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Gardening, Puttering and Adventure Thread, October 15

monarchastr.jpeg

Hi there, gardeners, putterers and adventurers! Don't you love the photo above?

A monarch resting in the asters on its way through eastern Nebraska this week.

Midwest Lurker

Seems a little late to me for a Monarch to be going through Nebraska, but I may not understand the schedule. Best wishes to our little traveler.

*


Edible Gardening/Putting Things By

From By-Tor:

Remember when he tried a bit of raw ghost chili? An adventure!

The ghost chilis I was sent are fermenting nicely with a kick start of some sauerkraut brine.

They're hot. Very hot. About a million Scoville units. By comparison, a jalapeno is about 8K SU.

Just a couple drops of the pickling brine will keep your mouth on fire for about ten minutes.

This is gonna make good hot sauce.

"Good".

ghost chil.jpg

He's been busy:

22 lbs of Roma tomatoes is now about 12 quarts of marinara sauce, good for pasta, pizza or soup.

Now I just have to pressure can it.

r mater 2.jpg

rmater 1.jpg

r mater 3.jpg

He doesn't mean he's going to pressure can it with plastic lids. The photo above is for fresh use.

*

Puttering

Also from By-Tor:

I consider it a successful day when I correctly install two GFI circuits and replace a bad hot water line without getting shocked or flooding the house.

Now off to the gym!

gfi 1b.jpg

pipel byt.jpg

Congratulations! And a reminder for all you putterers:

duct tapeii.jpg

Halloween Decorations

Zombie arm stakes. Easy. There are 24 more at the link.

zombie-arm-stakes.jpg

Lots o' punkins at Descanso Gardens, including a pumpkin house.

descanso p.jpg

A wide variety of looks here, some of which might carry through to Thanksgiving.

pumpkin-scarecrow-cro.jpg

*

Mystery Plant

Not really gardening since I didn't plant or nurture it, but it's an interesting something that has shown up this week at my new house in southwest Louisiana.

I'm strictly a lurker for the last couple of years but did post as daggit at one point.

mystr daggit.jpg

Nice to see you back, daggit!

Does anyone recognize this plant? Can you come close?

*

Gardens of The Horde

t may be a little difficult to see, but I have two agaves sporting quite the "plant boners ". The one on the left is 5 feet and still growing.
I have planted my front bed with things that thrive on neglect with great success.

Kindest regards

Bonecrusher

bonecrshr b.jpg

Hope everyone has a nice weekend.


If you would like to send photos, stories, links, etc. for the Saturday Gardening, Puttering and Adventure Thread, the address is:

ktinthegarden at g mail dot com

Remember to include the nic or name by which you wish to be known at AoSHQ, or let us know if you want to remain a lurker.


Week in Review

What has changed since last week's thread? Gardening, Puttering and Adventure Thread, Oct. 8


Any thoughts or questions?

I closed the comments on this post so you wouldn't get banned for commenting on a week-old post, but don't try it anyway.

Posted by: K.T. at 01:21 PM




Comments

(Jump to bottom of comments)

1 The mystery plant is Lycoris radiata, also known as "hurricane lily" because it typically blooms at the peak of hurricane season.

Posted by: Don at October 15, 2022 01:26 PM (3Xg5w)

2 I have a pot full of Carolina Reapers that I have been drying and crushing into pepper flakes. It's too much for me to use all at once but luckily I have a co-worker who enjoys spicy food.

As for the ghost peppers? I treat those with respect. The first time I bought a bottle of hot sauce made with it, it lasted a year.

Posted by: NR Pax at October 15, 2022 01:28 PM (Z7Jj3)

3 Good afternoon Greenthumbs
Home made dried hot peppers are great.
Mostly disappointed in garden this year, squash did best, have a little plant of chili peppers got a fair amount from but tomatoes barely enough to eat.

Posted by: Skip at October 15, 2022 01:37 PM (xhxe8)

4 Don at October 15, 2022 01:26 PM

Thanks, Don! There are some intriguing Lycoris plants in the world.

Posted by: KT at October 15, 2022 01:43 PM (rrtZS)

5 And since it's fall, I am trying to figure out how to proceed on getting a garden ready for next year. There's sort of a lawn. I have saved all my cardboard boxes from the move and am considering just putting those down for the winter to kill off the sod. The problem will be making sure they don' t get blown off in a storm this winter.

And the new rose will be here next week! I have to dig a hole for that and the one that will be shipped the following week.

Posted by: Notsothoreau at October 15, 2022 01:43 PM (uz3Px)

6 That plant (well the flower) is called a Johnny Jump Up. After the flower dies, it make grass similar to monkey grass for the winter, and then go back to hibernating as a bulb.

Posted by: Kevin at October 15, 2022 01:44 PM (kv3dj)

7 Barely Fall and already dreading leaves falling.

Posted by: Skip at October 15, 2022 01:45 PM (xhxe8)

8 I only go as hot as habaneros. This year my crop became a nice salsa made with carrots — I know I know but it’s fantastic and common in Belize and the Yucatán — a la Rick Bayless.

Posted by: keena at October 15, 2022 01:45 PM (MpOUf)

9 We're starting to get some nice fall color. There are always a few trees that are spectacular every year and they didn't let us down. When the noon day sun shines through the leaves the rich colors are wonderful. No kaleidoscope can compare.

Posted by: JTB at October 15, 2022 01:48 PM (7EjX1)

10 The mystery plant is Lycoris radiata

That's what I think as well.

Posted by: jewells45 at October 15, 2022 01:48 PM (nxdel)

11 Love the purple flowers with the butterfly. Excellent picture.
Years ago it was common to see containers of pickled jalapenos with carrots on every table at Mexican restaurants. Don't see them much anymore.

Posted by: AlmostYuman at October 15, 2022 01:54 PM (X6EPF)

12 We have hard freeze forecast Monday night, so we're getting anything worth getting out of the garden today.
Rolled up hoses, picked tomatoes (hoping at least a couple make it to Thanksgiving) gonna pick all the peppers, and probably bring in the zucchini my wife has been saving for seed. Okra, I believe, can freeze without affecting seeds.
Bees are acting weird... buzzing around with only a few okra flowers to feed on.

Posted by: MkY at October 15, 2022 01:54 PM (cPGH3)

13 Another sign of October: our big redbud is changing. I swear it goes from full midsummer green to yellow in about two days. You can almost see the leaves change minute by minute. We're at the point where one good storm with heavy, wind-driven rain will blow off most of the leaves. That will leave just the branches and a lot of dark brown seed pods. The whole process happens so quickly.

People have different ways to note the changes of seasons. Our redbud is one of ours.

Posted by: JTB at October 15, 2022 01:55 PM (7EjX1)

14 The mystery red flowers are hurricane lilies. So named because they bloom here on the northern Gulf Coast at about the same time we typically get nailed by some named storm or other.

Posted by: PlainJane at October 15, 2022 02:05 PM (RDtcS)

15 Good afternoon, gardeners!

Midwest Lurker, that is a beautiful photo. Come to think of it, I saw very few butterflies of any sort this summer.

The hottest I can go is habañeros, which were in my lunch: chicken chili (with beans). I am nursing a cold, which is at the waterfall-inside-my head stage. Chili and soup usually help. So far, no.

Between the head-cold and the wind, plans for leave-burning were canceled. I made a pile of windfall branches in the "pit" aka old stump burn-out. Maybe later this week.

On a happy note, the garbagemen picked up the broken fencing that I put in the abandoned neighbor's bin. It will take about three more trips to clean out the fallen fence.

Posted by: NaughtyPine at October 15, 2022 02:14 PM (/+bwe)

16 hiya

Posted by: JT at October 15, 2022 02:17 PM (T4tVD)

17 What part of Southwest LA?

Posted by: polynikes at October 15, 2022 02:20 PM (nMc+e)

18 My garden has been neglected this summer, but the tomatoes persist. They don't seem to be as sweet in the warmer climate here in Arkansas, although they are getting tastier now late in the season.

Posted by: Emmie at October 15, 2022 02:20 PM (Emce2)

19 I am making 92 US dollars an hour working from home. I never imagined that it was honest to goodness yet my closest companion is earning $16,000 a month by working on a laptop, that was truly astounding for me, she prescribed for me to attempt it simply.
Everybody must try this job now by just using this site.. W­Www.Profit97.com

Posted by: www.Profit97.Com at October 15, 2022 02:20 PM (Gnwqk)

20 Love the purple flowers with the butterfly. Excellent picture.
Years ago it was common to see containers of pickled jalapenos with carrots on every table at Mexican restaurants. Don't see them much anymore.
Posted by: AlmostYuman at October 15, 2022 01:54 PM (X6EPF)

I've put that photo in my queue to be another oil painting.

Posted by: polynikes at October 15, 2022 02:21 PM (nMc+e)

21 I finally had the other half of my dead hedges removed. Spent Thursday and Friday cleaning up the bed to lay down the red lava rock and put two more concrete planters in there to balance the other side of the front of my house where the same set up was done. Now I just need to paint the planters to match and decide what to plant.

Posted by: polynikes at October 15, 2022 02:25 PM (nMc+e)

22 It's unseasonably warm and dry here in the Puget Sound area. We've not had measurable rain in months. And the wildfire smoke is back with a vengeance. Air quality index is 160. That's bad.

I did see another owl on a walk at twilight the other day. Perhaps I'll send it along.

Posted by: nurse ratched at October 15, 2022 02:27 PM (U2p+3)

23 Posted by: nurse ratched at October 15, 2022 02:27 PM (U2p+3)

Yes the higher temp doesn't bother me just as long we have the corresponding rain to go along with it. Suffering the same thing in Houston.

Posted by: polynikes at October 15, 2022 02:30 PM (nMc+e)

24 Was up on roof shaping off some of the garden growing there, moss. Started some years ago in a corner under a sycamore but now is spreading rapidly. So took a spackle knife and loosen a lot of it. Once the leaves go it gets lots of sun.

Posted by: Skip at October 15, 2022 02:40 PM (xhxe8)

25 Has anyone here successfully dehydrated carrots or onions? Thanks.

Posted by: Mrs. JTB at October 15, 2022 02:45 PM (7EjX1)

26 "The definite height varies reliant on how abundant you twist the legs."

I love "English is not my first language" articles.

Posted by: TB at October 15, 2022 02:47 PM (Ur3df)

27 I canned tomatoes this week and I have to wait for more to ripen.
I think it is time to pick the corn to dry, but we have another week of dry weather forecasted.
It is also time to dig the last of the potatoes.

I think I will hack some blackberry vines back today.

Posted by: Kindltot at October 15, 2022 02:48 PM (xhaym)

28 That's why they call them Monarchs. Regal.

Posted by: Eromero at October 15, 2022 02:49 PM (gktX6)

29 Odd thing
I have a 3 foot long steel pipe in front flower bed that I use to hold up my aluminum 10 foot flag pole. Other week wife somehow saw a toad peeking out of top but inside. Other day it was back but I went out didn't see it. Wife went out and it's back inside the pipe. It's down in a few inches but it's there.

Posted by: Skip at October 15, 2022 02:56 PM (xhxe8)

30 Saturday greetings, gardeners, putterers, and adventurers.

Still desperate for some precipitation here in NE Okla. The lawn is so dead! Got some sprinkles this week - measured in hundredths of an inch.

High temp today will be over 80˚F. Low Monday night predicted to be freezing, the next night 26˚. Time to drain and roll up the hoses and pack away the watering timer for the winter. Finally did get some nice 'maters, but not a lot. Some basil. Some lessons, as always, on what to do and not, next year.

Posted by: mindful webworker - YouTube cancelled my YT channel at October 15, 2022 03:04 PM (dPyc1)

31 As for how that Lycoris radiata (we call them spider lilies) got there, squirrels are probably your culprit. A neighbor of ours across the street and several houses down planted a pink variety, and somehow one of them ended up in our flowerbed. We have an entire colony of the little gray terrors that love burying their prizes around our yoshino cherry. Occasionally, they forget about their stashes so we end up with a few mystery plants.

Posted by: Saber Alter at October 15, 2022 03:08 PM (py1gx)

32 From Boise area: Highs in the 70's, lows 45-55.

We were gone for part of this week - a last trailer trip before the weather shuts us down. We spent one day of the trip visiting 2 wineries - we met S.Lynn at one of them, and had a splendid time sipping wine and sharing stories.

Zucchini continue to produce!; the overlarge ones still need to be chopped for the compost. Only 1 cantaloupe still on the vine. We might be able to get a few late eating tomatoes.

We'll be traveling next weekend, so likely I won't post (sorry, rabid Famous Pat* fans!), so we'll need to watch the forecast to decide what to do about the poblanos, whether to harvest and refrigerate, put on a row cover, or let them be. They're looking much much better than at season's start, when I thought we'd get no crop.

Husband and I enthusiastically recommend Backwoods Home magazine and its sister publication Self Reliance (each is quarterly). Current issue had much info on potatoes (#3 and 4 potato producers are Ukraine and Russia; plant accordingly!), and on beneficial flowers to attract pollinators and other beneficial insects to your garden.

Posted by: Pat* at October 15, 2022 03:09 PM (540/r)

33 I tried to put a trellis up for my tomatoes, and it was not a total success.

First, I was too hesitant to trim back the lower branches to encourage the growth of branches up where the twine was holding up the tomatoes, and the branches swept to the ground where the tomatoes ripened
Second, I used thin PVC pipe that bent under the weight of all the tomatoes
Third, I used sissal yard that aged and broke in the sun and watering.

So I guess I get to be more aggressive in pruning up the vines, and I will used binder twine and either get metal wiring conduit or save back the suckers I cut off the trees.
I do like the trellising concept, even half-arsed the way I did it was as easy to pick as my usual tomato cages

Posted by: Kindltot at October 15, 2022 03:10 PM (xhaym)

34 Anyone still around?

Long time no see for me on the GT (It is 4:00AM here in Japan)

Posted by: Gentlemen, this is junta manifest at October 15, 2022 03:11 PM (ecW19)

35 Gentlemen -cool to find a world traveler stopping by

Posted by: Skip at October 15, 2022 03:14 PM (xhxe8)

36 My one oddity this year is that I got Taro to grow in a grow box. I get told that I can't grow it here, but that is not really true, we can't winter it here. It grows fine in 80-90 F Summers.

I think, in spite of my wife not wanting one, I will work to get a stock tub or something similar and grow a larger batch next year. I may try growing wapato (a local arrow root) next year as well. Both of them like growing in standing water and soggy ground.

Posted by: Kindltot at October 15, 2022 03:20 PM (xhaym)

37 Japan had a really bad year for persimmon. Prices in the store are up about 60% i think.

I have three trees, and my fuyu variety only has one that survived. That is the most common one and all around town I see the other trees are just as sad.
Fortunately, one of my other varieties looks OK.

Posted by: Gentlemen, this is junta manifest at October 15, 2022 03:23 PM (ecW19)

38 35 Gentlemen -cool to find a world traveler stopping by
Posted by: Skip

It's hard due to the time shift, but I used to stop by when I had different sleep habits.

Posted by: Gentlemen, this is junta manifest at October 15, 2022 03:29 PM (ecW19)

39 We pulled up the remaining tomato plants earlier in the week. It had frosted a couple of mornings and there was one pretty good freeze... got down to about 28 degrees for a couple hours so the plants were toast.

The plot looks so sad right now.

On the bright side our herbs are sheltered near the house and we've got a good batch of Sage and Rosemary to dry.

Posted by: Martini Farmer at October 15, 2022 03:30 PM (BFigT)

40 Looks who's coming, look who's coming!
A Big Fat Butterfly!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OdkS0GMl_TI

Posted by: gourmand du jour, wrapped in fog at October 15, 2022 03:33 PM (jTmQV)

41 >>Don't you love the photo above?

I have a little lemon tree and I have to keep it netted all year or the butterflies eat it bare. I also have a couple japanese pepper (shanshou) which is also a citrus and they get eaten bare all year long. I don't know how they survive.

Posted by: Gentlemen, this is junta manifest at October 15, 2022 03:33 PM (ecW19)

42 Did watch every lap of that rain soaked Japanese Grand Prix last weekend

Posted by: Skip at October 15, 2022 03:33 PM (xhxe8)

43 We've now reached 199 jars canned.

Coming up on the end of tomatoes, segueing into green tomatoes. Since we may get an early frost mid-week, I'm going to take whatever is left in the big garden, cut the stalks, and hang them for ripening.

It bothers me how many tomatoes went bad while I was collecting enough to can or cook with. Next year, I'm going to have a container in the freezer for the good parts of tomatoes that I've had to cut up.

Posted by: Miley, okravangelist at October 15, 2022 03:36 PM (Mzdiz)

44 I ride in the mountains, and the chestnuts were weird this year too. There are a few along the roads and they drop the chestnuts in Sept. Usually over about 2 weeks. This year they started dropping early just like the persimmon. By the time they were ready there were none left.

Must have been the early heatwave we had.

Posted by: Gentlemen, this is junta manifest at October 15, 2022 03:37 PM (ecW19)

45 Those tomato pictures look so good they are making me hungry.
I miss USA food a lot.

Posted by: Gentlemen, this is junta manifest at October 15, 2022 03:40 PM (ecW19)

46 Did watch every lap of that rain soaked Japanese Grand Prix last weekend
Posted by: Skip

No, I was busy in the rain getting wet myself.

Posted by: Gentlemen, this is junta manifest at October 15, 2022 03:41 PM (ecW19)

47 Gentlemen, this is junta manifest at October 15, 2022 03:40 PM

Are there any Japanese foods that you don't usually see in the USA that you like?

Posted by: KT at October 15, 2022 03:42 PM (rrtZS)

48 There's supposed to be some sort of lore about nut trees; walnuts, chestnuts and the like about their size, numbers and how early or late they fall that determines a cold/bad winter or not.

No idea which is which... but I have seen/read it somewhere.

Posted by: Martini Farmer at October 15, 2022 03:49 PM (BFigT)

49 I am a avid F-1 fan since 1996 and yearly get up to watch Japanese and Australia races, though this year was by accident yet missed nothing

Posted by: Skip at October 15, 2022 03:53 PM (xhxe8)

50 I have recently received tulip bulbs in the mail. I forgot I was to receive them for a donation. I live in zone 7 and I am wondering what is the best way to over-winter the little cuties. I have read keeping them in a air following bag in a cool, dark place is best. However, it's not consistently cool here yet, and I don't think putting them in the refrigerator would be ideal. Would love some tulip advice from horde. Thanks

Posted by: sidney at October 15, 2022 03:54 PM (itAo5)

51 Hey KT,

Sure, there are lot of great Japanese food. The fruits and vegetables are all stellar.

Society here is so different and one big aspect is how agriculture is all done with native Japanese with high emphasis on quality. Very few foreign foods can compete even though they are cheaper.
When I last lived in US, the vegetables really were tasteless in comparison. I don't know, maybe they have improved but I doubt it - isn't that why a lot of people grow their own?

Here people garden to save money. I garden mostly for varieties that are not common in Japan (like apricot) or which are too expensive for me to enjoy (like cherry, which I still can't grow.)

Posted by: Gentlemen, this is junta manifest at October 15, 2022 03:55 PM (ecW19)

52 You're supposed to be able to tell what the winter will be like from persimmon seeds:

https://youtu.be/2CV_r0BXdbc

Posted by: Notsothoreau at October 15, 2022 03:57 PM (uz3Px)

53 Some flower bulbs can be kept in dry but cool place over winter but not sure tulips.

Posted by: Skip at October 15, 2022 03:57 PM (xhxe8)

54 Are there any Japanese foods that you don't usually see in the USA that you like?
Posted by: KT

to be more specific.
The peaches (momo) are unbelievable.
The persimmon (kaki) are almost the reason I moved here.
I really like ume, and especially umeshu (alcohol) and umeboshi.

Posted by: Gentlemen, this is junta manifest at October 15, 2022 03:59 PM (ecW19)

55 Posted by: sidney

zone 7 is only a little warmer than where i am, and i have kept them in the dark garage on the cement floor in a cardboard box, and they were fine.

I have also planted them in fall, but I think you have to wait until after first frost so they don't sprout right away. They sit in the ground just fine all winter and pop up in spring.

Posted by: Gentlemen, this is junta manifest at October 15, 2022 04:02 PM (ecW19)

56 The pumpkins are pretty, and Mrs. E likes them in pie. I prefer sweet potato pie but can eat pumpkin pie as a whipped cream delivery system.

Posted by: Eromero at October 15, 2022 04:03 PM (/RDPd)

57 Thank you for advice 53 & 55.

Posted by: sidney at October 15, 2022 04:08 PM (itAo5)

58 Winter cleanup mode here. I've cut some dead branches and pulled and burned a bunch of the stickery tumbleweeds. Unfortunately the arid climate I like is preferred by a lot of prickly weeds.

Posted by: PaleRider is simply irredeemable at October 15, 2022 04:11 PM (3cGpq)

59 KT -

I saw your post earlier on HSR. I lived in CA and traveled to Japan for business since the 80s, so I have thought a lot about this. Hard to summarize. but:
Japan built this system within the constraints of reality - their cities were dense, difficult to connect due to mountains, well served by mass transit, and airports were gonna be way outside of town. They accepted these constraints and built a system where the engineering was adapted to the task.

US seems to be doing the opposite - they refuse to accept the reality of what exists. Instead of building a system to fit the task, they are building a fantasy system for a world that does not exist.

It is infuriating. How did the US get so out of control on so many issues.

Anyway, sun coming up and i go biking. See you all around.

Posted by: Gentlemen, this is junta manifest at October 15, 2022 04:13 PM (ecW19)

60
I have three trees, and my fuyu variety only has one that survived. That is the most common one and all around town I see the other trees are just as sad.
Fortunately, one of my other varieties looks OK.
Posted by: Gentlemen, this is junta manifest at October 15, 2022 03:23 PM (ecW19)


My wife's Fuyu persimmon did not put any flowers or fruit on this year, no idea why. I hope it is not world wide because she will buy a case at the market to eat by herself

Posted by: Kindltot at October 15, 2022 04:15 PM (xhaym)

61 I left my bulbs on the garage floor - I'd better put them in the dark. I don't want to plant them just yet.

Posted by: Miley, okravangelist at October 15, 2022 04:19 PM (Mzdiz)

62 Kindletot,
When I had the raised beds in Minneapolis I had 2x2 frames, same size as the bed, held seven feet above them on 2x2 posts. I had to really get elaborate on bracing them. But they'd hold 20 tomato vines easily. I also had one that was 1" PVC. It worked, but needed cross bracing every four feet.

You have to be ruthless on trimming the suckers. I allowed 3 or 4 per plant and cut off all the others. And still they'd be sneaky and you would find one growing on the ground, with lots of fruit!

There is a green plastic tape, made by Vigoro, that works well. Tie at the base of the plant, tie around the upper support, and then wrap the vine around the tape.

We just had a mini deluge. About .4 inches quickly. I'm in my booth at Mesa Marketplace and it was so loud we had to shout to hear each other.

Posted by: Gordon Scott at October 15, 2022 04:58 PM (PlCVJ)

63 "It is infuriating. How did the US get so out of control on so many issues."

Sociopaths in charge. Leadership that defends child butchery is capable of anything.

Posted by: Miley, okravangelist at October 15, 2022 05:03 PM (Mzdiz)

64 Saw By-Tor's achievements and had to share.

So last week I realized that the dishwasher had a slow leak from a plastic valve (no idea how LONG it was leaking).

Got new dishwasher, took about an hour to pull out the old dishwasher (for reasons that pre-date my occupancy of the house....). "Some" mold/mildew that got sprayed with a CRAPTON of bleach/water mixture. Less than 15 minutes to put the new one in.

GOOD NEWS! The new dishwasher is installed and NO leaks. And trust me, I have been looking....EVERY DAY (sometimes more than that....).

-SLV

Posted by: Shy Lurking Voter at October 15, 2022 05:21 PM (SEa82)

65 Congratulations, SLV! Anytime you get an installation right the first time is a big success. I still dream of such an achievement . . . .

Posted by: Gordon Scott at October 15, 2022 06:31 PM (PlCVJ)

66 One more week of mild weather (says accuweather) and then...rain and cold for the duration.

The begonias are outstanding this year. Too bad I have no room for them indoors. Wonder how big they'd get if I had a sunroom to overwinter them? They're 2ft tall and just as wide now, with loads of blooms

Posted by: JQ at October 15, 2022 06:48 PM (dpnJh)

67 Re fuyu (in case Kindlot checks back)

They all flowered and fruit set and grew. What happens around here is that the fruit starts to ripen way early - like august and september instead of now. In a normal year a few fall off rotten in fall, but most stay on until the first frost and then they are hard and ready. Different problem, I think. My experience is not flowering or setting fruit is what trees do when they have a bad year and are saving energy. They usually rebound the next year and it may be caused by needing fertilizer, bugs, bad weather,...

The market near me had them a few days ago for 78 yen. I didn't buy because they were a couple weeks from ripe and I always buy a case from the store (in addition to my trees which are usually a bit later) and figured I would have that before they were ready. Today I went to the store to buy a case and the box was tiny (12 instead of 16,) and the price was 30% higher. So i checked back at the first store and the price had doubled - i assume the earlier price was just a leftover from last year they didn't update in the computer. So persimmon prices have doubled.

Posted by: Gentlemen, this is junta manifest at October 16, 2022 12:11 AM (ecW19)

68 Daggit has spider lilies.

Posted by: aelfheld at October 16, 2022 11:25 AM (Zy9Yy)

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Here's What's Bugging Me: Goose and Slider
My Own Micah Wright Style Confession of Dishonesty
Outraged "Conservatives" React to the FMA
An On-Line Impression of Dennis Miller Having Sex with a Kodiak Bear
The Story the Rightwing Media Refuses to Report!
Our Lunch with David "Glengarry Glen Ross" Mamet
The House of Love: Paul Krugman
A Michael Moore Mystery (TM)
The Dowd-O-Matic!
Liberal Consistency and Other Myths
Kepler's Laws of Liberal Media Bias
John Kerry-- The Splunge! Candidate
"Divisive" Politics & "Attacks on Patriotism" (very long)
The Donkey ("The Raven" parody)
News/Chat