Saturday Gardening, Puttering and Adventure Thread, October 1

midwaythistle2.jpg

Happy Fall, everyone! Here's hoping that your weather is not destroying your home, yard or garden. Let us know if you are having difficulties from the hurricane.

Adventures

Once again, my friend recently got together with a bunch of girlfriends from middle school (Yes, they still liked each other.) for a fall gathering in an interesting location. This time in Midway, Utah, where there are nearby hot springs and also an alpine loop road into the Wasatch mountains. It is near Heber City. She was able to take some photos.

grlfriends midway UT.jpg

Leaves were starting to turn on the alpine loop.

alpine loop leaves.jpg

But near the springs in the mountains:

loopcascade springs.jpg

*

CaliGirl has a question after a recent adventure:

Hey KT,

I took pics of these trees right off of Highway 1 on the way to Hearst Castle. I don't know what type of tree this is. Any help would be appreciated. As you know, the drought is terrible and these trees are alive and have color in the middle of summer, I'd love to plant some and see if they make it at my house. I did not see any irrigation. I wondered if they were just really old shrubs that now look like a tree? Any information would be greatly appreciated.

My research shows it may be a New Zealand Christmas tree/pohutukawa metrosideros?

I'm not sure, I should have asked.

Does anybody know?

hearstc trees.jpg

Edible Gardening/Putting Things By

From By-Tor:

Just received a box of ghost chilis from a source I can not disclose. I did take a nibble about the size of a pea 8 minutes ago and I'm still in pain. I'm guessing 2 milion Scoville units maybe.
Some will be fermented for hot sauce. Not sure what I'll do with the rest yet.

ghooost chilis.jpg

*

Hey KT,

Here are the Santaka peppers that I grew, they are in the bowl and the other peppers are the first Hatch Red Chilis that have ripened. The Santaka are pretty hot 40,000-50,000 in the pepper ratings. I had tried one a few weeks ago, and it didn't seem that hot, but it wasn't fully ripened. When fully ripened they are pretty spicy. Not sure exactly what I am going to do with them, they say you can dry them a make a nice powder. I picked one green one by mistake but waste not want not. It is a pretty plant especially against the blue wall.

WeeKreekFarmGirl

So, not as hot as By-Tor's peppers!

peppr2.jpeg

peprr1.jpeg

One of our local supermarkets is featuring "Hatch Chili" everything right now. Even "Hatch Chili Apple Pie".

Sound good?

Ah, Nature

Hi Katy -

It's grey and rainy here in Virginia, but these magnolia seed pods that are dropping off the trees brightened up my walk today.

The Pilot

magnol seed.jpeg

I wonder if that color means "don't eat me or you will die"?

*

This fat little guy looked like he was almost ready to go last Sunday. I think by next weekend they will be gone for the year.

- fd

fathum.jpg

What a charmer.

*

My cousin planted a magnolia tree 30 years ago when a beloved dog died. It has been a vigorous tree since then, until it dropped all its leaves during the summer drought. She thought she would lose it. But it started re-sprouting leaves after fall rains. She has some hope that it will survive.

magnolia sp fall.jpg

Has anything like this every happened to you? One drought year here, some ornamental pears re-bloomed in the fall.


*

Gardens of The Horde

It's days like this when I wish I'd planted four or five more.

Diogenes

Autumn Sweet Clematis.

clemaatm.jpg

A gorgeous plant.

*

KT

It was about the hottest August-September ever, and in Lakeland, Florida that equals near-daily thunderstorm. I put in these Rain Lilly bulbs in this cheap planter maybe a dozen or more years ago and faithfully get blooms several times a year.

rdohdRain Lillies.jpg

Lovely flowers. Hope you don't have more rain than you can handle now in Central Florida.

*

Hope everyone has a nice weekend.


If you would like to send photos, stories, links, etc. for the Saturday Gardening, Puttering and Adventure Thread, the address is:

ktinthegarden at g mail dot com

Remember to include the nic or name by which you wish to be known at AoSHQ, or let us know if you want to remain a lurker.


Week in Review

What has changed since last week's thread?

Saturday Gardening, Puttering and Adventure Thread, September 24


Any thoughts or questions?

I closed the comments on this post so you wouldn't get banned for commenting on a week-old post, but don't try it anyway.

Posted by: K.T. at 01:22 PM




Comments

(Jump to bottom of page)

1 ohai

Posted by: kallisto at October 01, 2022 01:29 PM (dCxaZ)

2 My neighbor gave me some pepper plants, I don't know what they are, maybe Thai chilis? They are still green but curving at the bottom. Last year she gave me peppers, they were definitely Thai chili but not curved at bottom.

These are not turning red though. But I'll probably pick them soon and eat them anyway.

Posted by: kallisto at October 01, 2022 01:31 PM (dCxaZ)

3 Good afternoon Greenthumbs
Still getting some tomatoes and Anaheim peppers, lots green but not ripen.

Posted by: Skip at October 01, 2022 01:32 PM (xhxe8)

4 Since this is also the Adventure thread...getting ready to head to a Church Garage Sale adventure. Last spring when they had one got some nice kitchen tools and a badly needed hand vac. Today looking to score a hand mixer.

Posted by: kallisto at October 01, 2022 01:36 PM (dCxaZ)

5 That is not a tree under which I would want to stand.

My puttering for the day was re-mounting and re-sealing my "U-shaped" AC back into my upstairs window which I had removed as part of hurricane prep.

"Prep" may not be totally accurate as I had removed it during a moderate rain band that was hitting me as I awoke at around 0700. Upon seeing some minor water intrusion and hearing air wheezing through the sealing gaps, I decided, "Yep. This should come out now." My sealing job should be much better this time around.

Posted by: antisocial justice beatnik at October 01, 2022 01:37 PM (DTX3h)

6 I thought the Hummingbirds would all be gone by now but I saw one this morning. Just one though.

Posted by: fd at October 01, 2022 01:37 PM (Sf9YQ)

7 October beings with such a lovely gardening thread, particularly uplifting on this cool, rainy day. Thanks!

Posted by: Lola at October 01, 2022 01:38 PM (NIYa7)

8 I dug about 30 lbs of potatoes out of my conventional potato bed, and when we got our first rain in three months, I tilled the beds and planted garlic and transplanted bok choi from an area I overseeded.
I watered them in as well, and I hope they survive.
I am thinking I will plant winter cabbages there as well, they might get less attention from the cabbage white moths in the fall

I will have to buy some cabbages because it is time to make more sauerkraut

Posted by: Kindltot at October 01, 2022 01:40 PM (xhaym)

9 Great post! No gardening to report. Thinking about what needs to be done before the snow flies. Lots of unwanted wild trees and bushes must be cleared.

Posted by: Mrs. JTB at October 01, 2022 01:40 PM (7EjX1)

10 From Boise area: It hit 95 F on Tues. - not expected to top 72 today. Lows in low 50's but creeping down toward the high 40's soon. The cantaloupe plants have yellowing and withered leaves, but the tomato, zucchini, and poblano leaves are not showing cold damage.

I keep forgetting to mention we still have 4 poblano plants we haven't harvested yet. Not a bumper crop since they got a late start, but we may be able to make some chiles rellenos to freeze.

Zucchini still producing a few, ditto the green beans. We still have 3 potato bags to empty, but I can't remember if they're fingerlings or russets. At some point I'll have to make the decision to strip the paste tomato plant since the fruits don't seem to be getting riper. I'll leave the eating tomatoes as long as I can.

The mums got a sudden message from the Autumn Planet and decided to open all their buds at once - yellow flowers to cheer us as we look out the back kitchen window.
(post 1)

Posted by: Pat* at October 01, 2022 01:45 PM (a9dTa)

11 My lilacs have bloomed again this fall. So did a neighbor's. Before last year, I had never seen such a thing.

Posted by: April--dash my lace wigs! at October 01, 2022 01:46 PM (OX9vb)

12
I will have to buy some cabbages because it is time to make more sauerkraut

Cabbage is the workhorse vegetable of the kitchen. The basis for so many goodies all the cold season long. Also cole slaw, year round, if you're a fan of that item. Kind of the vegetable counterpart of the Lemon.

Posted by: kallisto at October 01, 2022 01:46 PM (dCxaZ)

13 Rain?
What's that?
Planted buckwheat 3 weeks ago. Should be flowering. The only plants that got beyond the cotyledon stage are being eaten by deer.
Have to feed the bees.

Posted by: MkY at October 01, 2022 01:46 PM (cPGH3)

14 My big project is to dig the hollyhocks out of a raised bed. Supposed "biennials" have become perennial, and HUGE, but I want the raised bed space back for food crops. So I started at one end of the bed, digging out both overgrown chives clumps and hollyhock roots - some half as thick as my wrist!! I only got halfway through the bed when I ran out of trash can space, so this project continues into next week.

I'd cut down the 5 foot stems to 18 inch stumps, and it's amazing how woody those stems are. As I was pulling one large clump out, it came out faster than I thought, and one of those stems got me right in the gut. I've got a small round bruise and a scrape from that thing - so I guess it got its revenge for being torn up.
(post 2/end)

Posted by: Pat* at October 01, 2022 01:50 PM (a9dTa)

15 I don't believe in the goat tree.

Posted by: Rusty Nail at October 01, 2022 01:50 PM (3AR13)

16 Goaty tree very pretty and the flower very sweet,
but the fruit of the poor goaty is impossible to eat.
-unless you bbq them.

Posted by: Eromero at October 01, 2022 01:51 PM (/RDPd)

17 We still have 3 potato bags to empty, but I can't remember if they're fingerlings or russets.

Fingerlings are my faves. Great taste, easy prep, what's not to like?

Posted by: kallisto at October 01, 2022 01:51 PM (dCxaZ)

18 I may try to plant a goat tree.

Posted by: t-bird at October 01, 2022 01:52 PM (GMLOL)

19 For you southern Morons, how do you prevent )$(*)(%^# fire ants from getting into root veggies such as taters or garlic? And, has anyone grown peanuts successfully? I think I planted mine too late this summer and they don't like the cooler nights, not to mention whatever pests are nibbling on them.

Posted by: Helena Handbasket at October 01, 2022 01:52 PM (llON8)

20 hiya

Posted by: JT at October 01, 2022 01:53 PM (T4tVD)

21 and one of those stems got me right in the gut. I've got a small round bruise and a scrape from that thing - so I guess it got its revenge for being torn up.

GAH!

I remember when my mom was out on a major hedgerow pruning mission and she came back with a black eye from a thin branch that had whipped back onto her face. I gave her my safety goggles and recommended she wear them next time.

Posted by: kallisto at October 01, 2022 01:53 PM (dCxaZ)

22 That is not a tree under which I would want to stand.
Posted by: antisocial justice beatnik


Could be worse.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Manchineel

"Standing beneath the tree during rain will cause blistering of the skin from mere contact with this liquid".....

Posted by: mikeski thinks the WV senator was named for it at October 01, 2022 01:56 PM (P1f+c)

23
Tie a yellow ribbon 'round the old goat tree
They've got real long beards
And give it up for free

Posted by: Achmed at October 01, 2022 01:56 PM (Sf9YQ)

24 I got about 15 lbs of potatoes, maybe 20. Just guessing, didn't weigh them. Right now, I have them in a box in the basement. I don't know how best to keep them into the winter.

Posted by: April--dash my lace wigs! at October 01, 2022 01:59 PM (OX9vb)

25 As Mrs. JTB said above, the garden is done for the year but plenty of wannabe trees are coming up against the fence line where the mower can't get to them. I keep the good long-handled loppers handy to start getting them out. Cutting them down isn't a problem. The PIA is bundling them up to take to the landfill. Things at ground level are not my friends these days.

Posted by: JTB at October 01, 2022 02:01 PM (7EjX1)

26 The PIA is bundling them up to take to the landfill. Things at ground level are not my friends these days.
Posted by: JTB

Burn pit. Even the most anal town allows a burn pit. 3' diameter is the usual.

Posted by: MkY at October 01, 2022 02:04 PM (cPGH3)

27 I love the photos KT includes in the thread. (And thanks to the folks who send them in.) I've kept several over the years to practice sketching and to try learning how to blend color to capture the subtle gradations.

Besides, a lot of them are just pretty.

Posted by: JTB at October 01, 2022 02:05 PM (7EjX1)

28 No gardening. In fact, I'll be interested to see if I get a notice from the township reminding me to mow the lawn before the frost hits. They haven't done diddly-squat with the overgrown mess next door.

I have to rake before I mow, owing to all the branches that broke during the most recent storm. They will destroy my pushmower. And it's been raining almost every day. Now it's sunny but it's too windy to burn a brushpile.

I will wait until the temperature reaches 65 before grabbing a rake.

Posted by: NaughtyPine at October 01, 2022 02:06 PM (/+bwe)

29 22 "Standing beneath the tree during rain will cause blistering of the skin from mere contact with this liquid".....
Posted by: mikeski thinks the WV senator was named for it at October 01, 2022 01:56 PM (P1f+c)


Not only that, but, "...the fruit is potentially fatal if eaten..."

Also, it's considered "endangered." That's a shame.

Posted by: antisocial justice beatnik at October 01, 2022 02:06 PM (DTX3h)

30 plenty of wannabe trees are coming up against the fence line where the mower can't get to them.

Also glysophate at 21% (1/2 and 1/2 for the concentrate) applied to freshly cut stumps will kill roots through the growing season. Tordon RTU will do the same year round.

Posted by: MkY at October 01, 2022 02:06 PM (cPGH3)

31 I'll bet the goats of the goat tree know where the money tree is.

Posted by: Napoleon XIV at October 01, 2022 02:07 PM (AiZBA)

32 Also glysophate at 21% (1/2 and 1/2 for the concentrate) applied to freshly cut stumps will kill roots through the growing season. Tordon RTU will do the same year round.
Posted by: MkY

Will that kill poison ivy?

Posted by: April--dash my lace wigs! at October 01, 2022 02:07 PM (OX9vb)

33 26 ... "Burn pit. Even the most anal town allows a burn pit. 3' diameter is the usual."

Nope. I looked into that and burn barrels, like when I was a kid, years back. No burning. Bummer! I'm surprised the county a-holes haven't banned grilling or patio fire pits. (Probably afraid of Big Grilling, Inc.)

Posted by: JTB at October 01, 2022 02:09 PM (7EjX1)

34 Even the most anal town

I'm right here you know.

Posted by: West Hollywood at October 01, 2022 02:10 PM (1oN8o)

35 Will that kill poison ivy?
Posted by: April--dash my lace wigs!

If you cut it first. Those treatments are for roots. Poison ivy plants are a weed-killer or glysophate spray... the latter only if there's nothing around you want.
If you have a big poison ivy vine on a tree, e.g., you sever the vine and leave an inch or so, treat the root side, and let the rest dry up.

Posted by: MkY at October 01, 2022 02:13 PM (cPGH3)

36 What makes cucumbers bitter?

Posted by: Ronster at October 01, 2022 02:19 PM (eTPr1)

37 ohai
Posted by: kallisto at October 01, 2022 01:29 PM (dCxaZ)

... Oh oh oh oh oh...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0xQUOOvbNfA

Posted by: Old Laughing Lady at October 01, 2022 02:19 PM (AiZBA)

38 Caligirl's tree sure looks like a pohutukawa.
There are images online of the trees in both Los Osos and Morro Bay (the right area of CA for Caligirl's sighting).

Posted by: AZ deplorable moron at October 01, 2022 02:19 PM (ItDxt)

39 Mystery tree with the flowers might be a crepe myrtle. Comes in many varieties and is a big landscape item in hot, dry southern California. I have one in my yard.

Posted by: TB at October 01, 2022 02:20 PM (Ur3df)

40 What makes cucumbers bitter?
Posted by: Ronster

Not enough water or over-ripe

Posted by: MkY at October 01, 2022 02:20 PM (cPGH3)

41 What makes cucumbers bitter?

Posted by: Ronster at October 01, 2022 02:19 PM (eTPr1)

When you leave them in the bowl and eat all of the tomatoes?

Posted by: CharlieBrown'sDildo at October 01, 2022 02:23 PM (XIJ/X)

42 The recent cooler temperatures (I know they won't last) have me starting to think of next year's garden. Ground prep, containers, seed or started plants, hybrid or heirloom, even feeders to attract birds that will go after bugs and flowers to attract bees. Those kinds of things. Then there is the usual balancing act between aspirations and reality and an aging body.

Posted by: JTB at October 01, 2022 02:25 PM (7EjX1)

43 My first response on seeing that "goat tree" would be to climb up there with them. Something chased them up there.

Posted by: TB at October 01, 2022 02:26 PM (Ur3df)

44 CBD, never thought of that.

Posted by: Ronster at October 01, 2022 02:26 PM (eTPr1)

45 The tree is fascinating, we have them all over they pop out with pom pom sized red blossoms. I've always thought they were some type of crepe myrtle and the wiki link to potuhukawa tree confirms that.

Posted by: gourmand du jour, in the fog yet again at October 01, 2022 02:32 PM (jTmQV)

46 I ordered a David Austin rose today, Lady of Shallot. I should be cleaning up the yard and planning a garden spot. I have a couple of weeks to prepare a place for this. I'd planned to put in rugosas, but just love his cultivars.

The raspberry has put out new leaves. The irises still look sad but also show new growth. I can buy a bale of straw at the store, so plan to do that and mulch them for winter.

Posted by: Notsothoreau at October 01, 2022 02:32 PM (uz3Px)

47 In an apparent attempt to unify the USA Russian state TV has issued threats of terror attacks in the USA

Posted by: Paul at October 01, 2022 02:34 PM (Q8aps)

48 i was going to crepe myrtle too. kinda hard to tell for sure from that picture.

Posted by: ontoiran at October 01, 2022 02:35 PM (RMtE9)

49 Okra is winding down. Colder nights (sub 50) are signalling an early fall (in late September?!) here in upstate SC. I'm trying to find someone who has a persimmon tree so I can read the seeds.

Not many tomatoes left on the bushes, either. Enough for fried green tomatoes and/or some relish. Our canning is now mostly stews and maybe some soups. Publius' family has a favorite vegetable beef recipe, but it really doesn't look conducive to canning - too many problematic ingredients (like cabbage) which won't hold up to a long pressure canning time.

I still haven't transplanted our cabbage seedlings, but might as well put them out.

Posted by: Miley, okravangelist at October 01, 2022 02:38 PM (Mzdiz)

50 "What makes cucumbers bitter?"

They find out that life is less than de vine?

Posted by: fd at October 01, 2022 02:38 PM (Sf9YQ)

51 Sorry.

Posted by: fd at October 01, 2022 02:39 PM (Sf9YQ)

52 Helena Handbasket, I've planted peanuts (Florida Runners and Virginia Jumbos) in ETEX. I have raised beds such good tilth I can stick my hand up past my wrist with no effort. Not planted in afew years though, seed in fridge. I had some boiled ones at TxMoMe a few years ago. They didn't last long. And yeah fireants like 'em. Plant same time as beans, pull up around now. It's Peanut Festival in Pelion S.C. Right now.

Posted by: Eromero at October 01, 2022 02:40 PM (/RDPd)

53 50 "What makes cucumbers bitter?"

They find out that life is less than de vine?
Posted by: fd at October 01, 2022 02:38 PM

*claps wildly* Bravo!!!

Posted by: NaughtyPine at October 01, 2022 02:40 PM (/+bwe)

54 46 ... notsothoreau,

I looked up that Lady of Shallot rose. Gorgeous! I hope it works for you. It reminded me a bit of the Peace rose, one of the most beautiful roses ever developed for my taste.

Posted by: JTB at October 01, 2022 02:41 PM (7EjX1)

55 Love the first photo - I'm assuming it's a bird's eye view of a Globe Artichoke. Pat* - I love Hollyhocks. I wish you could send a few my way after you dig them up.

Posted by: Pilot at October 01, 2022 02:41 PM (REwbE)

56
Seeing our first monarch butterflies of the season. We have a healthy crop of milkweed to keep them happy.

Posted by: Hadrian the Seventh at October 01, 2022 02:47 PM (n7D7l)

57 We have a healthy crop of milkweed to keep them happy.
Posted by: Hadrian

Is "healthy crop of milkweed" another way of saying "my yard is full of weeds"?

Posted by: AZ deplorable moron at October 01, 2022 02:50 PM (ItDxt)

58 >>> 52 Helena Handbasket, I've planted peanuts (Florida Runners and Virginia Jumbos) in ETEX. I have raised beds such good tilth I can stick my hand up past my wrist with no effort. Not planted in afew years though, seed in fridge. I had some boiled ones at TxMoMe a few years ago. They didn't last long. And yeah fireants like 'em. Plant same time as beans, pull up around now. It's Peanut Festival in Pelion S.C. Right now.
Posted by: Eromero at October 01, 2022 02:40 PM (/RDPd)

Thanks! This is the first time I've tried them and they went into a little ridge of compost on the ground. I will probably move things around for next year's planting.

Posted by: Helena Handbasket at October 01, 2022 02:51 PM (llON8)

59 Do not sous vide the peppers. Chop them up and make pico de gallo.

Posted by: Dr. Bone at October 01, 2022 02:52 PM (z+OQR)

60 Miley, okravangelist

Love it!
Our okra is now left to provide syncopation products for a local musician.
We've pickled, frozen and roasted about all we care to.

Posted by: MkY at October 01, 2022 02:53 PM (cPGH3)

61 Those red peppers look so tempting. I be dumb.

Posted by: bear with asymmetrical balls at October 01, 2022 02:57 PM (KFhLj)

62 BTW, to freeze okra...
Slice it as you would if frying immediately. Coat them in the flour and seasoning.
Blanch them on a cookie tray at 300 for 20 minutes. Cool. Freeze on the same tray. Vacuum seal.
You can pull them out of the bag, and fry directly. Seasoning won't fall off this way.

Posted by: MkY at October 01, 2022 02:57 PM (cPGH3)

63 Dry the peppers, even air drying then grind them up for hot flakes. Wife does that and can be kept years to make anything kicked up a notch

Posted by: Skip at October 01, 2022 03:02 PM (xhxe8)

64 >>>Those red peppers look so tempting. I be dumb.

>Best if paired with your sausage, egg and cheese breakfast sandwich.

Posted by: Dr. Bone at October 01, 2022 03:03 PM (z+OQR)

65
Is "healthy crop of milkweed" another way of saying "my yard is full of weeds"?
Posted by: AZ deplorable moron at October 01, 2022 02:50 PM (ItDxt)

__________

*snort*
No, they're all in the garden.

Posted by: Hadrian the Seventh at October 01, 2022 03:03 PM (n7D7l)

66 46 I ordered a David Austin rose today, Lady of Shallot. I should be cleaning up the yard and planning a garden spot. I have a couple of weeks to prepare a place for this. I'd planned to put in rugosas, but just love his cultivars.
Posted by: Notsothoreau at October 01, 2022

I have two of those roses, they smell so good.

Posted by: CaliGirl at October 01, 2022 03:04 PM (TOXd3)

67 >>>Dry the peppers, even air drying then grind them up for hot flakes.

>The pepper flake option is very versatile. It's easier to meter out the heat and you don't have to fuss with all of the crazy sauces. I like the sauces too, but some are too unpredictable and not so good.

Posted by: Dr. Bone at October 01, 2022 03:07 PM (z+OQR)

68 The story about the rebirth of the magnolia tree is an inspiration to me. The prolonged drought this summer caused one of our trees to go into shock and turn brown. Had the arborist out this week to evaluate it. He said to water it weekly for 30 minutes and watch it for the next few weeks. Best case is that it will drop the dead leaves and set out new growth, although it will likely lose some branches. Worst case is it's a goner.

It's probably the most expendable of the trees in our yard and it's an "installed" live oak and not a native Texas live oak, but still it would be a shame to lose a tree.

Posted by: Art Rondelet of Malmsey at October 01, 2022 03:14 PM (fTtFy)

69 Notsothoreau, I have sent you an email.

Posted by: Emmie at October 01, 2022 03:16 PM (6RgRK)

70 Is "healthy crop of milkweed" another way of saying "my yard is full of weeds"?
Posted by: AZ deplorable moron at October 01, 2022 02:50 PM (ItDxt)

*snort*
No, they're all in the garden.
Posted by: Hadrian

I didn't know milkweed would grow in AZ. It turns out that there is a native variety that I've seen growing wild.
I have some fallow areas (read dirt/decomposed granite) that I'm planting with jojoba from seed.
I think I'll get some of milkweed for the area as well.

Posted by: AZ deplorable moron at October 01, 2022 03:20 PM (ItDxt)

71 For you southern Morons, how do you prevent )$(*)(%^# fire ants from getting into root veggies such as taters or garlic? And, has anyone grown peanuts successfully? I think I planted mine too late this summer and they don't like the cooler nights, not to mention whatever pests are nibbling on them.
Posted by: Helena Handbasket at October 01, 2022 01:52 PM (llON


There was a guy in Alabama who talked about the voles getting into his sweet potatoes so he got a couple of junked freezers, took the lids off, "Shot holes in the bottom for drainage" (as one does) and filled them with soil for growing sweet potatoes.
He referred to them as his "hugelfreezers"

I could not get my sweet potatoes to sprout slips this year, they do not grow well here.
But my taro is doing well, so go figure.

Posted by: Kindltot at October 01, 2022 03:21 PM (xhaym)

72 I usually like pink roses. But that apricot is beautiful.

Sent you a reply, Emmie. Had to see what the local Dollar Tree looks like

Posted by: Notsothoreau at October 01, 2022 03:21 PM (uz3Px)

73 Almost world famous
PET THREAD NOOD

Posted by: Skip nood advisor at October 01, 2022 03:22 PM (xhxe8)

74 I got about 15 lbs of potatoes, maybe 20. Just guessing, didn't weigh them. Right now, I have them in a box in the basement. I don't know how best to keep them into the winter.
Posted by: April--dash my lace wigs! at October 01, 2022 01:59 PM (OX9vb)


My wife says when she was a kid they would dig a hole and bury them, but she didn't have an 18" winter water table to deal with
There is one guy who claims you have to put them in 5Gal buckets mixed with damp sand.
No idea for me. Keep them cool and dark is the only suggestion I have

Posted by: Kindltot at October 01, 2022 03:23 PM (xhaym)

75 I started a "journal RPG" recently that starts by having the player describe their ideal cottage. Mine would have an English cottage garden in front with an herb garden at the front door, because the first room you enter is the kitchen, and a Japanese garden in the back (with a tatami room and engawa for viewing it). It's making me do research to see how much of the plants in both could be edible/medicinal while still maintaining the visual aesthetic.

Posted by: Polliwog the 'Ette at October 01, 2022 03:25 PM (nC+QA)

76 We are all good here, thanks for asking.

11 My lilacs have bloomed again this fall. So did a neighbor's. Before last year, I had never seen such a thing.

My Tabebuia flowered near the top, maybe 10-13 feet up last month... I have no expertise, but that was completely unexpected. This yellow beauty is a March bloomer, just like every other one in central / south Florida.

Posted by: rdohd at October 01, 2022 03:27 PM (11ysA)

77 Posted by: AZ deplorable moron at October 01, 2022 02:50 PM (ItDxt)

With a little effort, milk weed can be used as a fiber plant for spinning thread. Not the "silk" but the middle layer of the stalks, which can be treated like flax.

Posted by: Polliwog the 'Ette at October 01, 2022 03:31 PM (nC+QA)

78 I keep a couple of pots of marigolds on my deck. The main pot had pretty good year, lots of blooms, attracting lots of bees and butterflies. It's about done for the year, and I should be collecting seeds from it this weekend (to plant again next years) buts its wet and dreary outside. Maybe it'll be dryer next weekend...

Posted by: Castle Guy at October 01, 2022 03:48 PM (Lhaco)

79 My power and water utility, Salt River Project, will give customers two shade trees if they are willing to attend a webinar on how to plant and grow them. They are emphatic that we should not amend the soil. It just makes them soft and ungrateful, apparently.

I chose desert willow and willow acacia.

Posted by: Gordon Scott at October 01, 2022 04:19 PM (QoBxZ)

80 Gordon Scott at October 01, 2022 04:19 PM

Do you know what variety of desert willow they are distributing? Seedless?

Posted by: KT at October 01, 2022 04:41 PM (rrtZS)

81 ahhh. Here is the description: Long, narrow bright green leaves; willowy appearance with large, fragrant trumpet-shaped flowers ranging from white to purple to pink. Mature size is 25’ tall x 20’ wide. No thorns.

I will check when I get home. The latin name might be on the tag.

Posted by: Gordon Scott at October 01, 2022 04:44 PM (QoBxZ)

82 For you southern Morons, how do you prevent )$(*)(%^# fire ants from getting into root veggies such as taters or garlic? And, has anyone grown peanuts successfully? I think I planted mine too late this summer and they don't like the cooler nights, not to mention whatever pests are nibbling on them.
Posted by: Helena Handbasket at October 01, 2022 01:52 PM (llON

I have used cinnamon to block ants from trailing back outside from inside which sometimes happens on hot CA days if they find food. Buy a cheap jar, pile the powder across the entry area. Eventually sweep it back up.

Posted by: Oldcat at October 01, 2022 04:53 PM (eoQWY)

83 Ronster at October 01, 2022 02:19 PM

Stress increases the amount of a chemical that makes cucumbers bitter. More later.

Posted by: KT at October 01, 2022 05:03 PM (rrtZS)

84 BTW, to freeze okra...
Slice it as you would if frying immediately. Coat them in the flour and seasoning.
Blanch them on a cookie tray at 300 for 20 minutes. Cool. Freeze on the same tray. Vacuum seal.
You can pull them out of the bag, and fry directly. Seasoning won't fall off this way.

Posted by: MkY at October 01, 2022 02:57 PM (cPGH3)

Blanching without water?

Posted by: Miley, okravangelist at October 01, 2022 05:04 PM (Mzdiz)

85 If still poking around here
HOBBY NOOD

Posted by: Skip at October 01, 2022 05:05 PM (xhxe8)

86 What do you think of this method of canning okra, without water bath or pressure cooker? Seems as though it didn't kill this old guy (although he has died by now). He does summer squash basically the same way.

https://www.youtube.com/ watch?v=PcaABHSCjUM

Posted by: Miley, okravangelist at October 01, 2022 05:05 PM (Mzdiz)

87 Mine would have an English cottage garden in front with an herb garden at the front door, because the first room you enter is the kitchen, and a Japanese garden in the back (with a tatami room and engawa for viewing it). It's making me do research to see how much of the plants in both could be edible/medicinal while still maintaining the visual aesthetic.

Posted by: Polliwog the 'Ette at October 01, 2022 03:25 PM (nC+QA)

You should watch this video, I think you'd love it!

https://www.youtube.com/ watch?v=EqE3gvH1_e0

Posted by: Miley, okravangelist at October 01, 2022 05:09 PM (Mzdiz)

88 Gordon Scott at October 01, 2022 04:44 PM

Sounds like a seedling since they didn't specify a color. Likely to make long pods that may produce seedlings. There are some seedless ones that are less messy. They grow fast. If you don't like the flowers on the one you get, you might be able to cut it off and graft on 'Sweet Bubba' or another low/no seed variety, or one of the taller shade types.

Posted by: KT at October 01, 2022 05:14 PM (rrtZS)

89 Art's Seedless desert willow grows to 25 feet. It's an old timer, developed in Utah.

Posted by: KT at October 01, 2022 05:15 PM (rrtZS)

90 Blanching without water?
Posted by: Miley, okravangelist

Yeah. Called "oven blanching." It works great.

Posted by: MkY at October 01, 2022 05:26 PM (cPGH3)

91 Posted by: Miley, okravangelist at October 01, 2022 05:09 PM (Mzdiz)

Thanks!

Posted by: Polliwog the 'Ette at October 01, 2022 05:39 PM (nC+QA)

92 Yeah. Called "oven blanching." It works great.

Posted by: MkY at October 01, 2022 05:26 PM (cPGH3)

Will have to try it - I have a few pounds of okra to deal with. Thanks!

Posted by: Miley, okravangelist at October 01, 2022 07:48 PM (Mzdiz)

93 55 Pilot, if you're checking this thread again - I could mail you seeds from the hollyhocks; I kept a lot - some pink, some deep reddish. We can figure out if KT will link us up so we can exchange contact info. I'm OK with her giving you my Email address.

Posted by: Pat* at October 01, 2022 08:05 PM (a9dTa)

94
@88 KT, I had no idea it was so complicated. Chances are I won't be here next summer, so I am not going to worry about the variety. I'll leave watering instructions for the next person to live here.

The two are: Willow leaf acacia, acacia salicina
Desert Willow, Chilopsis Linearis

I will forward a pic to you.

Posted by: Gordon Scott at October 01, 2022 09:03 PM (v9KcC)

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