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Sunday Morning Book Thread - 02-12-2023 ["Perfessor" Squirrel]

021223-Library.jpg

(ht: Weak Geek)

Welcome to the prestigious, internationally acclaimed, stately, and illustrious Sunday Morning Book Thread! The place where all readers are welcome, regardless of whatever guilty pleasure we feel like reading. Here is where we can discuss, argue, bicker, quibble, consider, debate, confabulate, converse, and jaw about our latest fancy in reading material, even if it's nothing more than the verbatim transcript of FJB's State of the Union Address. As always, pants are required, especially if you are wearing these pants...

So relax, find yourself a warm kitty (or warm puppy--I won't judge) to curl up in your lap, pour yourself a cup of whatever bitter brew you're drinking, and dive into a new book. What are YOU reading this fine morning?

PIC NOTE

Today's pic is courtesy of Weak Geek, a regular commenter on the Sunday Morning Book Threads:


Prof --

I tripped across this on Facebook on Wednesday night. Supposedly built by a German octogenarian who died recently. No one knew he had done this. More than 70,000 books.

Shared by Goodwill Librarian on FB. Link to something called Brico et Deco.

I prefer practical shelves.

Weak Geek

I, too, prefer more practical shelving, but you have to admire the ingenuity of using every available inch for book shelves.

CHANGING READING HABITS OVER TIME

I have noticed some distinct changes in my reading habits over the years. I suspect all of us go through various phases of reading, depending on where we are in our lives and what is interesting to us at the time.

When I was a child, I loved ghost stories and tales of adventure. What young boy doesn't? So I devoured anthologies of age-appropriate ghost stories, along with mystery stories like The Hardy Boys and The Three Investigators (many of the mysteries in the latter series had a supernatural component, though it was easily explainable by the end, like a Scooby-Doo mystery).

Then I discovered science fiction when I was around 12 or so and haven't looked back since. It's been a lifelong passion of mine and I'll always return to science fiction again and again. I just enjoy the sense of wonder and achievement to be found in stories that take humanity to very edge of our capabilities as a species.

I started reading fantasy in my early teens and that has also been a lifelong journey for me. Technically, I suppose I started reading it earlier, as I read Lloyd Alexander's Chronicles of Prydain and C. S. Lewis' Chronicles of Narnia as a kid, but then I *really* got into fantasy as a teenager after I read Lord of the Rings. Again, I just enjoy stories of adventure, heroism, strong characters who save the day (regardless of gender), and so forth.

After 9/11, I became much more interested in the world around me, so I started reading quite a few books on Islam to understand their psychology and religious/political ideology. Along the way, I started reading THIS website and numerous others to understand my own political leanings, which are decidedly conservative. I was also working on a project that involved teaching students mathematics so I delved into science and math to learn more about those subjects. I may be a failed physics major, but I do still love a good book on science!

Now, I spend a lot of time reading books on education and learning, as that's a large part of my job. You'd be surprised at how much we understand about how people *really* learn, but very little of that is implemented in the classroom.

And of course, I still read fantasy and science fiction, though at this point in my life it's to escape the bizarre reality we actually live in. The world is getting stranger and stranger every day to the point where even the weirdest stories in fiction tend to make more sense to me. That does not reflect well on us as a species. I'm also open to reading more diverse stories, in the true sense of the word, not in the DIE sense, especially those written by Morons (I have a couple lined up in my TBR pile right now).

I don't know what's next in my reading journey...Perhaps when I reach retirement I'll find some excellent books on hobbies I want to pursue...

++++++++++

021223-Joke.jpg

++++++++++

IT PAYS TO INCREASE YOUR WORD POWER

I encountered some unusual words in one of the books I've been reading this week, so I had to look them up:

peristyle - n. - a row of columns surrounding a space within a building such as a court or internal garden or edging a veranda or porch. Tetrastoön is a rarely used term for this style.

infundibular - adj. - shaped like a funnel

columbarium - n. - a room or building with niches for funeral urns to be stored

++++++++++

MORON RECOMMENDATIONS


Greetings! I enjoy the weekly book items; I am a long-time English teacher and I do some writing and editing on the side (between grading papers). I did some editing for a friend who is publishing his first historical novel, The Girl in the Thistles by S.K.Sandvig. [Amazon Link - PS]

Here's the book jacket blurb: Emilie, the 19-year old daughter of a Sioux mother and a Scottish father, finds her home destroyed when her clan is caught up in the US-Dakota war of 1862. Her mother is sent to a prisoner-of-war camp, and Emilie sets out to find her father, who has been missing since the beginning of the war. With help from two new and unlikely friends, Eustis and Anders, she begins a treacherous and emotional journey to track him down. Will she find him? Will her mother be set free? And will Emilie be able to rebuild the home she's lost?

The story is well-written and thoroughly researched; it includes accurate history, balanced portrayals of different groups, mystery, romance and a sympathetic coming-of-age story about a young woman caught between two warring cultures.

Writing Teacher

Comment: This came to me via the Book Thread mail bag (i.e., the Gmail account I use for the Book Thread items) and I always like to include recommendations from lurkers when possible. Sounds like a decent coming-of-age story for a young woman struggling to figure out who she is amidst the chaos and conflicts of mid-19th century America. NOTE: the American Civil War was also happening at this time...

+++++


How apropos that you started with a discussion of AI. I just finished The Myth of Artificial Intelligence, by Erik Larson. His principle thesis is that we are nowhere even close to general AI, and are, in fact, looking in the wrong places, using the wrong tools.

The book starts with a discussion of Turing's work, "deep learning", and the differences between deduction, induction, and abduction, aka inference. He then takes a tour through the last 40 years or so of efforts to replicate the human mind, but ultimately concludes that it's futile, if for no other reason than that we don't even know how WE think, much less how to imbue a machine with that ability. In effect, we're the guy looking for his car keys in the wrong spot because that's where the light is good.

The bottom line is that until we have a much better theoretical understanding of how our brains develop the educated guesses we use to navigate the world, GAI ain't happening. He argues for much more foundational work in neuroscience by individuals, as opposed to simply throwing teams of engineers at the problem.

p.s. Insty has a nice piece this morning on this topic. Just search Robots.

Posted by: Archimedes at February 05, 2023 09:06 AM (eOEVl)

Comment: Larson seems to make a good point in that we don't understand how WE think or how any animal really thinks. So how can we build a working intelligence? It may not be a completely futile endeavor, it just that we are still in very infancy stages of understanding human thinking. We have tremendous capacity for sorting through patterns via computers. But we humans can do it on a scale that dwarfs computation and don't even understand how it's possible.

+++++


I just can't read only Doom Patrol stories, even if the calendar is ticking. And I'm still on a respite from poker.

That's why, to my surprise, I'm reading an Ellery Queen mystery, There Was an Old Woman.

The Old Woman (70!) is a wealthy manufacturer who dominates her six offspring, sired by two husbands. The three oldest children, by Husband No. 1 -- long missing and declared dead -- are twistos. (Bidens?) The eldest son, who takes umbrage at everything, challenges one of his half-brothers to a duel. Pistols at dawn on the front lawn. Ellery surreptitiously replaces the rounds with blanks -- but somebody switches in a live round, and bang! A man is dead.

The book overuses exclamation points and italic type, and Inspector Queen's detectives aren't very intelligent. (One doesn't understand "universal.") And Ellery tosses out $50 words, making me feel not very intelligent. I'm still enjoying the book.

I've read that one of the EQ authors focused on the "how," and the other on the "who." I like the "who;" we get interludes of Ellery visiting each of the weirdos. Experience with EQ has me thinking I know who's guilty. I hope I'm wrong.

Posted by: Weak Geek at February 05, 2023 09:10 AM (Om/di)

Comment: Ellery Queen gets mentioned quite a bit around here. I'll have to check out some of those stories someday. I know a long, long time ago, I had a collection of Ellery Queen short stories (I think), though I can't remember the title or any of the plots. I do have fond memories of the book, so I'm guessing I enjoyed the stories. I do like how the authors seem to have divided the labor in crafting stories according to their strengths. The best collaborators do try to write according to their own strengths, complementing their partners' weaknesses in writing.

+++++


The discovery aspect was getting started on The Landmark Herodotus. I can't compare this translation to others but I'm finding it well done. Herodotus is usually mentioned for his book but I sense that it was more often heard than read in his day. It has a feel of Homer's epics about it. The Landmark translation has a conversational feel that I like. I'm just on the first chapter, so haven't got to the weirder stuff. Like with any of the Landmark series, which are all excellent, there is an ongoing battle between reading the text and getting lost in the copious maps and footnotes.

Posted by: JTB at February 05, 2023 10:10 AM (7EjX1)

Comment: "It was more often heard than read in his day." Sounds familiar, like a coffee table book that everyone just has to have to show off how well-read they are, yet no one has read beyond the blurb on the back cover. From just a cursory glance at his Wikipedia article, it does sound like Herodotus was keen on preserving events for posterity, though how well he achieved this feat is still open to debate.

More Moron-recommended reading material can be found HERE! (630 Moron-recommended books so far!)

+-----+-----+-----+-----+

WHAT I'VE ACQUIRED THIS PAST WEEK

In the interests of "completionism" I've been trying to finish various series of books. I'm currently working on completing the The Harpers, which is a series of 16 (mostly) stand-alone novels set in the Forgotten Realms campaign world for Dungeons and Dragons. As with most books of this nature, they can be a bit hit or miss, but I find them to be good "popcorn" fare when you don't want to read anything too serious or depressing. These days, I can use some light-hearted, enjoyable adventure stories with absurd plots and overpowered characters.


  • Forgotten Realms: The Harpers 04 - The Night Parade by Scott Ciencin

  • Forgotten Realms: The Harpers 05 - The Ring of Winter by James Lowder

  • Forgotten Realms: The Harpers 06 - Crypt of the Shadowking by Mark Anthongy

  • Forgotten Realms: The Harpers 10 - Masquerades by Kate Novak & Jeff Grubb

  • Forgotten Realms: The Harpers 11 - Curse of the Shadowmage by Mark Anthony

  • Forgotten Realms: The Harpers 12 - The Veiled Dragon by Troy Denning

  • Forgotten Realms: The Harpers 13 - Silver Shadows by Elaine Cunningham


WHAT I'VE BEEN READING THIS PAST WEEK:


  • Shorefall by Robert Jackson Bennett -- The sequel to Foundryside, exploring more about the nature of the magic system...

  • Locklands by Robert Jackson Bennett -- A magical version of Skynet takes over the world (seriously)...

  • Swamp Yankee 1 - Glitter Girl by Moron Author James Y. Bartlett. Buck Throckmorton highly recommended it, so I'm giving it a try. So far, it's like a cross between Haven (with no supernatural elements) and Justified (with less snark). Pretty good stuff!

  • Star Wars: Luke Skywalker and the Shadows of Mindor by Matthew Stover -- Luke Skywalker is in a gay love triangle with Emperor Palpatine (who's dead) and a supervillain who wants Luke to be the next Emperor. Not really, but LGBTQ+ could probably read it that way.

That's about all I have for this week. Thank you for all of your kind words regarding the Sunday Morning Book Thread. This is a very special place. You are very special people (in all the best ways!). The kindness, generosity, and wisdom of the Moron Horde knows no bounds. Let's keep reading!

If you have any suggestions for improvement, reading recommendations, or discussion topics that you'd like to see on the Sunday Morning Book Thread, you can send them to perfessor dot squirrel at-sign gmail dot com. Your feedback is always appreciated! You can also take a virtual tour of OUR library at libib.com/u/perfessorsquirrel. Since I added sections for AoSHQ, I now consider it OUR library, rather than my own personal fiefdom...

PREVIOUS SUNDAY MORNING BOOK THREAD - 02-05-23 (NOTE: Do NOT comment on old threads!)

021223-ClosingSquirrel.jpg

Posted by: Open Blogger at 09:00 AM




Comments

(Jump to bottom of comments)

1 Booken Morgen Horden!

Posted by: vmom stabby stabby stabby stabby stabamillion at February 12, 2023 09:00 AM (Xlnez)

2 Tolle Lege

Posted by: Skip at February 12, 2023 09:00 AM (xhxe8)

3 I will read a book this week.

Posted by: rhennigantx at February 12, 2023 09:01 AM (BRHaw)

4 Good morning and welcome to Bibliophiles Anonymous.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at February 12, 2023 09:01 AM (Dc2NZ)

5 The top pic... That's a lot of weight up there...

Posted by: davidt at February 12, 2023 09:01 AM (SYTee)

6 Good Sunday morning, horde!

Looks like the German was using books to insulate the attic.

Posted by: Dash my lace wigs! at February 12, 2023 09:01 AM (OX9vb)

7 MOrning, all!

Posted by: Wolfus Aurelius, Dreaming of Elsewhere at February 12, 2023 09:02 AM (omVj0)

8 I love the "spam from Hogwarts meme"

Posted by: vmom stabby stabby stabby stabby stabamillion at February 12, 2023 09:02 AM (Xlnez)

9 Good morning fellow Book Threadists, I hope everyone had a great week of reading.

Posted by: JTB at February 12, 2023 09:03 AM (7EjX1)

10 I look at that library pic and all I can think of is the guy who died buried under a stack of his pr0n mags.

Posted by: Tinfoilbaby at February 12, 2023 09:04 AM (WUIOX)

11 Those pants are fine. I would wear them to flaunt my junk at the Superbowl.

Posted by: A Xheerleader at February 12, 2023 09:04 AM (iayUP)

12 I have to leave soon to drop my tax info off at Block, so I'll mention that I'm reading Nevil Shute's A Town Like Alice (I keep thinking I've read it before, but everything in it seems new to me, so who knows). Good good stuff. As I commented earlier this week, Shute was not a falshy writer or one to use narrative tricks. Though he did have one novel with a long science-fiction section that turns out to be the vision or dream of the lead character. But while he may start slow and quiet, he will grab you and you will happily follow.

Posted by: Wolfus Aurelius, Dreaming of Elsewhere at February 12, 2023 09:04 AM (omVj0)

13 That picture reminds me of a favorite book from my childhood, Farley Mowat's "Owls in the Family".

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Owls_in_the_Family

Set in Saskatoooooooon.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at February 12, 2023 09:05 AM (Dc2NZ)

14 Well, hell. The character in "There Was an Old Woman" by Ellery Queen whom I had hoped wasn't complicit was -- and wasn't. That's all I will say about that.

The clues were solid and subtle, but the method of murder was far-fetched.

The book ends with a lame introduction of Ellery's assistant in the EQ radio series.

If this volume didn't include a second EQ novel, it would already go on the trade-in list. No need to keep it.

Posted by: Weak Geek at February 12, 2023 09:05 AM (Om/di)

15 I hope those center retaining braces on those slanting book shelves hold. The result if they fail could be funny or damaging.

Posted by: JTB at February 12, 2023 09:06 AM (7EjX1)

16 KTE took me to a fancy bookstore recently. Just amazing decor. I need to send a pic to perfesser

Posted by: vmom stabby stabby stabby stabby stabamillion at February 12, 2023 09:06 AM (Xlnez)

17 I normally read history books and an occasional mystery. When I am stressed, I read novels. I have read a lot of novels in the past two years.

Posted by: Thomas Paine at February 12, 2023 09:07 AM (mEASa)

18 Getting close to 1/2 in The Devil and Karl Marx, Communism's Long March of Death, Deception and Infiltration

Long before reading this I knew Communism has nothing to teach Christians but getting dooped they are and started long ago.

Posted by: Skip at February 12, 2023 09:07 AM (xhxe8)

19 Thanks to whoever it was (Salty?) who mentioned "The Year When Stardust Fell" (195, a YA science fiction novel b y Raymond F. Jones. In this story, the Earth passes through the tail of a comet and the particles wreak havoc on metal surfaces, causing any machinery with moving parts to essentially weld solid. Our protagonist is a teen boy, son of a chemistry professor, living in a small college town.

For a juvenile, it sure doesn't pull any punches about how fast and how far a society can collapse after technology grinds to a standstill.

This book was part of a series, the Winston Science Fiction Set, and it turns out I own one -- bought for its lurid cover, of course!

https://tinyurl.com/5k89b435

Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at February 12, 2023 09:07 AM (Dc2NZ)

20 I love that library

Posted by: Skip at February 12, 2023 09:07 AM (xhxe8)

21 Reading "Trail Dust," another Hopalong Cassidy novel by Mulford.

Posted by: OrangeEnt at February 12, 2023 09:07 AM (Angsy)

22 Gotta go to work.

I'll Bookmark this thread, to read it later.

Hasta la bye bye, Horde!


Jim
Sunk New Dawn
Galveston, TX

Posted by: Jim at February 12, 2023 09:08 AM (e6UQI)

23 As for Ellery Queen: Yes, Fred Dannay (the editor for many years of the mystery magazine) was the dazzling plot guy, and Manfred Lee, his cousin, was more the personality and people writer. He complained once about the weird people Dannay's plots required, and that he, Lee, was supposed to make them believable. He nearly always did.

There Was an Old Woman is from the WWII years, and is a classic example of "Ellery in Wonderland." The authors throw the logical Ellery into wild situations that could have come out of Lewis Carroll, and we watch him make sense of them. There's also some screwball comedy flavor to this one, a little like their 1938 The Four of Hearts, set in Hollywood.

Perfessor, the EQ cousins produced a number of books of short stories. Adventures of Ellery Queen from the mid-'30s, New Adventures (which contains one of the greatest impossible crime stories in print), and Calendar of Crime, among others.

Posted by: Wolfus Aurelius, Dreaming of Elsewhere at February 12, 2023 09:09 AM (omVj0)

24 >>> 6 Good Sunday morning, horde!

Looks like the German was using books to insulate the attic.

Posted by: Dash my lace wigs! at February 12, 2023 09:01 AM (OX9vb)

Now I wonder when this was discovered, and if it was recent, if the neighbors will pilfer to supply their fireplaces.

Posted by: Helena Handbasket at February 12, 2023 09:10 AM (llON8)

25 Moldbug about AI:

If it was possible to take over the world with bullshit, it would have happened already.

Mein Goldbug, I regret to inform you...

Posted by: BourbonChicken at February 12, 2023 09:10 AM (ybIRR)

26 Checked the wee free library on my walking trail and *Jackpot*! Big pictorials "WWI", "Great Battles of World War II", and "The Atlas of Past Times", which I plucked like ripe plums.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at February 12, 2023 09:10 AM (Dc2NZ)

27 Thank you for signing up for Owl Facts! You will now receive daily fun facts about owls!

Owls can use their tails for balance and have 30 individual bones in them!

Posted by: Owl Facts at February 12, 2023 09:11 AM (iayUP)

28 Prof --

If you ever get around to Ellery Queen, start with the "country" titles. I recommend "The French Powder Mystery" as a starter, but I say the best of those is "The Greek Coffin Mystery."

I started in my teens with "The Chinese Orange Mystery." It's so dated that I re ommend it only for completists.

Posted by: Weak Geek at February 12, 2023 09:11 AM (Om/di)

29 When I was a wee lass, elementary-school aged, I loved all the mysteries--Boxcar Children, Nancy Drew, and some others that I vaguely remember (but do not remember authors or whether or not they were series).

I also really loved biographies, which I think is kind of weird for youngsters, but I never claimed to be normal.

I still love both mysteries and well-written biographies and memoirs. I will read the occasional fantasy, and try a sci fi once in a while, but Space is cold and dark and techy and I don't tend to like them.

I've added historical fiction and a fair amount of non-fiction history, and I do seek out books to learn about things I don't know much about.

Posted by: Dash my lace wigs! at February 12, 2023 09:13 AM (OX9vb)

30 Getting close to 1/2 in The Devil and Karl Marx, Communism's Long March of Death, Deception and Infiltration
Long before reading this I knew Communism has nothing to teach Christians but getting dooped they are and started long ago.
Posted by: Skip at February 12, 2023 09:07 AM (xhxe

There is a video out on the interboobs somewhere of an early Jim Jones and his "church" singing a hymn to the tune of the "Internationale".

Hilarious stuff until you realize how they all ended up...

Posted by: Hairyback Guy at February 12, 2023 09:13 AM (R/m4+)

31 Well, hell. The character in "There Was an Old Woman" by Ellery Queen whom I had hoped wasn't complicit was -- and wasn't. That's all I will say about that.

The clues were solid and subtle, but the method of murder was far-fetched.

The book ends with a lame introduction of Ellery's assistant in the EQ radio series. . . .

Posted by: Weak Geek at February 12, 2023


***
But that's the fun of EQ: The murder method, or the setting, or the circumstances of the crime scene, "are* often farfetched. That is so much more fun to read about than the plodding investigators in so many modern stories. What would a modern detective make of a crime scene where the dead man's clothes have all been reversed, as well as most of the furnishings in the room?

Nikki Porter turns up in EQ short stories in Calendar of Crime and also in the novel The Scarlet Letters, both from the '50s. Then she vanishes, never to be heard from again.

Posted by: Wolfus Aurelius, Dreaming of Elsewhere at February 12, 2023 09:14 AM (omVj0)

32 I had seen that video of the fledgling owls before. But the Hogwarts spam idea made me laugh out loud. Thanks for the giggles,

Posted by: JTB at February 12, 2023 09:14 AM (7EjX1)

33 Now, I spend a lot of time reading books on education and learning, as that's a large part of my job. You'd be surprised at how much we understand about how people *really* learn, but very little of that is implemented in the classroom.

65% of US 4th grader cannot really actually read. They SEE SAY.
1. They have no understanding of phonics or word association that allow them to combine 2 words to make a new word. (eg Birth and Day = birthday)
2. School Systems (meaning the education process not the local board) are built on process that seems to assume the work in Grade 1 carries on to Grade 2 and so forth. There is no going back to remedy skills not learned and the group of cohorts is moved onward.
3. Education Colleges tend to be about 10 years to 20 years behind. How do you take 1 million post secondary professors and bring them up to speed fast enough that their new skills can be passed on to their current body of students? How do you bring 4 to 5 millions teachers up to speed fast enough to help their students?

Posted by: rhennigantx at February 12, 2023 09:15 AM (BRHaw)

34 Yah book thread! Writing update: My China book is on path to publication next week. Yes, yes, I'm Mr. Twoweeks on this, but this is by far my biggest and most complex book project and I'm trying to prevent myself from doing the usual thing and just getting it out of the way.

I have in fact continued to find little things to fix, so the delay has not been in vain. That being said, I think I've found as much as I can and I'll have to rely on nasty reviews to spot the stuff I haven't found.

If all goes well, it will go "live" and I'll send the link to the Perfesser and swing round to tell you all about.

Given the ongoing weirdness with China, I think the delay isn't going to hurt it.

Posted by: Ace-Endorsed Author A.H. Lloyd at February 12, 2023 09:15 AM (llXky)

35 The word I learned from Pliny this week is "lapidescent". It means "having a petrifying quality", as in "It had a lapidecent effect on my todger.

Posted by: Owl Facts at February 12, 2023 09:17 AM (iayUP)

36 Good morning book nuts.

Lately, I've been trying to branch out and expand beyond what I would normally gravitate to reaching for. To that end, when I visited two of my children in weeks' past, I pulled a random book or two from each of their tables or shelves to try.

Having tried that, I think I'll stick with my normal subjects and authors.

Posted by: Tonypete at February 12, 2023 09:17 AM (qoGsy)

37 If you ever get around to Ellery Queen, start with the "country" titles. I recommend "The French Powder Mystery" as a starter, but I say the best of those is "The Greek Coffin Mystery."

I started in my teens with "The Chinese Orange Mystery." It's so dated that I re ommend it only for completists.
Posted by: Weak Geek at February 12, 2023


***
Greek Coffin is one of the most elaborate and brilliant mystery novels ever written. Chinese Orange has a central idea that also sparkles. My favorites of that period are Siamese Twin, w/ a variant on the "people snowed in at a country house with a murderer," Egyptian Cross, and (despite some farfetchedness) American Gun, in which Ellery investigates a murder at an indoor rodeo show in Manhattan.

Posted by: Wolfus Aurelius, Dreaming of Elsewhere at February 12, 2023 09:17 AM (omVj0)

38 Whooo left that sock on?

Posted by: fd at February 12, 2023 09:18 AM (iayUP)

39 I have finished Burroughs' Moon cycle, which consists of "The Moon Maid", "The Moon Men", and "The Red Hawk". Overall they were an entertaining read.
I might reread them in the future, just like his Mars (Carter) cycle. There are princesses, including a space princess.
The first and especially the last book were not very deep, though the first one ends on a somewhat somber note.
This is accentuated in the second book, which covers some very serious topics, such as totalitarianism, corruption and decay engendered by totalitarianism (i.e. communism), resistance and collaboration, hope and despair, etc.. Not everything is sugar-coated, to say the least.
All three novels are entertaining, but the second is the most serious Burroughs novel I have read to date.
One can tell that they are all written fast, and in Burroughs' somewhat bombastic and superficial style. The upside is that they can be read just as fast

Posted by: PG at February 12, 2023 09:18 AM (84jHt)

40 If this volume didn't include a second EQ novel, it would already go on the trade-in list. No need to keep it.
Posted by: Weak Geek at February 12, 2023


***
Which one is the second?

Posted by: Wolfus Aurelius, Dreaming of Elsewhere at February 12, 2023 09:19 AM (omVj0)

41 Greetings!
"The Devil and Karl Marx..."
Not to detract from the book, but I had to bail out on it, such was grimness of the reading. I'll probably finish it later.

Posted by: gourmand du jour, gimpy edition at February 12, 2023 09:19 AM (jTmQV)

42 I have noticed some distinct changes in my reading habits over the years. I suspect all of us go through various phases of reading, depending on where we are in our lives and what is interesting to us at the time.
---
I'm now at a point where I am going full circle, re-reading the wartime stories of my youth. I devoured books like Reach for the Sky or Fly for Your Life in middle school and going through them again with 30 years of life-experience (and 21 years in the US Army and Air Force) is quite enlightening.

I'm also doing something I used to do but had to abandon due to limitations on free time: wargaming while reading about the period. This how I dug into history as a kid. I'd see a wargame on a topic and find books to flesh it out. Or I'd do the reverse - read about a topic and try to find a wargame that covered it.

Thus, I am pairing my RAF pilot biographies with John Butterfield's "R.A.F." solitaire wargame (by West End Games). It's still quite addictive and enjoyable. Again, having served as an operational planner and practical wargamer, I have renewed admiration for the genius behind its design.

Posted by: Ace-Endorsed Author A.H. Lloyd at February 12, 2023 09:20 AM (llXky)

43 fd, is this a good time?

Posted by: Ben Had at February 12, 2023 09:20 AM (OWEKl)

44 I started reading Hilary Mantel's Wolf Hall this last week, based on numerous recommendations here. What a fantastic book. I'm sure I will be immersed in Henry VIII's world for quite awhile because I can't imagine not finishing the whole trilogy.

Posted by: who knew at February 12, 2023 09:23 AM (4I7VG)

45 @37 --

Well, Wolfus, at least we agree on "Greek Coffin."

I bought "Siamese Twin" this year but haven't read it.

I guessed the killer in "Egyptian Cross" and "Spanish Cape," and just didn't like "American Gun."

As for the short stories, I've gone through "Q.B.I." many times.

Now, for those of you who've never tried EQ -- do these titles pique your interest?

Posted by: Weak Geek at February 12, 2023 09:24 AM (Om/di)

46 West End Games was one of my favorite publishers. They had the Star Wars license, so back in the day one could do "tactical ship-to-ship combat in the Star Wars universe" with Star Warriors. I still own "Assault on Hoth," a fun little game with upright cardboard pieces.

On the opposite end of the spectrum was "Imperivm Romanvm II," a majestic survey of the Roman Empire from 100 BC to AD 540. The game itself is neat, but what set it apart was that every rules heading had a quote from a classical source and at the back was huge bibliography. I spent about two years after I bought this going through Tacitus, Livy, Suetonius, Polybius, etc.

What better way to understand the Year of Four Emperors than to read about it while marching the various legions across a map? People forget that wargaming was a originally a teaching tool that has since morphed into a hobby.

Posted by: Ace-Endorsed Author A.H. Lloyd at February 12, 2023 09:24 AM (llXky)

47 Have one more short adventure to go for Lone Star Blood (the sequel to Lone Star Sons and Lone Star Glory) - which will be done and ready to release to the wild by late March, I think.
As for reading, finished "Wait for Me" - by Deborah Mitford. The first part, about growing up as the youngest of the notorious Mitford sisters was the best. The rest was sort of blah, interspersed with the clanging of dropped names, and the deaths of her parents, husband, and all the older sisters, one by one. Finished, shelved, and on to reading Juliet Nicholson's "The Great Silence" - about how Britain adjusted to the horrific toll of WWI. Nicholson's books were recommended here on the Book Thread - she is herself scribbling royalty, being the granddaughter of Vita Sackville-West and Harold Nicholson, but does have a gift for bringing an era to life.

Posted by: Sgt. Mom at February 12, 2023 09:24 AM (xnmPy)

48 Another sad fact - we left the little library I had constructed and stocked for the wee ones in my immediate neighborhood behind when we moved. The kids absolutely loved it.

Apparently, according to the informants that remain there, the new owners removed it.

Gah! Boy, I need some Calvin and Hobbes to pick me up.

Posted by: Tonypete at February 12, 2023 09:25 AM (qoGsy)

49 It's cold, just above freezing, cloudy and raining. Perfect reading weather. Since we have no errands to run, I'm enjoying the weather. Yay, me! Sipping my first cup of coffee while starting the book thread.

Posted by: JTB at February 12, 2023 09:26 AM (7EjX1)

50 Ha! It looks like the photo of the library used books as insulation for the ceiling. I'd have to say, they probably work well for that purpose.

Posted by: Ring 'O Fire at February 12, 2023 09:26 AM (J/pqx)

51 @40 --

"The Origin of Evil."

Posted by: Weak Geek at February 12, 2023 09:26 AM (Om/di)

52 gourmand I have a lifetime of reading man's inhumanity to man.

Posted by: Skip at February 12, 2023 09:27 AM (xhxe8)

53 The Book Of Job, guy has a tough go of it yet leans on GOD.

Posted by: Eromero at February 12, 2023 09:27 AM (MF3yS)

54 OMG, I want that attic library now!!

Posted by: Lizzy at February 12, 2023 09:27 AM (mqu1M)

55 "infundibular" I knew that word sounded familiar. I did recently encounter it while reading Pliny's Natural History:

The chamæleuce (Colt’s-foot) is known among us as the “farfarum” or “farfugium:” it grows on the banks of rivers, and has a leaf like that of the poplar, only larger. The root of it is burnt upon cypress charcoal, and, by the aid of a funnel (or tube, infundibulum), the smoke inhaled, in cases of inveterate cough"



infundibulum

Posted by: fd at February 12, 2023 09:27 AM (iayUP)

56 Given the ongoing weirdness with China, I think the delay isn't going to hurt it.

Posted by: Ace-Endorsed Author A.H. Lloyd at February 12, 2023 09:15 AM (llXky)

Brings up a question. Once you wrote it, I know you had people read it. Did you have an editor read it, or just regular people? How hard is it to find an editor? Where do you find an editor?

I read one website that indicated you should hire an editor to read your completed work, I've only found one site that says they will do it, but it was $2k. Hardly something a new writer would have laying around. And then, there's the proofreader. A.H. did you go through any of that?

Posted by: OrangeEnt at February 12, 2023 09:28 AM (Angsy)

57 I didn't start any new books this week. Just continuing with the Landmark Herodotus, The Lost Tales of Sir Galahad, and Le Morte D'Arthur. Also dipping into several books on drawing and painting, sort of like a chaser.

Posted by: JTB at February 12, 2023 09:29 AM (7EjX1)

58 "fd, is this a good time?
Posted by: Ben Had"

I'm about to start the waffles. A little later today.

Posted by: fd at February 12, 2023 09:29 AM (iayUP)

59 Wow, if you wanted to read a book but it's located in the roof. Good luck.

Posted by: dantesed at February 12, 2023 09:29 AM (88xKn)

60 Well, Wolfus, at least we agree on "Greek Coffin."

I bought "Siamese Twin" this year but haven't read it.

I guessed the killer in "Egyptian Cross" and "Spanish Cape," and just didn't like "American Gun."

As for the short stories, I've gone through "Q.B.I." many times.

Now, for those of you who've never tried EQ -- do these titles pique your interest?
Posted by: Weak Geek at February 12, 2023


***
I'm always fond of the stories where I figure out (okay, guess) the murderer in advance. Spanish Cape is pretty easy to figure, I'll admit, though the logic in it is fun to follow. I think you'll find Siamese Twin to be exciting. It's the first story about Ellery and his father to employ the dying message clue; and there are enough switches, and out-and-out danger, to make it fun.

Posted by: Wolfus Aurelius, Dreaming of Elsewhere at February 12, 2023 09:29 AM (omVj0)

61 Now, for those of you who've never tried EQ -- do these titles pique your interest?
Posted by: Weak Geek at February 12, 2023 09:24 AM (Om/di)

Just added Greek Coffin to my library hold list.

Posted by: Dash my lace wigs! at February 12, 2023 09:30 AM (OX9vb)

62 Eris and Salty. Thank you for recommending the Winston series. I had the best fun reading Heinlein's Juveniles, and these promise to be just as fun.

Posted by: I am the Shadout Mapes, the Housekeeper at February 12, 2023 09:30 AM (PiwSw)

63 Good morning

My first thought when I saw that library picture is that guy ruined his roof. Roofs have to breathe. You don't insulate the rafters. Can't figure out why they wouldn't be covered in mold.

Now back to your regularly scheduled programming.

Posted by: Sharon(willow's apprentice) at February 12, 2023 09:30 AM (Y+l9t)

64 Brings up a question. Once you wrote it, I know you had people read it. Did you have an editor read it, or just regular people? How hard is it to find an editor? Where do you find an editor?

Posted by: OrangeEnt at February 12, 2023 09:28 AM (Angsy)
---
I used volunteer "test readers" who found what they could. There are Morons who will help (I acknowledge one in the book), and then I read it aloud to my wife, who was reading over my shoulder.

This is after I did a hard-copy edit.

The particular challenge of this book is all the Chinese stuff. If I was writing about the US Civil War it would have been much, much easier.

Posted by: Ace-Endorsed Author A.H. Lloyd at February 12, 2023 09:31 AM (llXky)

65 Hot Coffee!!! Hellbender 2...Let's Go LuLu!!!

Posted by: Qmark at February 12, 2023 09:31 AM (+t9Oi)

66 I can understand, I had the same difficulty with "The Black Book of Communism".
If the answer to your philosophy is "we didn't kill enough people", time for a new philosophy.

Posted by: gourmand du jour, gimpy edition at February 12, 2023 09:32 AM (jTmQV)

67 Wow, if you wanted to read a book but it's located in the roof. Good luck.

Posted by: dantesed at February 12, 2023 09:29 AM (88xKn)
---
It's a pain when I'm tucked in bed and realize I need to look something up and have to downstairs.

I'd hate to have to go to the attic with a pry bar or something.

Posted by: Ace-Endorsed Author A.H. Lloyd at February 12, 2023 09:32 AM (llXky)

68 infundibulum
Posted by: fd at February 12, 2023 09:27 AM (iayUP)

Vonnegut wrote something about a Chronosynclastic infundibulum

Posted by: I am the Shadout Mapes, the Housekeeper at February 12, 2023 09:32 AM (PiwSw)

69 My local library recently rearranged their lobby/checkout area. Gone are the shelves of dvds, replaced by a long, double-sides shelf brimming with new releases. Fun place to browse - I zeroed in on the cook books where I found a delightful one by Jacques Pepin, "Art of the Chicken.". It is more memoir than cookbook. It has many of his watercolors, all depicting chickens, and each chapter provides a related chicken recipe. Just wonderful!

Posted by: Lizzy at February 12, 2023 09:32 AM (mqu1M)

70 Great use of space with the library, but I really hope cause of death wasn't wanting to pull a book from the peak!

Regarding Herodotus, I'd say he achieved his goal as well or better than anyone who came before him. & giant gold mining ants are at least as likely as any story being approved by our fact checking legacy media.

Posted by: InspiredHistoryMike at February 12, 2023 09:32 AM (2j1hH)

71 Tonypete, that's terrible news.

Philistines.

Reminds me of a friend of mine who bought a second house, poured a lot of money and time into renovating it, and sold it at a profit. It looked good.

The buyer razed it.

Posted by: Weak Geek at February 12, 2023 09:33 AM (Om/di)

72 I can understand, I had the same difficulty with "The Black Book of Communism".
If the answer to your philosophy is "we didn't kill enough people", time for a new philosophy.

Posted by: gourmand du jour, gimpy edition at February 12, 2023 09:32 AM (jTmQV)
---
I had to quit reading The Bloodlands. Just too depressing. Sadly, still going on.

Posted by: Ace-Endorsed Author A.H. Lloyd at February 12, 2023 09:34 AM (llXky)

73 Finished my re-read of Don Robertson's MISS MARGARET RIDPATH AND THE DISMANTLING OF THE UNIVERSE, and am tossing several coins to decide what's next.

Got hooked on science fiction myself at 12 -- had already read a lot of Poe, some Wells and Verne, a bunch of Tom Swift, and some other odds and ends. But at 12, I found a copy of Robert Heinlein's THE PUPPET MASTERS on a drug store paperback rack, finished it the same day, and started it again. My reaction was basically, "How long has this been going on and why didn't anyone tell me?" The paperback houses were reissuing tons of golden age sf at the time, and this kid was in heaven for years. Read almost nothing but sf for pleasure for nearly a decade.

Posted by: Just Some Guy at February 12, 2023 09:34 AM (a/4+U)

74 fd, just give me a call when it is convenient for you

Posted by: Ben Had at February 12, 2023 09:38 AM (OWEKl)

75 Like to put in a recommendation for a Fantasy book: Mythago Wood by Robert Holdstock.

It's probably Horror/Fantasy, really. It's dark in the way folk tales and myths are dark. Which isn't surprising as the stories of the Celtic fringe come to life in it.

The book is incredibly well written. It won awards etc etc. And Holdstock seemed to know every Celtic myth and folktale.

But, I really liked it because Holdstock tried to show how a pre-Christian person experienced the world. I don't know if he was right, but he succeeded at something. And that something is the opposite of Tolkein.

He and Gene Wolfe both believed that pre-Christians saw and interacted with gods etc.

There's heavy Jungian personality integration stuff as well, if you're into that. Which makes perfect sense given what the author is trying to do.

It's ambitious and complex but not show off. Holdstock just operated at that level naturally. And was trying to work through deep issues.

Posted by: Thesokorus at February 12, 2023 09:38 AM (1ais2)

76 I am sure our Marxists are trying to still follow Marx to the letter.

Posted by: Skip at February 12, 2023 09:39 AM (xhxe8)

77 Was it someone here who recommended "The Guest Room" by Chris Bohjallan?
Gawd I hated it. It was true to life, in how people would react, stupidly. I kept waiting to someone to tap into their inner Rambo. Either the Romanian stripper/sex slaves or the main character, the brother of the Bachelor. I was expecting the Girls to go on a tear escaping the Russian mobster. But no everyone makes one dumb move after another. It ends up being a tragedy.
What I'm wondering is can another author steal the same premise then take the story elsewhere? Plagiarism? With the sex-slave on the run, take them out of New York into Jersey. Then across America. Taking other jobs, realizing the strip clubs have a network that has an APB looking for them. Have the girls being smart and ruthless themselves. They were always watching American TV from the 80's during the day, then Russian clubs at night. Their quest is LA, and finding Kim Kardasheian. So their idea of America is 40 years out of date. Working biker bars and such. Relying on the cash, no ID, or SSN illegal alien network. Playing on their sex appeal, and youth to turn the tables on sleazebags, leaving them dead.

Posted by: Paladin at February 12, 2023 09:39 AM (neRM3)

78 I tried to read Abraham Lincoln Vampire Hunter this week but just could not get into it. It is like the author is constantly congratulating himself for this odd concept of combining historical facts about Lincoln with his fictional story. I'll keep at it while reading some other ones I enjoy more.

Posted by: Sharon(willow's apprentice) at February 12, 2023 09:39 AM (Y+l9t)

79 Okay...here we go....

Comin' out....

Open the door, Richard....

Posted by: JT at February 12, 2023 09:40 AM (T4tVD)

80 Marxists are the soft touch leninjsts know the people sill not adopt it on their own so vanguard persuasion through gramsci and Alinsky

Posted by: No 6 at February 12, 2023 09:41 AM (PXvVL)

81 My book this week has been _Hamlet's Mill_ by Giorgio de Santanilla and Hertha von Dechend. It's in that narrow category of books which ride the fine line between crackpot and genius. Similar works include Campbell's Hero With A Thousand Faces, Graves's Greek Myths, and Julian Jaynes's Origin of Consciousness etc.

The basic premise is that lots of old myths and folktales are astronomical allegories, where Samson, for instance, is probably the Sun, and so forth. I think that's pretty solid.

They kind of get onto thin ice when they presume that all this has a common origin in some pre-agriculture, pre-literacy civilization which was the ancestor of cultures all over the world -- including the New World civs, somehow.

It's very erudite and I learned a lot about old myths and tales, but this would be a dangerous book to give to someone young and impressionable, who might not know where that fine line falls.

Posted by: Trimegistus at February 12, 2023 09:41 AM (QZxDR)

82 Reading A History of the Ancient World by Chester G. Starr, 1965, 3rd edition 1982. He already has to address the revisionists in his preface to this edition, he basically just blows them off.
I'm enjoying it, and finally getting all the little kings and empires you read about in the Bible and elsewhere somewhat straight, like Sumerians, Assyrians and the like.
Got this decades ago helping a friend clean out his passed father's house. Also took a similar timeframe Herodotus, which I still have to get to, and another on the Persian Civilisation.
I'm enjoying these. Far removed from current events but still you see connections.

Posted by: From about That Time at February 12, 2023 09:42 AM (4780s)

83 In the heart, the infundibulum is the area of the right ventricle just below the pulmonary valve, also known as the pulmonary outflow tract. Abnormal narrowing of this segment (infundibular stenosis) is a feature of several congenital heart defects, most prominently Tetralogy of Fallot. I did not know it got its name from its somewhat funnel shaped configuration.

It pays to increase your word power-

tetralogy (noun)
1. A series of four related dramatic, operatic, or literary works.
2. A complex of four symptoms.

Posted by: Muldoon at February 12, 2023 09:42 AM (ykeLU)

84 In some ways my reading habits have changed over the decades, is some ways they haven't. I no longer bother with books on politics or current events or even very recent history. They used to be a large percentage of my reading. But in my mid-50s I realized how ephemeral they are, no matter how 'important' they may seem at the moment. Fiction or any literature with a woke slant (i. e., most of it) never gets a consideration. But poetry, classic and recent, that encourages the imagination and effectively uses the devices of verse is increasingly part of my book time. It makes me glad to be human. Often the recent poets are superb essayists. Malcolm Guite and Wendell Berry come to mind.

Posted by: JTB at February 12, 2023 09:42 AM (7EjX1)

85 Morning JT. My phone said it was snowing when I woke up but when I looked outside just a little drizzle.

Posted by: Sharon(willow's apprentice) at February 12, 2023 09:42 AM (Y+l9t)

86 I'm enjoying it, and finally getting all the little kings and empires you read about in the Bible and elsewhere somewhat straight, like Sumerians, Assyrians and the like.

What are we, chopped liver?

Posted by: Amalekites at February 12, 2023 09:43 AM (eOEVl)

87 I have never read Heinlein. Should remedy that.

When I turned 12, relatives in California sent me a copy of "The Number of the Beast" -- did I get that title correct? I never read it -- too enmeshed in the Hardy Boys and then the Executioner. Plus Bond.

From what I have read, it was a poor choice for a preteen.

Posted by: Weak Geek at February 12, 2023 09:43 AM (Om/di)

88 How is it that every single book in that roofline bookshelf is the exact same height? Seems fishy to me.

Posted by: Muldoon at February 12, 2023 09:43 AM (ykeLU)

89 What better way to understand the Year of Four Emperors than to read about it while marching the various legions across a map? People forget that wargaming was a originally a teaching tool that has since morphed into a hobby.
Posted by: Ace-Endorsed Author A.H. Lloyd at February 12, 2023 09:24 AM (llXky)

I've been a Wargamer since six years old when my older uncles let me play Risk with them one Christmas. Got it for my birthday that year and it litearlly it never got put away. Later came the Axis and Allies and Fortress Ameirca.
One of my uncles has a basement full of terrain and minatures for 1812 games and is a reenactor in the great lakes region.
I am curently converting an old ping pong table to a foldable Generation 2 Axis and Allies gameboard.

Now I need to find some friends.

Posted by: Reforger at February 12, 2023 09:44 AM (olB+z)

90 "and then I read it aloud to my wife"

Yeah this is key. All the truly great stylists (not virtuosi) did this.

The oral proceeded the written. The written is properly the oral preserved.

If it doesn't scan, it is wrong.

Posted by: Thesokorus at February 12, 2023 09:44 AM (1ais2)

91 Shop Rite's sales start on Sunday, and I usually go on Sundays to get it out of the way.

I figured if I go early and avoid the crowds and BOY was I wrong about THAT !

Posted by: JT at February 12, 2023 09:44 AM (T4tVD)

92 I'm a bit concerned. I knew the three words in the 'word power' segment. Further proof that I'm weird.

Posted by: JTB at February 12, 2023 09:44 AM (7EjX1)

93 Muldoon, I was just thinking that. I do not think that is real. You have to be able to circulate air directly under the roof. Also the wood across the shelving holding the books in would make it impossible to get the books out and there would be no way that a collection would be so perfectly sized.
It almost looks like a painting.

Posted by: Sharon(willow's apprentice) at February 12, 2023 09:46 AM (Y+l9t)

94 Drunken Donuts and Wawa are offering FREE Cups of coffee
to commemorate the Iggles Supe appearance.

Medium size cups only. I wanted to get a 55 Gal Drum size but no dice.

Posted by: JT at February 12, 2023 09:47 AM (T4tVD)

95 Does anybody remember a story called "Oblio and Arrow" about a boy and his dog?

My brother popped that on me yesterday as something from our childhood, but I have no recollection of it.

Posted by: Muldoon at February 12, 2023 09:47 AM (ykeLU)

96 I used volunteer "test readers" who found what they could. There are Morons who will help (I acknowledge one in the book), and then I read it aloud to my wife, who was reading over my shoulder.

This is after I did a hard-copy edit.

The particular challenge of this book is all the Chinese stuff. If I was writing about the US Civil War it would have been much, much easier.

Posted by: Ace-Endorsed Author A.H. Lloyd at February 12, 2023 09:31 AM (llXky)

Thanks. I also had the feeling that the guy running the website was angling for business.

SMBT has talked about how poorly written a lot of today's works are, and how they could have used an editor. Maybe they're not out there as much as they used to be. I'd hate to keep asking here for readers, although I'd read others' work in return. I'm just not sure how to go about finding out if my stuff is worth reading or not, and if it is, what I'd have to do to make it high quality, not drek.

Posted by: OrangeEnt at February 12, 2023 09:48 AM (Angsy)

97 In the sequel abe lincoln becomes a vampire along with a host of others like howard hughes and rasputin

Posted by: No 6 at February 12, 2023 09:49 AM (PXvVL)

98
There is a Ray Bradbury short story about some guy who owns a internal combustion car and has to sneak it out at night because it's illegal.

Does anyone remember what anthology that story is part of?

Posted by: Auspex at February 12, 2023 09:49 AM (j4U/Z)

99 fd, just give me a call when it is convenient for you
Posted by: Ben Had

Why not post your phone number so we can ALL call ya when its convenient for us.?

Posted by: JT at February 12, 2023 09:49 AM (T4tVD)

100 Tonypete, the same thing happened with my childhood home. It was a funky little victorian that had a small library off of the small living room with floor to ceiling built-in bookshelves and a deep window seat (held two comfortably) looking out into the front garden, well-shaded and camouflaged by a couple of old maples. It was absolute heaven. My parents sold the house when I went off to college (such a sad event!), but the family who bought it lived there for ~20 years made few changes (they loved the house so much they tried adding my brothers lap-eared bunnies, in a hutch out back, into the home sale (as if!!).

Fast forward to 2020 and my sister sends me a Zillow link to our house -- it had been sold and then "renoed" into a generic HGTV-style trendy home, the little library replaced by four empty, white walls, no window seat, just a window with an ugly desk plunked in front of it - facing the interior, not the window! The 4 tiny bedrooms upstairs were replaced with a master suite , including a ridiculously huge bathroom. Sigh. . .

Posted by: Lizzy at February 12, 2023 09:50 AM (mqu1M)

101 I was just thinking that. I do not think that is real. You have to be able to circulate air directly under the roof. Also the wood across the shelving holding the books in would make it impossible to get the books out and there would be no way that a collection would be so perfectly sized.
It almost looks like a painting.


I thought that as well, but if you look at the second row to the right of the centerline, about a quarter of the way down, you can see some books that appear to be coming out of the shelving. My guess is that he's never read any of those books, and simply intended them for decoration, so selected those of a uniform size.

Posted by: Archimedes at February 12, 2023 09:50 AM (eOEVl)

102 THE NUMBER OF THE BEAST ain't exactly a good place to start with Heinlein. THE PUPPET MASTERS, DOUBLE STAR, or that huge collection THE PAST THROUGH TOMORROW would be good ones, and so would some of his juveniles. I thought he was at his best pre-STRANGER IN A STRANGE LAND. Some of the essays in his collection EXPANDED UNIVERSE re: the state of education etc still hold up depressingly well.

Posted by: Just Some Guy at February 12, 2023 09:51 AM (a/4+U)

103 I have literally read, bought, been given hundreds of paranormal, Fortean, true ghost and alt-history books (sadly none of which I have now) and here is a highlight.

Best Regional Ghost Book

New England Ghost Files by Charles Turek Robinson

Robinson, a Harvard-trained anthropologist was a seminal figure in the New England paranormal community. He's gone now, become a ghost himself, but his book ignited a whole generation of ghost hunters and legend trippers seeking out the
strange, odd and monstrous from the Red Headed Phantom of Route 44 (Rehoboth, MA); Mercy "I am perfectly pleasant" Brown, New England's most famous Vampire; the haunted funhouse in New Hampshire; the underwater wreck with the ghostly face staring back; the regretful spirit in the Morgue... and much more.

Posted by: Mister Ghost at February 12, 2023 09:51 AM (TGPs7)

104 the 2 best recent Vampire books I've read in the last 20yrs. ...
Anno Dracula
The Bloody Red Baron
had the good fortune to have met Kim at a summer party Ile de Re 2012....

Posted by: Qmark at February 12, 2023 09:52 AM (+t9Oi)

105 The Girl in the Thistles (noted in content by Writing Teacher) is on kindle unlimited.

I'll read it and leave a review.

Posted by: Dash my lace wigs! at February 12, 2023 09:52 AM (OX9vb)

106 In 1971, it was made into the movie "The Point", including songs by Harry Nilsson. Anti-Vietnam.

Posted by: Archimedes at February 12, 2023 09:52 AM (eOEVl)

107 Morning JT. My phone said it was snowing when I woke up but when I looked outside just a little drizzle.
Posted by: Sharon(willow's apprentice)

Hiya Sharon ! We were supposed to get flurries turning to rain
during the night, but nothing here yet.

My birdbath is frozen now. It was thawed @7AM.

Posted by: JT at February 12, 2023 09:52 AM (T4tVD)

108 As I lose faith in the reliability of electronic matters I am increasingly drawn to physical books and non-electric entertainment. Whether it's unreliable electricity or brain dead system designs or corporate greed doesn't matter. Once the materials are in my hands and not under the control of others, I feel more secure. Clearly, my prepper instincts are getting stronger as is my curmudgeon quotient.

The upside is it gives me an excuse to acquire and enjoy well made books.

Posted by: JTB at February 12, 2023 09:52 AM (7EjX1)

109 95 Does anybody remember a story called "Oblio and Arrow" about a boy and his dog?

My brother popped that on me yesterday as something from our childhood, but I have no recollection of it.
Posted by: Muldoon at February 12, 2023 09:47 AM (ykeLU)
---

Sounds like the animated movie "The Point".

Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at February 12, 2023 09:53 AM (Dc2NZ)

110 Does anyone remember what anthology that story is part of?
Posted by: Auspex at February 12, 2023 09:49 AM (j4U/Z)

Rush. Anthology. Red Barchetta.

I think it on there.

Posted by: Reforger at February 12, 2023 09:53 AM (olB+z)

111 Oblio and Arrow, "Me and my Arrow":

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UBLbdDAzNfM

Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at February 12, 2023 09:54 AM (Dc2NZ)

112 @98 --

"Red Barchetta" by Rush drew upon a story with that premise, but the author wasn't Bradbury. It first appeared in Car & Driver magazine.

Posted by: Weak Geek at February 12, 2023 09:54 AM (Om/di)

113 >>Sounds like the animated movie "The Point".


Yes! Watch out for the Blue Meanies!!

Posted by: Lizzy at February 12, 2023 09:55 AM (mqu1M)

114 "I know why you're here. You're here because I rescue babies."

Those were the words uttered by Mark Houck (pro-life Catholic activist) when the FBI "heroes" showed up to terrorize him, his wife and their 7 children. Mark has been acquitted of all charges and plans to sue the FEEBs.

https://tinyurl.com/bdke326t

Posted by: kallisto at February 12, 2023 09:55 AM (Bklxb)

115 Look up infundibulum
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Infundibulum

Posted by: Ciampino - we need a Liberal infundibulum leading to THE LAKE OF FIRE at February 12, 2023 09:55 AM (qfLjt)

116 Mark has been acquitted of all charges and plans to sue the FEEBs.

Sue. Sue like the wind.

Posted by: Archimedes at February 12, 2023 09:55 AM (eOEVl)

117 @98 Auspex, around 1966 there was a short story by a major SF writer in Sports Car Graphic, my all-time favorite car magazine. A rorting, snorting outlawed old school roadster makes a wild run up the Pikes Peak highway, pursued by timid electrics. Spooky ending. I've looked for it for years, and can't find it. That could just possibly be the Bradbury piece.

Posted by: Way, Way Downriver at February 12, 2023 09:56 AM (jYCXf)

118 I just started Carly Simon's autobiography "Boys in the Trees" and it is surprisingly good. I only say that because Carly wasn't really on my radar growing up, even though her songs got a lot of airtime.

Carly's dad was the Simon in Simon & Schuster publishing, and a parade of interesting artists, writers, and musicians tramped through their Greenwich Village apartment building. Her father wrote letters to Eisenhower discussing nuclear disarmament and they became bridge and golf buddies.

I do like her album of standards called "My Romance":

https://tinyurl.com/2p88cwby

Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at February 12, 2023 09:56 AM (Dc2NZ)

119 The youtube I linked is a little over 5 minutes long.

Mark talks about how the new GOP congress will be holding hearings about the weaponization of the FBI. He will be a key witness providing testimony.

Posted by: kallisto at February 12, 2023 09:57 AM (Bklxb)

120 Yes! Watch out for the Blue Meanies!!
Posted by: Lizzy at February 12, 2023 09:55 AM (mqu1M)

That's "Yellow Submarine"!

Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at February 12, 2023 09:57 AM (Dc2NZ)

121 Good morning Horde!

Lovely book thread Perfesser!! I agree, books on the ceiling make for interesting insulation, but if you take one down, I assume the others fall on your head!

I'm trudging through The Coming of the Third Reich by Richard Evans, which assumes vast knowledge of pre world war 1 German history, thought and culture. The good thing about this is that it forces one to look that stuff up, since it's not taught in general world history courses, and it's rather intrinsic to understanding why the first two world wars occurred. For relief from that, I indulge in Scripture and Dave Barry (thanks JT!!!!)

Posted by: Moki at February 12, 2023 09:58 AM (JrN/x)

122 Am I the only male 29er that's never played Risk?


Posted by: weirdflunky at February 12, 2023 09:58 AM (cknjq)

123 >>That's "Yellow Submarine"!

D'oh!

Posted by: Lizzy at February 12, 2023 09:59 AM (mqu1M)

124 It's very erudite and I learned a lot about old myths and tales, but this would be a dangerous book to give to someone young and impressionable, who might not know where that fine line falls.
Posted by: Trimegistus at February 12, 2023 09:41 AM (QZxDR)

The thing is, the more you read that stuff, which is really just stuff outside the academy, the more you realize that the really smart people have read it too.

They don't blast it out, but swear to god, there are hints everywhere.

For just one example, Robert Howard was really erudite in the indo-european expansion.

Another, Leigh Brackett wrote a novella about Lemuria based entirely on Chruchward's books.

If one is inquisitive and doesn't put the bilnders on, one ends up in certain places...

Posted by: Thesokorus at February 12, 2023 10:00 AM (1ais2)

125 114 "I know why you're here. You're here because I rescue babies."

Those were the words uttered by Mark Houck (pro-life Catholic activist) when the FBI "heroes" showed up to terrorize him, his wife and their 7 children. Mark has been acquitted of all charges and plans to sue the FEEBs.

https://tinyurl.com/bdke326t
Posted by: kallisto at February 12, 2023 09:55 AM (Bklxb)

That is awesome news!

Posted by: Moki at February 12, 2023 10:00 AM (JrN/x)

126 Hardbacks keep falling on my head ...

Posted by: Weak Geek at February 12, 2023 10:00 AM (Om/di)

127 95 Does anybody remember a story called "Oblio and Arrow" about a boy and his dog?

My brother popped that on me yesterday as something from our childhood, but I have no recollection of it.
Posted by: Muldoon at February 12, 2023 09:47 AM

"The Point," an animated movie. Harry Nilsson wrote it, including the music. "Me and My Arrow" and "Lifeline" are probably the most well-known songs from it.

Posted by: Smart, sad, and subversive. Worth a watch. at February 12, 2023 10:01 AM (UKe2c)

128 Muldoon @ 95. There was a TV special cartoon about Oblio and his dog Arrow with excellent music by Harry Nillson (especially the song "Me and My Arrow"). It was called The Point. I don't know if it was based on a book or not.

Posted by: who knew at February 12, 2023 10:01 AM (4I7VG)

129 In my high school & college years, my preferred reading was the most avant-garde experimental craziness I could find, and I developed a lifelong attachment to the short stories of Jorge Luis Borges and Italo Calvino (in translation, of course; I'm no linguist). But that was before avant-garde became simply garde, and what was thrilling became repetitious. I lost much of my admiration for Samuel Beckett when Deirdre Bair's biography revealed him as a sad drunk; Paul Auster epitomizes experimentalism as contempt for one's readers; Mark Z. Danielewski followed the brilliance of House of Leaves with endless, incomprehensible doorstops; and so forth. Life is just too short for boring books, and only Torah learning is worth serious difficulty. So there.

Posted by: werewife, princess of Delray Beach at February 12, 2023 10:01 AM (SPNTN)

130 Hiya Moki !

Posted by: JT at February 12, 2023 10:02 AM (T4tVD)

131 weirdflunky-Yes

Posted by: Skip at February 12, 2023 10:02 AM (xhxe8)

132 114 "I know why you're here. You're here because I rescue babies."

Those were the words uttered by Mark Houck (pro-life Catholic activist) when the FBI "heroes" showed up to terrorize him, his wife and their 7 children. Mark has been acquitted of all charges and plans to sue the FEEBs.

https://tinyurl.com/bdke326t

Posted by: kallisto at February 12, 2023 09:55 AM (Bklxb)
----
Good for him. Suing needs to happen more often. We need legislation to change the law so that 'offical' get sued in THEIR PRIVATE CAPACITY. It's no good when the city, State, etc, pays the fine. No personal lesson is learnt.
We also need some deep pocket conservatives to pitch in to setup a pro bono conservative group, with really deep pockets, to sue on individuals' behalf.

Posted by: Ciampino -- we need a Liberal infundibulum leading to THE LAKE OF FIRE at February 12, 2023 10:02 AM (qfLjt)

133 This is going to drive me crazy. Brico et deco has to do with home decor. I cannot track down the story about this house. It is just too pristine. I used to sell new construction homes and the worst thing you can do is insulate the ceiling in an attic. Heat rises and creates moisture causing mold.
It just wouldn't especially over a number of years.
I wouldn't want anyone to think this is a good idea.

Posted by: Sharon(willow's apprentice) at February 12, 2023 10:03 AM (Y+l9t)

134 Aaron Kheriaty MD was fired from his position at UC Irvine (Director of Bioethics Dept) because he refused the jab on the basis that he had already recovered from a bout of the coof and therefore had antibodies.

He has since written a book,The New Abnormal: The Rise of the Biomedical Security State. The book has reached the top of the bestseller list in AMZ Political Freedom category:

https://tinyurl.com/3n8phbez

Posted by: kallisto at February 12, 2023 10:03 AM (Bklxb)

135 I called Hamlet's Mill potentially dangerous because I could see some college-age reader (especially an autodidact who isn't otherwise well-read in history and mythology) taking it as their personal One Book That Explains Everything.

Several of the books I compared it to are also frequently OBTEEs for autodidacts -- and of course we can't forget Chomsky and Rand, who made careers of writing OBTEEs.

Posted by: Trimegistus at February 12, 2023 10:03 AM (QZxDR)

136

Rush. Anthology. Red Barchetta.

I think it on there.
Posted by: Reforger at February 12, 2023 09:53 AM (olB+z)

Thanks!

Posted by: Auspex at February 12, 2023 10:04 AM (j4U/Z)

137 130 Hiya Moki !
Posted by: JT at February 12, 2023 10:02 AM (T4tVD)

Hiya JT! I feel sorry for your birds - no bath today!!

Posted by: Moki at February 12, 2023 10:04 AM (JrN/x)

138 Has anyone ever COMPLETED a game of Risk?

Posted by: Weak Geek at February 12, 2023 10:04 AM (Om/di)

139 31 ... "But that's the fun of EQ: The murder method, or the setting, or the circumstances of the crime scene, "are* often farfetched. That is so much more fun to read about than the plodding investigators in so many modern stories. What would a modern detective make of a crime scene where the dead man's clothes have all been reversed, as well as most of the furnishings in the room?"

Damn it, Wolfus! Now I want to dig out my old copies of Ellery Queen. (It's been a long time.) Hope it doesn't lead to rereading all my Nero Wolf stories. My TBR pile is already dangerously precarious.

Posted by: JTB at February 12, 2023 10:06 AM (7EjX1)

140 Hiya JT! I feel sorry for your birds - no bath today!!
Posted by: Moki

They understand the way of things.

Posted by: JT at February 12, 2023 10:06 AM (T4tVD)

141 Well, I was really late with my update on The Point. I should have known that the horde would beat me to it.

Posted by: who knew at February 12, 2023 10:06 AM (4I7VG)

142
When I was a young moron in the 60s there were very few fantasy books in the SF section my school or local libray. Andre Norton and Ursula K. Leguin are the only writers that come to mind. I didn't care for fantasy then and I don't now, with few exceptions.

I wish fantasy and SF were in separate sections. Fantasy has grown to be the majority of books in the SF section, and it's kind of annoying to have to look through all the titles with lords and ladies and names like Wolfsbane and Ravensborn.

I much prefer military type SF with spaceships and wars and bug-eyed monsters.

Posted by: frankly at February 12, 2023 10:06 AM (2383H)

143 This week I started The Cuckoo's Calling. Good grief, what long-winded sentences. This woman must buy semicolons by the trainload. Were the Harry Potter books this wordy?

Posted by: Oddbob at February 12, 2023 10:07 AM (nfrXX)

144 That is awesome news!

Posted by: Moki at February 12, 2023 10:00 AM (JrN/x)


Yes, from viewing this short clip it's clear Mark is a man of great faith and good character. What an example for his children and the world.

Posted by: kallisto at February 12, 2023 10:07 AM (Bklxb)

145 Sounds like the animated movie "The Point".

*******

Yeah, I Gargled™ it and was able to determine that. Listened to the Nilsson song Me and My Arrow (seemed vaguely familiar) and still have no recollection of ever having seen the movie, let alone glommed onto it as a significant tale from my youth. I just was curious if it was a "thing" that I missed, or "not a thing".

I never was a fan of Nilsson.

Posted by: Muldoon at February 12, 2023 10:08 AM (ykeLU)

146 eris, I enjoyed Boys In the Trees too. I listened to the audiobook that Carly herself read, and she did very well I thought.

Posted by: skywch at February 12, 2023 10:08 AM (uqhmb)

147 124
Another, Leigh Brackett wrote a novella about Lemuria based entirely on Chruchward's books.

Posted by: Thesokorus at February 12, 2023 10:00 AM (1ais2)
----
Lemuria, hmm, that's the island with all the lemurs right? ..... wait, that's Madagascar ...

Posted by: Ciampino - Lemuria sounds like a cheese at February 12, 2023 10:08 AM (qfLjt)

148 I finished "SPQR: A History of Ancient Rome"
By: Mary Beard
It was very engaging. Divided in to 3 parts, pre-Republic, Republic and Empire.

Posted by: gourmand du jour, gimpy edition at February 12, 2023 10:08 AM (jTmQV)

149 Regarding the Hogwarts pic:

It is Superb Owl Sunday!

Posted by: Fritzy at February 12, 2023 10:08 AM (YoZGp)

150 Clearly, my prepper instincts are getting stronger as is my curmudgeon quotient.

The upside is it gives me an excuse to acquire and enjoy well made books.
Posted by: JTB at February 12, 2023 09:52 AM (7EjX1)

Welcome to my Death of Western Civ First Aid Kit.
I need to be more organized, and I have a lot of paperbacks, instead of HBs. Mine is highly Catholic-weighted, of course, for the possibly upcoming Underground Church.

Posted by: sal: tolle adversarium et afflige inimicum at February 12, 2023 10:09 AM (wE246)

151 I had an epiphany this week about why I like some "romance" novels and why some are just boring and repetitive. It is the ones that have a mystery as the primary story line that I like. The romance is secondary to the story line. So, I like mystery stories where there is some sexual tension between the main characters.

Posted by: Sharon(willow's apprentice) at February 12, 2023 10:09 AM (Y+l9t)

152 I'm back to reading the Flashman novels. Rollicking good fun!

Posted by: ChupaMe at February 12, 2023 10:10 AM (BzvGd)

153 122 Am I the only male 29er that's never played Risk?


Posted by: weirdflunky at February 12, 2023 09:58 AM (cknjq)

No. I had a whole group of friends that wouldn't ever sit in front of a gameboard. They did cars and motorcycles. I owe them a lot though. My $500 car habit is a direct result of hamging out with the gearhead division in my high school. Truth be told I'm a WAY better greaser than a gamer.

Posted by: Reforger at February 12, 2023 10:10 AM (olB+z)

154 For all those more familiar with Ellery Queen than I: Is it true that for at least a few stories, one of the Queen ghostwriters was the immortal Jack Vance? If it isn't true, it should be!

Posted by: werewife, princess of Delray Beach at February 12, 2023 10:10 AM (SPNTN)

155 I just started Carly Simon's autobiography "Boys in the Trees" and it is surprisingly good. I only say that because Carly wasn't really on my radar growing up, even though her songs got a lot of airtime.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at February 12, 2023 09:56 AM (Dc2NZ)
---
I have a blog post on her evolution as a singer at my site (link in nic). Her earliest work is skeptical of marriage ("That's the way I always heard it should be") and adultery ("You belong to me") and heartache ("It will be coming 'round again") but one of her last hits was "The stuff that dreams are made of" which urges young women to stick it out even if the marriage is dull.

An interesting progression from skeptical unsatisfied liberal to very a conservative appreciation for the "slow and steady fire," which is "the reason we are alive."

The post is "A tale of Boomer evolution: Carly Simon" tinyurl.com/ubx52buu

Posted by: Ace-Endorsed Author A.H. Lloyd at February 12, 2023 10:10 AM (llXky)

156 One of the nice things about sf and fantasy was the amount of material you could find in some of the anthologies that didn't show up in the usual genre outlets -- Borges showed up in collections edited by Judith Merril and Terry Carr, for instance, and that was where I first ran across him. If memory serves, Merril included work by Malamud and others in her year's best collections.

Those 3 big collections of Borges edited and mostly translated by Andrew Hurley just don't read as well to me as the earlier di Giovanni translations; shame the earlier ones were taken out of print.

Posted by: Just Some Guy at February 12, 2023 10:11 AM (a/4+U)

157 My wife is in the (possibly) latter stages of writing her first novel, with plans for sequels depending on how things go with the first book. She has used both volunteer readers and professional editors. I think, thus far, the editors have cost her a total of $2K. She thinks it's been worth the money, given the feedback she received. Whether or not any of that cash is actually recovered is another question. She did submit an excerpt and won Xth place in a contest and got about $150 for it, so she is now the award-winning novelist in our family.

Posted by: PabloD at February 12, 2023 10:12 AM (56oEv)

158 I wish fantasy and SF were in separate sections.

I suspect most "hard" SF fans don't care much for sword-and-sorcery fantasy. But SF is legitimately a sub-genre of fantasy. S&S starts with the premise "what if magic were real?" Hard SF starts with "what if this technology were real?" Apply Clark's Law and there ya go.

Posted by: Oddbob at February 12, 2023 10:12 AM (nfrXX)

159 @149 --

*groan*

Posted by: Weak Geek at February 12, 2023 10:12 AM (Om/di)

160 Someone in last week's thread (Weak Geek?) mentioned canals, but I wasn't active in the morning to respond then. Buuuuuut......One of my favorite coffee-table-books is "Waterways; Past and Present" by Derek Pratt. It tells a brief history/narrative of a bunch of canals in Britain, but mostly it's an excuse to publish historical and current pictures of the canals! The pictures are neat. And the boats that travel the canals are....unique. Surprising long, super low to the waterline, completely unsuited to anything but canals....but still neat.

It makes me want to draw up a fantasy world were canal travel is as much a part of the setting as the castles and dragons! Of course, then I'd have to come up with a way that the canals were made and maintained by a classical or medeval culture, rather than an early industrial one...

Posted by: Castle Guy at February 12, 2023 10:13 AM (Lhaco)

161 Several of the books I compared it to are also frequently OBTEEs for autodidacts -- and of course we can't forget Chomsky and Rand, who made careers of writing OBTEEs.
Posted by: Trimegistus at February 12, 2023 10:03 AM (QZxDR)

I hear what you are saying. But at the same time, I am a crank. My family is made up of cranks. As long as someone isn't spouting off the conventional wisdom about something, I am interested. It's refreshing to hear even a Chomskyite at this point.

I just cannot take it anymore when some dullard informs me of the information getting blasted into all our brains 24/7 as if it were some unknown thing I wasn't aware of.

"Wow, you mean professors think ppl came out of Africa? Holy cow what was I thinking by not thinking that! Thanks for the info!"

Posted by: Thesokorus at February 12, 2023 10:13 AM (1ais2)

162 Carly SImon has done 4 albums of standards, My Romance, Moonlight Serenade, Film Noir, and Torch. I think they are all solid.

Posted by: who knew at February 12, 2023 10:13 AM (4I7VG)

163 I never read "Oblio and Arrow" but there was an animated version of it with music by Harry Nilsson called "The Point." (I had to look it up. It was released in 1971.) I remember one of the songs but don't recall watching the film.

Posted by: Art Rondelet of Malmsey at February 12, 2023 10:13 AM (fTtFy)

164 48 ... "Boy, I need some Calvin and Hobbes to pick me up."

Tonypete,
Calvin and Hobbes is always appropriate. Along with Wodehouse and Pat McManus.

Posted by: JTB at February 12, 2023 10:14 AM (7EjX1)

165 So, I like mystery stories where there is some sexual tension between the main characters.
Posted by: Sharon(willow's apprentice) at February 12, 2023 10:09 AM (Y+l9t)

I must be the opposite; this is the thing that is about to make me abandon the Cormoran Strike series. The mysteries are complex, and I like trying to figure them out, but the Robin/Strike relationship gets annoying for me.

Posted by: Dash my lace wigs! at February 12, 2023 10:14 AM (OX9vb)

166 Welcome to my Death of Western Civ First Aid Kit.
I need to be more organized, and I have a lot of paperbacks, instead of HBs. Mine is highly Catholic-weighted, of course, for the possibly upcoming Underground Church.
Posted by: sal: tolle adversarium et afflige inimicum at February 12, 2023 10:09 AM (wE246)

You should look into the underground church in Saudi for examples. We were part of the protestant group, but we knew and supported the Catholics as well. It was fascinating as well as instructive in how to share one's faith when it's against the law. Oddly, we had more freedom to speak about God and Christ in Riyadh than here.

Posted by: Moki at February 12, 2023 10:14 AM (JrN/x)

167 I just recently watched the new Dune movie, which I liked a lot. It spurred me to go back and read the original first three novels. About halfway through the first one.

I first read these in high school, some 40 plus years ago. It's nice to revisit something I read that long ago again. Perspective changes things. I was probably 17 when I first read them. I'm 59 now. 59-year-old me is much different than 17-year-old me.

Posted by: Biergood at February 12, 2023 10:14 AM (FQWHA)

168 On the other hand, Bradbury would not drive and hated the personal car with a passion, so he might not have written that pro-car story. Kind of out of character.

For a nice overview of those little(!) empires like Assyria and Sumeria, I never stop flogging for William MacNeill's "The Rise of The West," which looks at the overlap of opening and closing ecumenes through invention and innovation. He was one of the only conservative voices in Big History in the 60's.

Posted by: Way, Way Downriver at February 12, 2023 10:15 AM (jYCXf)

169 Has anyone ever COMPLETED a game of Risk?

Posted by: Weak Geek at February 12, 2023 10:04 AM (Om/di)
---
Yep, many times. Usually you don't need to as once the reinforcement bonus gets high enough, the winner becomes obvious.

There was a variant called "Castle Risk" set in Europe which was must faster - as the name indicates, each player has a castle (capital) and all you have to do is capture it to knock them out of the game.

My senior year in high school Saturday Night Shogun was a thing. Great game, too bad they have to keep renaming it.

Posted by: Ace-Endorsed Author A.H. Lloyd at February 12, 2023 10:15 AM (llXky)

170 Lemuria, hmm, that's the island with all the lemurs right? ..... wait, that's Madagascar ...
Posted by: Ciampino - Lemuria sounds like a cheese at February 12, 2023 10:08 AM (qfLjt)

Same same bro. Same same.

Posted by: Thesokorus at February 12, 2023 10:15 AM (1ais2)

171 142
When I was a young moron in the 60s there were very few fantasy books in the SF section my school or local libray. Andre Norton and Ursula K. Leguin are the only writers that come to mind. I didn't care for fantasy then and I don't now, with few exceptions.

I wish fantasy and SF were in separate sections. Fantasy has grown to be the majority of books in the SF section, and it's kind of annoying to have to look through all the titles with lords and ladies and names like Wolfsbane and Ravensborn.

I much prefer military type SF with spaceships and wars and bug-eyed monsters.

Posted by: frankly at February 12, 2023 10:06 AM (2383H)
----
My sentiments exactly, I have never been able to stomach Fantasy as it seems too much like magic. The first serious SF book I read was in my last year of HS in Nairobi. Found it in our very small library (the school was only 4 years old then). "Limbo 90" by Bernard Wolfe (1961). I didn't look back.

Posted by: Ciampino - Lemuria sounds like a cheese at February 12, 2023 10:15 AM (qfLjt)

172 Tetralogy of Fallot


Posted by: Muldoon at February 12, 2023 09:42 AM (ykeLU)

That would make a great fantasy novel title

Posted by: vmom stabby stabby stabby stabby stabamillion at February 12, 2023 10:15 AM (fUnHJ)

173 I almost forgot !

I don't think the pants guy is a guy !

Posted by: JT at February 12, 2023 10:15 AM (T4tVD)

174 I am sure our Marxists are trying to still follow Marx to the letter.
Posted by: Skip

Real communism has never been tried.

Posted by: Anonosaurus Wrecks, Not a Real Simulation at February 12, 2023 10:16 AM (FVME7)

175 I accidently wandered into a Buddhist columbarium in Kyoto, next to the vast cemetery at the Kiyomizu-Dera temple.

A surreal experience with chants echoing throughout.

Posted by: Dr. Varno at February 12, 2023 10:16 AM (X+Ku8)

176 There is currently a kickstarter up for a hardcover collection of Witchblade comics from the 90's. I've developed a taste for hardcover comic collections, but I've bought too many bad collections to spend money blindly...So I spent a bit of time this week reading the first Witchbalde comics digitally. I......Think I'm going to get the hardcover. The art is good (very 90's), and the story hasn't been pissing me off, so that right there puts it above several collections I've bought. Here's hoping the books don't disappoint!

Posted by: Castle Guy at February 12, 2023 10:17 AM (Lhaco)

177 In my store, Marxism will be in s&m fantasy which i don't sell so get out of here.

Posted by: humphreyrobot at February 12, 2023 10:17 AM (kpdIJ)

178 94 Drunken Donuts and Wawa are offering FREE Cups of coffee
to commemorate the Iggles Supe appearance.


**

Free wawa covfefe! Thanks for the tip, JT!

Posted by: vmom stabby stabby stabby stabby stabamillion at February 12, 2023 10:17 AM (fUnHJ)

179 Finished many games of Risk
Pondered once getting the Napoleonic game but it was like $120

Posted by: Skip at February 12, 2023 10:17 AM (xhxe8)

180 I'm about to start reading Men in Blue by W.E.B. Griffin.

Looks like it might be good !

Posted by: JT at February 12, 2023 10:18 AM (T4tVD)

181 Vance did do some Ellery Queens -- The Four Johns, A Room to Die In, and The Madman Theory, according to Vance's isfdb.org entry. (Thought I'd read somewhere that And on the Eighth Day was also Vance, but not sure on that one.)

The Queen novel The Player on the Other Side was done by Theodore Sturgeon.

Posted by: Just Some Guy at February 12, 2023 10:18 AM (a/4+U)

182 I never read "Oblio and Arrow" but there was an animated version of it with music by Harry Nilsson called "The Point." (I had to look it up. It was released in 1971.) I remember one of the songs but don't recall watching the film.
Posted by: Art Rondelet

I watched it back in the day. The big song from it was Me and My Arrow.

Posted by: Anonosaurus Wrecks, Not a Real Simulation at February 12, 2023 10:18 AM (FVME7)

183 Free wawa covfefe! Thanks for the tip, JT!
Posted by: vmom stabby stabby stabby stabby stabamillion

Posted by: JT at February 12, 2023 10:18 AM (T4tVD)

184 You should look into the underground church in Saudi for examples. We were part of the protestant group, but we knew and supported the Catholics as well. It was fascinating as well as instructive in how to share one's faith when it's against the law. Oddly, we had more freedom to speak about God and Christ in Riyadh than here.

Posted by: Moki at February 12, 2023 10:14 AM (JrN/x)
---
Interesting to see the changing attitudes. Last week's homily and the Friday message of the bishop both emphasize that "nice" is not a Christian virtue. This has been going on for a couple of years and there's a clear shift from "we'll win them over with kindness" to "We must speak clearly and hold fast to our faith."

For the last few decades the left basically won by default. They're not used to actual resistance.

My (ahem) book on the Spanish Civil War is instructive in this respect.

Posted by: Ace-Endorsed Author A.H. Lloyd at February 12, 2023 10:18 AM (llXky)

185 Then I discovered science fiction when I was around 12 or so and haven't looked back

my exposure to Sci-Fi was limited to the b/w flicks of the 1950s and StarTrek TOS. And of course HG Wells. But really not much of a fan.

However recently I started listening to old Sci-fi radio series such as X-Minus One, Escape, Dimension X...when these stories are good, they are excellent! (Maybe I appreciate them more because they are being acted out, therefore come more to life.) The authors who later became famous such as Ray Bradbury are well represented in these radio dramas.

Posted by: kallisto at February 12, 2023 10:19 AM (Bklxb)

186 I am reading Erik Larson's 'The Splendid and the Vile" about Churchill and his first year as Prime Minister (1940-1941). It covers the Fall of France, its affect in making the Battle of Britain that much easier for the Germans, the real threat of invasion and so on.

One thing I have learned so far- the "Enigma" movie with B. Cumberback is highly-colored BS. But I kind of knew that already.

Posted by: sal: tolle adversarium et afflige inimicum at February 12, 2023 10:19 AM (wE246)

187 I don't think the pants guy is a guy !
Posted by: JT

And if you're going to wear wacky hair and yoga pants you should at least match the colors better.

Posted by: She Hobbit (out and about in Middle Earth) at February 12, 2023 10:20 AM (0EjvZ)

188 I.....don't understand how you can actually reach the roof-books in the pictured library. And that triggers me. So many wasted books...

Posted by: Castle Guy at February 12, 2023 10:20 AM (Lhaco)

189 . "Boy, I need some Calvin and Hobbes to pick me up."

Tonypete,
Calvin and Hobbes is always appropriate. Along with Wodehouse and Pat McManus.
Posted by: JTB

Let's not forget Dave Barry !

Posted by: JT at February 12, 2023 10:21 AM (T4tVD)

190 Nicholson's books were recommended here on the Book Thread - she is herself scribbling royalty, being the granddaughter of Vita Sackville-West and Harold Nicholson, but does have a gift for bringing an era to life.
Posted by: Sgt. Mom at February 12, 2023 09:24 AM (xnmPy)

In my Larson I'm reading- her grandparents have their in case of invasion bugout and in case of capture suicide plans all made.

Posted by: sal: tolle adversarium et afflige inimicum at February 12, 2023 10:21 AM (wE246)

191 I played a couple games of Risk in high school - one of my friends had it, but it looks like there have been several variations of the core game (in addition to all the "themed" sets, for different things like GoT). I'm assuming that, like Axis and Allies, the rules were changed over the decades. Any opinions on which version is better? I may have to pick up a set and add it to the growing pile of war games for which I have neither time nor opponents.

Posted by: PabloD at February 12, 2023 10:21 AM (56oEv)

192 Really shocked some German over engineered his library

Posted by: Thesokorus at February 12, 2023 10:22 AM (1ais2)

193 That would make a great fantasy novel title

Posted by: vmom stabby stabby stabby stabby stabamillion at February 12, 2023 10:15 AM (fUnHJ)
---
The guys on the Lord of Spirits podcast love doing riffs like that. I listen to the episodes in a delay, but yesterday one of them said "It's a Torah paradox!" and other commented on that being a great name for a band.

Whereupon the first guy said "Yeah, they're pretty new. They're the opening act for Theophantic Glory Cloud," which is another term they decided needs to be a band (specifically Christian Metal). Fun stuff.

Posted by: Ace-Endorsed Author A.H. Lloyd at February 12, 2023 10:22 AM (llXky)

194 138 Has anyone ever COMPLETED a game of Risk?
Posted by: Weak Geek at February 12, 2023 10:04 AM (Om/di)

Once. In dramatic fashion. Then during clean up I got caught turning in a not complete set of cards (it worked, nobody checked). Violence ensued. It is still a sore subject. Probably worse than cheating at poker. Other than that, no. Some games lasted over two weekends and we would just clear the table and play something else.

Posted by: Reforger at February 12, 2023 10:22 AM (olB+z)

195 158 I wish fantasy and SF were in separate sections.

I suspect most "hard" SF fans don't care much for sword-and-sorcery fantasy. But SF is legitimately a sub-genre of fantasy. S&S starts with the premise "what if magic were real?" Hard SF starts with "what if this technology were real?" Apply Clark's Law and there ya go.

Posted by: Oddbob at February 12, 2023 10:12 AM (nfrXX)
----
Different philosophy. SF ships, weapons,gadgets are all things that 'might' someday be real, and we have lots of actual examples from lasers to space travel. Magic is never going to happen.

Posted by: Ciampino - Lemuria sounds like a cheese variety at February 12, 2023 10:22 AM (qfLjt)

196 77 What I'm wondering is can another author steal the same premise then take the story elsewhere? Plagiarism? With the sex-slave on the run, take them out of New York into Jersey. Then across America. Taking other jobs, realizing the strip clubs have a network that has an APB looking for them. Have the girls being smart and ruthless themselves. They were always watching American TV from the 80's during the day, then Russian clubs at night. Their quest is LA, and finding Kim Kardasheian. So their idea of America is 40 years out of date. Working biker bars and such. Relying on the cash, no ID, or SSN illegal alien network. Playing on their sex appeal, and youth to turn the tables on sleazebags, leaving them dead.
Posted by: Paladin
****
I'd already decided against reading the Bohjolian ... but dang! this sounds like a blast-and-a-half! I'd pay to read it. Could you write it, Paladin?

Posted by: werewife, princess of Delray Beach at February 12, 2023 10:23 AM (SPNTN)

197 They kind of get onto thin ice when they presume that all this has a common origin in some pre-agriculture, pre-literacy civilization which was the ancestor of cultures all over the world -- including the New World civs, somehow. [ . . . ] Posted by: Trimegistus at February 12, 2023 09:41 AM (QZxDR)

this is something of a mainstream thought, at least in Indo-European family of languages, and expanded to other cultures especially Asian language ones.
The analysis I read had a group of stories in common that were thought to be very old, the one I remember is "the boy who spoke to animals" A boy helps animals in trouble and they in turn help him complete a series of tasks set to him to get a reward

One that is common is Little Red Ridinghood and the Wolf, and The Tiger Grandma in Asia (My wife learned that one in Korea)
HOWEVER the Grandma leaves the children at home while she harvests millet, and in payment she get millet pancakes, and gets waylaid by the same tiger multiple times who steals her food, clothes, limbs and eventually eats her. This is essentially the Babylonian story of Ishatar saving her friend from Hell

Posted by: Kindltot at February 12, 2023 10:23 AM (xhaym)

198 The thing is, people have the same genetic basis, and the same basic "firm-ware" for how we think. We all have similar realities in societies and the need for the same resources and family support. If these stories did not start with the small groups that started spreading during the last couple of ice ages, prior to the flooding of the Beringia land bridge, we came up with them to fit the same needs afterwards.
Also, the resonate between cultures for that reason.

However, the stories last for a long time and say things in unique ways. One of the Australian creation stories notes a formation in the milky way they think looks like and Emu. In Patagonia some of the native stories think that same formation looks like a Rhea. Who knows what that means!

Posted by: Kindlktot at February 12, 2023 10:23 AM (xhaym)

199 About "Yellow Submarine" and the Blue Meanies. I rewatched it a few years ago and it was as weird as I remembered.

But I also saw an interesting parallel in our current times. The BLUE Meanies are determined to completely wipe out fun, music, humor, love, and happiness. They remove all the vivid colors from life and oppress anyone who opposes them. Sound familiar?

Who knew The Beatles would prove to be prophetic.

Posted by: Art Rondelet of Malmsey at February 12, 2023 10:23 AM (fTtFy)

200 Still mostly rereading beloved fiction novels lately. Just can't seem to muster up the mental fortitude to commit to something new. I did get Correia's 2A book, so I'm going to give that a go once I finish my current comfort book.

Posted by: She Hobbit (out and about in Middle Earth) at February 12, 2023 10:23 AM (0EjvZ)

201 The Navy has changed the Super Bowl Flyover Team to all female pilots. Always gotta make a statement.

https://tinyurl.com/5n94zswp

Posted by: IrishEi at February 12, 2023 10:24 AM (3ImbR)

202
My (ahem) book on the Spanish Civil War is instructive in this respect.
Posted by: Ace-Endorsed Author A.H. Lloyd at February 12, 2023 10:18 AM (llXky)

Title please?! I have an anniversary coming up!

Posted by: Moki at February 12, 2023 10:25 AM (JrN/x)

203 I've developed a taste for hardcover comic collections, but I've bought too many bad collections to spend money blindly

Ooh, that reminds me. Thanks to whomever recommended "Digger" here a few weeks ago. It's an interesting story with great characters. And unlike my other favorite comic "Girl Genius," the story actually goes someplace and has an end.

Posted by: Oddbob at February 12, 2023 10:25 AM (nfrXX)

204 I played Risk with my boys a lot. We bought the game on an airplane trip and from then on it was the airplane game. A lot more fun than Monopoly.

Posted by: Sharon(willow's apprentice) at February 12, 2023 10:25 AM (Y+l9t)

205 Time for church.
Thank you, 'Perfesser'- the SMBT is always a bright spot in the week.

In your honor, I'm including a medieval red squirrel in my Sixth Day of Creation circle in my quilt.

Posted by: sal: tolle adversarium et afflige inimicum at February 12, 2023 10:25 AM (wE246)

206 Posted by: PabloD at February 12, 2023 10:12 AM (56oEv)

Congrats to your wife! My coworker was able to avoid editor fee because a guy from work used to be in public relations and he did the task pro bono. Her book is now on AMZ but I'm not purchasing it. I started to read a draft and it was too stressful. It was her autobiography and her life was nightmare fuel.

Posted by: kallisto at February 12, 2023 10:25 AM (Bklxb)

207 Also, the resonate between cultures for that reason.

However, the stories last for a long time and say things in unique ways. One of the Australian creation stories notes a formation in the milky way they think looks like and Emu. In Patagonia some of the native stories think that same formation looks like a Rhea. Who knows what that means!

Posted by: Kindlktot at February 12, 2023 10:23 AM (xhaym)
---
Spiritual Warfare explanation: All cultures exist in the same environment of spirits and demons but describe it in different (but ultimately complimentary ways) depending on who they end up serving.

Posted by: Ace-Endorsed Author A.H. Lloyd at February 12, 2023 10:26 AM (llXky)

208 39 I have finished Burroughs' Moon cycle, which consists of "The Moon Maid", "The Moon Men", and "The Red Hawk". Overall they were an entertaining read.
....
The first and especially the last book were not very deep, though the first one ends on a somewhat somber note.
This is accentuated in the second book, which covers some very serious topics, such as totalitarianism, corruption and decay engendered by totalitarianism (i.e. communism), resistance and collaboration, hope and despair, etc.. Not everything is sugar-coated, to say the least.
All three novels are entertaining, but the second is the most serious Burroughs novel I have read to date.
One can tell that they are all written fast, and in Burroughs' somewhat bombastic and superficial style. The upside is that they can be read just as fast
Posted by: PG at February 12, 2023 09:18 AM (84jHt)

I read those a few years back. I remember the third book having a rushed ending. In the sense that there was a whole lot of world-building established (with how the society was re-constituting itself) only for the series to just end and not deal with any of the new society. It struck me as an odd way to end...

Posted by: Castle Guy at February 12, 2023 10:27 AM (Lhaco)

209 We played a lot of RISK! back in the original game.

I saw a recent version at it looked so very different.

Posted by: Chatterbox Mouse at February 12, 2023 10:27 AM (TXFi7)

210 126 Hardbacks keep falling on my head ...

Posted by: Weak Geek

And just like the guy who put
these shelves up I'll be dead

Posted by: vmom stabby stabby stabby stabby stabamillion at February 12, 2023 10:27 AM (fUnHJ)

211 Title please?! I have an anniversary coming up!

Posted by: Moki at February 12, 2023 10:25 AM (JrN/x)
---
Long Live Death: The Keys to Victory in the Spanish Civil War.

Posted by: Ace-Endorsed Author A.H. Lloyd at February 12, 2023 10:27 AM (llXky)

212 112 @98 --

"Red Barchetta" by Rush drew upon a story with that premise, but the author wasn't Bradbury. It first appeared in Car & Driver magazine.
Posted by: Weak Geek
****
If someone hasn't posted this already: The title is "A Nice Morning Drive." You can find the full text online.

Posted by: werewife, princess of Delray Beach at February 12, 2023 10:28 AM (SPNTN)

213 Good morning bookies! That top picture makes me very nervous, but it's very cool to look at.

I have some Lenten reading recommendations, if anyone is interested. The first one is a newly-published collection called Aquinas's Lenten Meditations: 40 Days with the Angelic Doctor St. Thomas Aquinas. I just received it and will start reading it on Ash Wednesday. Aquinas can be heady stuff so these bite-sized readings (two pages per day) will be perfect for a bird-brain like me. I had to order it from the publisher (Sophia Institute Press) in order to get it before Ash Wednesday.

Probably hitting the Pixy character limit so rec #2 will be below.

Posted by: bluebell at February 12, 2023 10:28 AM (pTb/Z)

214 Long Live Death: The Keys to Victory in the Spanish Civil War.
Posted by: Ace-Endorsed Author A.H. Lloyd at February 12, 2023 10:27 AM (llXky)

Thanks Sir Lloyd!!

Posted by: Moki at February 12, 2023 10:28 AM (JrN/x)

215 Last Thursday, one of you Rons or Ettes posted a link to this most amazing video titled "Best World War II Documentary on Naval Aviation in the Pacific • "ELEVEN" The Movie.

https://youtu.be/YfMhcK9gcqM

It did not disappoint. I was emotionally overwhelmed by the interviews of these gallant US aviators. The timing of seeing this now is for me impeccable. I am in the middle of reading Pacific Crucible, having just "watched" the carrier Lexington sing in the Battle of the Coral Sea, with the flattop Yorktown limping in retreat to fight another day.

May the memories of all of those soldiers be blessed. I would say "and never forgotten" but we all know that's no longer true.

Posted by: Biden's Dog sniffs a whole lotta malarkey, at February 12, 2023 10:28 AM (UW/qx)

216 The Navy has changed the Super Bowl Flyover Team to all female pilots. Always gotta make a statement.

Posted by: IrishEi at February 12, 2023 10:24 AM (3ImbR)
---
Hopefully it goes better than that all-female watch crew.

Or the first female F-14 pilot.

Posted by: Ace-Endorsed Author A.H. Lloyd at February 12, 2023 10:28 AM (llXky)

217 Welcome to my Death of Western Civ First Aid Kit.
I need to be more organized, and I have a lot of paperbacks, instead of HBs. Mine is highly Catholic-weighted, of course, for the possibly upcoming Underground Church.
Posted by: sal:

Along with a copy of the complete Catechism of the Catholic Church I have a 1960's era copy of The Saint Joseph Baltimore Catechism we used as kiddies.

They are on the top of one of the stacks in case I need to make a fast get away.

Posted by: Tonypete at February 12, 2023 10:29 AM (qoGsy)

218 It was very engaging. Divided in to 3 parts, pre-Republic, Republic and Empire.

Posted by: gourmand du jour, gimpy edition at February 12, 2023 10:08 AM (jTmQV)

Plagiarizing bitch!

Posted by: Julius Caesar at February 12, 2023 10:31 AM (Angsy)

219 Thanks, kallisto. I was pretty clear with my wife that I didn't want to read her work until it was a paperback in my hands (or hardback, if one of the big publishers goes crazy for it!). Not that I'm not interested, but I know that if she relies on me for advice then eventually it would just turn into my book. I tend to be "all or nothing" when I'm working on something, which is why everybody stays the hell out of my kitchen when I'm cooking.

Posted by: PabloD at February 12, 2023 10:31 AM (56oEv)

220 Has the Navy excluded trans-women from the flyover team? BIGOTS!!!

Posted by: PabloD at February 12, 2023 10:32 AM (56oEv)

221 201 The Navy has changed the Super Bowl Flyover Team to all female pilots. Always gotta make a statement.

https://tinyurl.com/5n94zswp

Posted by: IrishEi at February 12, 2023 10:24 AM (3ImbR)

Assigned at birth or Currently Female

Posted by: rhennigantx at February 12, 2023 10:32 AM (BRHaw)

222 I tend to be "all or nothing" when I'm working on something, which is why everybody stays the hell out of my kitchen when I'm cooking.
Posted by: PabloD

I pray you are as sarcastic as I am in that situation -

"Am I in your way?" *Gives death stare*

Posted by: Tonypete at February 12, 2023 10:33 AM (qoGsy)

223 When the big EMP happens or when the Church goes underground, my hard-copy of the Catechism of the Council is Trent will be golden.

Posted by: Chatterbox Mouse at February 12, 2023 10:33 AM (TXFi7)

224 Assigned at birth or Currently Female
Posted by: rhennigantx

Hard to say, but I'm sure the one with the wig on the outside of the helmet is actually a dude.

Posted by: She Hobbit (out and about in Middle Earth) at February 12, 2023 10:34 AM (0EjvZ)

225 My second Lenten recommendation (although it's not necessarily just for Lent) is called Eat, Fast, Feast by Jay W. Richards, with a forward by Dr. Jason Fung. Richards ties in the spiritual aspects of fasting (he's Catholic but mentions other Christians and other religions as well) with the medical benefits. He lays out a six-week plan that would be perfect to try during Lent.

It's a quick read and although I haven't finished it yet I will be trying this during Lent with two friends. In the forward, Dr. Fung says he had hoped that someone would write a book coupling the spiritual benefits of fasting with the health benefits, and I guess he approves of the way Richards does it!

As I said, he is Catholic and thus writes from a Catholic point of view (feast days of the Church, etc.) but I think this book would be suitable for anyone interested in the spiritual benefits of fasting.

Posted by: bluebell at February 12, 2023 10:35 AM (pTb/Z)

226 The Navy has changed the Super Bowl Flyover Team to all female pilots. Always gotta make a statement.

Posted by: IrishEi

In the Hogwarts Legacy game, so criticized for being a second cousin once removed from someone thought to be an anti-tranny bigot, they use the they/their pronouns for the player. I'm sure it is partly because it applies to both male and female players but it grates on me.

Posted by: Anonosaurus Wrecks, Not a Real Simulation at February 12, 2023 10:37 AM (FVME7)

227 92 I'm a bit concerned. I knew the three words in the 'word power' segment. Further proof that I'm weird.

Posted by: JTB at February 12, 2023 09:44 AM (7EjX1)
----
I only knew infundibular, from Anatomy. The Windows dictionary that SpellCheck uses thinks I meant mandibular. LOL

Posted by: Ciampino - diisocampheylborane at February 12, 2023 10:37 AM (qfLjt)

228 Hardbacks keep falling on my head ...
Posted by: Weak Geek

And just like the guy who put
these shelves up I'll be dead
Posted by: vmom

********

Reading's not for me
Cause
I'm never gonna stop the pain
By complaining
And now I'm free
Nothing's bothering meeeee

Posted by: Muldoon at February 12, 2023 10:37 AM (ykeLU)

229 My wife is in the (possibly) latter stages of writing her first novel, with plans for sequels depending on how things go with the first book. She has used both volunteer readers and professional editors. I think, thus far, the editors have cost her a total of $2K. She thinks it's been worth the money, given the feedback she received. Whether or not any of that cash is actually recovered is another question. She did submit an excerpt and won Xth place in a contest and got about $150 for it, so she is now the award-winning novelist in our family.

Posted by: PabloD at February 12, 2023 10:12 AM (56oEv)

Great! She must be over the moon.

I'm busted, so I can't afford a pro editor. Guess I'll just be a rejected author. Eh, we can't all be published purple haired, fat, lesbians who hate their dad and all men....

Posted by: Julius Caesar at February 12, 2023 10:37 AM (Angsy)

230 Just found out all 3 of my grandkids, ages 16 months, 4 and 6, coming for a prevalentine's es party this afternoon. My condo is not very big and it is cold and rainy. Should be interesting and a bit chaotic. I bought Amelia Bedelia and Peppa Pig valentine's books for the girls and a pop up for my grandson. Hoping to keep the chaos to a minimum but not likely.

Posted by: Sharon(willow's apprentice) at February 12, 2023 10:37 AM (Y+l9t)

231 Also, Captain Hate, if you are lurking, please show yourself! I have been missing your erudite comments!

Posted by: bluebell at February 12, 2023 10:37 AM (pTb/Z)

232 > Germany

Ah.... not many earthquakes there. Here in earthquake country, my first thought was "What happens if you're in that room during a significant quake?" Not a pretty picture.


> I finished "SPQR: A History of Ancient Rome"
By: Mary Beard

She's pretty much off my list, thanks to her "America deserved it" comments after 9/11. I'll read stuff written by leftists, even outright communists, but that was a bridge too far for me.

> these pants

Thanks to the magic of the Internet, you can get those with anything you like printed on them nowadays.

The most disturbing ones I've seen have pictures of George R.R. Martin all over them.

Posted by: Rodrigo Borgia at February 12, 2023 10:39 AM (bW8dp)

233 Bacon's on !

Posted by: JT at February 12, 2023 10:39 AM (T4tVD)

234 Weak geak, first played risk as college freshman. Group of budding freaks(sex drugs rock and roll) not hippies ( peace love dope). Little Jewish guy from Chicago, five two a hundred pounds, big glasses, short curly hair, known as Arnold although his name was Ron, had been picked on in high school and very glad that was behind him. Totally destroyed everyone, every time. I've always been expecting him to take over the world, at this point wish he had.

Posted by: From about That Time at February 12, 2023 10:39 AM (4780s)

235 Sharon, that sounds like so much fun! I hope you will have some sugary treats for them too, along with the excellent books.

Posted by: bluebell at February 12, 2023 10:40 AM (pTb/Z)

236 I saw a recent version at it looked so very different.
Posted by: Chatterbox Mouse at February 12, 2023 10:27 AM (TXFi7)
~~~~~

I got a remake of the original 1959 version for Christmas. I think Amazon has it.

Posted by: IrishEi at February 12, 2023 10:40 AM (3ImbR)

237 May need to pick up the Myth of AI book. Had a great conversation once after seeing Ex Machina and really got stuck on the possibility of AI doing something completely unexpected. Even if it seems unexpected, it would likely just be a low probability association of inputs, still controlled by a set of programmed rules. But could it ever do something truly novel, irrational, and human?

Posted by: She Hobbit (out and about in Middle Earth) at February 12, 2023 10:40 AM (0EjvZ)

238 Has the Navy excluded trans-women from the flyover team? BIGOTS!!!


********

Tranny pilot can't steer his plane because the docs at Bethesda lopped his stick off.

Posted by: Muldoon at February 12, 2023 10:41 AM (ykeLU)

239 Also, Captain Hate, if you are lurking, please show yourself! I have been missing your erudite comments!
Posted by: bluebell

Just don't mention James Jones.....

Posted by: JT at February 12, 2023 10:41 AM (T4tVD)

240 And Eris, I sent you an email a couple of days ago to your Comcast account. Not sure that's the right one . . .

Posted by: bluebell at February 12, 2023 10:42 AM (pTb/Z)

241 Also, Captain Hate, if you are lurking, please show yourself! I have been missing your erudite comments!
Posted by: bluebell

Also The Artist Formerly Known as Da Cannibal.

Posted by: JT at February 12, 2023 10:42 AM (T4tVD)

242 Oh yes, JT, I do miss Cannibal Bob as well. Every once in a while he or Heidi will pop in though, right?

Posted by: bluebell at February 12, 2023 10:43 AM (pTb/Z)

243 {i]I'd already decided against reading the Bohjolian ... but dang! this sounds like a blast-and-a-half! I'd pay to read it. Could you write it, Paladin?

I have always wondered if I could be writer. Been playing with this idea in my head. Best I learn how to spell better, and that whole grammar thing.

Posted by: Paladin at February 12, 2023 10:43 AM (neRM3)

244 When the big EMP happens or when the Church goes underground, my hard-copy of the Catechism of the Council is Trent will be golden.

Posted by: Chatterbox Mouse at February 12, 2023 10:33 AM (TXFi7)
---
Don't forget your stocks of holy water. I'm off to replenish mine. See everyone next week!

Posted by: Ace-Endorsed Author A.H. Lloyd at February 12, 2023 10:44 AM (llXky)

245 Zoom book club has completed Contact. It was a good read but Sagan was huffing a lot of weed and 2001 toward the end.

Next up: Clarke's Childhood's End.

Posted by: blaster at February 12, 2023 10:44 AM (pwExq)

246 What are we, chopped liver?
Posted by: Amalekites at February 12, 2023 09:43 AM (eOEVl)

No, not liver, but well-chopped.

Posted by: mrp at February 12, 2023 10:46 AM (rj6Yv)

247 One of the criteria my Zoom book club has been using to determine whether to read a book is whether it won a Hugo or not.

Looking at the list to decide what to read next, I peruse the Hugo list and I pretty much hate everything after 1984. Though we have included a couple of more recent winners - Red Shirts and Three Body Problem. But, yeah, 84 is the cutoff. GET OFF MY LAWN

Posted by: blaster at February 12, 2023 10:47 AM (pwExq)

248 I seem to recall playing a lot of Risk as a teen. I think we had a set with a 2-sided board. the whole world on one side, and a Europe-only map on the reverse.

Posted by: Castle Guy at February 12, 2023 10:48 AM (Lhaco)

249 "You'd be surprised at how much we understand about how people *really* learn, but very little of that is implemented in the classroom"

Thanks perfesser. Always a treat to lurk here. I taught Special Ed. As a 'encore career'. And well, the system is counterproductive to be kind. I now tutor elementary reading privately, hopefully to give some kids a chance that's were harmed by public schools. Can you make recommendations for study regarding your above statement?

Posted by: Just sayin at February 12, 2023 10:49 AM (IwwOi)

250 > I peruse the Hugo list and I pretty much hate everything after 1984

2000 was an unusual year, in that there were actually two decent books up for Best Novel, plus one "okay" book.

But yeah, as a general rule, the Hugos are trash, and have been for decades. They're a good signal for what NOT to buy.

Posted by: Rodrigo Borgia at February 12, 2023 10:50 AM (bW8dp)

251 It was her autobiography and her life was nightmare fuel.
Posted by: kallisto at February 12, 2023 10:25 AM (Bklxb)

I assume you mean it was a fictionalized story that was autobiographical. Because the tragedies of "ordinary" people's lives are not interesting. Sorry, they just aren't. The question must always be asked, after the tale of woe is told: Now what. What will you do with this. Otherwise, what's the point.

Posted by: BurtTC at February 12, 2023 10:50 AM (2eUt1)

252 I suspect most "hard" SF fans don't care much for sword-and-sorcery fantasy. But SF is legitimately a sub-genre of fantasy. S&S starts with the premise "what if magic were real?" Hard SF starts with "what if this technology were real?" Apply Clark's Law and there ya go. Posted by: Oddbob at February 12, 2023 10:12 AM (nfrXX)

This is not completely true. Sci Fi was originally an adventure genre that was deeply influenced by the progressive technocracy movement, which was a social movement around WWI. The Golden age stories reflect this, in that the knowledgeable individual saves the day by leading and informing the rest on the correct path, often relying on allies and subordinates working in coordination. This is also the original Superman by the way.
It morphed into straight science adventure, and then into whatever was current.

One critic commented that it was a political theory that spawned a genre, it would be as if the Bolsheviks collapsed and all that remained was the "realism" school of posters and art about tractors
Fantasy is different and if you want to know what fantasy is as created by a science fiction writer, read Randall Garrett's Lord Darcy books

Posted by: Kindlktot at February 12, 2023 10:51 AM (xhaym)

253 Throughout highschool I read a TON of SF and S&S books. Dug both genres.

Posted by: blaster at February 12, 2023 10:53 AM (pwExq)

254 Looking at the list to decide what to read next, I peruse the Hugo list and I pretty much hate everything after 1984.

What??! Neuromancer was '85, IIANM.

Posted by: Oddbob at February 12, 2023 10:53 AM (nfrXX)

255 I'm reading Lonesome Dove along with an online book club. So I watched the old series on TV. I'm loving both! Times were sure different then.

Posted by: Ultra pj at February 12, 2023 10:53 AM (G1dq6)

256 189 ... "Let's not forget Dave Barry !

Good morning, JT! Very true although I haven't read his stuff for a while.

Posted by: JTB at February 12, 2023 10:54 AM (7EjX1)

257 Tranny pilot can't steer his plane because the docs at Bethesda lopped his stick off.
Posted by: Muldoon at February 12, 2023 10:41 AM (ykeLU)

How are trannies just like Hitler?

Because they cut off the poles!

Posted by: BurtTC at February 12, 2023 10:56 AM (2eUt1)

258 "The Navy has changed the Super Bowl Flyover Team to all female pilots."

But can they parallel park?

Posted by: Ignoramus at February 12, 2023 10:57 AM (SJsWC)

259 The Golden age stories reflect this, in that the knowledgeable individual saves the day by leading and informing the rest on the correct path, often relying on allies and subordinates working in coordination.

And that doesn't describe Lord of the Rings because...?

This is also the original Superman by the way.

So is Superman technology or magic? And why does it matter?

Posted by: Oddbob at February 12, 2023 10:58 AM (nfrXX)

260 What??! Neuromancer was '85, IIANM.
Posted by: Oddbob at February 12, 2023 10:53 AM (nfrXX)


You are correct sir! I am a HUGE Gibson fan.

Neuromancer was published in 84. So, yeah. Umm. That's my excuse.

Posted by: blaster at February 12, 2023 10:58 AM (pwExq)

261 But could it ever do something truly novel, irrational, and human?
Posted by: She Hobbit (out and about in Middle Earth) at February 12, 2023 10:40 AM (0EjvZ)
---
That was the problem with HAL 9000 in 2001: A Space Odyssey. He was given conflicting orders and could not process them, so in the end he found the only "solution" that seemed to satisfy both parameters.

Isaac Asimov played around with this idea a lot in his Robot stories. He's set up a conflict between the three laws of robotics and then try to find a clever solution.

Posted by: "Perfessor" Squirrel at February 12, 2023 10:59 AM (BpYfr)

262 The Rangers could hang you just for riding along with bad men.

Posted by: humphreyrobot at February 12, 2023 11:00 AM (kpdIJ)

263 189 ... "Let's not forget Dave Barry !

Good morning, JT! Very true although I haven't read his stuff for a while.
Posted by: JTB

Did you ever read his novels; Big Trouble and Tricky Business ? Good Stuff !

Regards to yer Missus !

Posted by: JT at February 12, 2023 11:00 AM (T4tVD)

264 Dune is a challenge to put on screen. Part One of the new one foregoes plot detail to instead create the look and feel of an alternate world.

A nice set-up for Part Two which will kick ass. The kids don't know what's coming. All I told them was "don't f^ck with the Fremen!"

Posted by: Ignoramus at February 12, 2023 11:00 AM (SJsWC)

265 188 I.....don't understand how you can actually reach the roof-books in the pictured library. And that triggers me. So many wasted books...
Posted by: Castle Guy at February 12, 2023 10:20 AM (Lhaco)

Well, if they were all copies of Dreams From My Father and Heather Has Two Mommies, I wouldn't cry.

Posted by: Dash my lace wigs! at February 12, 2023 11:02 AM (OX9vb)

266 And the movie of Dave Barry's Big Trouble is a delight -- worth a watch just for Dennis Farina.

Posted by: Just Some Guy at February 12, 2023 11:02 AM (a/4+U)

267 Can you make recommendations for study regarding your above statement?
Posted by: Just sayin at February 12, 2023 10:49 AM (IwwOi)
---
Sure...Two books I rely on a lot when dealing with instructors are:

"How Learning Works: Seven Research-Based Principles for Smart Teaching" by Susan Ambrose, et al. It's one of the most influential books on learning in the past 15 years.

"Small Teaching" by James Lang - He breaks down learning into small, manageable chunks to get the most output from a small tweak to the learning process.

Both books are amazing, but very few people use them to guide their teaching practices.

Posted by: "Perfessor" Squirrel at February 12, 2023 11:03 AM (BpYfr)

268 Completed my re-reading of Jane Eyre. The first read was in childhood and I have carted the book around for decades because it was one of the first two books ever gifted to me. I was surprised that I only remembered bits and pieces of the story, so the story line was fresh and held many surprises. (I am fairly certain that I did not fully appreciate the book back when I first read it because I did not understand and fully appreciate the social mores of the period.) The writing style took some getting used to and although it was wordy (as I suspect language was back then) the story was descriptive and enjoyable. On the plus side, I encountered several words I don't remember ever seeing before.

Posted by: Legally Sufficient at February 12, 2023 11:03 AM (hPMYc)

269 Weak geak, first played risk as college freshman. Group of budding freaks(sex drugs rock and roll) not hippies ( peace love dope). Little Jewish guy from Chicago, five two a hundred pounds, big glasses, short curly hair, known as Arnold although his name was Ron, had been picked on in high school and very glad that was behind him. Totally destroyed everyone, every time. I've always been expecting him to take over the world, at this point wish he had.

Posted by: From about That Time at February 12, 2023 10:39 AM (4780s)

Too late now, Horshak's dead....

Posted by: OrangeEnt at February 12, 2023 11:03 AM (Angsy)

270 Jules Verne is a lot of fun, and much better than HG Welles in my opinion. I wish I had known this when I was a kid.

The Pratchett or Gaiman audio plays, with a huge cast (EG Christopher Lee in a small role) come across as silly to me. I'm trying The Colour of Magic and hopefully it won't be too silly. I've started it and the narrator is a bit hammy.

Posted by: BourbonChicken at February 12, 2023 11:04 AM (ybIRR)

271 Both books are amazing, but very few people use them to guide their teaching practices.

Posted by: "Perfessor" Squirrel at February 12, 2023 11:03 AM (BpYfr)

Excellent. Much obliged. Look forward to reading them.

Posted by: Just sayin at February 12, 2023 11:04 AM (IwwOi)

272 I am reading Henry ‘Chips’ Channing The Diaries. Very interesting view into the seedy side of the upper crust!

On an iPad so forgive lack of title formatting. .

Posted by: Piper at February 12, 2023 11:04 AM (ZdaMQ)

273 And the movie of Dave Barry's Big Trouble is a delight -- worth a watch just for Dennis Farina.
Posted by: Just Some Guy

Never seen it; but I'll keep an eye out !

Posted by: JT at February 12, 2023 11:06 AM (T4tVD)

274 Superman is magic with a thin veneer of pseudo-science on top, and the magic isn't even consistent.

For just one (among many) examples of this, see Larry Niven's "Man of Steel, Woman of Kleenex":

https://tinyurl.com/yxps7a6y

I never was much of a Superman fan. Batman was my favorite in the DCniverse, though I tended to go with Marvel as my first choice.

Posted by: Rodrigo Borgia at February 12, 2023 11:06 AM (bW8dp)

275
I am reading Henry ‘Chips’ Channing The Diaries. Very interesting view into the seedy side of the upper crust!

_________

An early example of the anti-American American. Max Hastings described him as "a consummate ass".

Posted by: Hadrian the Seventh at February 12, 2023 11:06 AM (MoZTd)

276 "How Learning Works: Seven Research-Based Principles for Smart Teaching" by Susan Ambrose, et al.

Ouch. Thirty-six bucks on Kindle. I guess they expect everyone buying it to expense it.

Posted by: Oddbob at February 12, 2023 11:06 AM (nfrXX)

277 PabloD, congrats to your wife!

Posted by: vmom stabby stabby stabby stabby stabamillion at February 12, 2023 11:07 AM (fUnHJ)

278 Thirteen bucks on thriftbooks.com. More better.

Posted by: Oddbob at February 12, 2023 11:08 AM (nfrXX)

279 @261 A recurring theme in many Kubrick flicks is "what makes a human human." in 2001, HAL is more human than the astronauts."

Posted by: Ignoramus at February 12, 2023 11:08 AM (SJsWC)

280
It's frustrating that by the time I get home from church the Book Thread is nearly over.

Posted by: Hadrian the Seventh at February 12, 2023 11:08 AM (MoZTd)

281 275 and he would be right! He really is. But there are funny parts that are an offshoot of his a**holism. Like his guessing of ages for women is so way off, he ages them 10 or 15 years!

Posted by: Piper at February 12, 2023 11:09 AM (ZdaMQ)

282 238 Has the Navy excluded trans-women from the flyover team? BIGOTS!!!


********

Tranny pilot can't steer his plane because the docs at Bethesda lopped his stick off.

Posted by: Muldoon at February 12, 2023 10:41 AM (ykeLU)
----
Well they are called joysticks.

Posted by: Ciampino - di-iso-campheylborane at February 12, 2023 11:10 AM (qfLjt)

283 "columbarium - n. - a room or building with niches for funeral urns to be stored"

Well known term in New Orleans, as we have to bury people above ground, for the most part.

Posted by: Javems at February 12, 2023 11:14 AM (AmoqO)

284 And that doesn't describe Lord of the Rings because...?

So is Superman technology or magic? And why does it matter?
Posted by: Oddbob at February 12, 2023 10:58 AM (nfrXX)


Well, if you want Lord of the Rings in that column, go for it. LOTR is an analysis of a world war using Saxon and Norse myths, which is pretty much Tolkien's entire career. There is magic, that is something created out of nothing by will or ritual, which I think puts it more into fantasy than science fiction.

My point about Superman was that is is a superior individual leading and saving the world.

Posted by: Kindltot at February 12, 2023 11:15 AM (xhaym)

285 280
It's frustrating that by the time I get home from church the Book Thread is nearly over.
Posted by: Hadrian the Seventh

Saturday Vigil ftw!

Posted by: nurse ratched at February 12, 2023 11:16 AM (U2p+3)

286 266 And the movie of Dave Barry's Big Trouble is a delight -- worth a watch just for Dennis Farina.
Posted by: Just Some Guy at February 12, 2023 11:02 AM (a/4+U)

When the scoped rifle falls out of the gold bag and the bad guy and Dennis says

We play with cheaters!

Posted by: rhennigantx at February 12, 2023 11:17 AM (BRHaw)

287 I never was much of a Superman fan. Batman was my favorite in the DCniverse, though I tended to go with Marvel as my first choice.
Posted by: Rodrigo Borgia at February 12, 2023 11:06 AM (bW8dp)


I actually liked Doc Savage better, but if you liked Batman, try reading some of The Shadow pulps. According to Razorfist, Batman is an inferior rip off of the the early Shadow stories

Posted by: Kindltot at February 12, 2023 11:19 AM (xhaym)

288 Best I learn how to spell better, and that whole grammar thing.
Posted by: Paladin at February 12, 2023 10:43 AM (neRM3)

That's what editors and proofreaders are for. Just write it, and let them correct your grammar.

Posted by: Dash my lace wigs! at February 12, 2023 11:19 AM (OX9vb)

289 My point about Superman was that is is a superior individual leading and saving the world.

With technology or with magic? You and Ciampino are the ones asserting that they are substantively different. I'm the one asking for an explanation of why.

Posted by: Oddbob at February 12, 2023 11:21 AM (nfrXX)

290 I sure hope those female Aviators are on speaking terms for the flyover, unlike that pair of black shoe types involved in the under way collision a couple years ago.

Posted by: bill in arkansas, not gonna comply with nuttin, waiting for the 0300 knock on the door at February 12, 2023 11:22 AM (lz5hY)

291 Bluebell, going to bake chocolate chip cookies. Haven't done any baking since I moved in.if it doesn't happen, I live across the street from Trader Joe's which had some pretty spectacular chocolate yesterday so there is a plan B.

Posted by: Sharon(willow's apprentice) at February 12, 2023 11:22 AM (Y+l9t)

292 Kara Hultgren crashed and burned, in 1994.
Therefore, wymynz cain't do nothin.
They should kick they shoes off and make a sammich.

We don't actually have a plan, but hey -- no voting.
It's...the He-Man Woman Hater Book Thread!
Boys will be boys. Teensy little boys.

Posted by: Way, Way Downriver at February 12, 2023 11:22 AM (jYCXf)

293 It's frustrating that by the time I get home from church the Book Thread is nearly over.

Posted by: Hadrian the Seventh at February 12, 2023 11:08 AM (MoZTd)

Go to a different service?

Posted by: OrangeEnt at February 12, 2023 11:23 AM (Angsy)

294 When I was a kid my favorite books were about surviving in the wild whether it be on a deserted island ,in the jungles or forested mountains.

That's why prepping is something I did for fun since I was a kid and still do.

Posted by: polynikes at February 12, 2023 11:24 AM (qnsfO)

295 It's frustrating that by the time I get home from church the Book Thread is nearly over.
----
Go to a different service?


Convert to Seventh Day Adventist?

Posted by: Oddbob at February 12, 2023 11:24 AM (nfrXX)

296 Project Brue Book:

Disclose.tv @disclosetv · 4h
MORE - Chinese authorities were preparing to shoot down a UFO.

JUST IN - Unidentified flying object has been detected near Rizhao in China, according to Chinese state media Global Times citing local maritime authorities.

Posted by: andycanuck (Vwz3I) at February 12, 2023 11:24 AM (Vwz3I)

297 Also, Captain Hate, if you are lurking, please show yourself! I have been missing your erudite comments!
Posted by: bluebell

Also The Artist Formerly Known as Da Cannibal.
Posted by: JT

And let's not forget our old pal Insomniac !

Posted by: JT at February 12, 2023 11:25 AM (T4tVD)

298 Fantasy and sci-fi aren't mutually exclusive. The first Star Wars showed that. They can easily exist together in a book.

The Corum series by Moorcock has both.

The Gun Powder Mage has both but is kinda intentionally dumbed down for marketing purposes.

Posted by: Thesokorus at February 12, 2023 11:25 AM (1ais2)

299 JUST IN - Unidentified flying object has been detected near Rizhao in China, according to Chinese state media Global Times citing local maritime authorities.

Why do you bastards keep shooting down our ships? We made them look like balloons so you wouldn't be threatened by them.

Posted by: Kang and Kodos at February 12, 2023 11:26 AM (nfrXX)

300 You know who else believed in Supermen saving the world??

Posted by: andycanuck (Vwz3I) at February 12, 2023 11:26 AM (Vwz3I)

301 @kindltot

The Lensman series is pure WWI era waspy progressivism.

Posted by: Thesokorus at February 12, 2023 11:27 AM (1ais2)

302 Balloons for some; miniature Red Chinese flags for all!

Posted by: andycanuck (Vwz3I) at February 12, 2023 11:27 AM (Vwz3I)

303 So the sense I'm getting is that a fair number of folks who are familiar with the characters Oblio and Arrow, but nobody who seems to be a real big fan. So perhaps a small cult-type film? I guess it's odd because my brother and I are only a year apart and were pretty close BITD, and to him this Oblio and Arrow thing was real meaningful and to me it's a nothingburger. Anyway, thanks for the feedback.

Posted by: Muldoon at February 12, 2023 11:28 AM (ykeLU)

304
With technology or with magic? You and Ciampino are the ones asserting that they are substantively different. I'm the one asking for an explanation of why.

Posted by: Oddbob at February 12, 2023 11:21 AM


IIRC, it was Asimov who postulated that any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic

Posted by: AltonJackson at February 12, 2023 11:29 AM (ENBF0)

305 Morning hordemates!

Posted by: Diogenes at February 12, 2023 11:29 AM (anj39)

306 IIRC, it was Asimov who postulated that any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic
Posted by: AltonJackson

Ya mean like when Adam said to Eve "Stand back ! I don't know how big this thing's gonna get !"

Posted by: JT at February 12, 2023 11:32 AM (T4tVD)

307 IIRC, it was Asimov who postulated that any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic
Posted by: AltonJackson at February 12, 2023 11:29 AM (ENBF0)

The Prestige tried to tie both together.

Posted by: polynikes at February 12, 2023 11:32 AM (qnsfO)

308 So glad I got my hearing aids fixed.
Now I can turn on the noise cancelling feature and read in peace whilst Mrs D drones on in the background.

Posted by: Diogenes at February 12, 2023 11:34 AM (anj39)

309 Was Mrs. D Charlie Brown's teacher??
Wah-wah wah wah.

Posted by: andycanuck (Vwz3I) at February 12, 2023 11:35 AM (Vwz3I)

310 So glad I got my hearing aids fixed.
Now I can turn on the noise cancelling feature and read in peace whilst Mrs D drones on in the background.


Every now and then I want to make a comment and then think "my wife doesn't read AoS but she could."

Posted by: Oddbob at February 12, 2023 11:36 AM (nfrXX)

311 Doggeh is putting the treadmill to good use by napping on it

Posted by: vmom stabby stabby stabby stabby stabamillion at February 12, 2023 11:36 AM (fUnHJ)

312 Looked up Communist Manifesto and all kinds of hits, how it isn't dead and buried is amazing. Failures all over the world, hundreds of millions murdered and it's still around and plenty to say why it's still important today.

Posted by: Skip at February 12, 2023 11:36 AM (xhxe8)

313 Jules Verne is a lot of fun, and much better than HG Welles in my opinion.

Posted by: BourbonChicken at February 12, 2023 11:04 AM (ybIRR)
* * * *
Agreed. I recently picked up a collection of H.G. Welles that I purchased many moons ago but never got around to reading. After completing one story, I placed the book in the donation pile for the library. It was a dull and unenjoyable read.

Posted by: Legally Sufficient at February 12, 2023 11:36 AM (hPMYc)

314
Saturday Vigil ftw!
Posted by: nurse ratched at February 12, 2023 11:16 AM (U2p+3)


Yeah, but for me only when it's unavoidable. Mass is for Sunday morning.

Posted by: Hadrian the Seventh at February 12, 2023 11:37 AM (MoZTd)

315 Insider Paper @TheInsiderPaper · 6h
WATCH: Earthquake search and rescue team lost their way to a village in Maraş in Turkey. A dog reportedly helped the team find their way towards the destination

https://tinyurl.com/mryf3haa

1:46-minute video.

Posted by: andycanuck (Vwz3I) at February 12, 2023 11:37 AM (Vwz3I)

316 An unidentified frying object over China?

Posted by: fd at February 12, 2023 11:38 AM (iayUP)

317 With technology or with magic? You and Ciampino are the ones asserting that they are substantively different. I'm the one asking for an explanation of why.
Posted by: Oddbob at February 12, 2023 11:21 AM (nfrXX)


The point I was trying to make was that Superman was technocratic character as he was a superior individual saving the world, I was never a fan for that reason.

I think that the difference between Science Fiction and Fantasy is that Science Fiction could exist in this world, and the universe is changed by technology that follows specific physical rules, where as Fantasy does not, and cannot exist in this universe, as it relies on force of will or ritual to inflict change.
Of course that means that Randall Garrett's Lord Darcy series is fantasy even though magic is handled as a technology, and John Ringo's There Will Be Dragons series is science fiction for all the dragons and spells because the technology creates the magic.

I think Randall Garrett did a better story than Ringo, though.

Posted by: Kindltot at February 12, 2023 11:39 AM (xhaym)

318 IIRC, it was Asimov who postulated that any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic
Posted by: AltonJackson at February 12, 2023 11:29 AM (ENBF0)


That was Clarke.

Posted by: blaster at February 12, 2023 11:40 AM (pwExq)

319 My NFL boycott effort has reached its intended destination. I wasn't aware that the Super Bowl was today until just now advised by one of my friends.

Posted by: polynikes at February 12, 2023 11:40 AM (qnsfO)

320 312 Looked up Communist Manifesto and all kinds of hits, how it isn't dead and buried is amazing. Failures all over the world, hundreds of millions murdered and it's still around and plenty to say why it's still important today.
Posted by: Skip at February 12, 2023 11:36 AM (xhxe

Descriptively and diagnostically useful. The prescriptions are obv very very bad.

Posted by: Thesokorus at February 12, 2023 11:41 AM (1ais2)

321 I'm still waiting for a copy of The Peripheral probably because of the Prime series. Is there some other Gibson book that I should read while waiting?

Posted by: Sharon(willow's apprentice) at February 12, 2023 11:41 AM (Y+l9t)

322 When I was a kid my favorite books were about surviving in the wild whether it be on a deserted island ,in the jungles or forested mountains.
That's why prepping is something I did for fun since I was a kid and still do.
Posted by: polynikes at February 12, 2023 11:24 AM (qnsfO)


My grandfather taught navigation and survival for Navy aviators during WWII, and one of my favorite books was How to Survive on Land and Sea, which was the text he taught from. Love that book

Posted by: Kindltot at February 12, 2023 11:41 AM (xhaym)

323 Now I can turn on the noise cancelling feature and read in peace whilst Mrs D drones on in the background.

******

My mom once spent a couple hours tapping gently on her hearing aid to get it to work before finally realizing that she had put a throat lozenge in her ear by mistake. You could try that and when your wife calls you out for ignoring her, blame it on the lozenge.

Posted by: Muldoon at February 12, 2023 11:41 AM (ykeLU)

324 > I think that the difference between Science Fiction and Fantasy is that Science Fiction could exist in this world

There's a lot of fudging there, though. For instance, as far as we know, there's no way to travel faster than light in our universe, but science fiction has FTL drives all over the place.

Posted by: Rodrigo Borgia at February 12, 2023 11:42 AM (bW8dp)

325 Computers are magic. When you think about what is going on it there it seems incredible that the damn things work at all.

Posted by: fd at February 12, 2023 11:42 AM (iayUP)

326 324 Posted by: Rodrigo Borgia at February 12, 2023 11:42 AM (bW8dp)

Science fiction has material and energy costs and concerns.

Science fantasy runs functionally on magic.

Best example is early Star Trek versus neo trek.

Posted by: sven at February 12, 2023 11:43 AM (Lzpvj)

327 Different philosophy. SF ships, weapons,gadgets are all things that 'might' someday be real, and we have lots of actual examples from lasers to space travel. Magic is never going to happen.
Posted by: Ciampino - Lemuria sounds like a cheese variety

For a change up, you might wish to read Larry Niven's "The Magic Goes Away", in which he explicates for a world in which magic is real, made possible by a substance called "manna". As the world's supply of "manna" was going away.....
and then read the book

There was a sequel called "The Magic May Return", but I never read that.

Posted by: A face in the crowd..... at February 12, 2023 11:43 AM (tjZg/)

328 Balloons for some; miniature Red Chinese flags for all!
Posted by: andycanuck

They're everywhere!

Disclose.tv@disclosetv
JUST IN - Unidentified flying object has been detected near Rizhao in China, according to Chinese state media Global Times citing local maritime authorities.
-
The FAA just closed down airspace in Montana, sent fighters to investigate a “radar anomaly,” then said there was actually nothing there
https://bit.ly/3YqeYBs
-
US fighter shoots down new unidentified object over Canada, PM Trudeau responds
https://bit.ly/3llRjTY
-
My theory is that the Martians have had enough of Biden's shit.

Posted by: Anonosaurus Wrecks, Not a Real Simulation at February 12, 2023 11:44 AM (FVME7)

329 325 Posted by: fd at February 12, 2023 11:42 AM (iayUP)

Computers are demonic adding machines given flashier powers by the blood sacrifices building them used to require.

Posted by: sven at February 12, 2023 11:44 AM (Lzpvj)

330 An unidentified frying object over China?
Posted by: fd at February


General Tso and the World of Tomorrow!

Posted by: A face in the crowd..... at February 12, 2023 11:44 AM (tjZg/)

331 Thanks for the thread, Perfessor.

Have a good one, gang.

Posted by: Just Some Guy at February 12, 2023 11:44 AM (a/4+U)

332 My NFL boycott effort has reached its intended destination. I wasn't aware that the Super Bowl was today until just now advised by one of my friends.
Posted by: polynikes at February 12, 2023 11:40 AM (qnsfO)


You should watch the opening ceremonies. When the Air Force does the flyover, it's even money the Goodyear blimp goes down in flames.

Posted by: Diogenes at February 12, 2023 11:44 AM (anj39)

333 I reread a bunch of Louise Penny mysteries over the past couple of weeks, and discovered, as with many other authors, I enjoy the first books in a series but dislike later ones. Kathy Reich's is like that, too. I like the earlier books, but start getting bored and impatient with later ones. I don't know if it's me or the author, so I just keep plugging along, hoping something will tweak my interest.

Someone mentioned Down the Common last week, A year in the life of a medieval village peasant. I'm about half way done, and think it is very true to its time and setting. If you are interested in that general time period, you might want to read Paul Doherty's Brother Athelstan mysteries. They take place in London during John of Gaunt's regency for Richard II, and show the awful living conditions of the common people of that time. 1/2

Posted by: Captain Josepha Sabin -- I wasn't particularly fond of the '70s the first time around at February 12, 2023 11:44 AM (SckW+)

334 IIRC, it was Asimov who postulated that any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic
Posted by: AltonJackson at February 12, 2023 11:29 AM (ENBF0)


No, I think it is a mindset. Tech can be achieved, reverse engineered and understood. Magic tends to be accepted as "it does what it does because it is its nature to do so"

No one really understands magnetism as far as I know, but that is more of a question of getting to it, not of just accepting it in the universe.

Posted by: Kindltot at February 12, 2023 11:44 AM (xhaym)

335 Completed my re-reading of Jane Eyre.

One of my all time favorites. My mom gave me the book to read when I was a teenager. I re-read it twice in my 20's and 30's. Love that book.

Posted by: jewells45 fuck cancer at February 12, 2023 11:45 AM (wagHN)

336 An unidentified frying object over China?
------------
A wok-it!

Posted by: andycanuck (Vwz3I) at February 12, 2023 11:45 AM (Vwz3I)

337 Posted by: Kindltot at February 12, 2023 11:41 AM (xhaym)

Frank Craighead.

Posted by: polynikes at February 12, 2023 11:45 AM (qnsfO)

338 Muldoon,
My brother and I had every word memorized. The Point was wonderful. My dad had the 8 track which he played for us often.

I think we saw the animated show many years later and were disappointed.

I found it on you tube and played it for a friend on a road trip a few years ago. Brought tears to my eyes how very sweet it is.

Posted by: nurse ratched at February 12, 2023 11:45 AM (U2p+3)

339 The psychic realm exists. It's foolish to think otherwise. Charlatans don't mean magic isn't real. Just as snake-oil salesmen don't disprove medicines.

Posted by: Thesokorus at February 12, 2023 11:46 AM (1ais2)

340 "columbarium - n. - a room or building with niches for funeral urns to be stored"

Well known term in New Orleans, as we have to bury people above ground, for the most part.
Posted by: Javems

Finally visited Saint Louis Cemetery No. 1 last weekend. It was fantastic. We also have a columbarium on my local parish grounds.

Posted by: Tonypete at February 12, 2023 11:46 AM (qoGsy)

341 I think that the difference between Science Fiction and Fantasy is that Science Fiction could exist in this world, and the universe is changed by technology that follows specific physical rules, where as Fantasy does not...

So you're asserting that Clark was wrong but still not explaining why.

Posted by: Oddbob at February 12, 2023 11:46 AM (nfrXX)

342 I looked up Chrono-Synclastic Infundibulum and am intrigued. I'm not much of a Vonnegut fan but will check it out.

Posted by: fd at February 12, 2023 11:46 AM (iayUP)

343 I think that the difference between Science Fiction and Fantasy is that Science Fiction could exist in this world the difference between Elon Musk's schemes and Joe Biden's.

Posted by: Anonosaurus Wrecks, Not a Real Simulation at February 12, 2023 11:47 AM (FVME7)

344 I recommend Scaramouche by Rafael Sabatini. He will give your vocabulary a workout while slyly educating you on the French Revolution. Also by Sabatini, Captain Blood and The Sea Hawk (which is entirely different from the movie starring Errol Flynn.) I am reading Victor Davis Hanson’s The Second World Wars which is teaching me things I didn’t know.
JimB

Posted by: JimB at February 12, 2023 11:47 AM (4HgXh)

345 Most technology seems like magic to me.
As I've been reading about mysterious flying objects, I kept thinking.....what if it really is aliens?

Posted by: Sharon(willow's apprentice) at February 12, 2023 11:47 AM (Y+l9t)

346 Is there some other Gibson book that I should read while waiting?

If you haven't read Neuromancer you definitely should. But work up to it. Start with the collection of shorts Burning Chrome.

Posted by: Oddbob at February 12, 2023 11:48 AM (nfrXX)

347 321 I'm still waiting for a copy of The Peripheral probably because of the Prime series. Is there some other Gibson book that I should read while waiting?
Posted by: Sharon(willow's apprentice) at February 12, 2023 11:41 AM (Y+l9t)


Gibson made his bones in cyberpunk, and he has a ton of novels there - Neuromancer was his first novel.

He had a break from that and then the world surpassed his fictional cyberspace. His more "modern" works that look more like The Peripheral start in Pattern Recognition.

So for a recommendation, I would say "Neuromancer" to get steeped in Gibson, then Pattern Recognition to get caught up with his progress.

Posted by: blaster at February 12, 2023 11:48 AM (pwExq)

348 You should watch the opening ceremonies. When the Air Force does the flyover, it's even money the Goodyear blimp goes down in flames.
Posted by: Diogenes at February 12, 2023 11:44 AM


This year it's Navy F/A-18s, all flown by females of course.

Posted by: Bert G at February 12, 2023 11:48 AM (aCgRi)

349 I finished The Cabin at the End of the World this week. It's what the movie Knock on the Cabin Door is based on. It was good. Son says he's afraid M. Night Shyamalan is going to screw with the ending so he's not sure he wants to see it.

Posted by: jewells45 fuck cancer at February 12, 2023 11:49 AM (wagHN)

350 There's a lot of fudging there, though. For instance, as far as we know, there's no way to travel faster than light in our universe, but science fiction has FTL drives all over the place.
Posted by: Rodrigo Borgia at February 12, 2023 11:42 AM (bW8dp)


I will accept that. The number of people in the world who look to me as a definitive source on science fiction is zero. I guess this is why Sci fi and fantasy are in the same section. It avoids fights.

(The number of cats on the other hand . . . Will accept anything as long as I can open cans of cat food)

Posted by: Kindltot at February 12, 2023 11:49 AM (xhaym)

351 JUST IN - Unidentified flying object has been detected near Rizhao in China, according to Chinese state media Global Times citing local maritime authorities.

Posted by: andycanuck (Vwz3I) at February 12, 2023 11:24 AM (Vwz3I)

Where's that beginning guy? First steps in declaring aliens are here and demand we give up our liberty to a global gov't?*

*There are no aliens, it's a trick.

Posted by: OrangeEnt at February 12, 2023 11:49 AM (Angsy)

352 Alton: You're thinking of Clarke. Asimov was a lot more of a hard-nosed materialist. Magic was a dirty word for him.

Posted by: Trimegistus at February 12, 2023 11:50 AM (QZxDR)

353 Harry Potter ain't using no technology.

Posted by: polynikes at February 12, 2023 11:50 AM (qnsfO)

354 dragons = fantasy
alien lizardoids = sci-fi

Posted by: andycanuck (Vwz3I) at February 12, 2023 11:50 AM (Vwz3I)

355 This year it's Navy F/A-18s, all flown by females of course.
Posted by: Bert G at February 12, 2023 11:48 AM


Correction (I had to look it up): It's a brace of F/A-18Fs, an EA-18G, and an F-35C.

Posted by: Bert G at February 12, 2023 11:52 AM (aCgRi)

356 345 Most technology seems like magic to me.
As I've been reading about mysterious flying objects, I kept thinking.....what if it really is aliens?
Posted by: Sharon(willow's apprentice) at February 12, 2023 11:47 AM (Y+l9t)


Latest right-wing conspiracy theory: The UFO videos released by the government are really of Chinese spycraft.

Posted by: blaster at February 12, 2023 11:53 AM (pwExq)

357 Where's that beginning guy? First steps in declaring aliens are here and demand we give up our liberty to a global gov't?*

*There are no aliens, it's a trick.
---------
Keep watching the lies skies!

@TheInsiderPaper · Feb 11
NEW 🚨 The UFO (Unidentified flying object), that has been shot down over Alaska, described as "cylindrical and silver-ish gray" and seemed to be floating, ABC News reports

Posted by: andycanuck (Vwz3I) at February 12, 2023 11:53 AM (Vwz3I)

358 So you're asserting that Clark was wrong but still not explaining why.
Posted by: Oddbob at February 12, 2023 11:46 AM (nfrXX)


are you asking for my sources or are you asking for my opinion?

it is possible that Clark was fond of thinking himself as a wizard to all the people who didn't understand tube driven radar.
I preferred George O Smith who thought that people who didn't understand tube driven radar should learn about it

Posted by: Kindltot at February 12, 2023 11:53 AM (xhaym)

359 So would Timmy telling Lassie, "I've fallen down the well, go get help, girl." and Lassie running into town and finding Mr. Gunderson and convincing him to grab a rope and follow her back to the well be categorized as fantasy or science fiction?

Posted by: Muldoon at February 12, 2023 11:54 AM (ykeLU)

360 Posted by: Muldoon at February 12, 2023 11:54 AM (ykeLU)

It would be in whatever section Dr Doolittle would be in.

Posted by: polynikes at February 12, 2023 11:55 AM (qnsfO)

361 Most technology seems like magic to me.
As I've been reading about mysterious flying objects, I kept thinking.....what if it really is aliens?
Posted by: Sharon(willow's apprentice) at February 12, 2023 11:47 AM (Y+l9t)


Watch V, and read The Greks Bring Gifts by Murray Leinster

Posted by: Kindltot at February 12, 2023 11:55 AM (xhaym)

362 2/2 Nothing drives me crazier than the depiction of medieval Europeans living in clean environments. No! Medieval Europe was filthy!!! And disgusting! Isabelle of Castillle was very proud that she took only two baths in her life -- the day she was born and the day she married Ferdinand of Aragon.

Posted by: Captain Josepha Sabin -- I wasn't particularly fond of the '70s the first time around at February 12, 2023 11:56 AM (SckW+)

363 Is this science fiction or fantasy?

Bad Weapon Takes@BadWeaponTakes
I am in absolute awe

I was today years old when I was informed, by an "expert" testifying for California's DOJ, that an AR is an area effect weapon, a single .223 round can sever a human being in half, barrel rifling is what makes a round tumble upon hitting it's target

Posted by: Anonosaurus Wrecks, Not a Real Simulation at February 12, 2023 11:57 AM (FVME7)

364 The NFL has a world class marketing team.

Berating half the country and laughing at them while doing it and still getting them to watch and support the league.

They are second to none and should be studied in every top business school.

Today of course is the biggest cucking of all.

Posted by: I guess I'll tell them at February 12, 2023 11:57 AM (vUNbA)

365 Anthropomorphic fantasy section. Right along with Thumper and Jiminy Cricket

Posted by: Muldoon at February 12, 2023 11:58 AM (ykeLU)

366 I was today years old when I was informed, by an "expert" testifying for California's DOJ, that an AR is an area effect weapon, a single .223 round can sever a human being in half, barrel rifling is what makes a round tumble upon hitting it's target
Posted by: Anonosaurus Wrecks, Not a Real Simulation at February 12, 2023 11:57 AM (FVME7)

Huh. That is just fascinating.

Posted by: Aetius451AD at February 12, 2023 11:58 AM (CsVWE)

367 Posted by: Captain Josepha Sabin -- I wasn't particularly fond of the '70s the first time around at February 12, 2023 11:56 AM (SckW+)

The movie Flesh and Blood being an exception.

Posted by: polynikes at February 12, 2023 11:58 AM (qnsfO)

368 I read the first of a new Flashman series this week, about Harry's son. Its pretty fun stuff, same basic concept, but a generation later set during the Napoleonic wars. Thomas Flashman starts out his adventures on board the Speedy with a young Thomas Cochrane.

Also read Nicholas Pileggi's book Casino, which the movie was based on. Its more complicated, has way more people involved, and has a slightly different sequence of events that happened in real life than the movie, but overall its basically the same story arc.

Scorcese glossed over or skipped a lot of the horrible stuff the mob did in Vegas.

Posted by: Christopher R Taylor at February 12, 2023 11:58 AM (0hOvj)

369 Anthropomorphic fantasy section. Right along with Thumper and Jiminy Cricket
Posted by: Muldoon at February 12, 2023 11:58 AM (ykeLU)


Have you ever listened to Jordan Peterson's discussion on Pinocchio? He verges on being the guy with the bulletin boards and red yarn, but he does a very good analysis of the story and how it fits into how myths explain how we think.

Posted by: Kindltot at February 12, 2023 12:00 PM (xhaym)

370 >>> 332 My NFL boycott effort has reached its intended destination. I wasn't aware that the Super Bowl was today until just now advised by one of my friends.
Posted by: polynikes at February 12, 2023 11:40 AM (qnsfO)


You should watch the opening ceremonies. When the Air Force does the flyover, it's even money the Goodyear blimp goes down in flames.
Posted by: Diogenes at February 12, 2023 11:44 AM (anj39)

Bitch tried to cut me off!

Posted by: flyover pilot at February 12, 2023 12:00 PM (llON8)

371 So would Timmy telling Lassie, "I've fallen down the well, go get help, girl." and Lassie running into town and finding Mr. Gunderson and convincing him to grab a rope and follow her back to the well be categorized as fantasy or science fiction?
-----------
So you believe my Turkish-dog rescuer video is doctored?!!!

How dare you!!!

İyi bir çocuk kim? DSÖ? Sen! Bu kim!

Posted by: andycanuck (Vwz3I) at February 12, 2023 12:01 PM (Vwz3I)

372 Nood

Posted by: Duke Lowell at February 12, 2023 12:01 PM (u73oe)

373 Obviously Lassie couldn't speak directly to Mr. Gunderson, so he would have to write a note, but wait...no opposable thumb. Maybe she could just scratch the words in the dirt with her paw.

"Timy n well. Bring rop."

Dumb dog. Can't spell worth beans.

Posted by: Muldoon at February 12, 2023 12:02 PM (ykeLU)

374 Thanks for the thread, Perfessor.

Posted by: OrangeEnt at February 12, 2023 12:02 PM (Angsy)

375 Just put a hold on Neuromancer. There's a waiting list but not as long as the Peripheral. A little intimidated though in that there is a study guide?

Posted by: Sharon(willow's apprentice) at February 12, 2023 12:02 PM (Y+l9t)

376 I have noticed some distinct changes in my reading habits over the years. I suspect all of us go through various phases of reading, depending on where we are in our lives and what is interesting to us at the time.

I used to read more fantasy and sci fi when I was in high school, then I found mysteries, thanks to my brothers and I read Chandler and Hammett. I found the first Spenser book at the library and read all those (I once had a collection of all the books but sold those a while back).

These days I mostly read historical mysteries, crime and adventure books, and historical adventure (cowboy stories, Bernard Cornwell stories, etc). Mixed in are a variety of theological and philosophy stuff.

What I do not have any time or patience for is gigantic doorstop tomes. If you cannot tell your story in 400 pages or less, I just do not have the patience for it.

Posted by: Christopher R Taylor at February 12, 2023 12:02 PM (0hOvj)

377 So would Timmy telling Lassie, "I've fallen down the well, go get help, girl." and Lassie running into town and finding Mr. Gunderson and convincing him to grab a rope and follow her back to the well be categorized as fantasy or science fiction?
Posted by: Muldoon

Nah. A shaggy dog story. (hehe)

Posted by: Tonypete at February 12, 2023 12:03 PM (qoGsy)

378 DSÖ?
--------------
So much for AI -- I'm pretty sure the English to Turkish translator website I used translated "Who?" as "W.H.O.?"

Dünya Sağlık Teşkilatı (WHO) / T.C. Dışişleri Bakanlığı

Posted by: andycanuck (Vwz3I) at February 12, 2023 12:06 PM (Vwz3I)

379 A couple of things about The Peripheral series (which I quite liked). 1) It can be difficult to understand because half the time they're limey lipping it and the other half hillbilly lipping it. 2) The book doesn't specify race (although my racist heart generally assumes white). When the series made Wilf Netherton and Conner Penske black I didn't mind or wasn't offended because it made no difference unlike much of Hollyweird's virtue signaling.

Posted by: Anonosaurus Wrecks, Not a Real Simulation at February 12, 2023 12:09 PM (FVME7)

380 What's that Lassie? I should tie a sheet bend rather than a square knot because the sheet bend is stronger?

Posted by: Anonosaurus Wrecks, Not a Real Simulation at February 12, 2023 12:11 PM (FVME7)

381 Just put a hold on Neuromancer. There's a waiting list but not as long as the Peripheral. A little intimidated though in that there is a study guide?
Posted by: Sharon(willow's apprentice)

Poor man's study guide.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Neuromancer

Posted by: Anonosaurus Wrecks, Not a Real Simulation at February 12, 2023 12:13 PM (FVME7)

382 It can be difficult to understand because half the time they're limey lipping it and the other half hillbilly lipping it

The line is extremely blurred between those two accents, as hillbilly came from low class Brit slang. The modern "ebonic" accent came from Southern English (its basically white sharecropper, like "axe you a question") and that came from Southwestern England slang.

Thomas Sowell has written and talked about this extensively. That's not authentic black, its authentic poor British.

Posted by: Christopher R Taylor at February 12, 2023 12:15 PM (0hOvj)

383 couple of things about The Peripheral series (which I quite liked). 1) It can be difficult to understand because half the time they're limey lipping it and the other half hillbilly lipping it.

+++
It was The Peripheral that got me started watching with subtitles. I had no idea what the hell was going on. Now quite addicted to this. Kind of like reading a book with video pictures. Lol

Posted by: Sharon(willow's apprentice) at February 12, 2023 12:19 PM (Y+l9t)

384 Whereupon the first guy said "Yeah, they're pretty new. They're the opening act for Theophantic Glory Cloud," which is another term they decided needs to be a band (specifically Christian Metal). Fun stuff.
Posted by: Ace-Endorsed Author A.H. Lloyd at February 12, 2023 10:22 AM (llXky)

Some fellow Old Drunks and I were musing on various subjects the other evening when I came up with the best Old Longhair band name: "The Dwindling Telomeres." Of course, "The Old Longhairs" would probably work just as well. I often wonder if the good folks of Central Texas could deal with a King Crimson cover act...

Posted by: Brewingfrog at February 12, 2023 01:09 PM (DXJR1)

385 240 And Eris, I sent you an email a couple of days ago to your Comcast account. Not sure that's the right one . . .
----

Thanks Bluebell! I'll check it out later. I've been in email avoidance mode lately.

Posted by: All Hail Eris at February 12, 2023 01:22 PM (MMJj1)

386 44 I started reading Hilary Mantel's Wolf Hall this last week, based on numerous recommendations here. What a fantastic book. I'm sure I will be immersed in Henry VIII's world for quite awhile because I can't imagine not finishing the whole trilogy.
Posted by: who knew at February 12, 2023 09:23 AM (4I7VG)

let me recommend Margaret George's "The Autobiography of Henry VIII". The story from his POV, with commentary from his Fool. Lengthy, but very good.

Posted by: sal: tolle adversarium et afflige inimicum at February 12, 2023 01:26 PM (wE246)

387 "There's a lot of fudging there, though. For instance, as far as we know, there's no way to travel faster than light in our universe, but science fiction has FTL drives all over the place."
[Posted by: Rodrigo Borgia at February 12, 2023 11:42 AM (bW8dp)]

L. Sprague DeCamp (an aeronautics engineer) didn't believe FTL drives or time travel were possible, so he, mentally at least, classified his stories that included such impossible elements as "fantasy." I've read (in one history of golden age science fiction or another) that because of that belief he wouldn't submit his "impossible technology" stories to hard science science fiction magazines. I liked the story too much, and am too lazy, to check to see if any of his "impossible technology" stories were first published in in "Astounding Science Fiction" or whether they were only published in its fantasy companion "Unknown."

Posted by: Pope John 20th at February 12, 2023 01:26 PM (cYrkj)

388 let me recommend Margaret George's "The Autobiography of Henry VIII". The story from his POV, with commentary from his Fool. Lengthy, but very good.
Posted by: sal: tolle adversarium et afflige inimicum at February 12, 2023 01:26 PM (wE246)

Second.

Posted by: Brewingfrog at February 12, 2023 01:32 PM (DXJR1)

389 All I can think of the pic is he added a lot of insulation.....

Posted by: OldToolLover at February 12, 2023 01:53 PM (D7f/X)

390 "I read the first of a new Flashman series this week, about Harry's son. Its pretty fun stuff, same basic concept, but a generation later set during the Napoleonic wars. Thomas Flashman starts out his adventures on board the Speedy with a young Thomas Cochrane."

If the books are set during the Napoleonic Wars, then it wouldn't be a generation earlier and Harry Flashman's son, but it might be a generation earlier and Harry's father, or an uncle, or even an older brother. Harry Flashman was in school at Rugby in the 1830s ("Tom Brown's School Days"), was involved in the First Anglo-Afgan War in 1838-42 ("Flashman"), chased pirates with James Brooke (the first white rajah of Sarawak) in the early 1840s ("Flashman's Lady"), was involved in the First Anglo-Sikh War in 1845-46 ("Flashman and the Mountain of Light"), and so on.

Posted by: Pope John 20th at February 12, 2023 02:14 PM (cYrkj)

391 Halfway through Great Expectations. Love the characters and story.

Posted by: LASue at February 12, 2023 02:18 PM (Ed8Zd)

392 Bluebell, if you're still around...my cookies came out terrific! Now I just have to make sure everybody takes some home.

Posted by: Sharon(willow's apprentice) at February 12, 2023 02:36 PM (Y+l9t)

393 Kindltot-I like your references to George O. Smith; a largely overlooked author of the golden age. His "Venus Equilateral" stories certainly qualify as hard science (IIRC he was an electronics engineer) and, as I recall (I don't think I've reread them since the 1960s) he provided a solid technical background for the reader, rather than relying on handwavium, in those stories.

He also wrote some pretty good SF where the science was very much in the background. For those who are interested, a nice selection of his works (including an edition of the collected "Venus Equilateral" stories that might not be the complete collection) are available at Project Gutenberg.

Posted by: Pope John 20th at February 12, 2023 02:54 PM (cYrkj)

394 May have done this before, but I do recommend Michael Flynn's "Eifelheim". His "Firestar" and "January Dancer" series are also worth the time (all of the above are science fiction).

If fantasy is your preference (& if you can find copies) Juliet E. McKenna's "Tales of Einarinn" series is quite nicely done, as is her "Green Man's Heir" series.

Posted by: aelfheld at February 12, 2023 03:34 PM (Zy9Yy)

395 'I read those a few years back. I remember the third book having a rushed ending. In the sense that there was a whole lot of world-building established (with how the society was re-constituting itself) only for the series to just end and not deal with any of the new society. It struck me as an odd way to end..."
Right, the new world was interesting, but we didn't get to see how the new Americans rise to glory again. However, I think I saw a hint (or was it just me?) that maybe the descendants of Or-Tis have preserved some scientific knowledge and the recovery will be quick.
Since it's out of copyright, anyone can write the sequel now ...

Posted by: PG at February 12, 2023 03:48 PM (84jHt)

396 Posted by: aelfheld

I read Eifelheim long ago but still remember a lot of - that's how much I liked it. Although the framing present day story was annoying.
Dunno why I never tried his other books

Posted by: vmom stabby stabby stabby stabby stabamillion at February 12, 2023 05:21 PM (fUnHJ)

397 Last!

Posted by: March Hare at February 12, 2023 11:48 PM (lwrAe)

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