Saturday Gardening And Puttering Thread, September 7 [KT]

_ AK Aug Lilies (1).JPG

The great photo above is from Jerry in Anchorage, Alaska. Those lilies bloomed in August. Wish they had bloomed in August where I live. I could have used a color like that. They kept predicting that high temperatures would go under 100 degrees this week. Might make it today.

But the weather was more worrisome in the East. Everyone OK?

Other COBs contribute Gardening and Puttering Content

Last week, CBD went to the garden for some exceptional vegetables. Rare for him.

Any gardening pointers for CBD?

Weirddave revealed a puttering topic, the: unknown small part of the week. Can you identify it without following the link?

unknon.jpg

The Horde seems to be somewhat macabre lately. Last week's Gardening Thread featured two separate Corpse Flowers submitted by Moron Robbie and a new lurker-contributor. Then we learned about another corpse flower from Misanthropic Humanitarian (from the Labor Day ONT.) There are not many of these plants in the world.

"The stench did not disappoint".

Hurricane and Carnivorous Plants

Our outdoor carnivorous plant specialist, Tony Litwin, has updated us on the aftermath of the hurricane in Florida. Following are a couple of photos of his more striking small carnivorous plants:

Just wanted you to know we made it here ok. Lots of limbs down but no major damage. We were very lucky here in Florida, with the Bahamas taking the brunt of it, and now the Carolinas are getting beat up badly, and the season isn't even over yet. Anyway, take care and be well and I'll be sending you pics again come spring. Until then...

22-)S. Psitticina xS. Leuc.jpg

Sarracenia psitticina x S. leucophylla

18-)Drosera Capill.jpg

Drosera capillaris

They look so inviting . . . .

The Edible Garden

From GolfBoy:

Here's something from our harvest for the Horde to marvel at.

cuketwins.jpg

Also, a picture of a yuuuge spider web from our backyard.

spiderweb g.jpg

That garden has an unusual guard. Goes with the unusual cucumber.

From Motionview:

Our first foray into gardening and we may have planted too many tomatoes. From seed, Northern San Diego County.

tomatMVIM.jpg

Congratulations on a great first crop! And from seed, too! Looks like you have enough tomatoes to make Gordon's salsa recipe.

Check out the later comments from last week's thread, too. Update: See related chokecherry photo below.

Gardens of The Horde

From Wee Kreek Farm Girl in the low desert:

I wish I knew what cactus this was but I got it from a girlfriend who got it from a friend so I have no idea but the bloom on it is amazing, it reminds me of a starfish. It blooms this time of year and gets one every few days for about a month. Sorry not so many garden pics recently but it has been nothing but hot here and we have had no rain, no monsoon activity at all this summer and it has been taking a toll on my garden. Supposed to start cooling off next week and it is time to plant my fall garden so I am excited to do that.

cacstar.JPG

Zanne sent in the following:

I must have thrown a peony plant off into the edge of the woods thinking it was dead. Then one day I looked across the yard,
saw a little bit of pink color and decided to investigate. The plant is about 3' tall and produces 3-4 buds every yr now. Love it!

peonysur.jpg

Unusual weekend around here. Pixy got a little cranky for a while, too. Check back later for more photos.

Back again.

Zanne also sent in the following photo from her neighbor's yard. The plant is about 10 feet tall. Recognize it? Clue: don't eat it.

cbdont.jpg

40 miles north

Corn poppy with festive tomato backdrop

corntomat.jpg

From the famous Pat* in Idaho. See detailed comment in last week's thread.

I keep forgetting about chokecherries as a crop. This looks like a banner year for them. Some of the clusters look a lot like grapes. (The chokecherry trees are part of the windbreak rows on one edge of our property.)

chokec.JPG

If you have sent in a photo but haven't seen it yet here, check back next week.

If you would like to send information and/or photos for the Saturday Gardening Thread, the address is:

ktinthegarden
at g mail dot com

Include your nic unless you want to remain a lurker.

Posted by: Open Blogger at 01:13 PM




Comments

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1 Happy Saturday All

Posted by: Anonymous Guy in Ca at September 07, 2019 01:15 PM (RcMUX)

2 WeirdDave ... wiretaps.

Posted by: Uncle Kenny at September 07, 2019 01:18 PM (PRDg/)

3 Good afternoon Greenthumbs
Going to use a few pepper varieties I grew for a stomboli tonight.

Posted by: Skip at September 07, 2019 01:24 PM (BbGew)

4 Love the lilies. So pretty and prolific. Wee Kreek's cactus bloom is very unusual. We have lots of cactus around but have never seen anything like that. Thanks to everyone for the pictures every week.

Posted by: AlmostYuman at September 07, 2019 01:33 PM (0B0xY)

5 Electrical splicers. Used to hook into existing circuit without cutting.
Wife has been canning like a fiend! This morning, it was some peach honey from the scrag ends of canning half peaches.
Tomorrow early, I'm making a small batch of apple butter.
She'll have to can for me, though. Even if I wanted to do it, she wouldn't trust me.

She's made enough spaghetti sauce, tomato paste, and tomato sauce for the next 9 months.

We've been playing with various veggies in the dehydrator.
Latest is zucchini, thinly sliced, dried longways. No spices, no nothing.
They are like a slightly sweetish, crunchy chip.
She's doing the Auto Immune protocol, so store-boughten chips are verboten. These are good!

Posted by: MarkY at September 07, 2019 01:33 PM (eMZAQ)

6 whatever that cactus/succulent is, I used to have one just like it. Took a couple years to get a bloom, and I still don't know what it is.


Those tomatoes are nice ... one year I'll get around to making salsa again, and freeze a bunch of quarts. Pretty easy and useful. I finally got my tiller back on the tractor, and tilled up some spots ... have beets and "tiller radishes" coming up ... might get hit by frost, but I'll try to cover them if a frost is coming.

Unknown small part? hmmm, looks like it would work for a grounding wire for an electric fence, is all I can figure. It would clip on to those steel rod posts. I've wired a ground wire between two hot wires to keep coons out of the sweet corn ... am told that helps a lot, to give them a good shock.

Posted by: illiniwek at September 07, 2019 01:34 PM (Cus5s)

7 BTW, 21#s of tomatoes made 9 pints of tomato sauce.
Also, Amish Paste, which is supposed to be like Roma's, have been a disappointment this year. Smaller, slower.
Will go back to Roma's next year.
Best producer, far and away in the mater patch has been

Posted by: MarkY at September 07, 2019 01:38 PM (eMZAQ)

8 Trump's plan to hert persins of color is working shown by the herricane created by his be policies to eliminernate persins of coler !!! Persins of no color was be bearly affected by the global warming storm. We must call on Presdent obama too do something about this....

Posted by: Mary Clogginstien from Obamaboro, VT and proud of it !!!! at September 07, 2019 01:38 PM (qM84C)

9 Crikey! How'd that happen?
...Jetstar.
Jestar has big, beautiful, meaty fruit. It's been a slow, cool, wet year, and those things have never shown any fungi.

Posted by: MarkY at September 07, 2019 01:39 PM (eMZAQ)

10 I've used those weird dave splicers. I don't like them, because they can cut the wire or leave very little of the wire to conduct amperes. Better to cut the wire, solder and slide shrink tubing over the splice.

Posted by: Ronster at September 07, 2019 01:41 PM (Eot2E)

11 so I was wrong on the unknown small part, here is how they are used, more clearly (for me) explained. I need some.

youtube.com/watch?v=Uh8ca6J3vsU

Posted by: illiniwek at September 07, 2019 01:41 PM (Cus5s)

12 Ronster, I don't like them for critical use (like brake controllers) but for trailer LED lights, you can't beat them!

Posted by: MarkY at September 07, 2019 01:43 PM (eMZAQ)

13 Army is beating Michigan. Glorious!

Posted by: Archer at September 07, 2019 01:48 PM (0E35O)

14 Wire splice

Posted by: Chris M at September 07, 2019 01:50 PM (6XZdO)

15 From Idaho's Treasure Valley: Still harvesting zucchini and cucumbers, and giving the vast majority of them to a friend's chickens. Still harvesting green beans, although production has dropped off significantly. Still harvesting red raspberries (some to freezer, some to steam juicer soon). Corn was finished up, and the last harvest frozen as stew corn. We harvested 2 bags of Yukon Gold potatoes, 9.5 pounds, including a few huge ones (still 2 bags to go). A few cantaloupes and tomatoes getting ready.

I'm trying to keep track of when I see hummingbirds so I know when they migrate away - I saw the usual 2 in my hummingbird garden today, working on the Scarlet Sage.

The rose-root-barrier project continues. We've been backfilling the trench on the lawn side, and husband has been cutting off the roots on the ends and the back (canal side). In areas where the sprouts have already been cut off from the parent plants, we've been killing the sprouts. In area where there's no grass, husband has sprayed them - within the lawn, I've been painting them with straight glyphosate (dyed it blue so I could see where I'd been already).

The weather's changing toward fall now. We had some rain after we went to bed Thursday night, a thunderstorm Friday morning, and more rain last night. I expect the linden to start changing color any time now - it's the first to change each fall.

Oh, under puttering (and headaches), our kitchen sink handle fell off last night, just before dinner. Husband has ordered the part, which will arrive Sunday. Hopefully the handle assembly will cooperate and everything will end up hunky-dory.

Posted by: Pat* at September 07, 2019 01:51 PM (2pX/F)

16 MarkY at September 07, 2019 01:39 PM

Congratulations, MarkY!

Posted by: KTbarthedoor at September 07, 2019 01:52 PM (BVQ+1)

17 I have a Rose of Sharon that looks very similar to that peony; they would look lovely planted together, to extend the bloom in that particular bed.

Posted by: Velvet glove, iron fist at September 07, 2019 01:54 PM (nhdxz)

18 Oh, No, Pat* Not the kitchen sink!

Sorry it took so long to post your chokecherries.

Ever taste one raw?

They have their name for a reason.

Posted by: KTbarthedoor at September 07, 2019 01:54 PM (BVQ+1)

19 IDC connectors. Don't use them on your salt water yacht.

Posted by: klaftern at September 07, 2019 01:54 PM (RuIsu)

20 Mark Y and the other morons...you are blessed to have your bounty.

My fall and winter harvest should be good if i pay attention.

Posted by: Lone Ranger at September 07, 2019 01:58 PM (643jk)

21 Whoa...

Someone is skewering the Left with pretty good (and brief) sketch humor. Not quite Babylon Bee but not far off:

Woke Teacher, White Savior

https://tinyurl.com/y5a56phy

Funny shit!

Posted by: ... at September 07, 2019 01:59 PM (uEbPt)

22 The "cactus" is probably Stapelia gigantea. Despite its appearance, it's not a true cactus, but a member of the Apocynaceae, which now includes the former milkweed family where stapeliads were previously placed.

Posted by: Don at September 07, 2019 02:00 PM (2odZQ)

23 I picked enough tomatoes to make 8 Qts of tomato juice.
I only had room for 7 in the canner, and one didn't seal.

So now, according to this story problem, I have 6 Qts canned and two in the fridge to either reprocess when more tomatoes are ripe, or to cook with.

I picked a mess of green beans the other day, put them on a tray and dried them in two days by putting them on the front seat of my Honda Accord with the windows up.
Honda makes a decent vegetable dryer apparently.

Posted by: Kindltot at September 07, 2019 02:02 PM (xG/b0)

24 Thanks for the I.D., Don.

Posted by: KTbarthedoor at September 07, 2019 02:03 PM (BVQ+1)

25 illinewek,
Wife (the farmer in the family) makes a fresh salsa that is to die for!
When she cans it, it gets thicker, but doesn't lose the fresh taste.
I don't know how well fresh onions freeze? Seems like you'd lose that crispness.
Her fresh is maters, onions (diced small), whatever peppers are ripe (usually some poblanos, with a smattering of jalapeno, maybe an Anaheim or two, bells if you got) and garlic. Salt, natch.
Only problem I know about fresh is that it takes an hour or so to make the fresh, and about 1/2 hour to eat.

Posted by: MarkY at September 07, 2019 02:06 PM (eMZAQ)

26 So now, according to this story problem, I have 6 Qts canned and two in the fridge to either reprocess when more tomatoes are ripe, or to cook with.

...or to flavor cheap vodka!

Posted by: MarkY at September 07, 2019 02:08 PM (eMZAQ)

27 Pat*
What's a steam juicer?
I'm sure we have room for another kitchen appliance in an outbuilding somewhere...

Posted by: MarkY at September 07, 2019 02:12 PM (eMZAQ)

28 You can never have too many tomatoes. Scientific fact. Beautiful yield Motionview!

Posted by: G marks the spot at September 07, 2019 02:16 PM (mrrpb)

29 One year long ago, we had so many tomatoes, we made 100 qts. of tomato juice. Great year.

Posted by: Ronster at September 07, 2019 02:25 PM (Eot2E)

30 21 That's not a joke... now playing on hs campuses near you

Posted by: MAxIE, mentioned in dispatches at September 07, 2019 02:30 PM (9TR2V)

31 The "cactus" is probably Stapelia gigantea. Despite its appearance, it's not a true cactus, but a member of the Apocynaceae, which now includes the former milkweed family where stapeliads were previously placed.
Posted by: Don at September 07, 2019 02:00 PM (2odZQ)


Does it extend ovipositors down the human trachea and deposit eggs? Because I might have seen one of those in the wild.

Posted by: hogmartin will be sad if you don't register for the fall MIMoMe at September 07, 2019 02:31 PM (t+qrx)

32 Thanks G. We have been using the cherry tomatoes to make this very quick pasta sauce, so good with fresh tomatoes https://bit.ly/2knWpjL

With the heirlooms the top picks are BLT (on smooshy white bread) and tomato salad with crusty baguette, similar to this one https://bit.ly/2lZIxMJ

Posted by: motionview at September 07, 2019 02:32 PM (pYQR/)

33 Kindltot at September 07, 2019 02:02 PM

Do you cook your dried green beans with potatoes and sausage like they do in Switzerland? Taste almost like fresh.

They keep them in pillow cases in the attic.

Posted by: KTbarthedoor at September 07, 2019 02:35 PM (BVQ+1)

34 Wifes tomato crop this year will be about 6 tomatoes. Pathetic.

Posted by: Ronster at September 07, 2019 02:40 PM (Eot2E)

35 Yay! Gardening thread!

I'm glad Tony Litwin reported in. I hope Florida takes a miss on big hurricanes this season.

Those pink lilies are fantastic! I really like the volunteer peony, too. Perhaps I should add some pink to next year's garden.

Last weekend I filled the blank spots in the back garden with two mums that I popped into pots I had in the shed. They're starting to bloom now and the autumn joy sedum is turning pink. I hope they stay pretty through October.

I didn't realize how great my garden looked this summer until I had Labor Day visitors who told me so. The only thing that looks bad is the garden under the kitchen window. I thought I had killed the slugs, but the hosta looks like a tiny maniac took a knife to the leaves.

Posted by: NaughtyPine at September 07, 2019 02:41 PM (/+bwe)

36 Love the lilies, and always interesting to see what Tony has for us. That spider web is fearsome. Ye gods. I don't want to see the creature that built that.

All the flowers and produce look lovely, and I got a chuckle out of Golfboy's mommy and baby cucumber.

Posted by: bluebell at September 07, 2019 02:49 PM (xkSLi)

37 Thanks for letting me know what it is Don. I will now have to tentatively smell the flower next time to see how bad it is. All in the name of science...

Posted by: wee kreek farm girl at September 07, 2019 02:51 PM (spBV6)

38 "When she cans it, it gets thicker, but doesn't lose the fresh taste.

I don't know how well fresh onions freeze? Seems like you'd lose that crispness" MarkY

thx, yeah, good point. I get a little nervous about canning tomatoes, but it is pretty much cookbook, and the crisp does sound better than mush from freezing. I bought the tools for canning while in prepper mode, but until the zombie apocalypse, I probably won't be inspired to go full speed. But salsa would be a good place to start, in the meantime.




Posted by: illiniwek at September 07, 2019 02:53 PM (Cus5s)

39 Monarch butterflies all around today, non stop feed at neighbor and our butterfly bushes

Posted by: A dude in MI at September 07, 2019 02:54 PM (WhTSP)

40 Monarch butterflies all around today, non stop feed at neighbor and our butterfly bushes
Posted by: A dude in MI at September 07, 2019 02:54 PM

That must be amazing. I have... a couple of plain white skimmers fluttering in the yard.

Posted by: NaughtyPine at September 07, 2019 02:56 PM (/+bwe)

41 Those yellow pieces are most likely made by 3M, at least they were when they became popular back in the 60's. They were an easy way to splice in additional circuits in automotive applications, like radios, and speakers and such. Not recommended for anything needing lots of current flow. I still have some blue ones (blue is 14Ga) in the basement. Yellow was larger size as I recall, red was smaller. Different size wire used different colors so it was easy to pick the size you needed.

Posted by: Lump at September 07, 2019 02:58 PM (AwjHq)

42 Fueling up for the trip south, I'm guessing. When we sail on Lake Michigan this time of year, a good mile offshore, never fail to see some monarchs over the lake...seems like a suicide run

Posted by: A dude in MI at September 07, 2019 02:59 PM (WhTSP)

43 The tomato pic reminds me of when the women in the family used to make jars. They bought bushels of plum tomatoes in New Jersey. S. Jersey was all farms back then.

Posted by: kakisto at September 07, 2019 03:00 PM (knNho)

44 Still hot and dry here, but the hummingbirds are going nuts. I've had to refill the feeders every other day and there are constant hummer wars on both feeders. Godspeed on the migration, guys.

Posted by: Art Rondelet of Malmsey at September 07, 2019 03:00 PM (S+f+m)

45 A few days ago, I saw a hummingbird sitting on a branch of a butterfly bush, first time ever seeing one sit still

Posted by: A dude in MI at September 07, 2019 03:06 PM (WhTSP)

46 Great looking set of tomatos, Motionview. Do you snack on the little ones? I do.

Posted by: 40 miles north at September 07, 2019 03:07 PM (o2vOl)

47 Haven't seen any Monarchs, just yellow swallowtails and Spicebush. Old faithful hummingbird has shown up, he likes the agastache in the pot on the deck. (hope I spelled that right)

Posted by: kallisto at September 07, 2019 03:07 PM (knNho)

48 I bought the tools for canning while in prepper
mode, but until the zombie apocalypse, I probably won't be inspired to
go full speed. But salsa would be a good place to start, in the
meantime. Posted by: illiniwek at September 07, 2019 02:53 PM (Cus5s)
=====

In my family, canning was done outside, on the grills, with picnic tables and serious beer.

Inside, the ladies did some stringing beans and coring tomatoes, and had serious beer, vodka, and mimosas.

Posted by: mustbequantum at September 07, 2019 03:08 PM (MIKMs)

49 Wee Kreek Farm Girl,

That cactus is really exotic. It looks like it's ready to jump up and smother my face like those awful critters in Aliens. [walks carefully around it ]

Posted by: 40 miles north at September 07, 2019 03:10 PM (o2vOl)

50 this next batch of Monarchs (I guess) will be the ones that fuel up (fatten up) for the flight to Mexico ... iirc, they go through a few hatch outs ...


yeah, here it is, about the Sept/Oct born monarchs. "The fourth generation of monarch butterflies does not die after two to six weeks. Instead, this generation of monarch butterflies migrates to warmer climates like Mexico and California and will live for six to eight months until it is time to start the whole process over again."

https://www.monarch-butterfly.com/

Posted by: illiniwek at September 07, 2019 03:13 PM (Cus5s)

51 40 miles, I can't seem to walk past that island without popping one or two. With the beefsteak I'm thinking of trying a tomato and mayo sandwich - how much more white (bread) can you get?

Posted by: motionview at September 07, 2019 03:13 PM (pYQR/)

52 Just got back from errands. I hate missing the thread in real time. Now to read the post.

Posted by: JTB at September 07, 2019 03:19 PM (bmdz3)

53 Tomatoes and peppers barely keeping up with what I need, not sure why.

Posted by: Skip at September 07, 2019 03:34 PM (BbGew)

54 Yes, I've tasted the chokecherries right off the trees - in fact I'm still taste-testing them. They're nowhere near as bad as I thought! (Main problem is, they're 90 percent pit!) I think I should have waited longer to harvest, since they're now turning the deep maroon-black I was told they should be. The result of the jelly experiment was syrup - we used a powdered pectin that said it would work with lower sugar recipes, and did 5 cups juice to 3 cups sugar. I think we didn't use enough pectin, so what we got was syrup. But it still tastes good - something you won't find at the grocery, for sure.

What is a steam juicer? It is a device for turning fruit into juice, without having to boil the fruit in water and then strain out the pulp. It has multiple layers. The bottom one is the water reservoir, which creates the steam. The next layer holds the juice, and has a tube attached to the side for siphoning juice out - it also has a conical open thing in the middle (think "bundt cake pan"), which lets the steam rise up to the fruit. The third layer up, that holds the fruit, and has holes in the bottom like a colander, to let steam in and juice flow down. And a lid goes on top. What you get at the end, is juice in the reservoir, and mushy fruit fit only for the compost. (Which you have to put into another container, because of course the holes in the bottom of the fruit-holding layer will let drips leak out while you're walking across the kitchen!)

I think I've got the layers right - ours is currently on the stove, and still too hot too mess with. Husband just took 3 pounds of red raspberries and turned them into juice so we can add it to our current beer batch. (We're trying a chocolate milk-stout, half with and half without added red raspberry juice.)

Oh gosh yes, it is a pain to be without running water in the kitchen. Since it's only going to be a short hiatus, I haven't gotten too creative, though I did wash green beans in the bathroom sink, and have had to use the laundry sink for rinsing a few critical items. As I said, hopefully everything will go according to plan and be hunky-dory by Sunday night.

Posted by: Pat* at September 07, 2019 05:10 PM (2pX/F)

55 When one is learning to preserve food, it is easy to get scared by the You Can Die warnings all over the place. But our ancestors did it a lot, without fancy equipment, and they lived long enough to forbear us.

A good starting book is the Cook's Illustrated guide to small batch preserving. They have recipes for everything from marinara to a recipe for radish pickles that starts to go bad in about 30 minutes. The recipes are easy and you don't have to invest a lot in materials as the yields are on the order of two pints or so. I've learned a lot from it, like using a peeled shredded tart green apple in fruit jams. It eliminates the need for pectin, or at least reduces the amount.

https://tinyurl.com/y37w26zy

Ball, the company that makes the jars, has a lot of good information on their website. They even sell a small kit for under $10 to get you started. I can heartily recommend their Jam and Jelly maker also. It makes the painful part of the process easy and painless.

https://tinyurl.com/y4u9mrds

Posted by: Gordon at September 07, 2019 07:13 PM (Uf/md)

56 Oh, and if you preserve marinara, one of the byproducts is seasoned roasted tomato juice. Morons will of course want to use it with vodka, but I can tell you pulling a pint out to share at breakfast, just out of the jar, is a really pleasant experience.

Posted by: Gordon at September 07, 2019 07:17 PM (Uf/md)

57 Do you cook your dried green beans with potatoes and sausage like they do in Switzerland? Taste almost like fresh.



They keep them in pillow cases in the attic.
Posted by: KTbarthedoor at September 07, 2019 02:35 PM (BVQ+1)


My GF's Foster dad is Swiss, I suspect that is what he is going to do. I dried them for her dad.

My contact is with pioneers stringing them on thread and drying them in the kitchen to make soup with, I think it is called "leather britches"

Posted by: Kindltot at September 07, 2019 07:52 PM (xG/b0)

58 Pat*, if you are steaming apples, especially if you are doing a sweet apple like a gravenstein, the pulp left over after steaming out all the easy juice can be run through a food mill and canned as apple sauce.

If you are really fancy, you can peel an core extra apples and shred them up with a mandoline or a Kitchen Aid shredder, like you would carrots for carrot salad, and mix them in with the pulp before canning it all.

You get a nice compote and juice for jelly both.


Posted by: Kindltot at September 07, 2019 07:57 PM (xG/b0)

59 A Country Doctor sent in the following message by email:
Those yellow doohickeys are for "T taps/splices" in, I believe 10 gauge wire.

One wire passes through the whole device, the other snubs short about 2/3ds the way in, the metal staple is pressed home with pliers, and the 'lid' is closed to provide insulation.

Posted by: KT at September 07, 2019 07:57 PM (BVQ+1)

60 Pat* at September 07, 2019 05:10 PM
I have only picked chokecherries once with my family, when they were bright red. Maybe they weren't fully ripe. They were . . . . astringent.

Made pretty syrup, though.

Posted by: KT at September 07, 2019 08:00 PM (BVQ+1)

61 Pat* at September 07, 2019 05:10 PM
Those steam juicers work great for concord grape jelly.

Posted by: KT at September 07, 2019 08:01 PM (BVQ+1)

62 Simply gorgeous

Posted by: Summer of Love at September 07, 2019 08:56 PM (FJrl0)

63 Anybody mind re-posting the salsa recipe? What exactly is the secret to a good salsa?

Posted by: jeremiah at September 07, 2019 09:48 PM (AGFts)

64 What, no one has ID'd those lovely red castor bean leaves yet? When my USAF spouse was a major, I used to tell him his insignia looked a lot more like a castor bean leaf than whatever other kind of leaf it supposedly represented...since I had representatives in my garden at the time, it was hard to argue against it.

Posted by: techno at September 07, 2019 10:42 PM (SwGqr)

65 40 miles north, I never thought of that but of course, from now on I will give it a wide berth... your comment made me laugh, thank you.

Posted by: wee kreek farm girl at September 07, 2019 10:59 PM (spBV6)

66 We don't steam apples, though since it's been a year, I'd have to look up exactly how we made the various apple products. Will report on that as it happens - stay tuned.

Posted by: Pat* at September 08, 2019 01:19 AM (2pX/F)

67 Vonnie's Three Chip Cherry Tomato Salsa

It's called three chip because those of tender tongue have to take three bites before they realize it's not going to kill them.

Yield is 6 to 8 pints

12 cups cherry tomatoes any variety or mixed
Halve or quarter the tomatoes. Pack them tightly in the measuring cup.
3 cups red onion, chopped
18 cloves garlic, minced
3-4 poblano peppers
8 large or 10 small to medium jalapeno peppers
2-3 habanaro peppers
All peppers should be seeded and chopped. One might want gloves for this step.
1 cup cilantro leaves, packed
2 tablespoons salt
The juice from 2 limes
1 cup cider vinegar


Put all ingredients in a large heavy pot and cook on medium heat for 20 minutes, stirring occasionally, tomatoes should be tender. Take off heat and run immersion blender through until tomatoes are mostly broken up, or process in food processor in batches. Put back on medium heat for 20 minutes stirring occasionally. Put in prepared pint jars and process in canner for 15 minutes.

We made a batch with regular tomatoes. It was much more red, and different. Good, but not great. I suspect the sweetness of the cherry tomatoes was the difference, so consider adding a bit of sugar if you're not using cherry tomatoes.

Posted by: Gordon at September 08, 2019 11:13 AM (Uf/md)

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Milestone: Oliver Willis Posts 400th "Fake News Article" Referencing Britney Spears
Liberal Economists Rue a "New Decade of Greed"
Artificial Insouciance: Maureen Dowd's Word Processor Revolts Against Her Numbing Imbecility
Intelligence Officials Eye Blogs for Tips
They Done Found Us Out, Cletus: Intrepid Internet Detective Figures Out Our Master Plan
Shock: Josh Marshall Almost Mentions Sarin Discovery in Iraq
Leather-Clad Biker Freaks Terrorize Australian Town
When Clinton Was President, Torture Was Cool
What Wonkette Means When She Explains What Tina Brown Means
Wonkette's Stand-Up Act
Wankette HQ Gay-Rumors Du Jour
Here's What's Bugging Me: Goose and Slider
My Own Micah Wright Style Confession of Dishonesty
Outraged "Conservatives" React to the FMA
An On-Line Impression of Dennis Miller Having Sex with a Kodiak Bear
The Story the Rightwing Media Refuses to Report!
Our Lunch with David "Glengarry Glen Ross" Mamet
The House of Love: Paul Krugman
A Michael Moore Mystery (TM)
The Dowd-O-Matic!
Liberal Consistency and Other Myths
Kepler's Laws of Liberal Media Bias
John Kerry-- The Splunge! Candidate
"Divisive" Politics & "Attacks on Patriotism" (very long)
The Donkey ("The Raven" parody)
News/Chat