (Sda6L)

79 Oschisms @ 76 - Second Cornwell's Sharpe series.

Posted by: Butch at August 09, 2015 10:32 AM (HLx1C)

80 #71

One cannot be separated from the other. Wealth is a buffer against stupid behavior, such as sleeping with Scott Bakula without protection. Without the wealth, the depiction of Murphy Brown choosing to have the kid would have been very different, perhaps standing as a warning instead of making it look like just another facet of the 'you can have it all' superwoman problem.

Posted by: Epobirs at August 09, 2015 10:32 AM (IdCqF)

81 Just finished Quartered Safe Out Here, a truly marvelous book. The squad talk was hilarious. My GF kept asking me what was so funny when I'd burst out with laughter. She didn't think it was that funny when I read it to her. (combat Vet humor, is mostly funny to other vets.) I plan to read excerpts of the book at my next guest lecture at Boston College in Oct.

Posted by: Vn Redleg at August 09, 2015 10:33 AM (L7quo)

82 Third the Sharpe's series. They are an easy read, great fun, lots of history about an era and events few know, and the main character is very memorable and likable. The shows are less so, but still good, particularly due to casting.

Posted by: Christopher Taylor at August 09, 2015 10:35 AM (39g3+)

83 any good YA books that deal with high fantasy? I'm looking for something like George Martin, but not Rape Rape Martin.
Posted by: boulder terlit hobo at August 09, 2015 09:57 AM (K6nQG)

The RedWall series is really good, an abbey is attacked by rats and the mice inside have to defend the Abbey. Lots of action.


Disney really missed the boat on Harry Potter, she offered them the chance to do Harry Potterland, but they said no because she wanted too much control, well she cause them to lose 30% in profits, which caused them to buy Star Wars. I am still waiting for the disaster called AVATAR land at Disney. They just need to build Star Wars at Hollywood studios, one of my wife's coworker planned her Honeymoon around Star Wars Days.

Posted by: Patrick from Ohio at August 09, 2015 10:36 AM (c4yY7)

84 I'd like to put in a plug for my cousin Tom Janikowski's book of extremely short and extremely bizarre short stories, "A Martini and a Pen." Tom is a Renaissance man- a Anglican priest, a musician, an author, a NRA instructor, and politically as conservative as any member of the Horde could wish. I had brunch with him and his pleasant wife when they were here in November and he never mentioned his "flash fiction." I have to admit, I didn't realize Tom had such a surrealistic sense of humor - a Midwestern grocery store shopper comes across an ancient Egyptian priest performing a mummification in the canned good aisle, a small town librarian named Drusilla Hackett comes to a bad end ..... It's fun light reading although I now believe my cousin is far stranger than I suspected.

Posted by: Donna &&&&& V.(brandishing ampersands once again) at August 09, 2015 10:37 AM (+XMAD)

85 8 Ah the "missing children" fable. I recall years ago when this was going on I got into an argument with my boss at lunch. He made the outrageous claim that there were 50K missing children. I asked him how many of those did he actually know. He said none. So I said did you know anyone who was killed in Vietnam. He said yes.
Since both were 50K you would think you would know some of those missing children eh? He shut up.
Posted by: Vic at August 09, 2015 09:16 AM (GpgJl)



Semi-OT: I bristle whenever someone claims that it's imperative to find a lost child within the first N hours, or else bad things happen. They haven't thought this through: missing kids are on hand either truly lost (wandering around) or grabbed up in a custody battle, or on the other, abducted by a child molester.


Since child molesters generally do their thing right away, the only scenario in which the time becomes critical is the unlikely happenstance that a child molester comes across a child wandering around. Otherwise, there's no overlap between the two groups. Truly lost children are typically found in the first hour or two; those kidnapped by child molesters typically aren't found for some time.

Posted by: Jay Guevara at August 09, 2015 10:39 AM (oKE6c)

86 Ike wasn't too worried about bombing the hell out of German cities in WWII.

Posted by: Vic at August 09, 2015 10:40 AM (GpgJl)

87 Regarding YA fiction, my daughter very much liked Revolution by Jennifer's Donnelly. It is the story of an elite high school girl with a dysfunctional family trying to deal with a tragedy. She blows off school and her friends causing her Nobel winning estranged father to take her with him to Paris. There she finds the diary of young girl similar to herself caught up in the French Revolution.

It is generally moron friendly in that it presents the French Revolution as bloody mob violence gotten out of hand rather than the first socialist utopia, the elite parents are kind of jerks, adults who never grew up, and the shallow drug filled lifestyle of the elites at elite high school. There is a bit of time travel. However, the beginning of the book does show our heroine engaging in drug use and there is no.happy ending where the family reunites.

Posted by: The Great White Snark at August 09, 2015 10:41 AM (/UM/a)

88 So when does J.K. Rowling being re-distributing her wealth. A billion dollars could go a long way.

Posted by: deepred at August 09, 2015 10:42 AM (xv5cf)

89 >>>Rounding up orphans, "street" kids, and other unwanted children and packing them off to colonial destinations was a policy implemented by the British government for many years

That is hilarious. They should have kept them in England, indoctrinate them to be envious and to blame others for their circumstances, and that the only possible solution is to always vote Labour. To paraphrase LBJ, "We'll have those orphans voting Labour for the next 200 years".

English people are so dumb. Junior Varsity Marxists.

Posted by: Barack Obama at August 09, 2015 10:43 AM (ktNqo)

90 22 30 63 85 (from freerangekids):

When you hear about all the "missing children" remember: There is approximately one child abduction murder for every 10,000 reports of a missing child. (Source: Polly Klaas Foundation.)

Put it another way: The Department of Justice reports that of the 800,000 children reported "missing" in the United States each year, 115 are the result of "stereotypical kidnapping" - a stranger snatching the child. About 90 percent of abductees return home within 24 hours and the vast majority are teenage runaways.

Posted by: cool breeze at August 09, 2015 10:44 AM (6Cu7i)

91 Thanks for the tip re Fraser's McAuslan series. Amazon has a paperback with all of the stories collected--and for a good price of $12 or so.

Posted by: Comanche Voter at August 09, 2015 10:45 AM (Sda6L)

92 O/T

Someone at Turner Classic Movies has a sense of humor. Floria Japan, a short comes on at 11:00, followed at 11:30 with "Thirty Seconds over Tokyo", the story of the Doolittle bombing of Tokyo.




Excellent! The day after the 70th anniversary of the A bomb bombing.

Posted by: Nip Sip at August 09, 2015 10:45 AM (0FSuD)

93
Rowling set her twitter mob, numbering a few million, on some poor guy who tweeted that Serena Williams is built like a guy and it gives her unfair advantage in women's tennis.

Rowling is a rich asshole.

Posted by: Bruce With a Wang! at August 09, 2015 10:46 AM (iQIUe)

94 One cannot be separated from the other. Wealth is a
buffer against stupid behavior, such as sleeping with Scott Bakula
without protection.



Posted by: Epobirs



Ewwwwww!

Posted by: Bossy Conservative...a rube in America at August 09, 2015 10:47 AM (+1T7c)

95 Christopher Taylor
@77 - I guess nobody told Ike what the Eighth Air Force and Bomber Command were doing?
@82 - The Sharpe series begins in India, parallels the career of Wellesley, later Wellington. Interesting to watch how Sharpe grows over the series of books. BTW, books were much better than the TV series.

Posted by: Butch at August 09, 2015 10:47 AM (HLx1C)

96
Began reading Citizens. Interestingly, the majority of the people slaughtered, I think over 80%, were the poor.

Posted by: Bruce With a Wang! at August 09, 2015 10:48 AM (iQIUe)

97 #84 Donna, tell your cousin Tom that there need to be Kindle editions of his book(s) of short stories.

Posted by: OregonMuse at August 09, 2015 10:48 AM (6Yjmn)

98 Rowling is a rich asshole.

Posted by: Bruce With a Wang! at August 09, 2015 10:46 AM (iQIUe)

Well, she British right? Why does that surprise anyone.

Posted by: Nip Sip at August 09, 2015 10:51 AM (0FSuD)

99 So when does J.K. Rowling being re-distributing her wealth. A billion dollars could go a long way.Posted by: deepred at August 09, 2015 10:42 AM (xv5cf)
---
You joking me? I can blow through that in under a week. (iowahawk had a great piece back when he was still blogging, about how taxing the top 1% at 100% of their income and confiscating all their assets wouldn't stop the deficit from expanding).

But I agree, Little Miss Harry Potter should be compelled to pay her fair share.

Posted by: Barack Obama at August 09, 2015 10:52 AM (ktNqo)

100 But in the midst of all this the young Fraser observes, "Scottish troops--they'll fight well if led by white men."
Posted by: Comanche Voter at August 09, 2015 10:32 AM (Sda6L)


I think he also says in the afterword something about the Scots being engaged in the age old struggle against their traditional enemies, the Scots.

Steel Bonnets is also a wonderful book. Made me want to rustle cattle in midwinter too.
Scotland and England did not have the resources to set up standing armies on the border, and the borderers, who had been in generational warfare with each other, probably would not have accepted it. So, various families were given control over sections of the border to act as agents for the crown, with what was basically a "letter of marque and reprisal" to maintain the law and keep the border safe as they saw fit.
When James I became sovereign over both sides of the border, he had to clamp down on it, and on the families. Over the period of pacifying the border some were transported to Northern Ireland, some were hanged, and some got sent to the Colonies.

I read somewhere else, and I don't know how accurate it was, but when the Scots arrived in the Colonies, they were encouraged to go West to settle on the frontier, where they could fight the Indians. There was a feeling by their new neighbors where they settled that it might have been better to just keep the Indians


Posted by: Kindltot at August 09, 2015 10:52 AM (3pRHP)

101 I suppose calling Serena Williams a "grunting, crip-walking ogre" would have been better?

Posted by: boulder terlit hobo at August 09, 2015 10:53 AM (K6nQG)

102 40 This is not my first attempt at college redo. I have done Calculus twice and freshman Mechanics 3 times. But it is the first time I've tried to be systematic about it. Hopefully, I'll have more commitment to it this time around.

Posted by: countrydoc at August 09, 2015 09:48 AM (3nRFS)

*****

Best of luck to you! I've always wanted to do that, too, but have also had some false starts. My son just completed Differential Equations, and told him I'm thinking of putting that on my bucket list of things to complete.

Posted by: Elinor, Who Usually Looks Lurkily at August 09, 2015 10:53 AM (NqQAS)

103 YA? I killed some waiting time recently with the first two (presumably) books of 'The Ghost and the Goth' by Stacey Kade. A quick search indicates there is a third book out or due soon.

The Ghost is the recently deceased head Mean Girl of the school, while the Goth is an outcast student who can see and hear her, along with every other ghost making his life a living hell with their demands. It sound like the setup for a WB show with a soundtrack drawing from whatever the music division is currently pushing at the demographic, well, because it is. I wouldn't be surprised if to hear it's been optioned already. It was fairly well done and should be engaging to less jaded youths running into some of the ideas for the first time.

Posted by: Epobirs at August 09, 2015 10:54 AM (IdCqF)

104 "Listened to Bernard Cornwall's Agincourt, which is a very entertaining historical fiction about Henry V's battle of Agincourt"

His nonfiction book on "Waterloo" is excellent.

countrydoc, I'm starting "Physics for Engineers and Scientists" as an attempt to hold off Alzheimers. I was an engineer 55 years ago. Also a recent textbook at a cut price.

Posted by: Mike K at August 09, 2015 10:54 AM (5namt)

105 Rowling I really can't stand her anymore, she keeps putting out little bits here and there about the Characters, just write another Harry Potter book or at least in the same universe. I hated how she came out later that Dumbledore is gay.

Posted by: Patrick from Ohio at August 09, 2015 10:55 AM (c4yY7)

106 Oh, and regarding Cornwell's Sharpe series: he usually wrote an "afterword" in which he described the locale and gave credit to the rightful person for Sharpe's heroics.

Looks like I have to add George MacDonald Fraser to my growing list of must read authors.

Posted by: Butch at August 09, 2015 10:55 AM (HLx1C)

107 101
I suppose calling Serena Williams a "grunting, crip-walking ogre on steroids" would have been better?

Posted by: boulder terlit hobo at August 09, 2015 10:53 AM (K6nQG)

FIFY

Posted by: Nip Sip at August 09, 2015 10:55 AM (0FSuD)

108 I haven't read these but they're on my list, Drew Hayes The Utterly Uninteresting and Unadventurous Tales of Fred, the Vampire Accountant and the sequel, Undeath and Taxes.

Posted by: The Great White Snark at August 09, 2015 10:57 AM (ahRaP)

109 I imaged butterbeer to be a cross between root beer and butterscotch.

Andrew Klavan has also written some nice YA fiction.


Posted by: Grampa Jimbo at August 09, 2015 11:00 AM (1ijHg)

110 I read "A Canticle for Liebowitz." this past week. Interesting. But I hated the ending.

Posted by: Grampa Jimbo at August 09, 2015 11:01 AM (1ijHg)

111 For anyone looking for an inexpensive hobby, in this case whittling, check out the 'Swiss Army Knife Whittling Book' by Chris Lubkemann. He uses a Tinker model Swiss Army knife to make what I call 'whimsy' from twigs, small branches and other small pieces of found wood. The projects range from little figures like an owl perched on a branch to a hand made checker board and pieces to a salt spoon or even a little sailboat. I think it would be a good intro for anyone, any age, to learn to whittle.

A Tinker SAK can be had for under 20 bucks and with care will last for generations. My older ones are well over 30 years old and are going strong even with regular use.

Posted by: JTB at August 09, 2015 11:01 AM (FvdPb)

112 "Tom is a Renaissance man- a Anglican priest, a musician, an author, a NRA instructor, and politically as conservative as any member of the Horde could wish."

*Stumbling, bumbling into Book thread*

Sounds like an interesting character, Donna&. Not a big reader but might have to look up.

Posted by: Ricardo Kill at August 09, 2015 11:02 AM (dxw2/)

113 #111. For anyone looking for an inexpensive hobby, in this case whittling, check out the 'Swiss Army Knife Whittling Book' by Chris Lubkemann. He uses a Tinker model Swiss Army knife to make what I call 'whimsy' from twigs, small branches and other small pieces of found wood

Whittling takes artistry. The expert whittler looks at a piece of wood and sees an owl perched on a branch, a checkerboard, a salt spoon.

Me, I look at a piece of wood, and all I see is a piece of wood.

Posted by: OregonMuse at August 09, 2015 11:06 AM (6Yjmn)

114 111. Whittling takes artistry. The expert whittler looks at a piece of wood and sees an owl perched on a branch, a checkerboard, a salt spoon.

Me, I look at a piece of wood, and all I see is a piece of wood.

-
I see white privilege.

Posted by: The Great White Snark at August 09, 2015 11:07 AM (hVd3a)

115
Meaning, when children are removed from the protection of an intact traditional family, the chances of bad things happening to them, of being mistreated and abused in whatever situation they find themselves placed in, go way, way up.







One of the more horrifying historical examples: the Children's Crusade in 1212

Posted by: IllTemperedCur at August 09, 2015 11:08 AM (egLDQ)

116  >>>I hated how she came out later that Dumbledore is gay.

But Ian McKellan is gay, along with Stephen Frye, Derek Jacobi, John Gielgud and Nigel Hawthorne. I believe over 80% of the English are gay. I think it has something to do with boarding schools. It's why they need to keep importing so many Muslims, to compensate for low birthrates. We need to do more here in the US to emulate this outstanding system, and I will strive to make this one of my legacy acievements. Thank you.

Posted by: Barack Obama at August 09, 2015 11:11 AM (ktNqo)

117
55 Read "Hard Bite" and "Bite Harder" by Anonymous 9 (saw them recommended here, IIRC.) Touching story about a paraplegic man and his service monkey. Okay, so there's serial killings and such involved...

Posted by: Agent J at August 09, 2015 10:05 AM (ueOgE)

******

I also read "Hard Bite" and "Bite Harder" by Anonymous 9 based on OM's recommendation and enjoyed them quite a bit. Serial killings, prostitution, running from the law, a felonious monkey: what's not to love?

Posted by: Elinor, Who Usually Looks Lurkily at August 09, 2015 11:12 AM (NqQAS)

118 My dad taught me the secret of whittling when I was young. To carve a bird, you start with a piece of wood and gradually cut away all the parts that don't look like a bird.




Meanwhile 8 chapters and 40,000 words or so of the next great American novel are now under my belt. Good progress the last week or so. I'm taking the same approach to writing as I would with whittling. I started with the OED and I'm removing all the words that don't look like a story.

Posted by: Muldoon, a solid man at August 09, 2015 11:13 AM (NeFrd)

119 And after Murphy Brown had the baby it pretty much disappeared having no impact on her life.

Liars.

Posted by: Vlad the Impaler, whittling away like mad at August 09, 2015 11:15 AM (ioXP7)

120 "Me, I look at a piece of wood, and all I see is a piece of wood."

OM ... I have the same problem. I can take a stick and make shavings. After that things go downhill fast. That's where the book is helpful. Even I (GASP!) could do the spoon or owl project. Fortunately, it only has to suit me. Besides, I find whittling, at any level, to be relaxing and provides moments of serenity.

Posted by: JTB at August 09, 2015 11:16 AM (FvdPb)

121 Morning everyone.
I'm reading The Martian and its enjoyable so far. Very technical and written by a scientist, which I can appreciate. Next us is Shake Hands with the Devil about the slaughter in Rwanda. Er...maybe I'll read another Destroyer novel first..
Any of you morons had a chance to read or borrow my book, Outward Frontier? If so, any thoughts or comments on it?

Posted by: Dana- author of Outward Frontier, a military sic fi adventure available on Amazon Kiindle at August 09, 2015 11:16 AM (eTvJc)

122 >>>One of the more horrifying historical examples: the Children's Crusade in 1212<<<

Pray, let us never forget the Reed Orphanage in Searchlight, Nevada, circa 1981.

Posted by: Fritz at August 09, 2015 11:18 AM (o/UmK)

123 But Ian McKellan is gay, along with Stephen Frye, Derek Jacobi, John Gielgud and Nigel Hawthorne.

Is there any Englishman who *isn't* gay??

Posted by: OregonMuse at August 09, 2015 11:18 AM (6Yjmn)

124 Looks like I have to add George MacDonald Fraser to my growing list of must read authors.


Posted by: Butch at August 09, 2015 10:55 AM (HLx1C)

I don't think you will regret it. GMF keeps coming up in the book thread and I keep thinking I have read a lot of his stuff, then yet another title of his pops up here. Just ordered the McAuslan collection, and this after I vowed to not order any more books from the SBT until I had space for them. Good thing I have a garage.

Posted by: Hrothgar at August 09, 2015 11:18 AM (ftVQq)

125 Are you a baseball fan? If you are, you probably know who Bill James is. He's one of those fancy sabermetrics guys... practically invented the genre, actually.

He also happens to be one of the top 10 American writers of the past half century. Find his book on crime, if you have no interest in baseball.

Still, one of the books I am currently reading is his 2010 "Gold Mine," which is just a series of articles he published online, slapped together in book form.

He starts out an article on how teams need to stop chasing after an RBI man, and ends up discussing, in this order:

1. Child abduction
2. The rising cost of healthcare and higher education
3. Public financing of stadiums

And he's about 100% right about all of it!

Don't ask me to explain how they are all tied together, they just are. Which comes from a clear thinker, writing clearly.

Posted by: BurtTC at August 09, 2015 11:18 AM (Dj0WE)

126 The United States had something going on that was not that far removed from the British practices. Very few people today know of the Orphan Trains out of New York.

Google those key words, along with The Children's Aid Society and you'll get to read a fascinating, forgotten piece of American history.

Posted by: jack burton at August 09, 2015 11:18 AM (20XS1)

127 Oh, and I won't bore you all too much but I did give a wink and a nod to the good folks at AOSHQ with this line from my book:

"The hoped-for link-up with 5th Army forces moving up the Italian mainland remained an illusory mirage as the Germans, weather and geography (but mostly the Germans) continued to stymie the Allied advance in the south."

Posted by: Muldoon, a solid man at August 09, 2015 11:19 AM (NeFrd)

128 My Favorite Martian was also gay. When I'm through, everyone will be gay.

Posted by: Barack Obama at August 09, 2015 11:19 AM (ktNqo)

129 My wife recently read "Gone Girl" and said it was fairly twisted. I don't know; there is plenty of twisted reality out there already. Isn't the point of books to sort of escape all of that? Plus it makes me think of Ben Affleck, who must be punched on a daily basis.

Posted by: Dana- author of Outward Frontier, a military sic fi adventure available on Amazon Kiindle at August 09, 2015 11:20 AM (eTvJc)

130 Posted by: Muldoon, a solid man at August 09, 2015 11:13 AM (NeFrd)

That technique worked for me, but it was a bear maintaining the alphabetical ordering of the OED words!

Posted by: Hrothgar at August 09, 2015 11:21 AM (ftVQq)

131 That technique worked for me, but it was a bear maintaining the alphabetical ordering of the OED words!


Posted by: Hrothgar at August 09, 2015 11:21 AM (ftVQq)

****


Heh!

I also found that to be insurmountable so I did allow myself the luxury of scrambling the original order.

Posted by: Muldoon, a solid man at August 09, 2015 11:22 AM (NeFrd)

132
I am rereading Eric Metaxas' "Bonhoeffer". Seeing as how the world seems to be heading in that direction again . . .

And weirdly, I was accused of being a lefty last night on the Trump thread for saying that Megyn Kelly did what she was paid to do, and that Trump sucks as a candidate.
Sorry, but does anyone really think he could win?

Mark Levin and Thomas Sowell won't run, so I usually am given the choice of, you know...Romney or McCain.

Good grief.

Posted by: GBruno at August 09, 2015 11:22 AM (u49WF)

133 "A albatross arrived at awful azimuths barely before breakfast."


I might be able to work with this alphabetical thing after all.

Posted by: Muldoon, a solid man at August 09, 2015 11:23 AM (NeFrd)

134 Has anyone read The Road to Serfdom? Allegedly it has foretold all that His Majesty Obama has foisted upon us.

Posted by: Dana- author of Outward Frontier, a military sci fi adventure available on Amazon Kindle at August 09, 2015 11:24 AM (eTvJc)

135 I read the comments on youtube and you will be shocked at the pro commie comments and attacks on people like Conquest and Schama. It's disgusting.

Posted by: Bruce With a Wang! at August 09, 2015 11:24 AM (iQIUe)

136
Dear Diary,

Another entry for my inevitable book on Hillary and her life in the fast lane.

Last night we cuddled after a few glasses of wine, and eventually she insisted on scissoring. I managed to accomplish all of her requests, especially the harder-harder and faster-faster admonitions.

Today I'm slightly tired, but plan on visiting with friends and family this afternoon. Anthony has been out and about with his new job, and I don't believe he is continuing his previous behaviors.

Life is wonderful, and I fully expect to be ensconced in the White House beginning in '17. It will be a glorious eight years, and this should set me up for a Senate run in the future.

Thank you diary for being there for me during the hard times, and I will repay you in spades after this is over. I'm speaking of Carlos Danger, ValJar, and of course that perennial prick Donald Trump.

Posted by: Huma Abedin at August 09, 2015 11:26 AM (OiFtZ)

137
134 Has anyone read The Road to Serfdom? Allegedly it has foretold all that His Majesty Obama has foisted upon us.
Posted by: Dana- author of Outward Frontier, a military sci fi adventure available on Amazon Kindle at August 09, 2015 11:24 AM (eTvJc

Yes. It is an awesome read. I teach it to my kids. I think it should be required reading for any conservative.

Posted by: GBruno at August 09, 2015 11:28 AM (u49WF)

138 >>Has anyone read The Road to Serfdom? Allegedly it has foretold all that His Majesty Obama has foisted upon us.

Yes and yes. It was written post WWII and was a warning to the US not to follow the road of socialism that Europe was taking. We have not listened.

Posted by: JackStraw at August 09, 2015 11:28 AM (OGm46)

139 One season of the British tv show/Doctor Who spin off Torchwood was called "Children of the Earth". Aliens used all of Earth's children to announce "We Are Coming". The aliens promised to cure some of Earth's diseases if they were given children as payment. The British government agrees, making a list of children who are not the brightest or otherwise have potential for greatness to be given up. Torchwood investigates and tries to stop it. We then learn the aliens' full message. "We Are Coming Back!" The aliens had come before, and the British already gave them some children to cure an outbreak. We learn the aliens used those children to make narcotics. Now I wonder if instead of just an interesting horror story made up by the writers, they were actually inspired by real world historical events.

Posted by: hadsil at August 09, 2015 11:29 AM (FsOrA)

140 137, 138 - okay you guys cemented it for me and i'll download it for le Kindle.

Posted by: Dana- author of Outward Frontier, a military sci fi adventure available on Amazon Kindle at August 09, 2015 11:29 AM (eTvJc)

141 Posted by: JackStraw at August 09, 2015 11:28 AM (OGm46)

Funny thing, after winning a "good" war against National Socialism, Western Civilization essentially re-branded it and slowly made it our own!

Posted by: Hrothgar at August 09, 2015 11:31 AM (ftVQq)

142 The Orphan Trains were run from the 1850s through the early 20th century and placed orphans from the east coast with families in the mid-west.

Info:

http://www.childrensaidsociety.org/about /history/orphan-trains

http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/amex/orphan/


Posted by: Retread at August 09, 2015 11:33 AM (kHK4O)

143 #119

No, the kid (whose name I cannot recall but I vaguely remember it had to do with Murphy's mother, the actress for which character died around the same time) was there. Eldon, the guy who perpetually refurbishing Brown's house, became the nanny as it provided an excuse for his ongoing presence. A decade later and they'd probably have made him gay to make his presence in the household without any sexual tension more believable.

Considering the nature of the show and the kid barely being a toddler when it ended, how much could they do with him? Even without the controversy, the kid marked the shark jumping moment for the series. Even with a live-in nanny to keep Brown's schedule mostly intact, the edge was gone.

Posted by: Epobirs at August 09, 2015 11:34 AM (IdCqF)

144 YA high fantasy recs:

Shannara - Terry Brooks
Librarian - Mel Odom
Dresden Files - Jim Butcher
Everything by Terry Pratchett
Dragonriders - Anne MacCaffrey
Eragon - Chris Paolini
Inkheart - Cornelia Funke
Maximum Ride - James Patterson (et al)

These are the ones still kicking around my house that engineering student daughter still will not let me pass on. They are suitable for both boys and girls and the action and adventure are fun, even though some references and concepts are a little over their heads.


Last week someone was asking about fun little boy books and I forgot to mention both Captain Underpants and Hank the Cow Dog. Actually wore out copies from son and had to buy new for daughter. The older two were very conventional readers, but the younger two still think outside the box.

Posted by: mustbequantum at August 09, 2015 11:37 AM (MIKMs)

145 war against National Socialism, Western Civilization essentially re-branded i

Yeah but we'll outsource da Jooo killing.

Posted by: DaveA at August 09, 2015 11:38 AM (DL2i+)

146 #128

That must have been a big surprise to his wife and daughter.

Posted by: Epobirs at August 09, 2015 11:39 AM (IdCqF)

147 >>Funny thing, after winning a "good" war against National Socialism, Western Civilization essentially re-branded it and slowly made it our own!

A republic, if you can keep it.

Posted by: JackStraw at August 09, 2015 11:39 AM (OGm46)

148 @134

Yes and yes. Try this on your kindle.


http://tinyurl.com/pys4ro4

Posted by: Nip Sip at August 09, 2015 11:40 AM (0FSuD)

149 >>One season of the British tv show/Doctor Who spin off Torchwood was called "Children of the Earth".

Ugh, hated that Children of Earth season/series. The children where kept alive while the aliens lived off them as sort of food slaves.

Re: All British men gay comment reminded me of an icky movie I stumbled upon called "The History Boys". Seemed like "Dead Poets Society" until it became clear that the obese, creepy teacher all the gifted boys loved was diddling them. Ick.

Posted by: Lizzy at August 09, 2015 11:43 AM (NOIQH)

150 Posted by: DaveA at August 09, 2015 11:38 AM (DL2i+)

Enter islam, stage left!

Posted by: Hrothgar at August 09, 2015 11:44 AM (ftVQq)

151 "And on a final note, I'm sure you'll all be thrilled to know that Obama is finally on board with the whole "killing human beings and harvesting their body parts is bad" thing. He's apparently discovered that it's being done by people who aren't his political allies, so now he feels free to criticize it."

POTUS's lack of self-awareness is preposterous.

Posted by: Socalcon at August 09, 2015 11:46 AM (DAB5r)

152 83 any good YA books that deal with high fantasy? I'm looking for something like George Martin, but not Rape Rape Martin.
Posted by: boulder terlit hobo at August 09, 2015 09:57 AM (K6nQG)

Jim Butcher, of Dresden fame, also did the Codex Alera series, which is actual YA (though I imagine high fantasy matters more than the YA). I've heard good things, though I did not actively seek out the second after finishing the first.

Susan Cooper's The Dark is Rising series is... impressively high-magicy. The Grey King is my favorite -- intertwines high fantasy seamlessly with Welsh farming life.

Posted by: Jobey in Error at August 09, 2015 11:46 AM (dGWLp)

153 Shannara - Terry Brooks
Isn't that the one MTV will be making into a series.

Posted by: Patrick from Ohio at August 09, 2015 11:47 AM (c4yY7)

154 Oh, and one nice little piece of prose from my dad's WWII diary (Anzio) and then I will leave you all in peace.



Apr 10, 1944--EZ Dog Diaries
A beautiful day. The flowers are coming out by the hundreds. There is a large peony bush beside our outdoor latrine. One of the buds is about ready to open. Enemy fire is still quite heavy.



Nice afterthought! I wonder how much writing my Dad did while on the latrine!

Posted by: Muldoon, a solid man at August 09, 2015 11:48 AM (NeFrd)

155 Oregon Muse: will do. Tom's work should be more accessible.

Posted by: Donna &&&&& V.(brandishing ampersands once again) at August 09, 2015 11:55 AM (+XMAD)

156 Greetings:

By almost a happenstance, I'm reading John Costello's "The Pacific War: 1941-1945". The author is British and a BBC alumni so the early chapters about the America in Asia and the Pacific pre-war wise seem to have an undercurrent of "If only America had had the good sense to first surrender to Mother England what more wonderful world it would have been.

I'm now in the Pearl Harbor and its immediate aftermath chapters and Japan's Imperial Army and Navy are pretty much having their way on their push south and east and west. Dark, dark days for our and our allies' forces.

My father suffered one of those non-Japanese-American interments from 1942-1946 including camping in some of America's finest backwaters and then an all-expense-paid tour of the western Pacific with complimentary stops at Saipan and Peleliu, so I have more than a dog in this fight especially in the throes of the annual August "Uh noes, A-bombs" rituals. Unfortunately for the modern media, I had a father who taught me that "The only thing wrong with the a-bombings was we only had two."

One of the things that occurs to me when I think about that era, is how little mention or awareness there seems to be about the China-India-Burma theater. The Empire of Japan was totally intent on turning Asia's southeast corner and overrunning all the way to Britain's Jewel in the Crown.

Any recommendations about books on that theater of WWII will be appreciated.

Posted by: 11B40 at August 09, 2015 11:55 AM (abx5/)

157 @154 - life is sometimes an outdoor latrine, it's nice to be able to see the peony bush with it.

Posted by: JEM at August 09, 2015 11:56 AM (o+SC1)

158 I really liked, The Emerald Atlas. I got the Audiobook, it's read by Jime Dale so he does all the characters in different voices so you can keep track.

Posted by: Patrick from Ohio at August 09, 2015 11:56 AM (c4yY7)

159 Nice afterthought!

I know, right? If it were me, I'd probably have written something like:

HOLY CRAP!! THE SHELLING WON'T STOP! I ALMOST GOT MY ASS SHOT OFF IN THE LATRINE YESTERDAY! SCREW THE PEONIES! WE'RE ALL GOING TO DIE!!

Posted by: OregonMuse at August 09, 2015 11:57 AM (6Yjmn)

160
121
. . .
Any of you morons had a chance to read or borrow my book, Outward Frontier? If so, any thoughts or comments on it?

Posted by: Dana- author of Outward Frontier, a military sic fi adventure available on Amazon Kiindle at August 09, 2015 11:16 AM (eTvJc)

******

In the preview at Amazon, I noticed that the "Historical Events" that set up the novel include constitutional amendments that establish term limits for senators and representatives and supreme court justices, as well a requirement for a term of service in the armed forces in order to be president.

I'm a veteran and a sci-fi fan. I clicked buy.

Posted by: Elinor, Who Usually Looks Lurkily at August 09, 2015 11:58 AM (NqQAS)

161 I learnt a long time ago not to get the Moron Horde started on the Pacific Theater (or, as the Brits might term it, Theatre); not unless I wanted to get myself angered, disgusted, and/or depressed. There are many, many regulars here with military relatives.

Historical truth can be hard on one's psyche.

Posted by: boulder terlit hobo at August 09, 2015 12:00 PM (K6nQG)

162 156: if you haven't yet read it, Eugene Sledge's "With the Old Breed" is one of the best (and extremely harrowing) accounts of the Pacific War from a grunt's POV that I have ever read.

Posted by: Donna &&&&& V.(brandishing ampersands once again) at August 09, 2015 12:01 PM (+XMAD)

163 Just finished King, Warrior, Magician, Lover, which is a book about masculine archetypes. The author gets somewhat hippy-dippy in the later chapters, but it's interesting nonetheless and useful as a guide for writers.

Working my way through a biography of John Hawkwood.

Posted by: Colorado Alex at August 09, 2015 12:02 PM (10ydV)

164 Whilst doing stuff like writing, book thread occurred.

JCS estimate of Allied casualties - killed, wounded, missing - for both invasions of Downfall was over 1.2 million IIRC.

How committed the Japanese were can be found at the end of the book Enola Gay. After Hiroshima the Inner Council was deadlocked with the hardliners saying they still had millions of untested soldiers. 2am 10 Aug Emperor Hirohito supported his foreign minister to accept the Potsdam demands. After some finessing by the US to accede to Japanese desires to keep their Emperor, the Japanese debated until the 14th when again Emperor Hirohito intervened to tell them to accept the unbearable. And still the night of the 14th, militarists broke into the Imperial Palace in an attempt to destroy Hirohito's recording to the Japanese people to surrender.

Posted by: Anna Puma at August 09, 2015 12:02 PM (JKTqi)

165 Ugh, forgive the grammatical errors. Not enough coffee this morning plus I'm still trying to get used to typing on an iPad.

Posted by: Donna &&&&& V.(brandishing ampersands once again) at August 09, 2015 12:05 PM (+XMAD)

166 Well, I tried to send the biker dude something but the weird format, and this busted CRT backup monitor, and my beffuddlement may have screwed it all up.

Posted by: Harvey Hapless Kormackov at August 09, 2015 12:05 PM (7l3Bf)

167 Another excellent book post, Oregon Muse!

I read another Matt Reilly book this week - "Area 7" because I need fluff right now, and it's the perfect book to take to the pool.

Posted by: Lizzy at August 09, 2015 12:08 PM (NOIQH)

168 That stuff about Britain sending the kids away....incredible. And up until fucking 1970???? I just can't process that shit.

Posted by: HUCK / AKIN 2016 at August 09, 2015 12:10 PM (0LHZx)

169 But Ian McKellan is gay, along with Stephen Frye, Derek Jacobi, John Gielgud and Nigel Hawthorne.

Is there any Englishman who *isn't* gay??

Posted by: OregonMuse at August 09, 2015 11:18 AM (6Yjmn)



I'll have you know, foul blaggard, that I am not gay.


Not even a tiny bit.





Well...maybe a little bit...



Look, I'm a full-on poofter. But, I will not stand here, sir, and hear you besmirch the good name of British manhood!

Good Day!

Posted by: Richard the Lion-Hearted at August 09, 2015 12:11 PM (KUa85)

170 My youngest still wakes me up in the middle of the night sometimes after a bad dream. And kids younger than that were put on a boat and sent to Australia by themselves. I feel like punching someone.

Posted by: HUCK / AKIN 2016 at August 09, 2015 12:11 PM (0LHZx)

171 No open thread yet, so let me quote the great Megan McArdle:

"Donald Trump is not going to be president. Bernie Sanders is also not going to be president. Their appeal to their supporters is precisely the reason they are not going to be president. Every few years, a large number of Americans need to learn the same lesson: The reason you don't hear the solutions that you want coming from the boring, scripted, mainstream politicians who get elected is that the solutions that you want do not appeal to the majority of your fellow countrymen."

Posted by: doug at August 09, 2015 12:12 PM (pObMl)

172 Posted by: doug at August 09, 2015 12:12 PM (pObMl)

___________

60% opposes Obamacare. We get Obamacare courtesy of the "serious" people.

70% opposes amnesty. We will get amnesty courtesy of the "serious" people.

Fuck them all.

Posted by: HUCK / AKIN 2016 at August 09, 2015 12:14 PM (0LHZx)

173 Posted by: doug at August 09, 2015 12:12 PM (pObMl)


Megan is neither great nor a McArdle.


Posted by: naturalfake at August 09, 2015 12:17 PM (KUa85)

174 Posted by: Muldoon, a solid man at August 09, 2015 11:48 AM (NeFrd)

Your dad was pretty darn good at understatement!

Thanks for sharing that!

Posted by: Hrothgar at August 09, 2015 12:19 PM (ftVQq)

175 Posted by: Anna Puma at August 09, 2015 12:02 PM (JKTqi)

IIRC, DoD is still issuing Purple Hearts minted in the run-up to the potential invasion of the Japanese Homeland!

Posted by: Hrothgar at August 09, 2015 12:21 PM (ftVQq)

176 170 My youngest still wakes me up in the middle of the night sometimes after a bad dream. And kids younger than that were put on a boat and sent to Australia by themselves. I feel like punching someone.

Posted by: HUCK / AKIN 2016 at August 09, 2015 12:11 PM (0LHZx)


Oranges and Sunshine is still available for $1.99 on Kindle. I am about 2/3rds through it. If you're angry now, maybe you shouldn't read it, you'll only get even more angry, especially the parts when the orphan agencies officers attempt to justify what they did.

Posted by: OregonMuse at August 09, 2015 12:23 PM (6Yjmn)

177
I have always wondered why The Road to Serfdom hasn't been the subject of the book thread, but maybe it's too obvious for this crowd. Though not nearly as prescient, Adam Smiths "The Money Game" is a great read also. Stands the test of time.

Posted by: GBruno at August 09, 2015 12:24 PM (u49WF)

178 @177 Multiple trigger warnings would be required

Posted by: doug at August 09, 2015 12:29 PM (pObMl)

179 OT: Just got back from seeing "Ricki and the Flash" with Meryl Streep. Very funny, and amazingly no sucker punches. In fact, her rocker chick character razzes Obama, has a "Don't Tread On Me" tattoo, and some of the best uncomfortable public clashes (there are many) are with her judgemental gay older son and her second boy with his sustainable vegan/Green wedding to a flitty upper class twit. Kevin Kline plays her ex and they play off each other so well.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, Literate Savage at August 09, 2015 12:30 PM (jR7Wy)

180 *flips through J.E. Ted Meredith's book on his service in PT boats*

He did a Pacific combat tour on PT-129. Then an MTO tour before becoming an instructor at the PT school in Miami, FL.

Ron 39 had worked up and had arrived in the Philippines when the atomic bombs dropped. "It was scheduled to join other PTs in Okinawa to participate in South Honshu invasion of Japan, but the bombs ended the war." pg 205

Posted by: Anna Puma at August 09, 2015 12:31 PM (JKTqi)

181 Hey, thanks for the tip, Eris. I'll have to check that one out.

These days I keep finding out that some show I'm watching has gone SJW. Recently it was "Orphan Black". I was enjoying it up to the point when foster-mom goes on her anti Thatcher tirade. Since I lived there at the time... [utters expletives unfit for book-thread]

Posted by: boulder terlit hobo at August 09, 2015 12:33 PM (K6nQG)

182 @181 I was listening to "Tech News Today" on twit.tv when the smarmy one-percenter host and snarky lefty guest host commented on how the Fox news Debate hosts (usually derieded on twit.tv) sounded almost like Democrats... and wasn't that great... [click]

One more MSM outlet that I just don't need. The left just can't stop telling us how much smarter they are than the great unwashed masses. It is almost like they don't fully believe it themselves.

Posted by: doug at August 09, 2015 12:38 PM (pObMl)

183 >>Posted by: All Hail Eris, Literate Savage at August 09, 2015 12:30 PM (jR7Wy)



I am really looking forward to not seeing that, this week.

Posted by: Garrett at August 09, 2015 12:40 PM (LjyWl)

184 177
I have always wondered why The Road to Serfdom hasn't been the subject of the book thread, but maybe it's too obvious for this crowd.

Posted by: GBruno at August 09, 2015 12:24 PM (u49WF)


Actually, the real reason is because is a long book, it uses big words and there are no pictures, nor photos of scantily-clad women.

I keed, I keed!

Posted by: OregonMuse at August 09, 2015 12:41 PM (6Yjmn)

185 my Grandfather was dropped of at an orphanage when because his mother died and he didn't want him or his brothers around, he was then then sent to live with Relatives and was used as a hired hand, but they made him sleep in a corn crib. He got lucky when a cousin came to visit and saw how he was living and she took him in. He never knew his brothers, one ran off to Philly and "made his money" this was during probation so it was assumed he worked as a bootlegger. Despite all this he was a great man, I love and still miss him. At his Funeral people came out of the wood work telling us how kind he was, one man came and was crying told us how he would drop off old telephone poles to his family, and because of him they did not get cold during the winter. He could have lost his job if they ever found out.
The Navy saved him, he became an electrician, I have his diary talking about looking for a job, he was about to reenlist and he landed a job, thank God he did, the ship he was stationed on was the USS Arizona

Posted by: Patrick from Ohio at August 09, 2015 12:43 PM (c4yY7)

186 I started "The Road to Serfdom" but have never finished it. Thought it was a difficult read.

Posted by: Harvey Hapless Kormackov at August 09, 2015 12:44 PM (7l3Bf)

187 #185. wow, what a story!

Posted by: OregonMuse at August 09, 2015 12:45 PM (6Yjmn)

188 listening to "Tech News Today" on twit.tv when the smarmy one-percenter host and snarky lefty guest host commented on how the Fox news Debate hosts (usually derieded on twit.tv) sounded almost like Democrats... and wasn't that great... [click]

One more MSM outlet that I just don't need. The left just can't stop telling us how much smarter they are than the great unwashed masses. It is almost like they don't fully believe it themselves.
Posted by: doug at August 09, 2015 12:38 PM (pObMl)
Well his wife did rake him over the coals when they divorced, he was caught having an affair with an employee.

Posted by: Patrick from Ohio at August 09, 2015 12:47 PM (c4yY7)

189 Patrick, wow. USS Arizona.

That is one of the great under-reported tragedies of the sinking of that battleship. The loss of the Sullivan brothers when USS Juneau sank gets all the air play, but multiple families lost clutches of brothers when USS Arizona exploded and sank.

Posted by: Anna Puma at August 09, 2015 12:50 PM (JKTqi)

190 160 - Elinor- thanks for the purchase!
I think that if we did enact term limits and requirements for military service (at least for El Presidente) our foreign policy decisions would be a whole helluva lot saner.
I'm a Mark Levin fan and I'm sold on his argument that the establishment, incestuous oligarchy that claims to speak for all conservatives will never push for term limits or any kind of electoral reform. So a Constitutional Convention it is- and damn all the supposed consequences. They're happening anyway.

Posted by: Dana- author of Outward Frontier, a military sci fi adventure available on Amazon Kindle at August 09, 2015 12:52 PM (eTvJc)

191 187 #185. wow, what a story!
Posted by: OregonMuse at August 09, 2015 12:45 PM (6Yjmn)
Unfortunately he threw out his photo book of his time on the Arizona, because all his friends were dead. We went to Hawaii for vacation, Man he was pissed at the Japanese, taking pictures those were his friends, I didn't understand it at the time and to my shame I was embarrassed I was 11. He would point to a name and talk about how this guy brought him aboard (saved his life)when he drank some bad Australian moonshine. They pumped his stomach. When the waves got big enough he would crack walnuts with the ship.

Posted by: Patrick from Ohio at August 09, 2015 12:55 PM (c4yY7)

192 What occurred to me today is how 'gendered' most children's fiction is nowdays. When I was growing up, fiction for younger folk was not so divided as now. Sure, Hardy Boys and Nancy drew were 'girl' and 'boy' stuff, but otherwise it was not so rigid.

I recognize the difficulty in engaging little boys to read, but like most parents with both genders, attempted to buy books and toys that appealed across the board. Saw a few articles on Target disgendering (is that a word?) clothing lines and I applaud. One of my girls liked red and thought that pink or purple (all that was available at the time in the cheap stores) was stupid, and as a parent I agreed because they were very hard to clean.

Rant for the day over.

Posted by: mustbequantum at August 09, 2015 12:55 PM (MIKMs)

193 I agree with Quayle, and I honestly believe you could wipe out about 90% of our poverty problems by having two parent families.

But I can also understand that elections are popularity contests and it's tough to not take on "single parents" without looking judgemental. You're talking about nearly 1 out of 2 homes in this day and age.

To me this is more of a "ground up" movement rather than trying to elect Huckabee-types that want to harp on single moms.

We all know why this epidemic of single motherhood is happening, loose women. But can any politcian actually say this? Of course not.

Posted by: Kal at August 09, 2015 12:57 PM (A3kYV)

194 181
Hey, thanks for the tip, Eris. I'll have to check that one out.



These days I keep finding out that some show I'm watching has gone
SJW. Recently it was "Orphan Black". I was enjoying it up to the point
when foster-mom goes on her anti Thatcher tirade. Since I lived there at
the time... [utters expletives unfit for book-thread]

Posted by: boulder terlit hobo at August 09, 2015 12:33 PM (K6nQG)

=================================================
C'mon, Orphan Black is a BBC show even though it was filmed in Canada with mostly Canadian actors. I thought Mrs. S's slams on Maggie were pretty tame, altogether.I'm more interested in how they found all those actresses and actors that look so much alike to play those clones. Almost like they were related or sumthin.

Posted by: John Pomeroy at August 09, 2015 12:58 PM (jhd41)

195 Anna Puma
He always said if he reenlisted he would be dead, because he worked the Electic lines putting up new poles etc he did not go to war, he kept the factories supplied with electricity.

Posted by: Patrick from Ohio at August 09, 2015 12:59 PM (c4yY7)

196 *reads through At Close Quarters, the official combat history of US PT boats*

Talk about someone who needs a book written about him - Robert L. Searles. As a Lt(jg) he commanded PT-38 of MTB Ron 3 on October 14th, 1942 when the Japanese were shelling Guadalcanal. June 1945 found Lt. Robert Searles in command of MTB Ron 31 patrolling the waters of Okinawa in preparation for the invasion of Japan.

Posted by: Anna Puma at August 09, 2015 01:00 PM (JKTqi)

197 We all know why this epidemic of single motherhood is happening, loose women. But can any politcian actually say this? Of course not.
Posted by: Kal at August 09, 2015 12:57 PM (A3kYV)
---
Loose morals being subsidized, is the problem.

I've always paid my own way! *huffs*

Posted by: All Hail Eris, Literate Savage at August 09, 2015 01:01 PM (jR7Wy)

198 *hits All Hail Eris up for a few Quatloos*

This should amuse you, selling stuff on eBay. Found an offer to activate 500 free listings. So activated and then read the fine print. 500 free listings in women's clothing. *thud*

Posted by: Anna Puma at August 09, 2015 01:03 PM (JKTqi)

199 If you're looking for a good YA fantasy series, I highly recommend the Unexpected Enlightenment series by L. Jagi Lamplighter.
First book: http://tinyurl.com/nf2eoel
It's lots of fun, and manages to be original by being shamelessly derivative. The main influences are Harry Potter and Narnia, but all of fantasy and myth is fair game. I especially loved the Lovecraft shout-out.

Posted by: Luke at August 09, 2015 01:04 PM (4v1Dl)

200 Loose morals being subsidized, is the problem.

I've always paid my own way! *huffs*
Posted by: All Hail Eris, Literate Savage

I think that's part of the issue, but I will break conservative orthodoxy in that I don't honestly believe if you took away government subsidized birth control that you would have less single moms.

I think ultimately the problem is our country has gone from one with strong religious values to aggressively secular.

One "out of the box" solution though that obviously has no chance of ever passing would be to eliminate the idea of a male providing child support until the kid is 18. I think women would suddenly be a lot more careful about "oops, I forgot to take my pill" if they didn't have so many safety nets. And news flash, women do get pregnant for a variety of nefarious reasons other than wanting to be a mom.

Posted by: Kal at August 09, 2015 01:05 PM (A3kYV)

201 re 132 "...Megyn Kelly did what she was paid to do..." can Trump win? The people who pay Megyn Kelly think Trump can win. Also are you saying she is a prostitute? :-)

Posted by: Huggy at August 09, 2015 01:08 PM (PGh+Q)

202 193 We all know why this epidemic of single motherhood
is happening, loose women. But can any politcian actually say this? Of
course not.

Posted by: Kal at August 09, 2015 12:57 PM (A3kYV)

I would say it is more due to divorce than "loose women".

Posted by: Vic at August 09, 2015 01:10 PM (GpgJl)

203 Ordered and started John Dos Passos' trilogy, based on comments here. Long-winded bugger. I took a break about 20% into the last book. Might go back to it.

Got "A History of the Jews" (Paul Johnson) again, I think, based on a recommendation here. Well written and interesting. I'm up to the beginning of the 19th C. and only at page 325 of about 600. A lot must have happened to them between 1820 and 1987 when he wrote it.

Took a short break to read Brad Thor's latest, "Code of Conduct". Bought it because of his podcast appearance here. OK. It's 350 pages. first (approx.) 330 are taken up setting up the terrible thing that's happening. Then it's all solved and the world is saved in 20 pages.

Posted by: John Pomeroy at August 09, 2015 01:11 PM (jhd41)

204 If you really want to be pissed off, a kid that was raped by his teacher was forced to pay Child Support. Yes he did contest it but lost even though he was the victim.

Posted by: Patrick from Ohio at August 09, 2015 01:13 PM (c4yY7)

205 Common esoteric take on the Socialist, Loose Morals and tying it in with illegal immigration. Some books state that the illegal aliens are animated by the souls of aborted babies and that they are searching for the parents that aborted them. Makes as much sense as Anthropogenic Global Warming to me. :-)

Posted by: Huggy at August 09, 2015 01:17 PM (PGh+Q)

206 @175 Re: Purple Heart medals.

I'd heard that as well. They have to produce new ribbon portions, but the metal part is still in stockpile after seven decades including Korea, Vietnam, skirmishes, Gulf I II and WoT actions.

And that half million that they procured? It was only the first set planned. They expected another two or three before war's end.

I will agree that perhaps the uninhabited island test should have been tried, but Nagasaki shows us that at least one city attack would have been necessary before a surrender happened.

And the stockpile wasn't that deep in 1945.

Posted by: Captain Comic at August 09, 2015 01:17 PM (6gkwH)

207 Some of the cause of single motherhood is divorce, and we can add widowhood, but that's not Murphy Brown. Murphy Brown was rich enough and decided, whatever, let's have one.

It's already been mentioned that what might (*might*) work for rich women won't work as well for a poor nineteen year old.

Posted by: boulder terlit hobo at August 09, 2015 01:17 PM (L8lZW)

208 Gen. Groves thought an atomic demonstration test would have been a bad idea for a simple interlocking reason. It would have removed the element of surprise and might have allowed the Japanese to develop a way to intercept the plane.

Posted by: Anna Puma at August 09, 2015 01:19 PM (JKTqi)

209 Had to pull out my old Miss Manners (one of my kids is getting married), and of course became totally distracted rereading some of her pronouncements.

What fun! I had forgotten how funny she was and how practical, especially for public occasions.

Posted by: mustbequantum at August 09, 2015 01:19 PM (MIKMs)

210 Lamplighter was/is also a force in the Tor boycott. I will add that to my "buycott" list

Posted by: boulder terlit hobo at August 09, 2015 01:19 PM (L8lZW)

211 Ah, Book Thread, how I've missed you!

Seriously, I keep showing up three or four hours late to these things, reading the comments, and deciding it's not worth putting my two cents in.

But today, it's worth it because I finished writing my first full-length novel this morning! Now I have to do a final edit (I do most of my editing as I go) and find lots of other people who want to read it. It's not really Moron material (young adult fantasy romance that reads like a historical fiction), but I'm sure somebody will like it.

*passes out celebratory cigars to the rest of the Horde*

And now back to your regularly scheduled programming.

Posted by: right wing whippersnapper- quietly rebellious at August 09, 2015 01:22 PM (wyXRZ)

212 211- congrats RWW! It's a great feeling to finish a book- hope it sells well when you publish.

Posted by: Dana- author of Outward Frontier, a military sci fi adventure available on Amazon Kindle at August 09, 2015 01:25 PM (eTvJc)

213 @208 Sounds like Groves was right. I wonder if a longer delay between Hiroshima and Nagasaki would have made Nagasaki unnecessary?

Posted by: doug at August 09, 2015 01:25 PM (pObMl)

214 Skimmed the Gaming thread and as usual, don't have a clue what the kids are talking about. "Dota 2 is Valve's MOTA." Huh?

Ooh, Matlock is on!

Posted by: All Hail Eris, Literate Savage at August 09, 2015 01:25 PM (jR7Wy)

215 Continue to make my way through 'The Forgotten Soldier', by Sajer.

It is a staggering account of the experiences as a German soldier on the eastern front. Those who have not studied the Russian/German elements of the war can not begin to appreciate the scale and brutality of conditions and conflict that occurred there.

Posted by: Mike Harmmer, Hardliner at August 09, 2015 01:28 PM (9mTYi)

216 RWW congrats. I guess I should dive back into editing my short novel. Good luck.

Posted by: Anna Puma at August 09, 2015 01:28 PM (JKTqi)

217 *passes out celebratory cigars to the rest of the Horde*

And now back to your regularly scheduled programming.
Posted by: right wing
-------------------------------

*trims the end*
*toasts it lightly*
*lights*
*draws*

Aaaaaaaaaaaaah.

Posted by: Mike Harmmer, Hardliner at August 09, 2015 01:30 PM (9mTYi)

218 215 Harmmer- Forgotten soldier was recommended to me when I was going through Infantry Officers Basic Course- a highly detailed and gritty book. Reminds me that I should break it out and read it again.

Posted by: Dana- author of Outward Frontier, a military sci fi adventure available on Amazon Kindle at August 09, 2015 01:34 PM (eTvJc)

219 Mike Hammer, once done with Sajer's book this might interest you.

US Army War College on German operations on the Russian Front.
http://preview.tinyurl.com/nfnfkuj

Posted by: Anna Puma at August 09, 2015 01:34 PM (JKTqi)

220 Stalingrad: The Fateful Siege by Antony Beevor is another good one.

Posted by: Dana- author of Outward Frontier, a military sci fi adventure available on Amazon Kindle at August 09, 2015 01:38 PM (eTvJc)

221 The American people were sick and tired of the war. They were sick and tired of the telegrams. There probably wasn't a community of 500 people who had not experienced a casualty, which did not have boys/men somewhere engaged in combat.

It was an every-waking-moment preoccupation. To shorten the war by even a day, by whatever means, would have easily won popular support.

Second guessing Truman's decision to drop both bombs is insulting to the people that were on the ground, and to their families. I suspect that those who felt that it was a bad idea had not seen the bodies of their friends/comrades mutilated by the Japanese.

But, that's just my perspective.

Posted by: Mike Harmmer, Hardliner at August 09, 2015 01:43 PM (9mTYi)

222 Speaking of horrific atrocities, I'm FINALLY getting around to reading Empire of the Summer Moon (about the Comanches), which I know people here have read. I knew a lot of the history from reading other books, but this has a lot of details I didn't know about Cynthia Ann Parker, her family, how the Walker Colt was developed, and other stuff.

Posted by: stace at August 09, 2015 01:43 PM (CoX6k)

223 Dear Gentle Reader,

Another fan of Miss Manners here. We have several of her books and thumb through them once in a while. Lots of common sense, well written and the lady has a great sense of humor.

Posted by: JTB at August 09, 2015 01:46 PM (FvdPb)

224 Anna Puma- What kind of short novel did you write?

Posted by: Dana- author of Outward Frontier, a military sci fi adventure available on Amazon Kindle at August 09, 2015 01:48 PM (eTvJc)

225 US Army War College on German operations on the Russian Front.
http://preview.tinyurl.com/nfnfkuj
Posted by: Anna Puma at August 09, 2015 01:34 PM (JKTqi)

220 Stalingrad: The Fateful Siege by Antony Beevor is another good one.
Posted by: Dana
--------------------------

Both noted. Thanks.

Have either of you read 'The Last 100 Days', Toland? Finished that a week or so ago, and have mentioned here. Very comprehensive account of the last 3 months of the war, from all perspectives. Great documentation.

Next week i'm going to take a break from studying war. I think I'll reread some Wodehouse, escapist humor.

Posted by: Mike Harmmer, Hardliner at August 09, 2015 01:49 PM (9mTYi)

226 'Harrmmer'?
Who the hell is that?

Posted by: Mike Hammer, Hardliner at August 09, 2015 01:49 PM (9mTYi)

227 C'mon, Orphan Black is a BBC show even though it was filmed in Canada with mostly Canadian actors. I thought Mrs. S's slams on Maggie were pretty tame, altogether.I'm more interested in how they found all those actresses and actors that look so much alike to play those clones. Almost like they were related or sumthin.

If they were smart, they'd rent her out as a Jane Doe corpse to the police procedurals; Ducky could dissect her a couple of times a month.

Posted by: Anachronda at August 09, 2015 01:50 PM (7rKzw)

228 Got all my Hugo reading in under the deadline, Butcher deserves to win, and I finally got to read something new this past week. Just finishing up Armada by Ernest Cline and it's pretty much the same formula as Ready Player One. It's a breeze to read, his liberal beliefs are only lightly touched upon (female Preznit) and it's obvious where it's headed. That said, I still enjoyed the read and now it's on to the next book, Angles of Attack. Would've read it sooner, but the idiot author turned down his Hugo nomination because he's a lefty and how dare the Puppies appreciate his work.

Glad it's free with Kindle Unlimited.

Posted by: NJRob at August 09, 2015 01:54 PM (WdCTZ)

229 Mike, actually there were people who were key on getting FDR to authorize the Manhattan Project now having second thoughts. Financier Alexander Sachs and scientists Albert Einstein and Leo Szilard. Since Germany was, in December 1944, unable to produce an atomic weapon they thought Japan could be defeated by conventional weapons. That atomic weapons would only confer a transitory advantages that would be outweighed by political psychological losses. Szilard feared the loss of US prestige while Eisenstein worried about an arms race. Sachs wanted a demonstration test attended by Allied and neutral scientists and that if the US was to use such weapons, warn the belligerent as to time of attack to allow evacuation.

Thank goodness FDR and Truman ignored such idiots.

Again my source is the book Enola Gay pg 69-72.

Posted by: Anna Puma at August 09, 2015 01:55 PM (JKTqi)

230 Dana what is my short novel? Well it was my NaNoWriMo effort a couple years back. And amazingly I am still happy about it. I call it my Indiana Jones story because it has mystery, action, mythology, and oh so naughty Nazis looking for magical artifacts.

Posted by: Anna Puma at August 09, 2015 01:59 PM (JKTqi)

231 "My wife recently read "Gone Girl" and said it was fairly twisted. "

I read it planning to see the movie. It was awful and I never went to the movie.

Posted by: Mike K at August 09, 2015 02:01 PM (5namt)

232 Anna- sounds fun- is it still in the works or have you published it? I'd be interested in reading it.

Posted by: Dana- author of Outward Frontier, a military science fiction action novel available on Amazon Kindle at August 09, 2015 02:03 PM (eTvJc)

233 Thank goodness FDR and Truman ignored such idiots.
-----------------------
Yes.

Posted by: Mike Hammer, Hardliner at August 09, 2015 02:04 PM (9mTYi)

234 Still in the works. Fixing grammatical errors. Trimming the over lengthy prose. And then adding new stuff that has now occurred to me that needs answering.

Posted by: Anna Puma at August 09, 2015 02:04 PM (JKTqi)

235 *blinks*

Eisenstein??? Oh kami did I just concatenate Einstein with Eisenstadt?

Posted by: Anna Puma at August 09, 2015 02:05 PM (JKTqi)

236 I read it planning to see the movie. It was awful and I never went to the movie.
Posted by: Mike K
------------------

Same here.
Really, I don't even understand why the book was so popular. I found it..., insipid. Got stuck with it on vacation.

Posted by: Mike Hammer, Hardliner at August 09, 2015 02:06 PM (9mTYi)

237 231- as I mentioned, with Affleck as the icing on the cake, I don't blame you.
What is that German word for "a face in need of punching?" yeah that is Affleck AND Damon. And part of that is simply the immature, reptile portion of my brain jealous that two social justice assclowns could hit it so big in le cinema.

Posted by: Dana- author of Outward Frontier, a military science fiction action novel available on Amazon Kindle at August 09, 2015 02:06 PM (eTvJc)

238 Anna if you need test readers/proof readers I'm happy to help!

Posted by: Dana- author of Outward Frontier, a military science fiction action novel available on Amazon Kindle at August 09, 2015 02:08 PM (eTvJc)

239
Eisenstein
-------------------

I just assumed that the guy was an Eisenhower/Einstein hybrid.

Good character name.

Posted by: Mike Hammer, Hardliner at August 09, 2015 02:08 PM (9mTYi)

240 Greetings, stace: ( 222 @ August 09, 2015 01:43 PM )

My recommendation, and I've read "Empire of the Summer Moon", for all things Comanche is T.R. Fehrenbach's "Comanches: The History of a People".

It was published back in '74, before PC took too firm a hold and covers the Comanche from before they came down from the Rockies or climbed up on horseback until their eventual demise. A couple of bits that stuck with me are that other Amerindians didn't like them much and vice versa and the comparison of them with our Muslim brothers and sisters.

A book anyone involved with asymmetric warfare should read.

Posted by: 11B40 at August 09, 2015 02:08 PM (abx5/)

241 Affleck and Damon reached their acting apogee with Dogma. And the trailers for Gone Girl all I could think of was the Scott Peterson case which killed any urge to see it.

Posted by: Anna Puma at August 09, 2015 02:09 PM (JKTqi)

242 Anna Puma ... Out of curiosity, were you part of the NaNo Typewriter Brigade? I've tried several NaNos but November always keeps some disruptive surprises for me. (I'm beginning to take it personally.) The manual typewriter is my preferred drafting tool.

Posted by: JTB at August 09, 2015 02:10 PM (FvdPb)

243 Dana, thank you for the offer. Because of past stalking issues, if Oregon Muse does not mind, please go through him for my email. Let OM act as the Baba you might say. Thanks.

JTB never part of any Typewriter Brigade.

Hammer, when translated Eisenstein would be Iron-Stone.

Posted by: Anna Puma at August 09, 2015 02:18 PM (JKTqi)

244 Hammer, when translated Eisenstein would be Iron-Stone.
Posted by: Anna
---------------------

I like it.

Posted by: Mike Hammer, Hardliner at August 09, 2015 02:20 PM (9mTYi)

245 Hammer, when translated Eisenstein would be Iron-Stone.
Posted by: Anna
---------------------

I like it.

Posted by: Mike Hammer
------------------------------

Sounds like a guy not to be crossed.

Posted by: Mike Hammer, Hardliner at August 09, 2015 02:22 PM (9mTYi)

246 237 Dana

Backpfeifengesicht. -- "A face badly in need of a fist" or "A face crying out for a fist in it".


Dana, is Outward Frontier available in non-Kindle, paper versions?

Posted by: NaCly Dog at August 09, 2015 02:35 PM (u82oZ)

247 Stace @ 222, I also recommend TR Fehrenbach's history of the Comanche. It's an eye-opener, especially because the Comanche weren't anything without the horses that the white men brought. They were just a hard-scrabble Shoshone division, on marginal territory in the Rockies ... and then they got the horse.
They came screaming out of the mountains, shoving other tribes, like the Lipan Apache and the Texas Tonkawa out of the way. This was one very good reason why the Lipan and the Tonkawa threw in their loyalties to the Texans.
Yes, the various Indian divisions hated each other more than they hated whites.

TH Fehrenbach also makes the interesting point that the practice by Comanche war parties of breaking the resistance of female captives by gang-raping them might have also have contributed to their falling birthrate over time. (Low birth rates were a rationale for their custom of adopting young and malleable captives.) A handful of female captives carrying a venereal disease ... that would have spread like wildfire among to the warriors, and then to their wives.

Posted by: Sgt. Mom at August 09, 2015 02:53 PM (95iDF)

248 I'm getting to the book post late today. I'll have to read the comments later.

This week I read Neil Gaiman's "The Ocean at the End of the Lane". Interesting. It's a children's book of sorts.

Currently reading Malcolm Gladwell's "What the Dog Saw", a collection of his New Yorker articles, published between 1996 and 2006, roughly. I particularly liked his articles about plagiarism and solving homelessness.

Posted by: biancaneve at August 09, 2015 03:02 PM (kBiy2)

249 Anna- sounds good, I'll ping OM. Stalkers? They're the biggest fans! I keed, I keed.

NaCly Dog- sorry, its just on Kindle, but you can download it to multiple formats (ipad, android etc).

Posted by: Dana- author of Outward Frontier, a military science fiction action novel available on Amazon Kindle at August 09, 2015 03:26 PM (eTvJc)

250 NaCly Dog- also thanks for clearing up the German face punch!

Posted by: Dana- author of Outward Frontier, a military science fiction action novel available on Amazon Kindle at August 09, 2015 03:28 PM (eTvJc)

251 The late Rosemary Sutcliff wrote a dozen or so YA historical novels. Most have to do with the history of England, from the warfare between various Iron Age tribes to the late Middle Ages.
Her "Sword at Sunset" is a good shot at Arthur, but for adults.

Posted by: Richard Aubrey at August 09, 2015 03:35 PM (Q/3mX)

252 Orphans sent to Australia did not disappear any more than others put up for adoption. Even in Australia itself up till 1970, all 'illegitimate' children were 'stolen' from their mothers by 'the authorities' soon after birth before their mothers could see them.
Google David Hill Australian Broadcasting Corporation (our PBS), he was on of the 'orphans' sent here from UK your book refers to. He wrote a book about it which is pretty fair and accurate. It's a bit like the Jimmy Saville thing: we were all too trusting back then.

Posted by: bruce at August 09, 2015 04:00 PM (vRHFY)

253 Anna,
Do you publish under Anna Puma or a pseudonym?

Posted by: lindafell de Spair at August 09, 2015 04:34 PM (xVgrA)

254 Listening to Shelby Foote's first Civil War book. Not sure if the library has the other two on Overdrive.

I was right that Moonwalking With Einstein won't be of much use for me (I refuse to fill my mind with raunchy images just to remember trivia), but it was fairly interesting.

Posted by: Polliwog the 'Ette at August 09, 2015 04:46 PM (GDulk)

255 The desktop app for Overdrive is annoying because it only works if it is the active tab, even the screensaver coming up turns it off. The LibriVox app does the same thing, although the website doesn't. For Overdrive that means I pretty much *have* to play it on my Kindle like I am right now while typing at the desktop.

Posted by: Polliwog the 'Ette at August 09, 2015 04:51 PM (GDulk)

256 252 Orphans sent to Australia did not disappear any more than others put up for adoption.

I think that the mothers who dropped their kids off at English orphanages because they could not provide adequate care, and then went back later to get them only to be told that they had been packed off to Australia might have a different view..

Posted by: OregonMuse at August 09, 2015 05:18 PM (6Yjmn)

257 I'm reading the Atlantic article about Quayle being right. I'm quite an unemotional person, but reading it brings sadness to my heart.

Posted by: chique d'afrique (the artist formerly known as african chick) at August 09, 2015 05:18 PM (Z9spM)

258 Rape of Nanking was a very good book. Very sad story, but may not have been the worst of the war in China. Nanking being the Capitol was filled with foreigners that were able to report on what happened and some who tried to save as many people as they could. Other areas lost many people but there is just little in the way of evidence other than census data before and after the war. Separating war deaths from migration or just deaths from disease and starvation is difficult. My memory may be a bit faulty but the population of Northern China fell over 15,000,000.

Also anyone looking for some light horror check out my daughters books under the name Grey Liliy.

Posted by: Fredlike at August 09, 2015 05:34 PM (AHd0y)

259 Re Conquest, I wouldn't say the archives have been opened, only some of them, briefly. Work is still done, on often secondary-type records (e.g. transportation records) and detective work is needed to extrapolate from them. Today much of this work is done by Memorial Society. The lists it publishes are the size of phone books, as Martin Amis put it. Just mentioning this but not quibbiling with Conquest's accuracy.

Posted by: EM at August 09, 2015 06:17 PM (6LC0t)

260 2015, eh? My time machine works!

Just finished Look, what did you expect?, by "Barack Obama as told to Bill Ayers," the third autobiography of Imam Obama by this team. Hilarious account of a practical joke by Ayers that got out of hand, and changed the course of history.

Posted by: Splunge at August 09, 2015 06:42 PM (iMxBJ)

261 I cannot remember the author or title, but there is also a book by a young orphan girl in Ireland who was fostered out to nuns who basically used her (and many others) as indentured labor in a commercial laundry. There was a lot more stuff like that going on all across the Empire.

Harry Turtledove is, as noted above, a bit formulaic, but he does it quite well, and with fairly exact knowledge of his subject.
A few weeks ago I read his newish "Joe Steele", a recasting of the career of Iosif Stalin into Depression-era America. Amusing ! It would help to have detailed knowledge of Soviet history from that era to appreciate all of the little in-jokes he works in.

Gotta go, canning tomato sauce today, woohoo !

Posted by: sock_rat_eez at August 09, 2015 07:44 PM (go6ud)

262 RWW, congratulations !
And thanks for the seegar !

Posted by: sock_rat_eez at August 09, 2015 07:51 PM (go6ud)

263 Turtledove didn't always have a formula. I still like "The Toxic Spell Dump" "Werenight" and "Agent of Byzantium".

Posted by: gingeroni at August 09, 2015 08:48 PM (baKy9)

264 Comanche thread? The book that did it for me was Pekka Hamalainen, "The Comanche Empire". They were North America's home-grown Mongol horde. They even kicked the Texans' ass.

Posted by: boulder terlit hobo at August 09, 2015 11:43 PM (AVEe1)

265 Just got back from driving all day. Upside was I got to listen to the entire audiobook for American Gun: A History of the U.S. in Ten Firearms by Chris Kyle.

Very entertaining and informative. At least, as far as I know the information is accurate. I know more about guns than I do about most subjects and no problems jumped out at me.

Posted by: BornLib at August 10, 2015 12:17 AM (zpNwC)

266 261 I cannot remember the author or title, but there is also a book by a young orphan girl in Ireland who was fostered out to nuns who basically used her (and many others) as indentured labor in a commercial laundry. There was a lot more stuff like that going on all across the Empire.

Yeah, I think those places were called "Magdalene Houses" or something like that. I was going to touch on them today in the "lost children" discussion, but I had enough material otherwise. There have been a number of books written on the Magdalenes and I may devote some time to them in a future book thread.

Posted by: OregonMuse at August 10, 2015 12:55 AM (6Yjmn)

267 Thanx for the mentions of HARD BITE, fellows of the Horde. Much appreciated. Sid says OOK!
Cheers,
Dean Drayhart

Posted by: Anonymous-9 at August 14, 2015 01:44 PM (vmHHv)

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