Saturday Gardening and Puttering Thread, January 9, 2021 [KT]

PXL_20210102_160832757.jpg

Hi, everybody! It's winter! And we're starting with a new photo contributor to the thread. What an interesting photo!

Hiya,
My garden is on the roof of a garage in an alley a few blocks from Wrigley Field. Yes, I live in Chicago, but I'm not a preening wokester, just a regular mongrel American who loves freedom.

The photo is of a piece of ice lodged atop a plant whose name escapes me at the moment. It looks like a diamond in a setting.

For my 60th birthday this past year I got a Hartley Botanic patio greenhouse/coldframe. It's beautiful and I'll be setting out seedlings in it in the next few months.

Can't wait!

Whipsaw

Below, the greenhouse. Looks fun:

IMG_20200525_112600.jpg

Edible Gardening

Wee Kreek Farm Girl is ahead of most of us:

Hey KT,
I know that most people aren't harvesting anything right now so after I picked my dinner tonight I thought I would send it to you.

At the top we have dinosaur kale, then left to right, a little sorrel, some parsley, another kale I can't remember what it is called, some small poblano peppers, little cherry tomatoes, bok choy, chinese kale, purple bok choy and some arugula, perpetual spinach, leaf lettuce, some broccoli leaves and some small baby broccoli heads, bunching onions, another kind of kale who's name escapes me, some mizuna and some Chinese broccoli leaves.

I am going to go pick my second Lisbon lemon of the year and make an olive oil and lemon vinaigrette. Put in more onions and throw in some feta and have at it. I did have some Komatsuma mustard greens in the bowl but they were the first ones I have harvested and I ate them right there in the garden without washing them because I am like that. Have to keep the immune system up somehow in the days of all this hand washing...

Happy 2021 Horde!

Wee Kreek Farm Girl

azveggii.JPG

Winter

Farmer is growing ice crystals.

I'm sending along some pics of the hoarfrost we had here earlier this week. Seen it before, but nothing like this, it was quite remarkable.
These are the front porch Christmas lights. Falls under puttering as I must get these down, LOL.

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And a guardrail.

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Music

From Don in Kansas, a little opera in the forest:

Gardens of and Puttering by The Horde

If you liked the great Nativity scene by Dr. Mabuse last week, here's the impressive story about its completion, again.

First crocus sighting!

And so the year begins.
More pics to follow as they get established.
Diogenes

diogcroc.JPG


Hogmartinsmom
asked Pat* for some details on how to winter-sow seedlings successfully.

Pat* wrote up an article for us:

"Winter sow for early and hardy seedlings"

This is based on an article of the same name, written by Kristina Seleshanko, appearing in the Winter 2020 issue (#19), of the magazine "Self-Reliance". I highly recommend it, and its parent publication "Backwoods Home" magazine. If you pass this information on, please give credit to the original author and magazine.

Best candidates for winter sowing: seeds whose packets mention "self-sows", "colonizes easily", "hardy", "needs pre-chilling", "may be direct sown in the garden". Also anything that implies it's adapted for cold climates, for example with Alaska or Siberia in its name. The original article lists artichokes, beans, beets, bok choi, broccoli, Brussels sprouts, cabbage, carrots, celery, chard, chives, collards, early types of corn, eggplant, kale, lettuce, onions, parsnips, peas, peppers, pumpkins, radishes, shallots, spinach, squash, and some tomatoes.

Suggested containers: The easier one is the type of plastic tub that salad mixes are sold in, with its lid. Poke or drill "about five holes" in the bottom for drainage. Make "two or three slashes" in the lid for air circulation.

The other suggested container is a gallon jug. Make it into a hinged container, by cutting nearly all the way around the container at the level of the base of the handle - but leave the handle area uncut! Put the holes in the bottom for drainage; leave the lid off for air circulation. You'll need duct tape to keep the container hinge closed most of the time.

Each container gets only one type of seed, and each should be labeled by whatever method you think will last.

Getting started: Fill each container with "a few inches" of clean potting soil. Get the soil thoroughly wet (including mixing the water and soil by hand if you have to), and let it drain. The article says at this point in the process, too soggy is better than too dry.

Plant the seeds at the recommended depth. Sprinkle a little extra soil on top, and press down so the seeds make good contact with their wet soil. Then add a little extra water.

Close the container (put the lid on the salad tub; or close the cut in the jug with duct tape).The container will fog up after a few minutes, which is good. If it doesn't, you have too much air circulation.

Put the container outdoors. It should be somewhere unsheltered, but not somewhere it's likely to be kicked around.

Check at least once a week. The container will freeze and thaw, but that's OK.

Once the sprouts show up, you'll be checking for moisture content, every one or two days. It's OK to open the container outdoors if it's cold, but do not do that when it's below freezing! If the soil in the container is always drying out, you'll have to block off some of the drainage holes in the bottom. If the soil is too wet, you can poke additional holes with an awl, or make an additional slit with a knife. Add water if the soil is dry, close the container, and replace it. As the seedlings grow, cut extra slashes in the lid for added air circulation.

Once the lid is more open space than plastic, you can transplant the seedlings. You don't need to harden them off because they're already used to outdoor conditions. Once the seedlings are planted out, keep them moist, but not too wet.

*****

Pat* adds: I plan to try this with Roma tomato seeds. Considering that the compost pile - which sits outside all through the winter - once produced a crazy number of tomato plants, this ought to work. And if it does, it will mean a big difference in how successful our paste tomato crop will be. We've had poor crops the last 2 years because the tomatoes didn't have time to ripen, so this should lengthen the season. I'm thinking the best place for the container, is sitting right by the raised beds I'll grow them in.

The article says it's OK to plant the seeds densely, and the seedlings won't mind being torn apart before planting because they're hardy - I plan to plant fewer seeds than that. The article doesn't give any specific advice about how big the seedlings should be, or how warm your outdoor temperatures should be, before you transplant them, so we're all on our own here. It does say to plant right after the winter solstice, so I'll be starting soon.

Thanks, Pat*! What great details!

We have talked about winter-sowing outdoors before, but it's been a while. Here's a photo of some lettuce I grew in deli containers:

I like to winter-sow baby leaf lettuce in domed deli containers which once held barbecued chickens. Holes are necessary in both the top and bottom of the container. After cutting off the baby leaves about an inch and a half above the soil line, I sometimes plant the roots out in the garden for a second harvest.

BabyLettuce.jpg

Baby leaf lettuce does not need much potting mix

Romaine types work out well in this kind of a container.

In our climate, it is essential that tomatoes get an early start. They go in about the same time that outdoor winter-sown seeds get planted. There are also some seeds that can go directly into the ground.

I've been kind of parceling out the cyclamen photos from Neal in Israel. Here is a classic type. Don't you love the leaves? Followed by a flower close-up.

1a cyclamen classic.jpg

1b cyclamen classic.jpg

Anything going on in your garden?


If you would like to send information and/or photos for the Saturday Gardening Thread, the address is:

ktinthegarden
at that g mail dot com place

Include the nic by which you wish to be known when you comment at AoSHQ,
unless you want to remain a lurker.

Posted by: Open Blogger at 01:23 PM




Comments

(Jump to bottom of page)

1 Good afternoon Greenthumbs and Snow Bunnies

Posted by: Skip at January 09, 2021 01:29 PM (Cxk7w)

2 I *love* the animals singing opera!

What zone is good for winter sowing as described above? I'm in eastern Ontario, which on American charts is zone 4. I don't think I'd dare trying sowing outside before March - it can get *really* cold here in the winter!

Posted by: Dr. Mabuse at January 09, 2021 01:34 PM (YEKLS)

3 Tried to dress up my chainsaw blade by hand will see if it helped if not a better sharpen agent or a new blade.

Posted by: Skip at January 09, 2021 01:34 PM (Cxk7w)

4 And another day I forgot to send in pics. I didn't really forget, my brain just fell down on the job. For some reason I saw that ice/frost on the rail as dog fur. Still do. Too many years with long-haired dogs I suppose.

Posted by: clutch cargo now 100% lubricant free at January 09, 2021 01:34 PM (uEauf)

5 Winter is just getting started here in Pa, won't see much come up for two months.

Posted by: Skip at January 09, 2021 01:35 PM (Cxk7w)

6 Dang. That top photo of the ice flower is beautiful!
Would definitely hang.

Posted by: Diogenes at January 09, 2021 01:41 PM (axyOa)

7 I'm trying to get myself back into a de-cluttering groove after slacking off for a few months. I have exhausted almost all of the really easy "just burn this old paper or cardboard item" or throw this broken item in the dumpster, stuff. I still have some of that I can do but a lot more of "I need to sort this box of old pictures, obits ect into these empty photo albums and binders, and get this clothing or household item I will never use to a thrift store" I find this 2nd category very mentally tiring, but I need to start pecking at it a few minutes a day or I'll end up tossing wheat with the chaff and/or dragging a lot of chaff to whenever I finally move and having any wheat deteriorate.

Posted by: PaleRider is simply irredeemable at January 09, 2021 01:46 PM (Aashi)

8 Skip at January 09, 2021 01:34 PM
Skip, I hope you didn't try to make your chainsaw blade dress-up too frilly.

Posted by: KT at January 09, 2021 01:48 PM (BVQ+1)

9 My sister before Christmas gave us this bulb that was in a waxed ball, she said it didn't need water as the wax ball held all it needed.
Should go get a picture of it and post it. It has sprouted 3 flowers.

Posted by: Skip at January 09, 2021 01:48 PM (Cxk7w)

10 The serving suggestions for Wee Kreek Farm Girl's fresh veggies sound wonderful.

Posted by: KT at January 09, 2021 01:49 PM (BVQ+1)

11 Howdy. Long time lurker here. I have a question.
I live in Colorado. Last year was a miserable garden season for me due to chipmunks. I tried several non-poisoness deterants with no luck. Before the season starts again, I would like to gather more information as to how to avoid this issue. Any advice from you folks?

Posted by: COMountainMarie at January 09, 2021 01:49 PM (pEmWl)

12 The first photo is so pretty. I love the red greenhouse.

I

Posted by: CaliGirl at January 09, 2021 01:50 PM (7bcfy)

13 I doubt it, I use my small files on miniatures so it was clogged up some. No pressing issue for chainsaw right now.

Posted by: Skip at January 09, 2021 01:50 PM (Cxk7w)

14 beautiful pictures. In my extended farmyard, I've been pulling weeds that I didn't get mown that finally dried up and burning them lately along with some dead tree limbs. I'm not being very efficient at this but it provides fresh air and a bit of exercise and catharsis and is reducing some of the weed seed load for spring and summer.

Posted by: PaleRider is simply irredeemable at January 09, 2021 01:50 PM (Aashi)

15 My sister before Christmas gave us this bulb that was in a waxed ball, she said it didn't need water as the wax ball held all it needed.
Should go get a picture of it and post it. It has sprouted 3 flowers.


Sounds like an amaryllis. We sold those where I worked. I have one sprouting right now.

Posted by: Jewells45TRUMPWON! at January 09, 2021 01:53 PM (nxdel)

16 First crocus of the season? Is that the name of the frog or toad that appears to be near the top middle of the photo?

Posted by: Gardening Moron at January 09, 2021 01:53 PM (3MG/9)

17 11. How big of a garden? I suspect that a greenhouse with screens and on a foundation to keep critters out might be needed unless you can acquire a chipmunk hunting cat or JRT type dog for pest control.

Posted by: PaleRider is simply irredeemable at January 09, 2021 01:54 PM (Aashi)

18 There are sprays that deter rodents and other critters. They require re-applications.

Posted by: davidt at January 09, 2021 01:54 PM (l3+k2)

19 https://i.postIMG.cc/kXdqB8DW/20210109-135148.jpg
No idea what it's called

Posted by: Skip at January 09, 2021 01:56 PM (Cxk7w)

20 Skip that is definitely an amaryllis.

Posted by: Jewells45TRUMPWON! at January 09, 2021 01:57 PM (nxdel)

21 And figured one reason pictures I take with tablet are bad as CBD pointed out, I took the flower with selfie mode and one with back camera and back isn't clear as lens must me getting scratched up.

Posted by: Skip at January 09, 2021 01:58 PM (Cxk7w)

22 There are 4 flowers and another shoot, some flowers are fading on back side.

Posted by: Skip at January 09, 2021 01:59 PM (Cxk7w)

23 Dr. Mabuse at January 09, 2021 01:34 PM
You might be able to find some local info on winter-sowing. Or look on a winter-sowing website for zone information. Check to see if the links on the old post above the lettuce photo are still good.

If there are plants that come up by themselves after winter where you live, you could winter-sow those before March. You might wait for some of the more tender seeds.


Posted by: KT at January 09, 2021 02:00 PM (BVQ+1)

24 We've never had many chipmunks around so I have no experience with how any of the sprays work. I suspect it also depends on if there is food w/o any deterrent sprays available next to the stuff one is trying to keep uneaten. The mountains might not have been bad, but down here on the CO plains it was so dry I don't think critters had anywhere other than folks' watered gardens and lawns to forage.

Posted by: PaleRider is simply irredeemable at January 09, 2021 02:00 PM (Aashi)

25 The opera is a hoot. And thanks to Pat for all the info on cold weather sowing.

Posted by: JTB at January 09, 2021 02:01 PM (7EjX1)

26 PaleRider is simply irredeemable at January 09, 2021 01:50 PM
Sounds like a bracing project for a wintry day.

Posted by: KT at January 09, 2021 02:02 PM (BVQ+1)

27 Gardening Moron, you found the sniper hiding in the picture, disguised as a frog. Good catch.

Posted by: AlmostYuman at January 09, 2021 02:02 PM (VlbLH)

28 I may have posted about Fy Nyth before. She gardens in Wyoming, where they have few frost free days.

https://youtu.be/Ua8w4Uk2q10

Posted by: Notsothoreau - look forward at January 09, 2021 02:07 PM (YynYJ)

29 >>>Any advice from you folks?<<<
>Do you have a cat? Get/raise an outdoor cat.

Posted by: Dr. Bone at January 09, 2021 02:07 PM (WOYcU)

30 Off to feed the horses. My other 'gardening' winter project has been trying to keep the pens a bit cleaner and spread the uneaten hay and the manure around the yard a bit more. Maybe will get a bit of grass and slow the weeds a bit, plus feed the trees I'd like to keep/grow to provide a bit of shade.

Posted by: PaleRider is simply irredeemable at January 09, 2021 02:08 PM (Aashi)

31 "Winter sow" sounds like it would be an excellent source of delicious bacon.

Posted by: hogmartin at January 09, 2021 02:15 PM (t+qrx)

32 I think those cyclamen leaves look like they have been painted with lacquer.

Posted by: KT at January 09, 2021 02:17 PM (BVQ+1)

33 I don't want to start a political discussion so I'll just say I have concerns about food supplies, both safety and availability, in the next few years. I have vague ideas for expanding our gardening area and making the backyard more livable. Can't do much this season due to medical matters but the future is another thing. No details in mind, yet, besides wanting more variety of veggies and enough extra to can or preserve.

Wish I had done this 30 or so years ago. Starting such things in my late 60s won't be easy.

Posted by: JTB at January 09, 2021 02:17 PM (7EjX1)

34 hogmartin at January 09, 2021 02:15 PM
Heh.

Posted by: KT at January 09, 2021 02:18 PM (BVQ+1)

35 We had a half way decent snow the day after Christmas, and a lot of it is still hanging around. The snow is good for two reasons: A) it provides insulation against Nebraska's wild freeze/thaw cycles, and B) we are going into 2021 down about 11 inches of rain. Since Omaha's average rainfall is around 30 inches, that means we are down at least a third and we need every drop of moisture that falls from the sky. All five of my butterfly bushes survived last winter, and I've got my fingers crossed that they will make it through this winter, too.

Because of my dietary restrictions and old age, we don't plant any veggies. The butterfly bushes are the backbone of my gardening. Outside of the butterfly bushes, I plant everything else in containers so I don't have to stoop. Everything I plant is aimed at the Monarch migration in late summer. I also get hummingbirds. It's nice to sit out on the porch and watch the flying things browse the buffet line. This summer, my new Persian will be allowed out -- closely supervised, of course. I think he is going to go crazy watching and chasing things.

Posted by: Captain Josepha Sabin -- current occupation: cat furniture at January 09, 2021 02:20 PM (cLSW1)

36 Whipsaw, did you get that patio greenhouse locally or order it from the UK?

Posted by: President-elect Emmie at January 09, 2021 02:21 PM (ofYez)

37 Posted by: COMountainMarie at January 09, 2021 01:49 PM (pEmWl)

I've never tried this, but I've heard the suggestion to use predator urine around the yard.

Posted by: President-elect Emmie at January 09, 2021 02:24 PM (ofYez)

38 Snowing here in my neck of the woods. Doesn't seem very serious about it though.

Posted by: Pug Mahon, Does this mask smell like chloroform? at January 09, 2021 02:24 PM (x8Wzq)

39 Gardening When It Counts by Steve Solomon. Lots of info about startng a garden and what crops are easiest to grow. Potatoes and kale are one of those complete proteins like corn and beans. He runs the Soil and Health group on groups.io. He's currently living in Tasmania. It's a very knowledgable group and a good fit politically.

Posted by: Notsothoreau - look forward at January 09, 2021 02:27 PM (YynYJ)

40 Anything growing in my garden?

Weeds.

Posted by: JAS, AoSHQ addict at January 09, 2021 02:28 PM (2BZBZ)

41 Snowing here in my neck of the woods. Doesn't seem very serious about it though.

Posted by: Pug Mahon, Does this mask smell like chloroform? at January

Same here East of Colorado Springs.

Posted by: Ronster at January 09, 2021 02:36 PM (XNcIR)

42 I am on Parler: TheRealBlau

Posted by: Nevergiveup at January 09, 2021 02:36 PM (85Gof)

43 "It's winter!" Gosh, I wish. In northwest Ohio, 4 miles from the lake, we haven't yet had what we would call real winter. Sure, killing frost enough to wipe out the usual weeds and make sure the tomatoes are gone for good, but we rely on some zero-ish spells to control bugs and greedy weeds. It's been cold enough to keep me in front of the screen, but the squirrels are not in hibernation yet.


Posted by: Way, Way Downriver at January 09, 2021 02:39 PM (zMFmR)

44 That is a lovely "cold frame," but I'll remind those who don't
have crazy import money that in my neighborhood, a window frame never
got thrown away. They'd get snatched out into the backyard, set up on
bricks or blocks, and rags shoved in where they didn't quite meet.
After they sat that way for a few years and had a coat of old leaded
white slapped on, it almost looked natural.


Posted by: Way, Way Downriver at January 09, 2021 02:40 PM (zMFmR)

45 If
you have glass like a replaced sliding door or shower enclosure, and
some nice cedar strips (for instance), you can glaze and caulk up a
swell little greenhouse for next to nothing. The big advantage of a
pre-designed one is the multiple shelves and easy access. If you think
through the design carefully, and make sure it can't settle in on
itself enough to break the glass, you can build a nice one really
cheap. The industrial-scale pros are not too proud to use visqueen
plastic sheet, staples, and saran wrap. Of course the glass is
classier.

Posted by: Way, Way Downriver at January 09, 2021 02:40 PM (zMFmR)

46 Robins in the yard watching me a bit, mostly eyballin' worms. That's a mild January.

Posted by: klaftern at January 09, 2021 02:40 PM (RuIsu)

47 Not puttering. Constructivating. Running the electric wiring in what is to become my "Great Room".

I have mostly-dead mulberry tree in the yard. Is the wood useful?

Posted by: Alberta Oil Peon at January 09, 2021 02:43 PM (mzC78)

48 Starting to think ahead to Spring and what do about my raspberries. The Nantahala plants produce great fruit. The others produce sickly little berries that break apart when picked. I'm wondering if I can improve the soil to make the sad berries better. Or just rip them out and go 100% Nantahala. The only problem with that is that with a variety of varietals they ripen at different times.

Posted by: Cumberland Astro at January 09, 2021 02:47 PM (d9Cw3)

49 My garden is, as the brits would say, "in a state". Its in desperate need of some weeding, but its just been sodden lately and i can't make it happen.

Posted by: funsize at January 09, 2021 02:47 PM (EiPf6)

50 Thanks Pat for the winter sow details. I have a collection of empty gallon water bottles ready to get started. KT the lettuce in deli containers is a great idea too. An affordable little greenhouse for sure. Hogmartin, Ha! that's sow the verb not the noun, but you knew that.

Posted by: hogmartinsmom at January 09, 2021 02:50 PM (S1cYH)

51 We received some rain last night. So, it's too wet to go out. It's also been too cold to go weed the area by the front door. Oh well. I will just have to drink wine and visit with all y'all.

Posted by: JAS, AoSHQ addict at January 09, 2021 02:51 PM (2BZBZ)

52 I have to wonder; if PJ media sells itself as conservative, why are they printing op-eds from a GOPe shitweasel like Rick Moran, who calls 250,000 Trump supporters lunatic nuts?

Posted by: Xipe Totec at January 09, 2021 02:51 PM (eJn7u)

53 "in state"

I am using that term.

Posted by: JAS, AoSHQ addict at January 09, 2021 02:52 PM (2BZBZ)

54 The average price gir a Hartley greenhouse is $65000 sounds like you are in tge elite group of Americans tgat can afford something like that

Posted by: Attila at January 09, 2021 02:52 PM (VHjUi)

55 The average price gir a Hartley greenhouse is $65000 sounds like you are in tge elite group of Americans tgat can afford something like that
Posted by: Attila at January 09, 2021 02:52 PM (VHjUi)

If you had a Hartley-Davtidson greenhouse, would it go "potato, potato"?

Posted by: Alberta Oil Peon at January 09, 2021 02:54 PM (mzC78)

56 Speaking of robins, I know they are common in much of the country, but in central Texas they are only migrators and we see them pretty rarely.

BUT this week we have seen hundreds of them. One day we had successive flocks of robins and cedar waxwings landing and enjoying our many small bird baths. I have no idea what that says about the harshness or mildness of the winter north of us, but it's very, very unusual here.

Posted by: Art Rondelet of Malmsey at January 09, 2021 02:55 PM (fTtFy)

57 @52 I wondered aloud about that same thing the other day. Another contributor named TJ O'Neill basically said the same thing.

Posted by: Chairman LMAO at January 09, 2021 02:57 PM (gDJlP)

58 Btw, this is a gardening thread, let's keep it on topic. Sorry for the sidebar.

Posted by: Chairman LMAO at January 09, 2021 02:58 PM (gDJlP)

59 The average price gir a Hartley greenhouse is $65000 sounds like you are in tge elite group of Americans tgat can afford something like that
Posted by: Attila at January 09, 2021 02:52 PM (VHjUi)

If you had a Hartley-Davtidson greenhouse, would it go "potato, potato"?
Posted by: Alberta Oil Peon at January 09, 2021 02:54 PM (mzC7


Only the shovelhead.

Posted by: hogmartin at January 09, 2021 03:01 PM (t+qrx)

60 On predator urine, we used coyote urine very successfully at our old place on many critters, but we didn't have chipmunks. Bought it at Callahan's General Store in Austin but also ordered it online.

I have to wonder who started that business and how they "harvest" it.

Posted by: Art Rondelet of Malmsey at January 09, 2021 03:02 PM (fTtFy)

61 Oh, I forgot to mention that the predator urine comes dried in a powder form. Important detail.

Posted by: Art Rondelet of Malmsey at January 09, 2021 03:03 PM (fTtFy)

62 Regarding the crocus sighting, I have casually looked for Snowdrop bulbs, without any success. Anyone have any of those planted?

Posted by: Mike Hammer, etc., etc. at January 09, 2021 03:03 PM (Wup5j)

63 Mike Hammer, etc., etc. at January 09, 2021 03:03 PM
I think they generally sell those in the fall.

Posted by: KT at January 09, 2021 03:06 PM (BVQ+1)

64
If you had a Hartley-Davtidson greenhouse, would it go "potato, potato"?
Posted by: Alberta Oil Peon at January 09, 2021 02:54 PM (mzC7

Only the shovelhead.
Posted by: hogmartin
------
I feel compelled here to mention the Indian Pipe plant.

Posted by: Mike Hammer, etc., etc. at January 09, 2021 03:07 PM (Wup5j)

65 Mike Hammer, etc., etc. at January 09, 2021 03:03 PM
I think they generally sell those in the fall.
Posted by: KT
-------

No doubt, but I just haven't run across any.

Posted by: Mike Hammer, etc., etc. at January 09, 2021 03:08 PM (Wup5j)

66 Often heard the theory cat urine of the household variety can keep away some rodent pests. They don't know it's not a bobcat.

Posted by: Skip at January 09, 2021 03:11 PM (Cxk7w)

67 That woman who was trampled to death at tge Trump rally ???
She died still clutching her DONT TREAD ON ME. Flag

Posted by: Attila at January 09, 2021 03:16 PM (lMTkX)

68 I have some snow drops, Mike Hammer. Got them years ago from Michigan bulb co.

Posted by: My life is insanity at January 09, 2021 03:16 PM (Z/jzm)

69 First crocus of the season? Is that the name of the frog or toad that appears to be near the top middle of the photo?
Posted by: Gardening Moron at January 09, 2021 01:53 PM (3MG/9)

Ha!
I didn't notice.
Hear it all the time.

Posted by: Diogenes at January 09, 2021 03:16 PM (axyOa)

70 Top photo looks like tentacle porn.

I'll show myself out.

Posted by: Cannibal Bob at January 09, 2021 03:21 PM (ogGkH)

71 Had a flock of about 50 bohemian waxwings invade the neighborhood a couple of days ago. Real fun to watch them interact and flit about. The next day I noticed our yard looked like someone had dropped pomegranate all over the white snow. Little red berry poop bombs.

Posted by: Bosk at January 09, 2021 03:24 PM (lDdRA)

72 Chipmunks?

Cute as all get out but are destructive critters. Really just cute rats. Here's a method I use

https://www.trap-anything.com/homemade-chipmunk-trap.html

Get a grabber to fish out of the bucket

Posted by: Bruce at January 09, 2021 03:26 PM (vd8XM)

73 Nood pets ya'll

Posted by: Jewells45TRUMPWON! at January 09, 2021 03:34 PM (nxdel)

74 Tried to dress up my chainsaw blade by hand will see if it helped if not a better sharpen agent or a new blade.

Skip, have you seen the file Stihl has out? It has 3 files on it so it hits everything in one stroke. Down one side with teeth facing right then once around the other side. It's a bit pricey but better than buying a new chain and will make them last longer.



Posted by: dartist at January 09, 2021 03:37 PM (+ya+t)

75 I have mostly-dead mulberry tree in the yard. Is the wood useful?
Posted by: Alberta Oil Peon

For smoking, it's both a hard wood and a sweet wood (fruit).
Very hard- burns nearly as hot as hedge, but hard to split.
Decay resistant, for what that's worth.

Posted by: MarkY at January 09, 2021 03:50 PM (nM/fW)

76 Where is the open thread?

Posted by: Goatweed at January 09, 2021 05:06 PM (90fhE)

77 From Idaho's Treasure Valley, Boise area: Again, not much to say. Raked more sycamore leaves to stuff in trash. Pot of tiny indoor crocus doing fine. Some rain. Took down Christmas tree & outdoor lights. Bought potting soil for winter sowing - veg. seeds are in stock at our hardware store.

We bought a 2nd birdseed feeder so I can clean poop off 1st one without starving birds.

Started a batch of hard cider - used this year's squeezin's plus frozen cider from last year.

Semi-politics section: I put up the Pine Tree Flag from the American Revolution, "An Appeal to Heaven" as my protest. Will stay up as long as I'm not happy with political situation. Otherwise, my usual encouragement to improve survival skills, build trustworthy network of friends/allies, keep up morale, resist oppressive "FedCoats", mock gov't officials & media (without getting caught red-handed).

Posted by: Pat* at January 09, 2021 06:33 PM (2pX/F)

78 Popping in mighty late for garden thread. Love the photos, especially the ice diamond. Good luck to all winter gardeners. I've decided to plant zuchinni only and buy tomato plants. May still make paper pots for unknown seeds.

Posted by: NaughtyPine at January 09, 2021 07:32 PM (/+bwe)

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