Sunday Morning Book Thread 06-09-2019

merci used book cafe Paris.jpg
Merci Used Book Café, Paris, France


Good morning to all you 'rons, 'ettes, lurkers, and lurkettes, wine moms, frat bros, crétins sans pantalon, nitwits, dimwits, drag queens, bull dykes, bushwhackers, hornswogglers, and you hungover morons who went to yesterday's Michigan MoMe. I'm hoping one or more of you will check in with a report, who attended, amount of alcohol consumed, number of arrests, etc. Welcome once again to the stately, prestigious, internationally acclaimed and high-class Sunday Morning Book Thread, a weekly compendium of reviews, observations, snark, and a continuing conversation on books, reading, writing, and publishing by escaped oafs who follow words with their fingers and whose lips move as they read. Unlike other AoSHQ comment threads, the Sunday Morning Book Thread is so hoity-toity, pants are required. Even if it's these pants, which look something you'd wear to Caligula's barbecue. (h/t Eris)


It Pays To Increase Your Word Power®


The only example of a HOWCATCHEM I can think of off the top of my head is Columbo. What are some others?

maid in library 02.jpg


Chernobyl

Mrs. Muse and I have been watching the Chernobyl HBO series and enjoying it very much (although this Forbes article shows how they got the underlying science very, very wrong), so I decided to poke around a bit to see what's available to read on it.

First up, we have Chernobyl: The History of a Nuclear Catastrophe by Serhii Plokhy, wherein he

...draws on new sources to tell the dramatic stories of the firefighters, scientists, and soldiers who heroically extinguished the nuclear inferno. He lays bare the flaws of the Soviet nuclear industry, tracing the disaster to the authoritarian character of Communist party rule, the regime's control of scientific information, and its emphasis on economic development over all else.

I'm also interested in Voices from Chernobyl by journalist Svetlana Alexeivich, who "presents personal accounts of what happened to the people of Belarus after the nuclear reactor accident in 1986, and the fear, anger, and uncertainty that they still live with." This book won the Nobel Prize in Literature in 2015.

And, published just this year, there is Midnight in Chernobyl: The Untold Story of the World's Greatest Nuclear Disaster, which

Draw[s] on hundreds of hours of interviews conducted over the course of more than ten years, as well as letters, unpublished memoirs, and documents from recently-declassified archives...which brings the disaster to life through the eyes of the men and women who witnessed it firsthand. The result is a masterful nonfiction thriller, and the definitive account of an event that changed history: a story that is more complex, more human, and more terrifying than the Soviet myth.

All of these books are fairly spendy (> $12.00). Slightly cheaper ($9.99) is Frederik Pohl's novel Chernobyl, which draws on first-person accounts as well as those with access to technical information inside the USSR. Considering that this novel came out within months of the accident, Pohl must've had some contacts in very high places.


Moron Recommendations

Last week, there were several recommendations for Native Tongue, such as:

41 I third the recommend for Hiaason's "Native Tongue" - it's hilarious. I believe that Hiaason was the first to document the phenomenon of "Florida Man" in all his comic glory.

Posted by: Sgt. Mom at June 02, 2019 09:28 AM (xnmPy)

Native Tongue (Skink Book 2):

When the precious clue-tongued mango voles at the Amazing Kingdom of Thrills on North Key Largo are stolen by heartless, ruthless thugs, Joe Winder wants to uncover why, and find the voles. Joe is lately a PR man for the Amazing Kingdom theme park, but now that the voles are gone, Winder is dragged along in their wake through a series of weird and lethal events that begin with the sleazy real-estate agent/villain Francis X. Kingsbury and can end only one way....

Sounds like pretty much everyone in this novel is Florida Man.


___________

The Memoirs of Ulysses S. Grant has always been a moron favorite. But:

Do you know there is now an annotated version of the Memoirs out?

Posted by: Mary Poppins' Practically Perfect Piercing at June 02, 2019 09:54 AM (Ki5SV)

I did not know this. The Annotated Memoirs of Ulysses S. Grant, which was published late last year, is over 1100 pages long. This might be one book you'd want to have a hard copy of. Because this customer review warns of serious problems with the footnote formatting on the Kindle edition and I would think that getting the footnotes done properly is an important feature for an annotated edition of any book. I've noticed footnote problems (broken or absent links) in many e-books I've purchased, and most of the time, it's only a minor annoyance. However, in a book like this, it could inteference yuuugely with your reading enjoyment. The Kindle version is $22.99, so in this case, you might want invest the additional $4 for the hardcover edition.

___________

100 Insty mentioned this book this morning:

https://pjmedia.com/instapundit/332071/

It's titled, "Back Row Americans", about the poorest Americans and their faith.

He also links the authors website, "First Things".

Where the author tells his story.

This may be good. Though I have to admit, for me, there was a whiff of the anthropologist among the natives in some of the writing. Which I dislike.

Read it for yourself though.

Insty thinks this may be a very important book.

Posted by: naturalfake at June 02, 2019 09:55 AM (CRRq9)

The book referred to here is Dignity: Seeking Respect in Back Row America.

After abandoning his Wall Street career, Chris Arnade decided to document poverty and addiction in the Bronx. He began interviewing, photographing, and becoming close friends with homeless addicts, and spent hours in drug dens and McDonald's. Then he started driving across America to see how the rest of the country compared. He found the same types of stories everywhere, across lines of race, ethnicity, religion, and geography.

The people he got to know, from Alabama and California to Maine and Nevada, gave Arnade a new respect for the dignity and resilience of what he calls America's Back Row--those who lack the credentials and advantages of the so-called meritocratic upper class. The strivers in the Front Row, with their advanced degrees and upward mobility, see the Back Row's values as worthless. They scorn anyone who stays in a dying town or city as foolish, and mock anyone who clings to religion or tradition as naïve...This book is his attempt to help the rest of us truly see, hear, and respect millions of people who've been left behind.

I have no idea whether this book is going to be as "important" as Insty thinks, but here is an excerpt from one of the chapters so you can read a bit of it for yourself.

___________

I told myself I needed to ease off on the military-themed recommendations and instead concentrate on providing a little more variety ('diversity', if you will) so this thread doesn't get monotonous, but I couldn't pass up this one:

...if you want to read a great novel of WWII, try "The Cruel Sea," by Nicholas Monsarrat.

Posted by: CharlieBrown'sDildo at June 02, 2019 12:04 PM (wYseH)

I remember my dad had this one in his library, but I never read it. The Amazon blurb is pretty sparse:

A powerful novel of the North Atlantic in World Wat II, this is the story of the British ships Compass Rose and Saltash and of their desparate cat-and-mouse game with Nazi U-boats. First published to great acclaim in 1951, The Cruel Sea remains a classic novel of endurance and daring.

Lots of used copies are avaiable. No Kindle edition, although that's not true of some of Monsarrat's other novels, including Something To Hide:

An act of kindness has grave consequences in this heart-rending novel about a young girl, pregnant and abandoned, and the man who helps her. When decent, compassionate Carter takes pity on this young girl, he is quickly drawn into an ordeal beyond his control. Succumbing first to her desperate cries for help, and then to her threats, he agrees to let her spend the night in his flat. Aided only by his own unskilled hands, she gives birth to a sickly baby. For Carter, the anguish has only just begun, as he witnesses a traumatic chain of events unfold.

There's also The White Rajah:

The breathtaking island of Makassang, in the Java Sea, is the setting for this tremendous historical novel. It is a place both splendid and savage, where piracy, plundering and barbarism are rife. The ageing Rajah, threatened by native rebellion, enlists the help of Richard Marriott - baronet’s son-turned buccaneer - promising him a fortune to save his throne. But when Richard falls in love with the Rajah’s beautiful daughter, the island, and its people, he find himself drawn into a personal quest to restore peace and prosperity.

Both sound interesting enough to go on my TBR stack.

___________




book cartoon 42.jpg


Books By Morons

Moronette shibumi is an author. She's written 3 romance novels. I did not know that until she let it slip last week. So I sent her an e-mail pestering her about it and she said:

It was a long time ago, in the 2000s...I wrote all three of them during the time my Dad became disabled due to heart issues. It helped with the stress. It took about eight years to get agent and a publisher...we'd have to sell a LOT of books for anything to come my way.

So here they are:

A Bath Intrigue
Emily's Christmas Wish
An Enchanting Minx

___________

Moron author Francis Porretto has just published a new novel in his Futanari Saga, The Wise and the Mad:

An activist group mounts a major attack on Rachel MacLachlan’s DesireCorp…

Arcologics’ life sciences group begins the development of an artificial conception-to-birth womb…

Sir Thomas Walsingham, recently named the Duke of Norfolk, begets a second futanari daughter…

Futanari clone Fountain surprises everyone who knows her by displaying a gift far beyond mere culinary talent...

And Pope Clement XV, the first American to be raised to the Throne of Saint Peter, decides to cleanse the Church of sexual scandal once and for all.

Onteora County, the United States, and the world are once again in turmoil, and the long awaited sequel to “Innocents” and “Experiences” is here to tell you all about it!

Available on Kindle for $3.99.Or you can get the entire collection for $6.99. This also includes The Athene Academy Collection, which consists of 3 novelettes.

I have to warn you that these novels are rated NC-17 for sexual content. And if you're unfamiliar with the word 'futanari', you'd best not google it. Especially not images. I'm dead serious about this. Because what you see cannot be unseen. Francis has written other books that aren't quite so hardcore, for example the 'Realm of Essences' series, the first of which is Chosen One, which I've mentioned on an earlier book two three years ago.


___________

So that's all for this week. As always, book thread tips, suggestions, bribes, insults, threats, ugly pants pics and moron library submissions may be sent to OregonMuse, Proprietor, AoSHQ Book Thread, at the book thread e-mail address: aoshqbookthread, followed by the 'at' sign, and then 'G' mail, and then dot cee oh emm.

What have you all been reading this week? Hopefully something good, because, as you all know, life is too short to be reading lousy books.

Posted by: OregonMuse at 09:00 AM




Comments

(Jump to bottom of page)

1 Books!

Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at June 09, 2019 09:00 AM (vhcul)

2 Tolle Lege
Just a couple of chapters to go on Caine Mutiny, loved it and shame took so long to decide to read it.

Posted by: Skip at June 09, 2019 09:02 AM (BbGew)

3 Working on John Lockes 14th book in a series. Stupid but fun.

Posted by: rhennigantx at June 09, 2019 09:03 AM (JFO2v)

4 the Sunday Morning Book Thread is so hoity-toity, pants are required.


If this is true, why did you welcome cretins sans pantalon?

Posted by: Bandersnatch at June 09, 2019 09:05 AM (fuK7c)

5 So the latest Progressive drivel is that CIA let Russia Russia Russia have defective Nuke plans so that Russia Russia Russia nuke factories would fail.

Posted by: rhennigantx at June 09, 2019 09:05 AM (JFO2v)

6 hiya

Posted by: JT at June 09, 2019 09:09 AM (34DX1)

7 The only example of a HOWCATCHEM I can think of off the top of my head is Columbo. What are some others?
_______

Doyle's The Final Problem comes to mind, with some others. One of the murders in Celebrated Cases Solved by Judge Dee is another.

Really, the dominance of the whodunnit was something that came in the 20th C. It's not so clearly defined in earlier mysteries.

A related type-distinction is howdunnit? And John Dickson Carr fan will know what that is. But it goes at least back to Murders in the Rue Morgue. And, in a sense, The Purloined Letter. In the latter,there is no Who? involved.

Posted by: Eeyore at June 09, 2019 09:10 AM (VaN/j)

8 "The Cruel Sea" is an outstanding book. I cannot recommend it enough.

Good morning, all.

Posted by: blake - used sock salesman at June 09, 2019 09:10 AM (WEBkv)

9 Nice Lieberry!

I saw those pants on an urban outdoorsman not too long ago.

The pants probably started out as Dockers khakis but after being out in the field on a bum's ass for weeks or months on end they looked just like the one in the picture.

As we passed in the street, I told the vagrant "nice pants!". He stopped and yelled out obscenities in some unknown bum's language then shuffled away.

Posted by: Hairyback Guy at June 09, 2019 09:10 AM (Z+IKu)

10 An Enchanting Minx

The Fawn Liebowitz Story.

Posted by: rhennigantx at June 09, 2019 09:10 AM (JFO2v)

11 5 So the latest Progressive drivel is that CIA let Russia Russia Russia have defective Nuke plans so that Russia Russia Russia nuke factories would fail.
Posted by: rhennigantx at June 09, 2019 09:05 AM (JFO2v)
_______

The best thing I have ever heard attributed to the CIA.

Posted by: Eeyore at June 09, 2019 09:10 AM (VaN/j)

12 Good morning fellow Book Threadists. Hope everyone had a great week of reading.

Posted by: JTB at June 09, 2019 09:10 AM (bmdz3)

13 hiya Eris !

Posted by: JT at June 09, 2019 09:11 AM (34DX1)

14 Books, lots of books! I finished "Arcane America" this week - eh, it's OK. Kind of spluttered out into a 'meh' ending, and when I went searching through my Kindle for something else, I found "Delivering Virtue" by Brian Kindall, which I think was a recommend on the book thread some time past. So, working on that.

Also - this week, I finished Luna City #8 - anyone on the Book Thread want to beta read the final draft in search of discrepancies, goofs and general feedback to an independent 'ron author? PM at clyahayes-at-gee-mail-dot-com, or answer on the thread.

Posted by: Sgt. Mom at June 09, 2019 09:11 AM (xnmPy)

15 A related type-distinction is howdunnit? And John Dickson Carr fan will know what that is. But it goes at least back to Murders in the Rue Morgue. And, in a sense, The Purloined Letter. In the latter,there is no Who? involved.
Posted by: Eeyore at June 09, 2019 09:10 AM (VaN/j)
-----------

I believe "The Murders in the Rue Morgue" is considered the grandfather of all detective fiction.

Posted by: blake - used sock salesman at June 09, 2019 09:12 AM (WEBkv)

16 "Futanari saga?"

**extreme Spock eyebrow**

Well, chacun a son gout, as they say.

Posted by: Mary Poppins' Practically Perfect Piercing at June 09, 2019 09:12 AM (Ki5SV)

17 My favorite HOWCATCHEM - The Devotion Of Suspect X by Japanese author Keigo Higashino.

Posted by: OggiG at June 09, 2019 09:12 AM (Bk5Q+)

18 Still in Herman Wouk's "The Caine Mutiny". I've reached the infamous "I know there's a spare key to the mess locker!" incident and its crazy aftermath.

It of course follows the descent into paranoia of Captain Queeg, but it is as much about the maturing of a soft young Princeton boy, Ensign Willie Keith, and has many funny bits on adjusting from civilian life to The Navy Way:

The boatswain's mate began an alibi which sounded to Willie like this: "The port bandersnatch got fouled in the starboard rath when we tried to galumph the cutting cable so as not to trip the snozzle again. I had to unshackle the doppelganger and bend on two snarks instead so we could launch in a hurry."

"Well, couldn't you have vorpaled the sillabub or taken a turn on the chortlewort? That way the jaxo would be clear of the varse and you could forget about the dudelsak."

Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at June 09, 2019 09:13 AM (vhcul)

19 I love the painting of the naturalist's study and the one of the books and watch. They are rich, revealing, and attractive.

Posted by: JTB at June 09, 2019 09:13 AM (bmdz3)

20 I've been a fan of The Cruel Sea since my teens. (Movie had Jack Hawkins, IIRC.) It is terrific. I'd probably put it first among action-oriented* navy novels, until O'Brian took the palm.

Monsarrat also wrote a related book, Three Corvettes, which is a memoir, rather than a novel.

*As opposed to personality-driven like The Caine Mutiny.

Posted by: Eeyore at June 09, 2019 09:16 AM (VaN/j)

21 HMS Ulysses by Alistair MacLean stands high on my list of naval thrillers.

Posted by: sharps45 at June 09, 2019 09:17 AM (8mDaR)

22 I believe "The Murders in the Rue Morgue" is considered the grandfather of all detective fiction.
Posted by: blake - used sock salesman at June 09, 2019 09:12 AM (WEBkv)


I've always preferred The Mystery of Marie Roget, myself, but that's probably because I find the murder of Mary Rogers quite interesting.

And since we're speaking of Poe, allow me to recommend The Raven, a 2012 film starring John Cusack as Poe, in a movie where a villain is staging murders based on Poe's stories.

Posted by: Mary Poppins' Practically Perfect Piercing at June 09, 2019 09:17 AM (Ki5SV)

23 If the Chernobyl stuff interests you, check out "Idaho Falls", which is the true story of the only criticality accident with casualties at an operating reactor in the United States. It was in 1961 at SL-1 in Idaho, and involved three operators.

Some of the story is speculation - whether there was something going on between an operator and another's wife - but that was considered in the investigation too, so it's not like it was added to make the story more lurid and scandalous. Basically - spoiler here - three military guys in their early 20s, living in the middle of nowhere in 1961 died from a reactor explosion with no surviving witnesses and which may have been an accident, a prank, or a murder-suicide. And the only people who will ever know are buried in lead and concrete, at least the parts of them that weren't disposed of as high-level contaminated waste.

Posted by: hogmartin at June 09, 2019 09:18 AM (t+qrx)

24 21 HMS Ulysses by Alistair MacLean stands high on my list of naval thrillers.
Posted by: sharps45 at June 09, 2019 09:17 AM (8mDaR)
-----------------------

That book made me cold just be reading it.

Posted by: blake - used sock salesman at June 09, 2019 09:19 AM (WEBkv)

25 Thought the White Rajah sounded interesting, jumped on my library system account to see if a library had a copy and sure enough, one copy available. It wil get shipped to my home library and should have it by Wednesday. I love being able to do this.

Posted by: Sharon at June 09, 2019 09:19 AM (QzF6i)

26 I think Hiassen has 3 movies to his name. Striptease, Hoot, and Skinny Dip (TV).

Seems there would be more.

Posted by: rhennigantx at June 09, 2019 09:20 AM (JFO2v)

27 Didn't one Hiassen book have a rapey dolphin in it? That would be an interesting one to adapt.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at June 09, 2019 09:21 AM (vhcul)

28 I am fed up with Amazon sellers. For the third time, I've ordered a used book and had the wrong one delivered. The refund note ends with "keep the wrong book." Only ONE seller bothered to send me the right book.

And today a seller of toys emailed me to ask me to take down my negative review of a defective toy.

Posted by: NaughtyPine at June 09, 2019 09:21 AM (/+bwe)

29 Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at June 09, 2019 09:13 AM (vhcul)

I don't know if it was original to Wouk, but that book was the first time I heard the "when in danger or in doubt, run in circles, scream and shout" thing. That advice has not failed me since.

Posted by: hogmartin at June 09, 2019 09:22 AM (t+qrx)

30 And today a seller of toys emailed me to ask me to take down my negative review of a defective toy.
Posted by: NaughtyPine at June 09, 2019 09:21 AM (/+bwe)


Irwin Mainway?

Posted by: hogmartin at June 09, 2019 09:23 AM (t+qrx)

31 I just this morning started a book I've had lying around for a while. Like, since the 80s.

Julian Barnes' "Staring at the Sun". Quite like it so far, I remember having started it once but nothing of what's in it.

It got me thinking about the nature of my reading. It seemed like the 80s was a great time to discover new authors, Barnes, Milan Kundera, T.C. Boyle.

And I'm wondering whether it was the decade or it was just me. Out of college, reading only for pleasure. Finding authors I hadn't been assigned.

These days I'm mostly catching up on classics. I don't discover anyone new unless they're foisted upon me (Orhan Pamuk).

So were the 80s special or am I just maudlin?

Posted by: Bandersnatch at June 09, 2019 09:23 AM (fuK7c)

32 Thanks to MP4 for suggesting the annotated Grant's Memoirs.

First, definitely get the hard cover as OM suggests. It's heavy for a paperback binding and the flood of footnotes would be difficult on an e-reader.

Second, based on the intro, the author gives the impression of SJW-ism. Too much northeast liberal exposure and a good bit of smug superiority. It almost threw me off from the beginning.

Third, from what I've read so far her comments are accurate and provide good context to Grant's allusions. The tone is quite academic, so don't read them expecting spritely writing.

I have a library copy which I'll return shortly. My regular copy of the Memoirs will do for now. If I want to study them thoroughly, this annotated version would do the job.

Posted by: JTB at June 09, 2019 09:24 AM (bmdz3)

33 "when in danger or in doubt, run in circles, scream and shout"
---

I laughed too. That needs to be embroidered on a pillow.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at June 09, 2019 09:25 AM (vhcul)

34 On the Kindle, I read a novella, The Librarian: A First Contact Story by M. N. Arzu. This little gem is as much a story of love as it is of first contact. Ms. Arzu was born in Guatemala and fell in love with books after her oldest sister translated The Chronicles of Narnia for her. She also has a series about Merfolk - Mermaids and Mermen - which seems interesting.

I also read The Tattooist of Auschwitz by Heather Morris. The book is a novel based on the true story of Ludwig "Lale" Eisenberg, a Slovakian Jew. In April, 1942, Lale is transported to Auschwitz-Birkenau. Because of some good fortune and his ability to speak several languages, he becomes the tattooist of both camps. In July of 1942, he comforts a young woman waiting to have her number, 34902, tattooed to her left arm. After one look at her, Lale vows to have both of them survive the camp and to marry her.

The book is a story of love budding and then blossoming even among the horrors and atrocities of a concentration camp. With the rise of anti-Semitism world wide, and particularly among the left in America, it also is a warning of how quickly the unthinkable can become reality. We should all remember that "If you save one, you save the world.."



Posted by: Zoltan at June 09, 2019 09:25 AM (Zgezk)

35 Thought the White Rajah sounded interesting, jumped on my library system account to see if a library had a copy and sure enough, one copy available. It wil get shipped to my home library and should have it by Wednesday. I love being able to do this.
Posted by: Sharon at June 09, 2019 09:19 AM

I find myself doing that more and more, especially with popular books.

Posted by: NaughtyPine at June 09, 2019 09:25 AM (/+bwe)

36 Finished I, Claudius this week. My only quibble with it was that I was always getting the secondary characters confused with each other. No such problem with Caligula. Holy shit was he a malignant fuck; no wonder that greaseball who published Penthouse did a relatively high budget porn extravaganza about that cocksucker. I had no idea that he taxed the hell out of everyone, including out and out thievery, to pay for his nuttery. All he needed was a lesbian wife to be an early version of Slick. Finally he pissed off everyone and got Arkancided and Claudius became the accidental Emperor, if you can believe his account.

Anyway, the book group wisely decided to go straight into Claudius the God, which starts out with an account of Herod, King of the Joooos so it's already got my attention in a good way. Btw I noticed in the Author's Notes that Graves thanked Laura Riding for helping him with suggestions. Are any of you familiar with her work? I tried to read something by her a long time ago and was thoroughly confused by it to the point that I put it down. My tastes have changed a great deal since then and if any of you think she's worth reading I'll probably revisit her.

Posted by: Captain Hate at June 09, 2019 09:25 AM (y7DUB)

37 I am currently reading Dynasty The New York Yankees 1949-1964

When rooting for the Yankees was like rooting for US Steel

by Peter Golenbeck

Which I've read several times before but I picked it up at a yard sale for a buck

Then, I'm gonna inhale a Reacher novel, all of which I've read several times and are like crack to me.

Then I'm gonna tackle The French Foreign Legion.

Posted by: JT at June 09, 2019 09:26 AM (34DX1)

38 27 Didn't one Hiassen book have a rapey dolphin in it? That would be an interesting one to adapt.
Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at June 09, 2019 09:21 AM (vhcul)

Native Tongue

Posted by: rhennigantx at June 09, 2019 09:26 AM (JFO2v)

39 Then I'm gonna tackle The French Foreign Legion.
Posted by: JT at June 09, 2019 09:26 AM (34DX1)


I read this as "tickle".

*wanders off for coffee*

Posted by: hogmartin at June 09, 2019 09:27 AM (t+qrx)

40 Hans, if you're here: excellent recommendation on "The Powers of the Earth" by Travis Corcoran. It read very much like Heinlein and had believable science, predictable human nature and an anti-SJW background. The AI component was well-thought out and the Dogs were an entertaining touch, especially as to taking a whizz in a spacesuit.
I'll be adding the sequel to my reading list.

Posted by: RI Red at June 09, 2019 09:28 AM (fhiAA)

41 We've recently had a futanari as First Lady ...

Posted by: Kingsnake at June 09, 2019 09:29 AM (3JbJY)

42 Didn't one Hiassen book have a rapey dolphin in it? That would be an interesting one to adapt.


There was a book, I'm pretty sure it was by Farley Mowat, in the jr. high library that had a consensual dolphin sex scene. The girl scientist wanted it and the dolphin was enthusiastic.

I wondered if the grownups knew it was there.

Posted by: Bandersnatch at June 09, 2019 09:29 AM (fuK7c)

43 Okay, not judging here *squints eyes* but when I went to the link to one of Shibumi's romance novels, the "related books" row of suggestions included an anthology of male-on-male robo-sex science fiction, and lots of books with handcuffs on the cover.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at June 09, 2019 09:29 AM (vhcul)

44 I read this as "tickle".

Nah. Homey don'y play dat.

Posted by: JT at June 09, 2019 09:29 AM (34DX1)

45 28
And today a seller of toys emailed me to ask me to take down my negative review of a defective toy.
Posted by: NaughtyPine at June 09, 2019 09:21 AM (/+bwe)

Dear Sir or Madam,

I am terribly displease with the lifesize and to-scale B Hussein Obama penis action toy.

Posted by: rhennigantx at June 09, 2019 09:29 AM (JFO2v)

46 If you like Hiassen, Tim Dorsey is also good ...

Posted by: Kingsnake at June 09, 2019 09:30 AM (3JbJY)

47 I've become fascinated with the tale of "Titty Mouse and Tatty Mouse", but have some concerns. First, why is it called a Fairy Tale? There are no fairies. Second, what is the "old form" that runs around the house? That's creepy. Third, why does the stool hop? These things task me, and keep me up at night.

Posted by: freaked at June 09, 2019 09:30 AM (UdKB7)

48 And today a seller of toys emailed me to ask me to take down my negative review of a defective toy.
Posted by: NaughtyPine at June 09, 2019 09:21 AM (/+bwe)

Irwin Mainway?
Posted by: hogmartin at June 09, 2019 09:23 AM

Irwin had a better command of English and didn't offer two defective toys to replace the first!

Posted by: NaughtyPine at June 09, 2019 09:30 AM (/+bwe)

49 I don't know if it was original to Wouk, but that book was the first time I heard the "when in danger or in doubt, run in circles, scream and shout" thing. That advice has not failed me since.
Posted by: hogmartin at June 09, 2019 09:22 AM (t+qrx)


I first encountered "when in worry or in doubt, run in circles, scream and shout" in one of Heinlein's books.

Posted by: OregonMuse. AoSHQ Thought Leader & Pants Monitor at June 09, 2019 09:30 AM (MRoRq)

50 The 30 year plus saga of the Clinton crime family has been an ongoing "HOWCATCHEM."

Posted by: geoffb at June 09, 2019 09:31 AM (zOpu5)

51 booken morgen panzers!!!

Posted by: vmom superior, order of sweet merciless ninjas at June 09, 2019 09:31 AM (dm05u)

52 One of my favorite books by Monsarrat is "The Master Mariner: Running Proud". It is the story of Matthew Lawe, who commits an act of cowardice while serving under Drake against the Spanish Armada. Because of this act, he is cursed to immortality, serving at sea through centuries of famous sea battles. This volume follows him through Trafalgar.
Monsarrat began a second volume, "The Master Mariner: Darken Ship", which he never finished. It was published after his death, with his notes for the incomplete sections, to take the story into the 20th century.

Posted by: Pete the POM Inspector at June 09, 2019 09:31 AM (mb9J+)

53 And Pope Clement XV, the first American to be raised to the Throne of Saint Peter, decides to cleanse the Church of sexual scandal once and for all.

By making it all legal! Love it...

Posted by: Pope Francis, The Red at June 09, 2019 09:32 AM (ZY9MN)

54 OregonMuse. AoSHQ Thought Leader & Pants Monitor

"When in danger or in doubt, run in circles, scream and shout" is a saying of long standing at the US Naval Academy. There is more to it, if interested.

Posted by: NaCly Dog at June 09, 2019 09:32 AM (u82oZ)

55 43 Okay, not judging here *squints eyes* but when I went to the link to one of Shibumi's romance novels, the "related books" row of suggestions included an anthology of male-on-male robo-sex science fiction, and lots of books with handcuffs on the cover.
Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at June 09, 2019 09:29 AM (vhcul)


Seriously? Perhaps you should clear your browsing history.

Posted by: OregonMuse. AoSHQ Thought Leader & Pants Monitor at June 09, 2019 09:33 AM (MRoRq)

56 Proceed, Salty!

Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at June 09, 2019 09:33 AM (vhcul)

57 46 If you like Hiassen, Tim Dorsey is also good ...
Posted by: Kingsnake at June 09, 2019 09:30 AM (3JbJY)

I think Coleman is one of my all time fav characters. Maybe Jeff Bridges or John Goodman could pull it off.

Posted by: rhennigantx at June 09, 2019 09:34 AM (JFO2v)

58 52 One of my favorite books by Monsarrat is "The Master Mariner: Running Proud". It is the story of Matthew Lawe, who commits an act of cowardice while serving under Drake against the Spanish Armada. Because of this act, he is cursed to immortality

=====

Back in the day, in a similar theme, was the Casca series by Barry Sadler. (Yes, that Barry Sadler.) About the Roman soldier who speared Christ in his side, condemned to roam the Earth until the Second Coming ...

Posted by: Kingsnake at June 09, 2019 09:34 AM (3JbJY)

59 Seriously? Perhaps you should clear your browsing history.
---

It. Was. RESEARCH!!!

Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at June 09, 2019 09:34 AM (vhcul)

60 booken morgen panzers!!!
Posted by: vmom superior, order of sweet merciless ninjas at June 09, 2019 09:31 AM

Isn't that the patented San Franpsycho mating call?

Posted by: NaughtyPine at June 09, 2019 09:35 AM (/+bwe)

61 "When in danger or in doubt, run in circles, scream and shout" is a saying of long standing at the US Naval Academy. There is more to it, if interested.
Posted by: NaCly Dog at June 09, 2019 09:32 AM (u82oZ)


But did it originate there? If not, where did it come from?

And - unrelated - why do I misremember "a collision at sea can ruin your whole day", attributed to Thucydides? I could have sworn it was in my BJM, but it isn't, nor my dad's. And Thucydides never said that.

Posted by: hogmartin at June 09, 2019 09:35 AM (t+qrx)

62 Something I've been doing, not for the first time, is synoptic reading. In this case, early WWII at sea. I've done this before, mostly about Jutland, but one can do it with any subject, including novels and poems.

I'll read just part of one account, then the parallel sections of another. Almost like being back in school. And it can be illuminating. One thing I discovered, when reading about Jutland, was an outright case of plagiarism which I've never seen mentioned.

One thing you can catch this way is where one author insinuates (rather than openly making) interpretations into the work. One of the ones I've been reading is Gierr Haarr's The Gathering Storm. Overall I'm favorably impressed, but one qualification is that he relies too much on Corelli Barnett's Engage the Enemy More Closely. Like everything else I've seen by Barnett, on naval matters, it is not reliable. He (Barnett) isn't always accurate, and is ALWAYS imbalanced in presentation. It's more like reading a legal case than history; everything not telling against his message is suppressed or ignored.

To take one example, Haarr follows Barnett in criticizing the Admiralty for inadequate prep for the ASW war. On one level, that has a case for it; they certainly had less than they needed, both in material and equipment. But there are two problems with pushing that thesis. One is that the RN was miles ahead of everyone else in ASW. The other is that this was unavoidable given the politicians' starving of the fleet, with the accompanying atrophy of British industry need to support it.

But Haarr's book is pretty good. I will definitely get his on Norway. (I am reading it along with Roskill's official history, and Churchill. Roskill, btw, isn't so good as Morison.) He does have an odd way of veering between operational narrative and "I was there" accounts, which sometimes seems abrupt. He is less thorough about plans, at least so far.

Posted by: Eeyore at June 09, 2019 09:35 AM (VaN/j)

63 It got me thinking about the nature of my reading. It seemed like the 80s was a great time to discover new authors, Barnes, Milan Kundera, T.C. Boyle.

And I'm wondering whether it was the decade or it was just me. Out of college, reading only for pleasure. Finding authors I hadn't been assigned.

These days I'm mostly catching up on classics. I don't discover anyone new unless they're foisted upon me (Orhan Pamuk).

So were the 80s special or am I just maudlin?
Posted by: Bandersnatch at June 09, 2019 09:23 AM (fuK7c)


I think it's just your situation. Everyone has their own touchstones. For me Penguin had a series in the late 70s overseen by Phillip Roth, Writers From the Other Europe, that strongly influenced my reading habits (Kundera was one of the authors).

I read Flaubert's Parrot by Barnes and enjoyed it a great deal. For whatever reason I haven't read anything subsequent by him but that's probably more a statement of my capricious choices than the quality of his work.

Posted by: Captain Hate at June 09, 2019 09:35 AM (y7DUB)

64 57 46 If you like Hiassen, Tim Dorsey is also good ...
Posted by: Kingsnake at June 09, 2019 09:30 AM (3JbJY)

I think Coleman is one of my all time fav characters. Maybe Jeff Bridges or John Goodman could pull it off.
Posted by: rhennigantx at June 09, 2019 09:34 AM (JFO2v)

=====

I like how Serge comes up with innovative & convoluted ways of offing miscreants ...

Posted by: Kingsnake at June 09, 2019 09:36 AM (3JbJY)

65 It. Was. RESEARCH!!!
Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at June 09, 2019 09:34 AM (vhcul)

-----------------

Works for me!

Posted by: Pete Townsend at June 09, 2019 09:36 AM (WEBkv)

66 And as far as what I am reading (I'm stuck in the house this weekend with blisters on my feet)?

I read a new book on the Regency that wasn't very good, so I won't mention it. Frankly, if you want my opinion, the best books about that period are J.B. Priestley's The Prince of Pleasure and Carolly Erickson's Our Tempestuous Day. So I decided to cleanse my palate by returning to one of my faves, Priestley's The Edwardians, from 1970.

First I am going to show you a picture. This is the Edwardian musical-comedy actress Marie Studholme:

https://tinyurl.com/y6d7xvks

And now, a lengthy quote from Priestley, going some way to explaining why I find women from the period of 1890-1914 more erotic than women of today:

"These Edwardian garden-party ladies, with their elaborate and ridiculous hats and padded coiffures, with their tight-lacing and tiny waists and well-covered prominences in front and behind (so they always seem as if they are about to bow), with all their hidden petticoats and long trailing skirts, with nothing of them clearly seen except eyes and mouths and helpless-looking dimpled hands - may appear to be anything but temptresses. But the older I get, the more deeply I am convinced that that is exactly what they were.

Anna Held:

https://tinyurl.com/y3fscjsx

"And their lusty males, crammed with all that Edwardian food and inflamed by all its drink. were constantly tempted, were avidly longing to discover what the women were really like once the frippery and finery and social disguise were removed.

High fashion, 1914:

https://tinyurl.com/y6sfgld6

"So the illicit affair, however dangerous, the little tap on the bedroom door behind which the delicious creature, with heroic bared bosom and great marmoreal thighs, was waiting - oh it was all irresistible!

My goddess, 1910:

https://tinyurl.com/y5q355fe

"Such longings, such imaginings, such thoughts, charged the very air with sexuality. Or so - not without evidence, though none of it direct and personal - I suspect."

Gabrielle Ray:

https://tinyurl.com/y5a77o3h

Posted by: Mary Poppins' Practically Perfect Piercing at June 09, 2019 09:38 AM (Ki5SV)

67 "5 So the latest Progressive drivel is that CIA let Russia Russia Russia have defective Nuke plans so that Russia Russia Russia nuke factories would fail.

Posted by: rhennigantx at June 09, 2019 09:05 AM (JFO2v) "



Hah.
I wish I thought that they were capable of that level of competence in defending this country or attacking its enemies.

Looking back over the last half-century or so (especially in the light of the last decade or two) mostly I see what could be either incompetence or treason in its Constitutional meaning.

Posted by: sock_rat_eez - they are gaslighting us 24/365 at June 09, 2019 09:38 AM (a5hgv)

68 21 HMS Ulysses by Alistair MacLean stands high on my list of naval thrillers.
Posted by: sharps45 at June 09, 2019 09:17 AM (8mDaR)
______

Liked it, but mostly for the very dramatic ending. The lead up doesn't stick in my memory so well.

(BTW, the minelayers Ulysses is compared to, the Abdiel class, could NOT do 40 knots. Neither could our Atlantas. In both wars, there were a bunch of ships whose speeds were exaggerated. Not that that tells against a novel, though.)

Posted by: Eeyore at June 09, 2019 09:38 AM (VaN/j)

69 And - unrelated - why do I misremember "a collision at sea can ruin your whole day", attributed to Thucydides? I could have sworn it was in my BJM, but it isn't, nor my dad's. And Thucydides never said that.
Posted by: hogmartin at June 09, 2019 09:35 AM (t+qrx)
----------------

Sounds like something Admiral Beatty might have said.

Posted by: blake - used sock salesman at June 09, 2019 09:39 AM (WEBkv)

70 Milo Yiannopoulos recently published a short book called "Middle Rages: Why the Battle for Medieval Studies Matters to America". It's an examination of how the left is destroying academia with lies and threats if each discipline doesn't kowtow to the SJW mob's idea of 'proper' approach. All intended to destroy Western culture and Christianity. The subject is serious but, without going to far, Milo has a lighter, mocking tone for the antagonists.

His account is disturbing and infuriating. A group of academics allow themselves to join into an attack by a junior teacher on a respected professor who doesn't toe the SJW line and even mocks it. It follows the usual SJW approach of lies, smears, threats and claims of threats to them when their own words are used against them.

I can't understand why more lawsuits against these punks aren't brought. In a more civilized time these attacks would call for duels or, in this case, a serious cat fight.

Posted by: JTB at June 09, 2019 09:39 AM (bmdz3)

71
I liked Nicholas Monsarrat's "The Tribe that lost it's Head"....which is about English civil servants in an African country that turns on them...

Dry British humor....on the level of "Black Mischeif" by Evelyn Waugh. If you liked Waugh's book you will probably like "The Tribe that lost it's Head" and the follow up "Richer than his All his Tribe" by Monsarrat.

"The Nylon Pirates" by Monsarrat was pretty good as well....

I haven't read "The Cruel Sea" (his most famous book) yet.....but, it's on THE LIST.

Posted by: Some Guy in Wisconsin at June 09, 2019 09:39 AM (EICTX)

72 60 booken morgen panzers!!!
Posted by: vmom superior, order of sweet merciless ninjas at June 09, 2019 09:31 AM

Isn't that the patented San Franpsycho mating call?
Posted by: NaughtyPine at June 09, 2019 09:35 AM (/+bwe)

Since we are back to martial and mating advice I highly recommend is Love Worth Making. Has some great advice and loving and living with another person. I suggest reading it with your lover on a chapter by chapter basis and it may take 2 or 3 weeks.

I feel the author actually cares about people and wants them to have happier, more full lives.

Posted by: rhennigantx at June 09, 2019 09:40 AM (JFO2v)

73 There was a real "White Rajah" in the 19th Century -- a whole dynasty of them. The Brooke family ran Sarawak (the part of Malaysia on the island of Borneo) as independent monarchs. Theoretically they were tributary underlings of a nearby Sultan, but very quickly became much more powerful than he was. Kind of like Egypt and the Ottomans in the same era.

I don't think the Brookes ripped many bodices, but they were a fascinating clan of soldiers, administrators, scientists, and adventurers.

And then the Japanese showed up.

Posted by: Trimegistus at June 09, 2019 09:40 AM (ROHxG)

74
It. Was. RESEARCH!!!

Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at June 09, 2019 09:34 AM


yes, those links to the german bovine artificial insemination scat pron are easily explained...

actual snippet of conversation from the MiMoMe: "...whilst he had his arm all the way in there, the cow siht on him..."

Posted by: AltonJackson at June 09, 2019 09:40 AM (KCxzN)

75 I finished "Soldier of Arete" by Gene Wolfe, the follow-up to and completion of "Soldier of the Mist." Ancient Greek soldier suffers headwound that destroys his memory but enables him to see the gods.

No one wrote like Wolfe.

Posted by: NaughtyPine at June 09, 2019 09:41 AM (/+bwe)

76 HOWCATCHEM...What are some others?

Spy-Gate. How you catch them? First you get rid of Jeff Sessions. Then you let their own hubris do the rest. Starring Barry Um as The Dog-eater Who Didn't Bark.

Posted by: The Gipper Lives at June 09, 2019 09:42 AM (Ndje9)

77 These Edwardian garden-party ladies, with their elaborate and ridiculous hats and padded coiffures, with their tight-lacing and tiny waists and well-covered prominences in front and behind...


I'm a fan of the era as well, but I incline more to Alfred Cheney Johnson photographing the Ziegfield Girls.

Posted by: Bandersnatch at June 09, 2019 09:42 AM (fuK7c)

78 marmoreal - like marble

thanks for that word, MP4

Posted by: vmom superior, order of sweet merciless ninjas at June 09, 2019 09:42 AM (dm05u)

79 Test

Posted by: Puddin Head at June 09, 2019 09:43 AM (vV/gB)

80 15 A related type-distinction is howdunnit? And John Dickson Carr fan will know what that is. But it goes at least back to Murders in the Rue Morgue. And, in a sense, The Purloined Letter. In the latter,there is no Who? involved.
Posted by: Eeyore at June 09, 2019 09:10 AM (VaN/j)
-----------

I believe "The Murders in the Rue Morgue" is considered the grandfather of all detective fiction.
Posted by: blake - used sock salesman at June 09, 2019 09:12 AM (WEBkv)
_______

Sort of. As usual, the Chinese did it first*, which is why I included Dee. Also, Voltaire's Zadig, though not otherwise like detective fiction, has at the start a deduction scene that exactly presages Dupin and Holmes.

*Despite the mulitculti's claims of our "Eurocentric" education, when I was in school, "the Chinese did it first" was like "it tastes like chicken".

Posted by: Eeyore at June 09, 2019 09:43 AM (VaN/j)

81 Just finished up Side Life by Steve Toutongi. Here's part of a review from goodReads

Side Life might be described as Edgar Allen Poe meets materialistic nihilism. No happy ending, no third act by design, the author's considerable writerly skill at place, characters and conviction is used to express an existential cry of despair

Pretty much how I felt when I finished. 2/5

Posted by: motionview at June 09, 2019 09:43 AM (pYQR/)

82 Oh, and to increase your word power:

MARMOREAL (adj.): of, pertaining to, or resembling marble.

Posted by: Mary Poppins' Practically Perfect Piercing at June 09, 2019 09:43 AM (Ki5SV)

83 79 Test
Posted by: Puddin Head at June 09, 2019 09:43 AM (vV/gB)

Ye have failed, take up the Ring and join the Nazgul reserves

Posted by: vmom superior, order of sweet merciless ninjas at June 09, 2019 09:44 AM (dm05u)

84 The Brooke family ran Sarawak (the part of Malaysia on the island of Borneo) as independent monarchs. Theoretically they were tributary underlings of a nearby Sultan, but very quickly became much more powerful than he was. Kind of like Egypt and the Ottomans in the same era.

I don't think the Brookes ripped many bodices, but they were a fascinating clan of soldiers, administrators, scientists, and adventurers.

And then the Japanese showed up.
Posted by: Trimegistus at June 09, 2019 09:40 AM (ROHxG)


This sounds very much like the germ of the idea that Stephenson used to come up with the Sultanate of Kinakuta in The Baroque Cycle. Now I'm curious about whether that's where he got it.

Posted by: hogmartin at June 09, 2019 09:44 AM (t+qrx)

85 On the subject of relationship advice, "The Five Love Languages", the gist of which is that the way each partner both gives and receives love is different, and how to find the common ground ...

Posted by: Kingsnake at June 09, 2019 09:44 AM (3JbJY)

86 actual snippet of conversation from the MiMoMe: "...whilst he had his arm all the way in there, the cow siht on him..."
Posted by: AltonJackson at June 09, 2019 09:40 AM (KCxzN)

--------------------

Borrowing a phrase used by the late James Herriot: "The Bull with the Bowler" in referring to early artificial insemination.

Posted by: blake - used sock salesman at June 09, 2019 09:46 AM (WEBkv)

87 I give up. Fucking iPhone.

Posted by: Puddin Head at June 09, 2019 09:46 AM (vV/gB)

88 "So the illicit affair, however dangerous, the little tap on the bedroom door behind which the delicious creature, with heroic bared bosom and great marmoreal thighs, was waiting - oh it was all irresistible!"

Posted by: Mary Poppins' Practically Perfect Piercing at June 09, 2019 09:38 AM (Ki5SV)


I had to look up "marmoreal".

Posted by: hogmartin at June 09, 2019 09:46 AM (t+qrx)

89 Book nerds!

Posted by: Ogre at June 09, 2019 09:47 AM (t6MX/)

90 I've never heard of a "Howcatchem" but I have heard of "Procedurals" which seem to be the same thing.

Posted by: Trimegistus at June 09, 2019 09:47 AM (ROHxG)

91 "actual snippet of conversation from the MiMoMe: "...whilst he had his arm all the way in there, the cow siht on him..."

Posted by: AltonJackson at June 09, 2019 09:40 AM (KCxzN) "



There are good reasons why rural folk through the ages have been noted for coarse and scatological humor.

Posted by: sock_rat_eez - they are gaslighting us 24/365 at June 09, 2019 09:47 AM (a5hgv)

92 I'm a fan of the era as well, but I incline more to Alfred Cheney Johnson photographing the Ziegfield Girls.
Posted by: Bandersnatch at June 09, 2019 09:42 AM (fuK7c)


Oh, I love them, too (and if you do, fellow Morons, you could do no worse than buy Jazz Age Beauties: https://tinyurl.com/yxz3gvx5), but as I once remarked to Insomniac, what drives me wild is (or, rather, would, if I could) delving through all of that lace and satin and silk to the delicious treasure underneath it all, like slowly coming to the center of a living candybox.

Posted by: Mary Poppins' Practically Perfect Piercing at June 09, 2019 09:48 AM (Ki5SV)

93 There are good reasons why rural folk through the ages have been noted for coarse and scatological humor.
Posted by: sock_rat_eez - they are gaslighting us 24/365 at June 09, 2019 09:47 AM (a5hgv)


As well as deft, gentle hands and soothing voices.

Posted by: hogmartin at June 09, 2019 09:49 AM (t+qrx)

94 That miniseries on catching the Unabomer would be a howcatchem.

Posted by: blaster at June 09, 2019 09:49 AM (ZfRYq)

95 HMS Ulysses by Alistair MacLean stands high on my list of naval thrillers.

Posted by: sharps45 at June 09, 2019 09:17 AM (8mDaR)

I've read practically all of his books but that one doesn't seem familiar so I'm guessing I missed it.

Posted by: Polliwog the 'Ette at June 09, 2019 09:49 AM (uquGJ)

96 Dammit

Posted by: Mary Poppins' Practically Perfect Piercing at June 09, 2019 09:49 AM (Ki5SV)

97 Puddin Head, this is the Book Thread. What you do in your spare time is up to you.

Posted by: RI Red at June 09, 2019 09:50 AM (fhiAA)

98 Borrowing a phrase used by the late James Herriot: "The Bull with the Bowler" in referring to early artificial insemination.


My family tore through the Herriot books starting when I was twelve. The whole arm reaching up the behind of an animal came up shockingly often. Helping a cow give birth or unclogging something it seemed he was always up to his armpit.

Posted by: Bandersnatch at June 09, 2019 09:51 AM (fuK7c)

99 Want to talk about Nicholas Monsarrat as an author.

He is famous in some circles for his cynical portrayal of Africa, tribes and the decolonization efforts of the UK post WWII. He saw that up close and personal. They are OK if you are a Leftist.

But I aver his best books were about his Naval Service time, and some of his short stories.

The Cruel Sea was based in part on his WWII experiences. He also wrote the non-fiction Three Corvettes, which is an omnibus of some wartime articles he wrote.

His short stories in The Ship That Died of Shame, and Other Stories are very good, especially the title story, I Was There and Dinner Party.

H.M.S. Marlborough Will Enter Harbour is another strong novella.

And I found the three stories in Depends on What You Mean by Love to be utterly charming. Three looks at wartime and love, in a variety of expressions.

Of interest in his later books is The Kappillan of Malta. It is well written, and a good two stories inside (WWII Malta and Malta under the Great Siege).

Avoid the rest, as they are not worthy. I did not like The Master Mariner: Running Proud[i/], for example. Especially avoid his two autobiographies, as you will hate the author after reading them.

Posted by: NaCly Dog at June 09, 2019 09:51 AM (u82oZ)

100 My favorite HOWCATCHEM - The Devotion Of Suspect X by Japanese author Keigo Higashino.

Posted by: OggiG at June 09, 2019 09:12 AM (Bk5Q+)



Beaten to the punch on this one.

"The Devotion Of Suspect X" is an excellent novel as well as a great Howcatchem.

Posted by: naturalfake at June 09, 2019 09:51 AM (J2mEl)

101 85 On the subject of relationship advice, "The Five Love Languages", the gist of which is that the way each partner both gives and receives love is different, and how to find the common ground ...
Posted by: Kingsnake at June 09, 2019 09:44 AM (3JbJY)


This is a good book, but it does tend to oversimplify. Like all sort of help books like this, it identifies something as a magic key - there are anecdotes where couples are unhappy, then they understand each others love language, and voila, everything is fixed.

There is not really a provision for what happens if it doesn't? Because it always works.

Posted by: blaster at June 09, 2019 09:52 AM (ZfRYq)

102 Whew. Saved by a close tag. Close. Too close.

Posted by: NaCly Dog at June 09, 2019 09:52 AM (u82oZ)

103 61
And - unrelated - why do I misremember "a collision at sea can ruin your whole day", attributed to Thucydides? I could have sworn it was in my BJM, but it isn't, nor my dad's. And Thucydides never said that.
Posted by: hogmartin at June 09, 2019 09:35 AM (t+qrx)
______

Back in the 60s the Naval Institute ran that under a picture of an Iowa class BB with a damaged bow. That's where I became aware of the line.

Posted by: Eeyore at June 09, 2019 09:53 AM (VaN/j)

104 This week I'm reading Four Roads Cross, by Max Gladstone. It's a followup to his breakout novel Three Parts Dead, and you really have to re-read the earlier book before diving in.

They're fantasies, but the tone is like financial/legal thrillers. It's a magic-based modern-feeling society, with some nice ongoing conflict between the wizards who are currently on top and the priests of the old gods, who used to be on top. Nobody's perfect, but it's not a Martinesque crapsack of bastards, either.

Posted by: Trimegistus at June 09, 2019 09:53 AM (ROHxG)

105
As well as deft, gentle hands and soothing voices.

Posted by: hogmartin at June 09, 2019 09:49 AM


the cow says "Mooooooooooooooooo"

Posted by: AltonJackson at June 09, 2019 09:53 AM (KCxzN)

106 Currently reading Death of an Army by Anthony Farrar-Hockley because it had been cited in Mosier's Myth of the Great War. Published in 1967, it is an analysis of the destruction of the British Expeditionary Force at First Ypres in October 1914. The author was a professional soldier (started as a Private and ending as a Brigadier General) and had seen extensive combat experience during WWII and Korea; thus he has some keen insight into the strengths and weaknesses of the British Army and makes some interesting observations (such as commanders tending to over-estimate their own challenges and minimizing those of the enemy). The over-whelming strength of the German artillery allowed them to pound the British positions, but the superiority in British marksmanship helped them blunt German assaults to a certain extent. The scale of the fighting was such that towards the end of October 1914, three British battalions (initially about 2400 men) had been whittled down to a combined command of 587 men, including reinforcements that arrived the previous day. The maps are generally adequate and show major terrain features but are a bit cluttered due to the book being a smallish hardcover. Rating = 4.25/5

Posted by: Retired Buckeye Cop is now an engineer at June 09, 2019 09:53 AM (5Yee7)

107 the cow says "Mooooooooooooooooo"
Posted by: AltonJackson at June 09, 2019 09:53 AM (KCxzN)


Posted by: hogmartin at June 09, 2019 09:54 AM (t+qrx)

108 There's a whole genre of Florida-based wacky mystery/noir stories, and it's no coincidence that most of the writers put in some time as reporters at Florida papers.

Posted by: Trimegistus at June 09, 2019 09:54 AM (ROHxG)

109 I've been reading, among other things, Nabokov's third full length work of fiction The Defense. Although I'm mostly inept at playing it, I'm a sucker for anything well done about chess and prodigies in general. For example, I could watch Searching for Bobby Fischer many many times before getting tired of it. So this is right in my wheelhouse plus this is a very mature work for Vlad at 29, with shifting time frames and multiple perspectives in describing a fascinatingly weird character. Reading his earliest works have been real eye openers for me.

Posted by: Captain Hate at June 09, 2019 09:54 AM (y7DUB)

110 The way the story is told, i think-

"The Red Dragon"

would qualify as a howcathem as maybe the most famous howcatchem of them all.


"One book to howcathem all" -said JRR Tolkien or -

Ash Ketchum,

one or the other.

Posted by: naturalfake at June 09, 2019 09:55 AM (J2mEl)

111 Finished binge watching The Widow on Prime last night.

It's based on a book, and Amazon sells books!

It was really good though maybe a bit plodding. Really good at episodic story telling - each episode has an arc, but they are also clearly part of the whole story arc.

Posted by: blaster at June 09, 2019 09:56 AM (ZfRYq)

112 Borrowing a phrase used by the late James Herriot: "The Bull with the Bowler" in referring to early artificial insemination.
Posted by: blake - used sock salesman at June 09, 2019 09:46 AM (WEBkv)

Buddy Hackett has a great joke about artificial insemination.

Posted by: rhennigantx at June 09, 2019 09:56 AM (JFO2v)

113 Starting in on the Shorter Cambridge Medieval History to prep for Prof. Rachel Fulton Brown's Medieval History 101: The Unauthorized Version. Milo Yiannopolis' Middle Rages: Why the Battle for Medieval Studies Matters to America is a good introduction to what's been going on in the field lately.

Also rereading Jim Butcher's Dresden Files, starting with Storm Front. Fascinating seeing how he;'s matured as an author since that first installment.

Posted by: Hans G. Schantz at June 09, 2019 09:56 AM (FXjhj)

114
My family tore through the Herriot books starting when I was twelve. The whole arm reaching up the behind of an animal came up shockingly often. Helping a cow give birth or unclogging something it seemed he was always up to his armpit.

Posted by: Bandersnatch at June 09, 2019 09:51 AM (fuK7c)
---

This is the first thing that came to mind when the delicate and sensitive Shibumi was regaling us with her bovine spelunking tale.

Lot of hands in orifices with that Herriot chap. Remember the vet who lit cow farts and burned down the barn?

Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at June 09, 2019 09:57 AM (vhcul)

115 There's a whole genre of Florida-based wacky mystery/noir stories, and it's no coincidence that most of the writers put in some time as reporters at Florida papers.
Posted by: Trimegistus

Dave Barry's Big Trouble and Tricky Business are examples of this.

Posted by: JT at June 09, 2019 09:58 AM (34DX1)

116
The whole arm reaching up the behind of an animal came up shockingly often. Helping a cow give birth or unclogging something it seemed he was always up to his armpit.

Posted by: Bandersnatch at June 09, 2019 09:51 AM


they make special gloves for that

Posted by: AltonJackson at June 09, 2019 09:58 AM (KCxzN)

117 Most interesting read of the week:

Ordeal By Fire
An Informal History of the Civil War
by Fletcher Pratt

which I happened on by chance while browsing the heaps of decent history books on Kindle for 99 cents each.

Interesting, readable, with a unique style that I easily accommodated to. Definitely an overview of the major events without the extensive background provided by most authors. A few amusing anecdotes about leaders that I haven't seen elsewhere, a couple of words I actually had to look up, and a host of typographical errors that kept me busy footnoting them.

Overall, recommended, even if you have read a lot of CW history, just for the different approach.

Posted by: sock_rat_eez - they are gaslighting us 24/365 at June 09, 2019 09:58 AM (a5hgv)

118 Almost 10. Time for a fresh cup of tea and sunshine.

Hope you all have a wonderful day.

Posted by: Mary Poppins' Practically Perfect Piercing at June 09, 2019 09:59 AM (Ki5SV)

119 they make special gloves for that
Posted by: AltonJackson at June 09, 2019 09:58 AM (KCxzN)

German opera gloves.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at June 09, 2019 09:59 AM (vhcul)

120 70
Posted by: JTB at June 09, 2019 09:39 AM (bmdz3)
________

Well, the education we get about the Middle Ages has always been BS. Back in 1971, on my first day of college classes, the 2nd class I attended was Medieval History. The opening line of the lecture was "Everything you think you know about the Middle Ages is wrong." He was right.

The Flat Earth myth is a particular bugaboo of mine. But I've met college professors who not only bought it, but were horrified in hearing it refuted. (That one I already knew was BS in HS, thanks to Samuel Eliot Morison.)

Posted by: Eeyore at June 09, 2019 10:00 AM (VaN/j)

121 No one else read the "Casca" books?

I also devoured the Sven Hassell novels when I was a kid. Re-read "Monte Cassino" / "The Beast Regiment" a few years ago, 40+ years after the fact, and it was not as enjoyable as when I was a kid. Too unrealistic. But cracking read for a young teen ...

Posted by: Kingsnake at June 09, 2019 10:01 AM (3JbJY)

122 Tried reading The Thin Man by Dashiell Hammett.

Put it down as boring, and a culture I can not get into. Did not finish.

Reading How to Survive an Active Shooter: What You do Before, During and After an Attack Could Save Your Life (Conversations)
by Jacquelyn Lynn. I hope I do not need this when I visit London with my wife. Pretty good so far.

Read Mort by Terry Pratchett. Unlike many of his books, this started slow but ending well.

Posted by: NaCly Dog at June 09, 2019 10:02 AM (u82oZ)

123
German opera gloves.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at June 09, 2019 09:59 AM


*wipes coffee off monitor*

& henceforth, forever shall they be known

Posted by: AltonJackson at June 09, 2019 10:02 AM (KCxzN)

124 All right book nerds, Imma relax and read and sip coffee.

Later taters!

Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at June 09, 2019 10:02 AM (vhcul)

125 Dave Barry's Big Trouble and Tricky Business are examples of this.
Posted by: JT at June 09, 2019 09:58 AM (34DX1)

I love the movie Big Trouble.

Posted by: rhennigantx at June 09, 2019 10:02 AM (JFO2v)

126 RI Red - you're absolutely right - I would (and did) love Travis Corcoran's The Powers of the Earth and Causes of Separation. They're like Heinlein's The Moon is a Harsh Mistress, only much better. The end of the sequel was simply amazing - legitimately telegraphed, yet a shocking surprise. Now if only we could twist Travis' arm to get him writing on Book 3.

Posted by: Hans G. Schantz at June 09, 2019 10:03 AM (FXjhj)

127 I'm continuing with the the new McCullough book and Churchill biography. So far they are both excellent for information and enjoyable writing. After the Churchill biography I'm going to get out my copy of Churchill's Ministry of Ungentlemanly Warfare.

Posted by: JTB at June 09, 2019 10:03 AM (bmdz3)

128 87 I give up. Fucking iPhone.
Posted by: Puddin Head at June 09, 2019 09:46 AM (vV/gB)
______

Why did you even start fucking the iPhone?

Posted by: Eeyore at June 09, 2019 10:03 AM (VaN/j)

129 Read every Haiisen out. Skink, is the fav. Of course the destruction of the FL. Environment is sometimes heavy. But hey, now you can hunt pythons in the Everglades. So theres that.

Girthy book thread, OM thanks.

Posted by: Cannibal Bob at June 09, 2019 10:03 AM (OX6sG)

130 "The Cruel Sea" is an outstanding book. I cannot recommend it enough.

Good morning, all.
Posted by: blake - used sock salesman at June 09, 2019 09:10 AM (WEBkv)


I've come close to giving up entirely on fiction. For any number of reasons, but this in particular, perplexes me to the point of having to ask... Why a novel about WWII? I don't understand the concept, really. I know writers gotta write what they write, but why on Earth would I read a novel about it?

There are tons of astonishingly "thrilling" and informative non-fiction works on these topics, and I don't see how someone's fictionalized account would add anything of value to it.

Just my opinion.

Posted by: BurtTC at June 09, 2019 10:04 AM (cY3LT)

131 All right book nerds, Imma relax and read and sip coffee.

Later taters!
Posted by: All Hail Eris,

Bye Eris

Posted by: JT at June 09, 2019 10:04 AM (34DX1)

132 Why did you even start fucking the iPhone?

"It was a Dark and Stormy Night......."

Posted by: JT at June 09, 2019 10:05 AM (34DX1)

133 Tom Wolfe, "Bonfire of the Vanities", if you want a graphic, arms deep artificial horse insemination.
After reading that, I knew it was going to be a great read.

Posted by: RI Red at June 09, 2019 10:06 AM (fhiAA)

134 @sixthformpoet

ONE

My dad died. Classic start to a funny story. He was buried in a small village in Sussex. I was really close to my dad so I visited his grave a lot. I still do. [DON'T WORRY, IT GETS FUNNIER.]

https://tinyurl.com/y2fsubro

Funny 'short story'.
(see what I did there...keeping it book thread-ish?)

Posted by: Tami at June 09, 2019 10:06 AM (cF8AT)

135
they make special gloves for that

Posted by: AltonJackson at June 09, 2019 09:58 AM (KCxzN)

Huh!

Posted by: Shep! at June 09, 2019 10:07 AM (OX6sG)

136 I've been reading a book the Bassett Women. Scandalous sisters in Western Colorado in the early 1900's. One is even thought to have been a cattle thief.

Posted by: Infidel at June 09, 2019 10:07 AM (xzK3J)

137 Also reading In Peace and War: Interpretations of American Naval History, II Edition
by Kenneth J. Hagan (Editor). This is apparently an important book, with more recent versions.

It is an administrative history of the US Navy, with essays on the Navy over time. More strategic than operational and tactical, it is far removed from action at sea. This is for the naval completest or specialist.

Posted by: NaCly Dog at June 09, 2019 10:08 AM (u82oZ)

138 My favorite howcatchem: Day of the Jackel

Posted by: Byron H at June 09, 2019 10:08 AM (4yfva)

139 Andrew McCarthy has fully red pilled - he has a piece in NR (I got to it linked from some good guys) about how awful the Steele "dossier" is.

While it does not name the NR NT's, it does slam Trump critics pretty hard.

I expect McCarthy is going to not be at NR for much longer.

Posted by: blaster at June 09, 2019 10:11 AM (ZfRYq)

140 https://tinyurl.com/y2fsubro

Funny 'short story'.
(see what I did there...keeping it book thread-ish?)
Posted by: Tami at June 09, 2019 10:06 AM (cF8AT)
-----------

Great story.

Also like the "Please buy my book, I owe people money."

Posted by: blake - used sock salesman at June 09, 2019 10:11 AM (WEBkv)

141 127 I'm continuing with the the new McCullough book and Churchill biography. So far they are both excellent for information and enjoyable writing. After the Churchill biography I'm going to get out my copy of Churchill's Ministry of Ungentlemanly Warfare.
Posted by: JTB at June 09, 2019 10:03 AM (bmdz3)
______

I assume you meant the new Roberts bio of WSC. How much does it go into naval matters?

Eventually I'll get to it, but that is where I'm truly curious. There's a pretty strong case that Churchill was a net negative to the RN, even if (like me) you support the idea of the Gallipoli invasion, if not the execution.

Still, his World Crisis really jump started my naval fixation.

Posted by: Eeyore at June 09, 2019 10:12 AM (VaN/j)

142 The Cruel Sea is a very unvarnished look at the challenges facing an anti-submarine warfare (ASW) escort on convoy duty. It is excellent but some of the episodes are very grim. HMS Compass Rose is probably the most famous of the Flower-class corvettes that Britain ever had, even though she never existed.

For those interested, Monsarrat also has to other books about ASW escorts:

Three Corvettes that contains 3 non-fiction essays.

HMS Marlborough will Enter Harbour a long short shtory about a badly damaged ship's battle with a submarine.

Both are worthwhile reads.

Posted by: Retired Buckeye Cop is now an engineer at June 09, 2019 10:12 AM (5Yee7)

143 The Woman who tweeted a photo of a DC metro employee eating on the train (it's not allowed) and then the Woman had the lynch mob come after her because the employee was black and some how how she is a racist, she's from India. She had her book dropped by her publisher because they don't associate with racists. Well she's suing the Publisher.

Posted by: Patrick from Ohio at June 09, 2019 10:12 AM (dKiJG)

144 I think it's just your situation. Everyone has their own touchstones. For me Penguin had a series in the late 70s overseen by Phillip Roth, Writers From the Other Europe, that strongly influenced my reading habits (Kundera was one of the authors).

Holy Cow, did I love that series.

I believe I read everyone of them. I wish they'd made a hardback set cuz I would've bought it.

Lots of unknown (in the US) gems in there.-

The Guinea Pigs
This Way for the Gas Ladies and Gentlemen
Street of Crocodiles
Sanitarium Under the Sign of the Hourglass

Darkly humorous or matter of factly shocking is usually the tone of the books.

If you see one of them, buy it.

It's pretty much guaranteed to be good even if not your cup of tea.

Posted by: naturalfake at June 09, 2019 10:12 AM (J2mEl)

145 Finished As You Wish: Inconceivable Tales from the Making of The Princess Bride by Cary Elwes, Joe Layden, et al.

The Dread Pirate Roberts sure wants to share his over-abundance of feelings. Not as good a book as David Niven's The Moon is a Balloon. I will be donating this to the local Public Library auction, just as I did Niven's book.

Posted by: NaCly Dog at June 09, 2019 10:14 AM (u82oZ)

146
https://tinyurl.com/y2fsubro

Funny 'short story'.
(see what I did there...keeping it book thread-ish?)
Posted by: Tami at June 09, 2019 10:06 AM (cF8AT)

love it

thanks for sharing!

Posted by: vmom superior, order of sweet merciless ninjas at June 09, 2019 10:14 AM (dm05u)

147 I love Sunday morning: Book Thread, coffee in bed, cat on lap, great reading recommendations.
But the sun is out and the chore list beckons.
BBL, Maroons!

Posted by: RI Red at June 09, 2019 10:14 AM (fhiAA)

148 So the latest Progressive drivel is that CIA let Russia Russia Russia have defective Nuke plans so that Russia Russia Russia nuke factories would fail.

Because Commies failing can only be attributed to Western perfidy?

Posted by: Bob the Bilderberg at June 09, 2019 10:16 AM (qc+VF)

149 139 Andrew McCarthy has fully red pilled - he has a piece in NR (I got to it linked from some good guys) about how awful the Steele "dossier" is.

While it does not name the NR NT's, it does slam Trump critics pretty hard.

I expect McCarthy is going to not be at NR for much longer.
Posted by: blaster at June 09, 2019 10:11 AM (ZfRYq)
_________

The slow conversions are interesting. Of course, there were the early ones like Schlicter and Kimball ("suck it up and vote against Hillary"). But it seems there are an increasing number seeing the light.

The NT holdouts look increasingly like the dwarfs in The Last Battle.

Posted by: Eeyore at June 09, 2019 10:16 AM (VaN/j)

150 I just saw Nigel Hamilton on CSPAN (he wrote a good bio on young JFK, Reckless Youth) really dissing Churchill on D-Day.

Hamilton has just written a bio of FDR and seems completely in thrall to him, but he says that Churchill opposed the Normandy landing and kept wanting to go up through Italy and land at the south of France.

I've always been a Churchill fanboi but Italy accomplished nothing ("holding down x German divisions" doesn't count), and his soft underbelly of Europe didn't work in Greece or the south of France either.

Posted by: Bandersnatch at June 09, 2019 10:16 AM (fuK7c)

151 Chores beckon. Have a great day storming the castle, everyone. May you not need your General Mattis plan.

Posted by: NaCly Dog at June 09, 2019 10:17 AM (u82oZ)

152 I think it's just your situation. Everyone has their own touchstones. For me Penguin had a series in the late 70s overseen by Phillip Roth, Writers From the Other Europe, that strongly influenced my reading habits (Kundera was one of the authors).
---------------

Is this where I admit that a reading buddy and I were enthralled with "Doc Savage" and read everything written by "Kenneth Robeson?" And from there moved on to "The Avenger?"

Posted by: blake - used sock salesman at June 09, 2019 10:17 AM (WEBkv)

153 There are tons of astonishingly "thrilling" and informative non-fiction works on these topics, and I don't see how someone's fictionalized account would add anything of value to it.

Just my opinion.
Posted by: BurtTC at June 09, 2019 10:04 AM (cY3LT)


A novel allows you to view events through someone else's eyes and "read their mind." You can't do that in non-fiction. Most fiction is intellectual bubblegum, but sometimes an author has a very important message or it is a form of therapy. Some very powerful novels about war have been written by combat veterans.

Posted by: Retired Buckeye Cop is now an engineer at June 09, 2019 10:19 AM (5Yee7)

154 The Woman who tweeted a photo of a DC metro employee eating on the train (it's not allowed) and then the Woman had the lynch mob come after her because the employee was black and some how how she is a racist, she's from India. She had her book dropped by her publisher because they don't associate with racists. Well she's suing the Publisher.
Posted by: Patrick from Ohio at June 09, 2019 10:12 AM

Another reason to get off Twitter. It encourages people to be pricks who post pics of others without consent and it encourages people to mob.

Posted by: NaughtyPine at June 09, 2019 10:19 AM (/+bwe)

155 Some while ago, I commented on Anthony Horowitz' The Word Is Murder for a novel plot device. Horowitz, author of The House of Silk, creator and writer of Foyle's War and many others, created a Watson-like character to chronicle the adventures of Detective Hawthorne and that character is Horowitz, author of The House of Silk, creator and writer of Foyle's War and many others. I'm not aware of other authors making themselves a character in their own books (other than Vonnegut in Slaughterhouse 5, Breakfast of Champions and others but he is a very minor character in those books). Anyway, he has written another book in which he himself is Hawthorne's amanuensis, The Sentence Is Death.

In a recent book, Horowitz created a fictional mystery author who was a rather nasty piece of work. Similarly, fictional Horowitz and particularly Hawthorne are not terribly likeable nor do they like each other. In the news book, Horowitz is shooting an elaborate scene of Foyle's War on a tight schedule when Hawthorne drives through the period set in a modern car ruining the shot. He then bullies Hawthorne into chronicling his latest investigation. One wonders if he is commenting on mystery authors of his acquaintance.

Posted by: Anonosaurus Wrecks, Tyrannosaur Wrangler at June 09, 2019 10:20 AM (+y/Ru)

156 very powerful novels about war have been written by combat veterans.
Posted by: Retired Buckeye Cop is now an engineer at June 09, 2019 10:19 AM (5Yee7)

=====

All Quiet on the Western Front, springs immediately to mind. Limiting ones self to strictly non-fiction is sad ...

Posted by: Kingsnake at June 09, 2019 10:21 AM (3JbJY)

157 Is this where I admit that a reading buddy and I were enthralled with "Doc Savage" and read everything written by "Kenneth Robeson?" And from there moved on to "The Avenger?"

Posted by: blake - used sock salesman at June 09, 2019 10:17 AM (WEBkv)



Somewhere between 11-13

I read everyone one of those I could get my hands on.

Cheap paperbacks used to be cheap.

Posted by: naturalfake at June 09, 2019 10:21 AM (J2mEl)

158 How could a futanari book be NC-17? Just the concept seems XXX. I'm not judging here, but it's pretty out there.

Posted by: Brave Sir Robin at June 09, 2019 10:21 AM (ty7RM)

159 Also all of the Fu Manchu stories.

Posted by: naturalfake at June 09, 2019 10:22 AM (J2mEl)

160 137 Also reading In Peace and War: Interpretations of American Naval History, II Edition
by Kenneth J. Hagan (Editor). This is apparently an important book, with more recent versions.

It is an administrative history of the US Navy, with essays on the Navy over time. More strategic than operational and tactical, it is far removed from action at sea. This is for the naval completest or specialist.
Posted by: NaCly Dog at June 09, 2019 10:08 AM (u82oZ)
______

Damn! Just what I need, another one to put on my list.

Posted by: Eeyore at June 09, 2019 10:22 AM (VaN/j)

161 Well, the education we get about the Middle Ages has always been BS. Back in 1971, on my first day of college classes, the 2nd class I attended was Medieval History. The opening line of the lecture was "Everything you think you know about the Middle Ages is wrong." He was right."

Long ago, I loved the series "connections", and one of the points the host, James Burke continually made was that technology and new methods of agricultural production continuously advanced throughout what we call "the dark ages". They just didn't have big centralized governments.

One seemingly trivial development that really surprised me was chimneys - you'd think someone would have thought of that a long time ago, but apparently the oldest chimney ever found dates to 1185, everybody just got used to breathing a lot of smoke all the time before that, or else they cooked outside and slept with the animals to keep warm. Probably a good reason why most early civilizations were in places where you didn't have to worry about freezing your ass off for half the year.

Posted by: Tom Servo at June 09, 2019 10:22 AM (V2Yro)

162 I loved reading the Doc Savage books.

I was hoping that Buckaroo Banzai would be an updated version.

Not exactly.

Posted by: blaster at June 09, 2019 10:23 AM (ZfRYq)

163 LOL, the warning about not looking up 'futanari' is like shining a laser dot in front of a cat for me....

Posted by: anchorbabe fashion cop at June 09, 2019 10:24 AM (ufFY8)

164 No one asked, but my love language is words of praise.

Posted by: San Franpsycho at June 09, 2019 10:25 AM (EZebt)

165 Want to talk about Nicholas Monsarrat as an author.

He is famous in some circles for his cynical portrayal of Africa, tribes and the decolonization efforts of the UK post WWII. He saw that up close and personal. They are OK if you are a Leftist.


Um....No sir.
"The Tribe that lost it's Head" is not glorifying leftist tropes. One of the main antagonists in the novel is a leftist journalist that twists everything that happens to make the British civil servants look like monsters....when in fact the opposite is true. Monsarrat is basically calling out #FakeNews years before Trump came along....
"The Tribe that lost it's Head" is an entertaining book that would be shunned by leftists....or banned by leftists...as THAT seems to be their MO.

Search it out and give it a read if you haven't read it yet.... and if you have read it and think it's FOR leftists...then, reread it. It's the opposite.

Posted by: Some Guy in Wisconsin at June 09, 2019 10:25 AM (EICTX)

166 159 Also all of the Fu Manchu stories.

Posted by: naturalfake at June 09, 2019 10:22 AM (J2mEl)
_______

I gave up on those after the one that ends at the Great Pyramid. Nayland Smith has him trapped, absolutely, and we never see how he got away. He just appears outside. That's gross cheating.

Posted by: Eeyore at June 09, 2019 10:25 AM (VaN/j)

167 I've been humping Chernobyl as the best drama put on TV. Great acting by all. Favorite scene is Two Old Guys On a Bench in the last episode.

The Global Nuclear Industry is collateral damage.

Posted by: Zombie Meatloaf at June 09, 2019 10:26 AM (1UZdv)

168 Posted by: Patrick from Ohio at June 09, 2019 10:12 AM (dKiJG)

An advantage to leftist autophagy, the designated victims *don't* go quietly into the night like conservatives usually did. They are just as full of entitlement as their attackers and that will benefit us as well.

Posted by: Polliwog the 'Ette at June 09, 2019 10:26 AM (uquGJ)

169 Currently reading "Ghost Front - A Novel of the Next World War". Can't put it down, and it keeps me awake long after I put it down and turn off the lights, wondering just what those Chinese bastards have really put in all those microchips? Scary stuff, excellent read.

Posted by: That Deplorable SOB Van Owen at June 09, 2019 10:27 AM (wZ9cV)

170 120 ... "The Flat Earth myth is a particular bugaboo of mine. But I've met college professors who not only bought it, but were horrified in hearing it refuted."

Hi eeyore, I agree. As I learn more about 'accepted' academic 'facts', I trust them and their proponents less and less. It might be history or global warming or art appreciation or the food pyramid. I remember what Chesterton thought of archeology. And academics clinging to their 'facts' are worse than any religious fanatic (cough *Muzzies* cough) being challanged.

Posted by: JTB at June 09, 2019 10:28 AM (bmdz3)

171 That should be "Ghost FLEET", not "Front".

Doh.

Posted by: That Deplorable SOB Van Owen at June 09, 2019 10:28 AM (wZ9cV)

172 For those interested in WW2 I recommend two books by Bill D. Ross, Iwo Jima: Legacy of Valor, and Peleliu: Tragic Triumph. The latter really shows the incompetence of the military. Here's one of the worst examples:
______

Someone in the chain of command decided to try a new method of getting fresh water ashore to resupply the troops. At first glance, it looked like a good idea. Perhaps it was -- if someone, anyone, had displayed common sense. But no one did.

Instead of bringing potable water ashore in amtracs carrying 1,000-gallon trailer tanks pulled by jeeps or trucks, or on pallets loaded with conventional 5-gallon steel jerry cans, why not bring the precious cargo to the beach in 55-gallon barrels previously used to hold gasoline or diesel fuel?

The reasoning behind the scheme had a measure of undeniable logic. The steel drums took up less valuable space on landing craft, and a few could be carried in each amtrac with assault forces. Once ashore, they could be tipped over and rolled to waterheads by shore party troops, becoming easily accessible sources to replenish supplies of drinking water.

But...

No effort had been made to purge the barrels of the residue of petroleum they still contained. Thus every drop of water was contaminated and literally unfit for human consumption. To drink it was an open invitation to disaster, but many hundreds of unwary Marines did despite the evil taste -- and the inescapable consequences.

Half-crazed with unbearable thirst and overpowering heat, the men gulped down canteens full of the vile mixture. Within minutes, many doubled over with hellish stomach cramps. Others were hit with violent and uncontrolled coughing, vomiting, and diarrhea.

Posted by: Jim S. at June 09, 2019 10:30 AM (ynUnH)

173 I have to second, third, fourth the Skink novels of Carl Hiiasen. I think my favorite is "Stormy Weather" which takes place in the aftermath of Hurricane Andrew. I enjoy insurance fraud. But I would say Native Tongue is the funniest. I recall really liking "Tourist Season" too. Of course growing up in Florida, the question always was "If it's tourist season, why can't we shoot them?"

I am reading Elmore Leonard's first Raylan Givens novel. Not sure what I think of it. I think I will get the short stories that include "Fire in the Hole", and then we'll see.

And I finished "The Education of Will" which was too much Lifetime movie and not enough dogs. It's by Patricia McConnell who is an amazing teacher of all things dog, but this was not a particularly education book.

I just bought "Dignity" and "Something to Hide" and we shall see. I hope I like "Dignity" and that it's redeeming. And I hope I can even finish "Something to Hide."

Posted by: Tonestaple at June 09, 2019 10:30 AM (V7tgo)

174 I just saw Nigel Hamilton on CSPAN (he wrote a good bio on young JFK, Reckless Youth) really dissing Churchill on D-Day.

Hamilton has just written a bio of FDR and seems completely in thrall to him, but he says that Churchill opposed the Normandy landing and kept wanting to go up through Italy and land at the south of France.

I've always been a Churchill fanboi but Italy accomplished nothing ("holding down x German divisions" doesn't count), and his soft underbelly of Europe didn't work in Greece or the south of France either.
Posted by: Bandersnatch at June 09, 2019 10:16 AM (fuK7c)


My view of Churchill is that he was not exactly an amateur, but also not fully professional, and his desires to "throw the surprise punch" was a reflection, partially of what he did not know about military tactics, and partly his frustration with the fops and gizzards who occupied some of the positions in the professional military.

In other words, part of the problem is that Churchill tried to have these wonderful efforts executed, and part of the problem were at times, not any fellas of strong enough character to tell him no.

Posted by: BurtTC at June 09, 2019 10:31 AM (cY3LT)

175 Chernobyl: I, too, have been reading on it and watching Youtube videos.

A question: did they get the cause right? The xenon buildup, the graphite-tipped control rods causing the runaway reaction -- and from what I found, this much is accurate.

Too bad Hollywood told us so much that was BS.

Posted by: Go Low Carbs at June 09, 2019 10:31 AM (JMvpH)

176 I am re-reading, and translating into English, a two-volume history of the Spanish Civil War by a man who actually fought in Franco's army.

La Vida Cotidiana durante la Guerra Civil (Daily Life during the Civil War) - one volume for Franco Spain (Nacional) and one for Government/Loyalist/Commie Spain (Republicana).The author, Rafael Abella, was not a Big Name Historian but a pharmacist who took up writing late in life, and as far as I know his works have never been translated into English. I bought these in 1976 and they have stayed with me through many moves and library purges.

Why am I doing this? Because my 21-year-old Marine wants to read it. I pointed out that there are lots of histories in English of the Spanish Civil War, and he said, "Yes, but there's nothing from the Nationalist point of view." And the soldier's-eye view is certainly fascinating, and sometimes even funny. Howzabout those Italian volunteers getting their first glimpse of Spanish girls? Or those ramrod-up-the-rear German instructors who are trying to instill discipline in young men whose idea of warfighting is lots of noise and reckless courage?

Husband is urging me to get in touch with the original publisher (Planeta, in Barcelona), but I hesitate. I'm not looking for a contract and I don't expect to be paid for it, and my only fear is that they'll send a cease-and-desist order, which I will not comply with.


Oh yes - got a hold of "La Mort de Staline" - the French comic book on which the Steve Buscemi movie was based. Even blacker and grimmer than the movie.

Posted by: Annalucia at June 09, 2019 10:32 AM (S6ArX)

177 There are tons of astonishingly "thrilling" and informative non-fiction works on these topics, and I don't see how someone's fictionalized account would add anything of value to it.

Just my opinion.
Posted by: BurtTC at June 09, 2019 10:04 AM (cY3LT)

A novel allows you to view events through someone else's eyes and "read their mind." You can't do that in non-fiction. Most fiction is intellectual bubblegum, but sometimes an author has a very important message or it is a form of therapy. Some very powerful novels about war have been written by combat veterans.
Posted by: Retired Buckeye Cop is now an engineer at June 09, 2019 10:19 AM (5Yee7)


Yes, and I understand why the men who write them want them written... at this stage in my reading career though, I'm not sure why I would want to read them.

Posted by: BurtTC at June 09, 2019 10:32 AM (cY3LT)

178 161 Well, the education we get about the Middle Ages has always been BS. Back in 1971, on my first day of college classes, the 2nd class I attended was Medieval History. The opening line of the lecture was "Everything you think you know about the Middle Ages is wrong." He was right."

Long ago, I loved the series "connections", and one of the points the host, James Burke continually made was that technology and new methods of agricultural production continuously advanced throughout what we call "the dark ages". They just didn't have big centralized governments.

One seemingly trivial development that really surprised me was chimneys - you'd think someone would have thought of that a long time ago, but apparently the oldest chimney ever found dates to 1185, everybody just got used to breathing a lot of smoke all the time before that, or else they cooked outside and slept with the animals to keep warm. Probably a good reason why most early civilizations were in places where you didn't have to worry about freezing your ass off for half the year.
Posted by: Tom Servo at June 09, 2019 10:22 AM (V2Yro)
________

Yes, the advances, especially from the 12th C onward, were immense. Another thing that gets overlooked is that the explosion of Europe, worldwide, started in what is unquestionably the Middle Ages, as did the improvements in ships and navigation. Henry the Navigator was close contemporary of his cousin, Henry V of England.

Now, the lack of real centralized government is interesting, and not realized. People read Renaissance Absolutism back onto the era. I remember another professor who was asked if Divine Right could exist without Absolutism. He looked puzzled at even being asked, and said "That describes every monarchy of the Middle Ages." (Of course, that degree of subsidiarity raised its own problems, enough to make even an extreme Chestertonian subsidiarist like me to take pause.)

Of course some of the Emperors tried to move that way, but it never worked.

Posted by: Eeyore at June 09, 2019 10:33 AM (VaN/j)

179 172
No effort had been made to purge the barrels of the residue of petroleum they still contained. Thus every drop of water was contaminated and literally unfit for human consumption.
Posted by: Jim S. at June 09, 2019 10:30 AM (ynUnH)


That... is retarded.

Posted by: rickl at June 09, 2019 10:34 AM (sdi6R)

180 I've always been a Churchill fanboi but Italy accomplished nothing ("holding down x German divisions" doesn't count), and his soft underbelly of Europe didn't work in Greece

-
All those mountains made the soft belly hard.

Posted by: Anonosaurus Wrecks, Tyrannosaur Wrangler at June 09, 2019 10:35 AM (+y/Ru)

181 Long ago, I loved the series "connections", and one of the points the host, James Burke continually made was that technology and new methods of agricultural production continuously advanced throughout what we call "the dark ages". They just didn't have big centralized governments.
Posted by: Tom Servo at June 09, 2019 10:22 AM (V2Yro)


Book related, has anyone read Burke's "Connections" book? I just found that my local library system has the show available for streaming, but I don't see the books.

"The Secret Life of Machines" was another show along the same lines as Connections, I should see if that's available anywhere.

Posted by: hogmartin at June 09, 2019 10:37 AM (t+qrx)

182 No effort had been made to purge the barrels of the residue of petroleum they still contained. Thus every drop of water was contaminated and literally unfit for human consumption.
Posted by: Jim S. at June 09, 2019 10:30 AM (ynUnH)

That... is retarded.
Posted by: rickl at June 09, 2019 10:34 AM (sdi6R)


Yeah, seems like criminal negligence, perpetrated by some REMF who was looking at an inventory sheet, and had no idea it would impact actual human personnel.

Posted by: BurtTC at June 09, 2019 10:37 AM (cY3LT)

183 Posted by: Go Low Carbs at June 09, 2019 10:31 AM (JMvpH)

Vic would probably know. He said before that everyone in the industry had to study the incident to death which annoyed him since it was mostly caused by politics.

Posted by: Polliwog the 'Ette at June 09, 2019 10:37 AM (uquGJ)

184 172 For those interested in WW2 I recommend two books by Bill D. Ross, Iwo Jima: Legacy of Valor, and Peleliu: Tragic Triumph. The latter really shows the incompetence of the military. Here's one of the worst examples:

.... No effort had been made to purge the barrels of the residue of petroleum they still contained. Thus every drop of water was contaminated and literally unfit for human consumption.....

Posted by: Jim S. at June 09, 2019 10:30 AM (ynUnH)

=====

Sounds like someone's source was "With The Old Breed" by Eugene Sledge. Coincidentally one of the three best books I've ever read.

Posted by: Kingsnake at June 09, 2019 10:38 AM (3JbJY)

185 I finished Sidney Powell's "License to Lie" after reading James Duane's "You Have the Right to Remain Innocent". Both are well-researched, factual books that make it clear that too many prosecutors -- even at the federal level -- will bend or break the rules to get you convicted. And they pay no consequences.

So, do what prosecutors and cops tell their kids: don't talk to the police; simply say "I want a lawyer" and shut up.

Posted by: Go Low Carbs at June 09, 2019 10:38 AM (JMvpH)

186 Vic would probably know. He said before that everyone in the industry had to study the incident to death which annoyed him since it was mostly caused by politics.
Posted by: Polliwog the 'Ette at June 09, 2019 10:37 AM (uquGJ)

Thanks. I will ask him next week.

Posted by: Go Low Carbs at June 09, 2019 10:41 AM (JMvpH)

187 I read some smart guy years ago who said, in effect, that the best written biography allows the character to escape but a well written novel would cause the protagonist to sleep at his nakedness.

Posted by: Anonosaurus Wrecks, Tyrannosaur Wrangler at June 09, 2019 10:41 AM (+y/Ru)

188 Husband is urging me to get in touch with the original publisher (Planeta, in Barcelona), but I hesitate.


Oh, listen to Husband. They can't cease and desist you if you're not selling it and what you could do is give them new revenue from an old out of print book.

Posted by: Bandersnatch at June 09, 2019 10:42 AM (fuK7c)

189 The Guy who Killed Bin Laden recommend 4 Hours of Fury
It about operation VARSITY, 17,000 airborne troops dropped into Germany. I never heard of this operation before so I am giving it a whirl, the book just came out.

Posted by: Patrick from Ohio at June 09, 2019 10:43 AM (dKiJG)

190 One trouble with Churchill is he couldn't handle dealing with people who would stand up to him. The most obvious case was in his first stint at the Admiralty. In Jackie Fisher he met a character every bit as strong-willed and overwhelming as his own. At first he fell under Fisher's spell, but the inevitable split occurred. And the vengeful streak in both came out.

But he also had problems dealing with Andrew Cunningham in WWII, and Stephen Roskill argues that he preferred Dudley Pound as First Sea Lord precisely because Adm Chatfield was another strong-willed man he didn't want to deal with.

Chatfield, BTW, was captain of HMS Lion at Jutland, and apparently his refusal to join in the careless cordite stowage (which was standard, and even encouraged, by Jellicoe as well as Beatty*) made it possible for the ship's magazines to be flooded, and the ship saved.

*And which predates either's appointment.

Posted by: Eeyore at June 09, 2019 10:44 AM (VaN/j)

191
"Well, couldn't you have vorpaled the sillabub or taken a turn on the chortlewort? That way the jaxo would be clear of the varse and you could forget about the dudelsak."
Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at June 09, 2019 09:13 AM (vhcul)

The Navy was much more creative than my co-workers: when I was the New Guy (age 16) I was sent from person to person to bring back the skyhook. The sad part is, I didn't know I had been fooled until two years later when I read about this trick in "The Great Impostor".

Posted by: Go Low Carbs at June 09, 2019 10:45 AM (JMvpH)

192 The Navy was much more creative than my co-workers: when I was the New Guy (age 16) I was sent from person to person to bring back the skyhook. The sad part is, I didn't know I had been fooled until two years later when I read about this trick in "The Great Impostor".
Posted by: Go Low Carbs at June 09, 2019 10:45 AM (JMvpH)

=====

Hey, Cherry! Go down to the motorpool and fetch me some canopy grease ...

Posted by: Kingsnake at June 09, 2019 10:47 AM (3JbJY)

193 Also rereading Jim Butcher's Dresden Files, starting with Storm Front. Fascinating seeing how he;'s matured as an author since that first installment.

TBH, I think I liked the earlier ones better before the plots got all dark and end-of-the-world serious and were mostly Harry running around destroying Chicago landmarks.

Posted by: Bob the Bilderberg at June 09, 2019 10:49 AM (qc+VF)

194 Howcatchem: Hillary Clinton and the Mysterious Home Brew Server. I'm still waiting to see if AG Barr solves this one.

Posted by: jim at June 09, 2019 10:49 AM (gjGvH)

195 it was mostly caused by politics.


Posted by: Polliwog the 'Ette at June 09, 2019 10:37 AM (uquGJ)


Hmmm....


An old friend is a nuclear engineer, and he did some of the simulations of Chernobyl out in Idaho. His thoughts about Soviet nuclear reactor design were enlightening. It wasn't politics; it was engineering.

Posted by: CharlieBrown'sDildo at June 09, 2019 10:53 AM (wYseH)

196 194 Howcatchem: Hillary Clinton and the Mysterious Home Brew Server. I'm still waiting to see if AG Barr solves this one.

=====

Just. One. More. Thing ...

Posted by: Kingsnake at June 09, 2019 10:53 AM (3JbJY)

197 I read some smart guy years ago who said, in effect, that the best written biography allows the character to escape but a well written novel would cause the protagonist to sleep at his nakedness.
Posted by: Anonosaurus Wrecks, Tyrannosaur Wrangler at June 09, 2019 10:41 AM (+y/Ru)


The risk of course, with any biography (and certainly any autobio) is that the author loves his subject TOO much. What tends to temper that however, is honesty and integrity.

My preference with works on military and political subjects, are not biographies. I'd much rather discover the people involved for myself, within the events and their interactions with others, rather than having the author force feed them to me.

Posted by: BurtTC at June 09, 2019 10:53 AM (cY3LT)

198 "Well, couldn't you have vorpaled the sillabub or taken a turn on the chortlewort? That way the jaxo would be clear of the varse and you could forget about the dudelsak."
Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at June 09, 2019 09:13 AM (vhcul)
_______

My wife once said that, when she asks me what I'm thinking about (as women like to do) she usually gets "I was wondering how many watertight lugs will fit on the fore-fossil deck."

(She is a complete landlubber.)

Posted by: Eeyore at June 09, 2019 10:53 AM (VaN/j)

199 Lot of hands in orifices with that Herriot chap. Remember the vet who lit cow farts and burned down the barn?
Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at June 09, 2019 09:57 AM (vhcul)


Yes, and that weird disease vets picked up from having their arms up cows' butts all day, what made you periodically crazy and one time it made Herriot try to kiss an uptight, stuffy woman whose dog he saw regularly.

Posted by: OregonMuse. AoSHQ Thought Leader & Pants Monitor at June 09, 2019 10:54 AM (MRoRq)

200 Husband is urging me to get in touch with the original publisher (Planeta, in Barcelona), but I hesitate.


Oh, listen to Husband. They can't cease and desist you if you're not selling it and what you could do is give them new revenue from an old out of print book.
Posted by: Bandersnatch at June 09, 2019 10:42 AM

Not to mention, they're not getting any revenue from the $80-$607 used copies. A translation might encourage a reissue.

Posted by: NaughtyPine at June 09, 2019 10:54 AM (/+bwe)

201 Maria Bartiromo really bringing it this morning.

Posted by: Pete Seria at June 09, 2019 10:54 AM (7ZQe3)

202 For those who are reading about Churchill, Hillsdale college has a free online course regarding Churchill.

Larry Arnn, the President of Hilldale , has a particular interest in Churchill, and the college has devoted a lot of research time and has been gifted some of his papers, etc.

sign up page
https://tinyurl.com/yxq4tnrs

Posted by: Jen the original at June 09, 2019 10:54 AM (bI9Li)

203 This Way for the Gas Ladies and Gentlemen

An incredibly shocking book. Every page I was thinking "holy shit".

Yeah I pretty much snagged everything in that series I saw.

Posted by: Captain Hate at June 09, 2019 10:55 AM (y7DUB)

204 when she asks me what I'm thinking about (as women like to do)


I was dating a girl named Rie Anne while studying French. She'd ask me what I was thinking about and I'd say "rien" (nothing) and she flattered herself that I was thinking about her.

Posted by: Bandersnatch at June 09, 2019 10:56 AM (fuK7c)

205 An old friend is a nuclear engineer, and he did some of the simulations of Chernobyl out in Idaho. His thoughts about Soviet nuclear reactor design were enlightening. It wasn't politics; it was engineering.
Posted by: CharlieBrown'sDildo at June 09, 2019 10:53 AM (wYseH)


I've heard that the RBMK reactor design the Soviets built at Chernobyl was discarded here many years previously as unsafe for civilian use.

Posted by: OregonMuse. AoSHQ Thought Leader & Pants Monitor at June 09, 2019 10:56 AM (MRoRq)

206 I was dating a girl named Rie Anne while studying French. She'd ask me what I was thinking about and I'd say "rien" (nothing) and she flattered herself that I was thinking about her.
Posted by: Bandersnatch at June 09, 2019 10:5


You made that up just now, didn't you?

Posted by: OregonMuse. AoSHQ Thought Leader & Pants Monitor at June 09, 2019 10:57 AM (MRoRq)

207 I have Pohl's Chernobyl, and while it is fictionalized characters-wise, it has a lot of actual detail on the meltdown. Goodreads has a review of the book up as well, and explains how he got access to the info.

Reason's Suderman has a good piece up on Neal Stephenson and his new book Fall, a review of his past works and some personal bio stuff, worth a read:

https://reason.com/2019/06/05/if-we-told-you-neal-
stephenson-invented-bitcoin-
would-you-be-surprised/

Posted by: GnuBreed at June 09, 2019 10:58 AM (Z4rgH)

208 The White Rajah?

Sarawak. Another victim if Japan's rapacious desire to create their own empire by bringing the Eight Corners of the World Under One Roof, aka World War II.

Posted by: Anna Puma at June 09, 2019 10:58 AM (SpqyT)

209 194 Howcatchem: Hillary Clinton and the Mysterious Home Brew Server. I'm still waiting to see if AG Barr solves this one.
Posted by: jim at June 09, 2019 10:49 AM (gjGvH)

It is actually SO much worse than you can believe. The FBI released about 150 MB of files on friday.
1. They a very sure that copies of all 60k emails exist.
2. Machines were destroyed by FBI agents to hide files.
3. One of the files that was emailed around was an Excel with list of $30 B in stolen money. (Sid Blumenthal was trying to find someone to sell the files to)
4. The homebrew server was hacked so many time HRD was up to email address HRC22@.

Posted by: rhennigantx at June 09, 2019 10:58 AM (JFO2v)

210 Posted by: CharlieBrown'sDildo at June 09, 2019 10:53 AM (wYseH)

From what Vic said I got the impression that the engineering problems were due to politics, and thus unfixable at an operational level even though the competent people were trying to warn TPTB that was the case.

Posted by: Polliwog the 'Ette at June 09, 2019 10:59 AM (uquGJ)

211 And in case you are looking for more reading on Churchill, here is the beginning of a search list at Hillsdale for their work on Churchill's biography, art, etc.

https://www.hillsdale.edu/?s=Churchill

Posted by: Jen the original at June 09, 2019 10:59 AM (bI9Li)

212 One trouble with Churchill is he couldn't handle dealing with people who would stand up to him. The most obvious case was in his first stint at the Admiralty. In Jackie Fisher he met a character every bit as strong-willed and overwhelming as his own. At first he fell under Fisher's spell, but the inevitable split occurred. And the vengeful streak in both came out.

But he also had problems dealing with Andrew Cunningham in WWII, and Stephen Roskill argues that he preferred Dudley Pound as First Sea Lord precisely because Adm Chatfield was another strong-willed man he didn't want to deal with.

Chatfield, BTW, was captain of HMS Lion at Jutland, and apparently his refusal to join in the careless cordite stowage (which was standard, and even encouraged, by Jellicoe as well as Beatty*) made it possible for the ship's magazines to be flooded, and the ship saved.

*And which predates either's appointment.
Posted by: Eeyore at June 09, 2019 10:44 AM (VaN/j)


Correct me if I'm wrong, it's been years since I read "Dreadnought," but the problem for Fisher was not that he butt heads with Churchill, but that the Admiralty itself, when Churchill was not around, and became so enraptured with speed and big guns, that they forgot about armor.

And when Fisher tried to warn them, they acted like he was insane. Or an asshole. Which he probably was.

Posted by: BurtTC at June 09, 2019 10:59 AM (cY3LT)

213 That was just one example about Peleliu. Perhaps the worst one is that they didn't need to take the island, and they knew they didn't have to beforehand. They had an initial plan that involved taking out the island even though all they needed to do was neutralize the landing strip which they could have accomplished by bombing it. Then they approved a second plan that completely bypassed the island. They realized at some point that they still had Peleliu on their "things to do" list and decided, what the heck, let's just take it. Either that or we'll have to reprint all of our action plans.

Posted by: Jim S. at June 09, 2019 10:59 AM (ynUnH)

214 I've heard that the RBMK reactor design the Soviets built at Chernobyl was discarded here many years previously as unsafe for civilian use."

That's what makes the claims that "The CIA did it!!!" so comical. It's like they let a bunch of 6 year olds play with matches in a room full of gunpowder, and now claim that nothing bad would ever have happened if that foreign agent didn't show up.

Posted by: Tom Servo at June 09, 2019 10:59 AM (V2Yro)

215 You made that up just now, didn't you?

Nope. Marie Anne P(Italican name)i. Went by Rie Anne.

Posted by: Bandersnatch at June 09, 2019 11:00 AM (fuK7c)

216 Neat Stephenson and Bit-Coin?

Does the writer have some Kong Bucks that need to be unloaded?

Posted by: Anna Puma at June 09, 2019 11:00 AM (SpqyT)

217 201
Maria Bartiromo really bringing it this morning.

Posted by: Pete Seria at June 09, 2019 10:54 AM (7ZQe3)

What is she bringing?

Posted by: anchorbabe fashion cop at June 09, 2019 11:01 AM (ufFY8)

218 Another reason to get off Twitter. It encourages people to be pricks who post pics of others without consent and it encourages people to mob.
Posted by: NaughtyPine at June 09, 2019 10:19 AM (/+bwe)

Yup.....also another reason not to ride public transportation, which are nothing more than rolling dumpster fires.

Posted by: Hairyback Guy at June 09, 2019 11:03 AM (Z+IKu)

219 "Is this where I admit that a reading buddy and I were enthralled with "Doc Savage" and read everything written by "Kenneth Robeson?" And from there moved on to "The Avenger?""

I LOVE Doc Savage! Finally managed to read all 182 of them a few years ago.

"Kenneth Robeson" was merely a Street & Smith house name. Most of the Doc Savage books were written by a guy named Lester Dent. The Avenger was written by a completely different author whose name escapes me at the moment, but he also used the Kenneth Robeson house name.

Posted by: tsj017 at June 09, 2019 11:03 AM (7ReX+)

220 From what Vic said I got the impression that the engineering problems were due to politics, and thus unfixable at an operational level even though the competent people were trying to warn TPTB that was the case.
Posted by: Polliwog the 'Ette at June 09, 2019 10:59 AM (uquGJ)


Always a safe assumption, when considering how the Soviets messed up what they did. Politics trumped all.

Posted by: BurtTC at June 09, 2019 11:04 AM (cY3LT)

221 Then there is Dean Ing's Chernobyl Syndrome... And How to Survive It. The book is an expanded non-fiction version of the later part of Ing's previous novel Pulling Through about how to survive a limited nuclear war.

Posted by: Anna Puma at June 09, 2019 11:07 AM (SpqyT)

222 Maria Bartiromo really bringing it this morning.
Posted by: Pete Seria

She's very jiggly.

Posted by: JT at June 09, 2019 11:07 AM (34DX1)

223 164 No one asked, but my love language is words of praise.

Posted by: San Franpsycho at June 09, 2019 10:25 AM (EZebt)


Guess what my love language is?

Posted by: Bill Clinton at June 09, 2019 11:07 AM (MRoRq)

224 Guess what my love language is?
Posted by: Bill Clinton

VD

Posted by: JT at June 09, 2019 11:09 AM (34DX1)

225 Does the writer have some Kong Bucks that need to be unloaded?
Posted by: Anna Puma at June 09, 2019 11:00 AM (SpqyT)


Mr. Lee's Greater Hong Kong is a private, wholly extraterritorial, sovereign, quasi-national entity not recognized by any other nationalities and no way affiliated with the former Crown Colony of Hong Kong, which part of the People's Republic of China. The People's Republic of China admits or accepts no responsibility for Mr. Lee, the Government of Greater Hong Kong, or any of the citizens thereof, or for any violations of local law, personal injury, or property damage occurring in territories, buildings, municipalities, institutions, or real estate owned, occupied, or claimed by Mr. Lee's Greater Hong Kong.

Posted by: hogmartin at June 09, 2019 11:09 AM (t+qrx)

226 Yup.....also another reason not to ride public transportation, which are nothing more than rolling dumpster fires.
Posted by: Hairyback Guy at June 09, 2019 11:03 AM (Z+IKu)


Buncha amateurs.

Posted by: Greyhound Bus Lines at June 09, 2019 11:11 AM (MRoRq)

227 ided only by his own unskilled hands, she gives birth to a sickly baby.


***********

???????
Can somebody explain this sentence to me?

Posted by: Muldoon at June 09, 2019 11:13 AM (m45I2)

228 Maria was not buying any BS lines from Pols. She just doesn't let them get away with spin. Refreshing. One of a handful of straight up reporters

Posted by: Pete Seria at June 09, 2019 11:13 AM (7ZQe3)

229 The shielding in Chernobyl's reactors was graphite.

Which works but is flammable.

Posted by: blaster at June 09, 2019 11:14 AM (ZfRYq)

230 141 ... eeyore, I haven't got that far in the Roberts Churchill biography. I'm enjoying it, and his writing style, but keep interrupting it for other reading. So far, Roberts is being even handed about the man.

As much as I admire Churchill, I always regarded him as vitally important but not perfect. I think that makes him more interesting.

Posted by: JTB at June 09, 2019 11:15 AM (bmdz3)

231 212
Correct me if I'm wrong, it's been years since I read "Dreadnought," but the problem for Fisher was not that he butt heads with Churchill, but that the Admiralty itself, when Churchill was not around, and became so enraptured with speed and big guns, that they forgot about armor.

And when Fisher tried to warn them, they acted like he was insane. Or an asshole. Which he probably was.

Posted by: BurtTC at June 09, 2019 10:59 AM (cY3LT)
_____

Not really right. Frankly, Massie is pop history, though well written. It was Fisher, not the Admiralty, who put the most emphasis on guns and speed, and deemphasized armor. The rest of the Admiralty held him in check.

And there is no known case of a battleship's or battlecruiser's main belt being penetrated at Jutland. (At Dogger Bank, Lion's was damaged, but still not pierced.) Nor is there a case that their decks were penetrated. Nor that the Germans shot any better.

The two problems were:

- Stowage of cordite, especially in action, which has been described as "suicidal". Flash tight doors were left open, and cordite was even stored outside the magazines entirely.

- At oblique impact, British shells tended to either break up or explode prematurely (the opposite of "duds".) Nonetheless, the Germans' initial reaction was great respect for the RN's bigger guns of 13.5" and especially the 15".

It should be remembered that the Germans were close enough to shore avoid losses. If they'd had to return as far as the Brits did, Seydlitz certainly, and others possibly, would have been lost.

Posted by: Eeyore at June 09, 2019 11:15 AM (VaN/j)

232 oops. "Aided only by his own unskilled hands.,.."

Posted by: Muldoon at June 09, 2019 11:16 AM (m45I2)

233 A HOWCATCHEM TV series: There was a show produced in Canada that aired on one of the US networks a few years back. Title was "Motive". It showed the crime which usually looked pretty bad, making you think the perp was a real psycho. As the plot played out the motive was found and it was something far less heinous, sometimes bordering on accidental.

Posted by: George V at June 09, 2019 11:16 AM (ORvjE)

234 <i>172
For those interested in WW2 I recommend two books by Bill D. Ross, Iwo Jima: Legacy of Valor, and Peleliu: Tragic Triumph. The latter really shows the incompetence of the military. Here's one of the worst examples:

______



Someone in the chain of command decided to try a new method of
getting fresh water ashore to resupply the troops. At first glance, it
looked like a good idea. Perhaps it was -- if someone, anyone, had
displayed common sense. But no one did. </i>- - - - - - - -I remember reading about that in Morison's history. As someone above mentioned, it did seem rather stupid.
I've just found a set of records that I purchased at a school auction in the early 90's. A history of the US (up to the early 70's) written and narrated by Morison. Now all I have to do is find my record player and hope it still turns.

Posted by: Three and One at June 09, 2019 11:18 AM (2tvJ1)

235 224 Guess what my love language is?
Posted by: Bill Clinton

VD

Posted by: JT at June


THIS is exactly the reason I do not take a sip when reading the HQ.

Posted by: Infidel at June 09, 2019 11:18 AM (xzK3J)

236 May Hogmartin never get a heat-seeking robo-dog up his jet's tailpipe.

Posted by: Anna Puma at June 09, 2019 11:19 AM (SpqyT)

237 230 141 ... eeyore, I haven't got that far in the Roberts Churchill biography. I'm enjoying it, and his writing style, but keep interrupting it for other reading. So far, Roberts is being even handed about the man.

As much as I admire Churchill, I always regarded him as vitally important but not perfect. I think that makes him more interesting.
Posted by: JTB at June 09, 2019 11:15 AM (bmdz3)
______

No matter what the criticism, his performance of keeping them in the war, especially during the year alone, cannot be impeached.

Part of the problem is that he was so great a writer and rhetorician that you have to carve away a lot. It's just too easy to get swept away, as I did 50-odd (!) years ago when I first encountered him.

Posted by: Eeyore at June 09, 2019 11:19 AM (VaN/j)

238 Great book recommendations but let's face it, we're here for the pants.

Posted by: Diogenes at June 09, 2019 11:23 AM (h1Sto)

239 214 I've heard that the RBMK reactor design the Soviets built at Chernobyl was discarded here many years previously as unsafe for civilian use."

That's what makes the claims that "The CIA did it!!!" so comical. It's like they let a bunch of 6 year olds play with matches in a room full of gunpowder, and now claim that nothing bad would ever have happened if that foreign agent didn't show up.
Posted by: Tom Servo at June 09, 2019 10:59 AM (V2Yro)

The cause of all problems and failures of Socialism:
1. Capitalist
2. Hoarders
3. Profiteers
4. Foreign agents
5. Trade
6. Jooz
7. Bad luck

Posted by: rhennigantx at June 09, 2019 11:29 AM (JFO2v)

240 May Hogmartin never get a heat-seeking robo-dog up his jet's tailpipe.
Posted by: Anna Puma at June 09, 2019 11:19 AM (SpqyT)


That's very nice of you to say that. I was just hoping I won't have to ditch the Yamaha outside of Port Sherman because the BIOS snow-crashed and then I'd have to catch a ride to the Raft with the Mafia.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bcMHzPs-Ub0

Posted by: hogmartin at June 09, 2019 11:30 AM (t+qrx)

241 too many Mexican jumping beans will make your stool hop

Posted by: Boulder t'hobo at June 09, 2019 11:30 AM (CNxxF)

242 VD
Posted by: JT at June 09, 2019 11:09 AM (34DX1)

better put some ice on that

Posted by: rhennigantx at June 09, 2019 11:32 AM (JFO2v)

243 The cause of all problems and failures of Socialism:
1. Capitalist
2. Hoarders
3. Profiteers
4. Foreign agents
5. Trade
6. Jooz
7. Bad luck
Posted by: rhennigantx at June 09, 2019 11:29 AM (JFO2v)
_______

Don't forget the traitorous Kulaks and running dogs.

Posted by: Eeyore at June 09, 2019 11:33 AM (VaN/j)

244 Annalucia, kudos to you for translating.

I did a quick dredge and found that Abella's Vida Cotidiana went through a lot of editions. Apparently there is a demand for this book in Spain.
Used editions are very spendy though.

Posted by: Kindltot at June 09, 2019 11:35 AM (hSQmw)

245 BTW, a week or two ago I criticized the writing in Charles Stanton's Medieval Maritime Warfare. Well, it gets better as it goes along. My opinion of the book is rising. I should have remembered that I am, ultimately, an Ent, and not been so hasty.

Posted by: Eeyore at June 09, 2019 11:35 AM (VaN/j)

246 rhennigantx, you forgot "Bad Weather"

Posted by: Kindltot at June 09, 2019 11:36 AM (hSQmw)

247 rhennigantx, you forgot "Bad Weather"
Posted by: Kindltot at June 09, 2019 11:36 AM (hSQmw)


6. Jooz

Posted by: hogmartin at June 09, 2019 11:37 AM (t+qrx)

248 Who just can't wait to run out and get Michael Wolff's new book?


"Even if I was wrong, I'm not going to admit it to you," said Wolff in an interview for the Yahoo News podcast "Skullduggery."The exchange over Wolff's multiple mistakes grew testy at times."You get all these things wrong and then you ask us to trust you," this correspondent said to Wolff."No, you get these things wrong," Wolff retorted. "This critique is bulls***!"



When even Yahoo calls him out for being full of shit you know what a wonderful book it will be

Posted by: TheQuietMan at June 09, 2019 11:39 AM (D6Gdn)

249 When even Yahoo calls him out for being full of shit you know what a wonderful book it will be
Posted by: TheQuietMan at June 09, 2019 11:39 AM (D6Gdn)

That there is what you call a shit fight.

Posted by: rhennigantx at June 09, 2019 11:42 AM (JFO2v)

250 Welcome to Northern CA

https://www.sacbee.com/news/local/crime/article231273088.html

Posted by: rhennigantx at June 09, 2019 11:44 AM (JFO2v)

251 Good morning horde,

Here's what I've been reading lately:

Class Mom by Laurie Gelman--A Mom in her late 40's has a son in kindergarten and 2 daughters in college. She agrees to serve as Class Mom for the kindergarten class. It is snarky and fun. Light reading. Had me laughing out loud several times.

I finished A Beautiful Place to Die which was recommended on this thread. I enjoyed it. I liked the dry humor and wit. Have downloaded the 2nd in the series, but I haven't started it yet.

Coup D'Etat by Ben Coes. A military/spy thriller, the 2nd one in the series. An interesting premise--Pakistan messes with India, and the two countries go to war. Besides the fact that both countries have nuclear weapons, an added danger is that China and/or Russia will enter the war, and then, what will the U.S. do? I really like the main character, the writing is suspenseful, and it quickly pulls you into the story.

I'm currently in the middle of The Nature of the Beast by Louise Penny. I really love her Three Pines series. You begin to feel like the characters are your friends, and you care about what happens to them. There is some SJW stuff sometimes, but I tolerate it because the writing is good, and I love the characters. Plus, the mysteries are interesting. If you are new to the series, I recommend reading them in order.

Posted by: Violet at June 09, 2019 11:45 AM (pxpp+)

252 248 Who just can't wait to run out and get Michael Wolff's new book?

"Even if I was wrong, I'm not going to admit it to you," said Wolff in an interview for the Yahoo News podcast "Skullduggery." [...]

When even Yahoo calls him out for being full of shit you know what a wonderful book it will be


I'm sure the NPR interview will go much smoother. In fact, the first one already has. They had him on a couple days after Mueller's office shot down his "draft indictment" BS. They brought it up but then totally bought his hand-wavy BS response to it.

Posted by: Bob the Bilderberg at June 09, 2019 11:47 AM (qc+VF)

253 The breathtaking Overnight Thread, in the smart military blog Ace of Spades HQ, is the setting for this tremendous epic. It is a place both splendid and savage, where plundering, promiscuity, and barbarism are rife. The aging Misanthropic Humanitarian, threatened by commenter insouciance and double-dog dare rebellions, typified by AlaBAMA, enlists the help of Yoko Ono - Beatle's bride-turned auteur. This has quelled the restless natives effectively since time immemorial, but this time, failing to restore equanimity, he finds himself drawn into a quest to restore peace and propinquinty.

Posted by: Duncanthrax at June 09, 2019 11:47 AM (DMUuz)

254 I didn't carefully read thru the entire thread but wasn't the TV series "Monk' a 'HOWCATCHEM'?

Greetings to the horde.

Posted by: Anonymous Guy in Ca at June 09, 2019 11:47 AM (RcMUX)

255 Klavan brings some heat!

https://tinyurl.com/y64qfh5x

Posted by: rhennigantx at June 09, 2019 11:48 AM (JFO2v)

256 The breathtaking Overnight Thread, in the smart military blog Ace of Spades HQ, is the setting for this tremendous epic. It is a place both splendid and savage, where plundering, promiscuity, and barbarism are rife. The aging Misanthropic Humanitarian, threatened by commenter insouciance and double-dog dare rebellions, typified by AlaBAMA, enlists the help of Yoko Ono - Beatle's bride-turned auteur. This has quelled the restless natives effectively since time immemorial, but this time, failing to restore equanimity, he finds himself drawn into a quest to restore peace and propinquinty.
Posted by: Duncanthrax at June 09, 2019 11:47 AM (DMUuz)


It's a tragedy.

Posted by: DR.WTF at June 09, 2019 11:50 AM (aS1PU)

257 I've commented before about my enjoyment of movie scripts re-written as if they were Shakespeare play. My latest purchase is Two Gentlemen of Lebowski.

Posted by: Anonosaurus Wrecks, Tyrannosaur Wrangler at June 09, 2019 11:50 AM (+y/Ru)

258 Michael Wolff needs to be horsewhipped in public, preferably by me, followed by Jeff Sessions.

Posted by: Captain Hate at June 09, 2019 11:51 AM (y7DUB)

259 Wolff insisted that none of the questions about his accuracy matter or are significant, noting that he had faced many of the same criticisms about his last book, "Fire and Fury."

"The object of this book, as with the last book - and I remember I went through the same thing with the last book... is about trying to re-create life in Trump world," he said. "It's trying to give readers a sense of what this experience is, of what goes on here, of the tenure, of the language, of the emotional life of Trump world."




Facts don't matter. It's all about feelzzz. Perfect for the left

Posted by: TheQuietMan at June 09, 2019 11:52 AM (D6Gdn)

260 250 Welcome to Northern CA

https://www.sacbee.com/news/local/crime/article231273088.html
Posted by: rhennigantx at June 09, 2019 11:44 AM (JFO2v)
-------------

If you saw the daily stupidity I see on CA roads, you'd be surprised there aren't more shootings.

Posted by: blake - used sock salesman at June 09, 2019 11:52 AM (WEBkv)

261 Getting back to the Middle Ages, I've always heard it divided into the Dark Age c. 500-1000 and the High Middle Ages from 1000-1400 or so. It's surely more complicated than that, but it's better than just writing the whole period off as the Dark Ages.

I haven't read the book, but Henri Pirenne's "Mohammad and Charlemagne" argues that the first couple of centuries after the fall of Rome were not terribly traumatic or disruptive. The successor kingdoms kept many of the trappings of Roman civilization and the Byzantine Empire flourished. The real catastrophe came with the spread of Islam which cut Europe off from its traditional trade with the Mediterranean and the East. So that would further constrict the "Dark Ages" to 700-1000 or even less. That was also the period when the Vikings were raiding monasteries, spreading additional chaos.

Posted by: rickl at June 09, 2019 11:53 AM (sdi6R)

262 "It's trying to give readers a sense of what this experience is, of what goes on here, of the tenure, of the language, of the emotional life of Trump world."

OrangeMan Bad!

Posted by: NPC_0001110 at June 09, 2019 11:54 AM (DMUuz)

263 Welcome to Northern CA

https://www.sacbee.com/news/local/crime/article231273088.html

-
All part of our civilization's return to Voltaire's Novel Savage.

Posted by: Anonosaurus Wrecks, Tyrannosaur Wrangler at June 09, 2019 11:54 AM (+y/Ru)

264 The breathtaking Overnight Thread (...)
Posted by: Duncanthrax at June 09, 2019 11:47 AM (DMUuz)

It's a tragedy.
Posted by: DR.WTF at June 09, 2019 11:50 AM (aS1PU)


Tomorrow. Comedy, tonight.

Posted by: hogmartin at June 09, 2019 11:55 AM (t+qrx)

265 WTF happened to Patterico? Dude is applauding YouTube's decision to deploatform all conservatives.

Posted by: Lurking Lurker at June 09, 2019 11:56 AM (FiUMj)

266 The breathtaking Overnight Thread (...)
Posted by: Duncanthrax at June 09, 2019 11:47 AM (DMUuz)

It's a tragedy.
Posted by: DR.WTF at June 09, 2019 11:50 AM (aS1PU)

Tomorrow. Comedy, tonight.
Posted by: hogmartin at June 09, 2019 11:55 AM (t+qrx)


You'll laugh. You'll cry. You'll hurl chunks.

Posted by: DR.WTF at June 09, 2019 11:57 AM (aS1PU)

267 243 The cause of all problems and failures of Socialism:
1. Capitalist
2. Hoarders
3. Profiteers
4. Foreign agents
5. Trade
6. Jooz
7. Bad luck
Posted by: rhennigantx at June 09, 2019 11:29 AM (JFO2v)

Tom Clancy famously said, paraphrasing here, that Soviet machines are crap.

Posted by: Go Low Carbs at June 09, 2019 11:58 AM (JMvpH)

268 he breathtaking Overnight Thread (...)
Posted by: Duncanthrax at June 09, 2019 11:47 AM (DMUuz)

It's a tragedy.
Posted by: DR.WTF at June 09, 2019 11:50 AM (aS1PU)

Tomorrow. Comedy, tonight.
Posted by: hogmartin at June 09, 2019 11:55 AM (t+qrx)

You'll laugh. You'll cry. You'll hurl chunks.
Posted by: DR.WTF at June 09, 2019 11:57 AM (aS1PU)


Something convulsive, something repulsive, something for everyone.

Posted by: hogmartin at June 09, 2019 11:58 AM (t+qrx)

269

Speaking of gun fire there was a panic at the DC fag parade. They thought they heard gunfire and a stampede started. No gunfire. It was probably a mishap with the synchronized fisting

Posted by: TheQuietMan at June 09, 2019 11:59 AM (D6Gdn)

270 I own a book. And, someday, I plan to read it.

Posted by: Alexandra Ocasio Cortes, economist at June 09, 2019 12:00 PM (Z216Q)

271 WTF happened to Patterico? Dude is applauding YouTube's decision to deploatform all conservatives.
Posted by: Lurking Lurker at June 09, 2019 11:56 AM (FiUMj)


The police state prosecutor and his toadies have gone full retard.

Posted by: Captain Hate at June 09, 2019 12:01 PM (y7DUB)

272
Klavan brings some heat!



https://tinyurl.com/y64qfh5x

Posted by: rhennigantx at June 09, 2019 11:48 AM (JFO2v)

I've heard him interviewed on a local radio station and he's always very good. He did the screenplay for the Gosnell movie

Posted by: TheQuietMan at June 09, 2019 12:01 PM (D6Gdn)

273 254 I didn't carefully read thru the entire thread but wasn't the TV series "Monk' a 'HOWCATCHEM'?

Maybe not every episode but many of them were. Some years ago I saw Sue Grafton give a short talk at a signing event. She asserted that there were three sub-genres for mystery/crime stories: hard-boiled detective, cozy, and police procedural. That categorization seems to hold up pretty well.

Posted by: Bob the Bilderberg at June 09, 2019 12:02 PM (qc+VF)

274 I own a book. And, someday, I plan to read it.

Posted by: Alexandra Ocasio Cortes, economist at June 09, 2019 12:00 PM (Z216Q)


Are you going to color it in first?

Posted by: TheQuietMan at June 09, 2019 12:02 PM (D6Gdn)

275 Are you going to color it in first?

I can help with that.

Posted by: Sniffin' Uncle Joe Biden at June 09, 2019 12:04 PM (EgshT)

276 WTF happened to Patterico?

Dunno. Sadly left a long time ago ...

Posted by: Adriane the Rapture Critic ... at June 09, 2019 12:05 PM (LPnfS)

277 Dude is applauding YouTube's decision to deploatform all conservatives.

Posted by: Lurking Lurker at June 09, 2019 11:56 AM (FiUMj)

Patterico isn't "applauding" YouTube, but he does make a rational argument that government should stay out of it.


I think he is incorrect, because he doesn't recognize the monopoly power that Youtube and Twitter and Facebook and Google have over the marketplace of ideas.


But he does make some good points.

Posted by: CharlieBrown'sDildo at June 09, 2019 12:06 PM (wYseH)

278 7. Bad luck
Posted by: rhennigantx at June 09, 2019 11:29 AM (JFO2v)

In the Heinleinian sense?

Posted by: Polliwog the 'Ette at June 09, 2019 12:06 PM (phT8I)

279 Posted by: TheQuietMan at June 09, 2019 11:59 AM (D6Gdn)

There are gay people who read and comment here.

Any chance you could ease up on the gratuitous fag-bashing?

Posted by: CharlieBrown'sDildo at June 09, 2019 12:08 PM (wYseH)

280 The only example of a HOWCATCHEM I can think of off the top of my head is Columbo. What are some others?

---------

There's some dusty old book where Raskolnikov kills an old pawnbroker at the beginning.

Posted by: Yudhishthira's Dice at June 09, 2019 12:08 PM (5aX2M)

281 203 This Way for the Gas Ladies and Gentlemen

An incredibly shocking book. Every page I was thinking "holy shit".

Yeah I pretty much snagged everything in that series I saw.
Posted by: Captain Hate at June 09, 2019 10:55 AM (y7DUB)

=====

Thanx for the tip. Added to my list. Have you read "I Will Bear Witness" by Victor Klemperer?

Posted by: Kingsnake at June 09, 2019 12:08 PM (3JbJY)

282 My latest purchase is Two Gentlemen of Lebowski.
Posted by: Anonosaurus Wrecks, Tyrannosaur Wrangler at June 09, 2019 11:50 AM (+y/Ru)


Never saw it in a theater but the movie version of Rosenkranz and Gilderstein are Dead - Richard Dryfuss was in it, iirc - was good.

Posted by: Adriane the Rapture Critic ... at June 09, 2019 12:08 PM (LPnfS)

283 261 Getting back to the Middle Ages, I've always heard it divided into the Dark Age c. 500-1000 and the High Middle Ages from 1000-1400 or so. It's surely more complicated than that, but it's better than just writing the whole period off as the Dark Ages.

I haven't read the book, but Henri Pirenne's "Mohammad and Charlemagne" argues that the first couple of centuries after the fall of Rome were not terribly traumatic or disruptive. The successor kingdoms kept many of the trappings of Roman civilization and the Byzantine Empire flourished. The real catastrophe came with the spread of Islam which cut Europe off from its traditional trade with the Mediterranean and the East. So that would further constrict the "Dark Ages" to 700-1000 or even less. That was also the period when the Vikings were raiding monasteries, spreading additional chaos.
Posted by: rickl at June 09, 2019 11:53 AM (sdi6R)
______

One problem with all such divisions is the question of When and Where? Remember, the legions left Britain long before Rome fell in the West.

Also in Britain, the Roman infrastructure - both political and material, disappeared. That wasn't true in Gaul, for instance. They kept using the baths in Paris for many centuries. (In fact, Medieval people bathed far more than their Renaissance descendants. Not new knowledge, either. Albert Jay Nock mentions it.)

Another book, from my college days, is Gimpel's The Medieval Machine. It has a lot of interesting stuff about their technology, including evidence that many (or even most) of Da Vinci's sketches weren't his inventions, but long established ideas, passed down by generations of artisans.

(OTOH, Gimpel goes off the rails at the end, in predicting we we collapse. But that has nothing to do with the actual history part.)

Posted by: Eeyore at June 09, 2019 12:09 PM (VaN/j)

284 Posted by: TheQuietMan at June 09, 2019 11:59 AM (D6Gdn)

They live in a terrifying world. That it is solely a product of their own oikophobic (and the phobia is real not just an over-used term) paranoia would take a miracle for them to understand.

Posted by: Polliwog the 'Ette at June 09, 2019 12:09 PM (phT8I)

285 Patterico is the kind of "conservative" who is horrified at the thought that any one on the right would ever, ever fight back against what the left is doing to them.

He's also the perfect example of why all Never-Trumpers are locked into hating and despising the right now, because we have refused to Recognize their Great Wisdom in hating Trump. Just like Ace predicted over 2 years ago now.

Posted by: Tom Servo at June 09, 2019 12:10 PM (V2Yro)

286 268
Something convulsive, something repulsive, something for everyone.
Posted by: hogmartin at June 09, 2019 11:58 AM (t+qrx)
_______

Hogmartin dashes in with the threadwinner.

Posted by: Eeyore at June 09, 2019 12:11 PM (VaN/j)

287 The entire 'Dignity' book can be found on the pages of The Guardian in a slew of articles by the communist Arnade. Don't be a sucker like Glenn Reynolds and give your money to them. It's just a book of the exact the same thing. It's a sad day indeed when alleged conservatives are giving money to someone who pitches 'poverty porn' to the Marxist rabble on the Guardian.

Posted by: Landru at June 09, 2019 12:11 PM (ztteU)

288 Posted by: Eeyore at June 09, 2019 12:09 PM (VaN/j)

"Gimpel The Fool" is a short story by Isaac Bashevis Singer!

Posted by: CharlieBrown'sDildo at June 09, 2019 12:11 PM (wYseH)

289 Friday I deleted Patterico from my bookmarks, just as I did Little Green Footballs year ago.

Posted by: Zoltan at June 09, 2019 12:12 PM (Zgezk)

290 years, not year

Posted by: Zoltan at June 09, 2019 12:13 PM (Zgezk)

291 280 The only example of a HOWCATCHEM I can think of off the top of my head is Columbo. What are some others?

---------

There's some dusty old book where Raskolnikov kills an old pawnbroker at the beginning.
Posted by: Yudhishthira's Dice at June 09, 2019 12:08 PM (5aX2M)

Old TV show the Magician. It was all about tricking the culprit into revealing themselves.

Posted by: Don Q at June 09, 2019 12:13 PM (NgKpN)

292 I'm listening to an old BBC radio play of "The Cruel Sea" right now.

And cooking Coq Au Vin, yum.

Posted by: Gem at June 09, 2019 12:14 PM (XoAz8)

293 ...hey kept using the baths in Paris for many centuries.

*******

Apparently until around 1887, when mass production of affordable perfume came into vogue and bathing went out of style throughout the country. Computer modeling indicates there is a possibility that bathing will resume by the second half this century, but so far there have been no confirmed evidence of this beginning in any substantive way.



(Does this qualify as gratuitous Frog bashing?)

Posted by: Muldoon at June 09, 2019 12:16 PM (m45I2)

294 noood

Posted by: HA at June 09, 2019 12:16 PM (MAstk)

295 The breathtaking Overnight Thread,

"Tis a silly a place, let's not go there."

Posted by: Anna Puma at June 09, 2019 12:17 PM (SpqyT)

296 I am reluctant to criticize Peleliu too severely for three reasons. First, the general commanding, Major General Rupertus, died of a heart attack before the war ended so we never got to hear his side of the story. Then the idea that the entire battle was unnecessary is based upon the premise that the rationale for the battle, to deny the airstrip to the Japanese during our invasion of the Philippines, was invalid given that no Japanese aircraft were stationed there but the Japanese might have deployed some. Finally, this was the first big battle in which the Japanese used the tactic that would create such bloodbaths at Iwo Jima and Okinawa. Previously, they fought for a few days then when they realized the battle was lost, they would suicidally "banzai" charge and the battle would be over. Here and for the rest of the war, they dug in and forced us to dig every one out and we simply did not expect and were not prepared for that.

I've heard that one reason we were so unprepared was that the jungle canopy covered the rugged terrain. What we thought was a hill was, in fact, a series of ridges.

Posted by: Anonosaurus Wrecks, Tyrannosaur Wrangler at June 09, 2019 12:18 PM (+y/Ru)

297 But...

No effort had been made to purge the barrels of the residue of petroleum they still contained. Thus every drop of water was contaminated and literally unfit for human consumption. To drink it was an open invitation to disaster, but many hundreds of unwary Marines did despite the evil taste -- and the inescapable consequences.

Half-crazed with unbearable thirst and overpowering heat, the men gulped down canteens full of the vile mixture. Within minutes, many doubled over with hellish stomach cramps. Others were hit with violent and uncontrolled coughing, vomiting, and diarrhea.
Posted by: Jim S. at June 09, 2019 10:30 AM (ynUnH)

Whoever was responsible for that decision should have been court-martialed. It had been known for years before that date that motor fuel is not safe to drink.

Posted by: Alberta Oil Peon at June 09, 2019 12:19 PM (7njPr)

298 Never saw it in a theater but the movie version of Rosenkranz and Gilderstein are Dead - Richard Dryfuss was in it, iirc - was good.

-
Yes, I liked it.

Posted by: Anonosaurus Wrecks, Tyrannosaur Wrangler at June 09, 2019 12:20 PM (+y/Ru)

299 Re Peleliu: Easy to think of all the possibilities, in hind sight, when there were literally millions of other things to think of.

Also, to reiterate from earlier, that bit in the mentioned book was sourced from Eugene Sledge's "With The Old Breed", which is one of the three best books I've ever read.

Posted by: Kingsnake at June 09, 2019 12:22 PM (3JbJY)

300 Yes, and I understand why the men who write them want them written... at this stage in my reading career though, I'm not sure why I would want to read them.
Posted by: BurtTC at June 09, 2019 10:32 AM (cY3LT)

You sound like the sort of person who is uncomfortable with the very idea of fiction itself.

Posted by: Alberta Oil Peon at June 09, 2019 12:22 PM (7njPr)

301 It's a tragedy.

Its a mystery, wrapped in a riddle. inside an enema.

Posted by: JT at June 09, 2019 12:23 PM (34DX1)

302 "9 1/2 Weeks" seems like a HOWCATCHEM.

Posted by: Guy Mohawk at June 09, 2019 12:25 PM (r+sAi)

303 "170 120 ... "The Flat Earth myth is a particular bugaboo of mine. But I've met college professors who not only bought it, but were horrified in hearing it refuted."

Hi eeyore, I agree. As I learn more about 'accepted' academic 'facts', I trust them and their proponents less and less. It might be history or global warming or art appreciation or the food pyramid. I remember what Chesterton thought of archeology. And academics clinging to their 'facts' are worse than any religious fanatic (cough *Muzzies* cough) being challanged.

Posted by: JTB at June 09, 2019 10:28 AM (bmdz3) "
\



Truth.

One of the reasons I like the older history books is their refreshing freedom from revisionism and PC.

Posted by: sock_rat_eez - they are gaslighting us 24/365 at June 09, 2019 12:26 PM (a5hgv)

304 Hey, Cherry! Go down to the motorpool and fetch me some canopy grease ...
Posted by: Kingsnake at June 09, 2019 10:47 AM (3JbJY)

Sending the green roughneck down to the tool push to get the key to the Vee Door.

Posted by: Alberta Oil Peon at June 09, 2019 12:26 PM (7njPr)

305 " ... and partly his frustration with the fops and gizzards who occupied some of the positions in the professional military. "


LOL.

So stealing that phrase.

Posted by: sock_rat_eez - they are gaslighting us 24/365 at June 09, 2019 12:30 PM (a5hgv)

306 301 It's a tragedy.

Its a mystery, wrapped in a riddle. inside an enema.
Posted by: JT at June 09, 2019 12:23 PM (34DX1)
_____

The trouble is that what's inside an enema doesn't stay inside the enema.

Posted by: Eeyore at June 09, 2019 12:30 PM (VaN/j)

307 The Casca books were great. My favorites were the first one, and the one were he was a panzer grenadier on the eastern front killing commies.

Posted by: eastofsuez at June 09, 2019 12:31 PM (U2zca)

308 Thanx for the tip. Added to my list. Have you read "I Will Bear Witness" by Victor Klemperer?
Posted by: Kingsnake at June 09, 2019 12:08 PM (3JbJY)


Thanks, I'll check it out.

Posted by: Captain Hate at June 09, 2019 12:31 PM (y7DUB)

309 287 The entire 'Dignity' book can be found on the pages of The Guardian in a slew of articles by the communist Arnade. Don't be a sucker like Glenn Reynolds and give your money to them. It's just a book of the exact the same thing. It's a sad day indeed when alleged conservatives are giving money to someone who pitches 'poverty porn' to the Marxist rabble on the Guardian.
Posted by: Landru at June 09, 2019 12:11 PM

Yes. In one of his pieces, called "Why I Don't Use Heroin," he explains why he has bought heroin for others but no longer mentions rehab to his "friends." He also expects all Americans to ask ourselves why WE create and WE allow such pain.

Posted by: NaughtyPine at June 09, 2019 12:32 PM (/+bwe)

310 The shielding in Chernobyl's reactors was graphite.

Which works but is flammable.

Posted by: blaster at June 09, 2019 11:14 AM (ZfRYq)

But it's pretty darned hard to get graphite to burn; pretty much have to heat it red hot first. By the time the graphite begins burning, the reactor has already been destroyed.

Posted by: Alberta Oil Peon at June 09, 2019 12:34 PM (7njPr)

311 303
Truth.

One of the reasons I like the older history books is their refreshing freedom from revisionism and PC.
Posted by: sock_rat_eez - they are gaslighting us 24/365 at June 09, 2019 12:26
______

Oh, they have their own distortions. I don't recall Gibbon mentioned on this thread. Macauley was another.

A friend described the classical history of the late 19th and 20th Cs as always insisting that "everything happened later than it did." And of course that nothing was ever written by the purported author.

But they are DIFFERENT distortions, which is useful.

Posted by: Eeyore at June 09, 2019 12:34 PM (VaN/j)

312 Over the years, I've given several copies of With the Old Breed to former Marines.

Posted by: JT at June 09, 2019 12:37 PM (34DX1)

313 304 Hey, Cherry! Go down to the motorpool and fetch me some canopy grease ...
Posted by: Kingsnake at June 09, 2019 10:47 AM (3JbJY)

Sending the green roughneck down to the tool push to get the key to the Vee Door.
Posted by: Alberta Oil Peon at June 09, 2019 12:26 PM (7njPr)

-----

307 The Casca books were great. My favorites were the first one, and the one were he was a panzer grenadier on the eastern front killing commies.
Posted by: eastofsuez at June 09, 2019 12:31 PM (U2zca)

-----

312 Over the years, I've given several copies of With the Old Breed to former Marines.
Posted by: JT at June 09, 2019 12:37 PM (34DX1)

=====

@Alberta : Hahaha. :-)

@eastofsuez : *thumbs up* I also liked the one in Mayan civilization where Casca tried to give a transfusion to his wife(?) and she died due to his "poisonous blood".

@JT There's some things in "With The Old Breed" where I ... sorry, just got shivers ... where I think "Wow, that's a rough one ..."

Posted by: Kingsnake at June 09, 2019 12:40 PM (3JbJY)

314 There are gay people who read and comment here.

Any chance you could ease up on the gratuitous fag-bashing?
Posted by: CharlieBrown'sDildo at June 09, 2019 12:08 PM (wYseH)

The gay people who read and comment here probably do not take part in Pride Parades, or indulge in other behavior intended to outrage and scandalize us Normies.

Posted by: Alberta Oil Peon at June 09, 2019 12:43 PM (7njPr)

315 The cause of all problems and failures of Socialism:
1. Capitalist
2. Hoarders
3. Profiteers
4. Foreign agents
5. Trade
6. Jooz
7. Bad luck

Posted by: rhennigantx at June 09, 2019 11:29 AM (JFO2v)


Also:

8. Wreckers.

Posted by: OregonMuse. AoSHQ Thought Leader & Pants Monitor at June 09, 2019 12:49 PM (MRoRq)

316 289 Friday I deleted Patterico from my bookmarks, just as I did Little Green Footballs year ago.

Posted by: Zoltan at June 09, 2019 12:12 PM (Zgezk)


Yeah, I haven't been to Patterico's site since, oh, about 2016.

Posted by: OregonMuse. AoSHQ Thought Leader & Pants Monitor at June 09, 2019 12:54 PM (MRoRq)

317 Ya know, with all of the illegals and other assorted nitwits, no-loads and bums, I've come to suspect that there are countries where people stop at green lights.

They do it in front of me ALL the time !

Posted by: JT at June 09, 2019 12:56 PM (34DX1)

318 @JT There's some things in "With The Old Breed" where I ... sorry, just got shivers ... where I think "Wow, that's a rough one ..."
Posted by: Kingsnake

Amen brutha.

Posted by: JT at June 09, 2019 12:57 PM (34DX1)

319 Michael Wolff needs to be horsewhipped in public, preferably by me, followed by Jeff Sessions.
Posted by: Captain Hate

Whew

Posted by: James Jones at June 09, 2019 01:04 PM (34DX1)

320 @92

Please stop, MP4. I have a cold and panting is difficult right now.

Posted by: creeper at June 09, 2019 01:11 PM (kujMl)

321 I think Coleman is one of my all time fav characters. Maybe Jeff Bridges or John Goodman could pull it off.
Posted by: rhennigantx at June 09, 2019 09:34 AM (JFO2v)

The story of how "Coleman" got his name elicited groans and expressions of horror in my teenaged daughter. I thought it was par for the course in this society. As for actors to play him, if you've ever seen "My Name Is Earl," the younger brother, "Randy" is exactly how I pictured Coleman.

I used to be a huge Dorsey fan until he unleashed his inner SJW with nasty screeds about Sarah Palin back in the day.

Posted by: SandyCheeks at June 09, 2019 01:33 PM (tGSHk)

322 "How Catch 'em" ?

Think deep state.

Posted by: Marooned at June 09, 2019 01:49 PM (8hRlF)

323 I've just finished Higginbotham's "Midnight in Chernobyl" and it is excellent.

Some of the official cowardice/dishonesty is of course infuriating, but it was useful to remind myself how amazingly heroic a lot of the responders were. The first firefighters to arrive had no idea (apart from "fire at the nuclear plant"), but a lot of the follow-on responders knew exactly what they were facing.

(The guy who volunteered to be lowered from a crane and perform a key part of the sealing-off task, for example. After he was clear he collected his rubles, his case of vodka, his certificate - and he threw away his three dosimeters because he preferred not to know what they would read.)

As a young Cold Warrior I thought Chernobyl and the official response were a uniquely Soviet fuckup. Now I think too of the chain of errors leading to the Challenger explosion, NASA management's party line that the odds of catastrophe were 1/100,000 (vs ground-level engineers' damn good guess of ~1/100), Feynman's findings in the commission, and General Kutyna's tale of key information he laundered to give Feynman: He knew the engineer and the astronaut would be identified and fired if he simply came out with it.

The particulars of Chernobyl were uniquely Soviet, sure. The larger pattern - the spectrum of responses from the contemptible to the incredibly heroic; the self-serving nature of bureaucracy - is not.

Posted by: JPS at June 09, 2019 02:00 PM (UgdG5)

324 Finished this week - Above the Waterfall by Ron Rash, 5 outta 5 stars, loved it

Romances-o-the-week -

Burn for You by J. T. Geissinger, 3 outta 5 stars, too much hand-wavium for me, plus automatic deduction for butter-my-butt-and-call-me-a-biscuit dialogue.

The Swedish Prince by Karina Halle, 3 outta 5 stars, nice characterization, but royals are not my thing, and automatic deduction for use of the term d*ck pic on the first page.

Posted by: MMcK at June 09, 2019 03:12 PM (xHxJf)

325 A science fiction author from older times wrote a Howcatchem that featured a telepathic detective, Alfred Bester's The Demolished Man.

Posted by: tireddoc at June 09, 2019 03:15 PM (69DCz)

326 Oh, I liked The Demolished Man a lot, tireddoc! Read it as a kid.
I even remember the "pepsi" he used to keep the telepathic cops out of his head : "Tenser said the tensor'

Posted by: vmom superior, order of sweet merciless ninjas at June 09, 2019 04:13 PM (dm05u)

327 OM,

Another great post. Thanks, also thanks for the forbes link on Chernobyl -- I keep hearing how great the show is, but the errors mentioned in the article are the kind of stuff that would have me throwing the TV out the window if I watched it.

One of the first real books I ever read was "The cruel sea". My father had it in his library (well, that book was his library) as well, so I am guessing it was a "it" book for that generation. Growing up desperate for things to read led me to that. It was a great book as I remember. Also was a movie but I don't recall that much.

I always thought the scene in Jaws with the captain talking about his war experience was inspired by the book though. When I saw Jaws (when released) It felt like he was telling the exact story of sailors finding off shark attacks as told in the book. I assume they just stole that bit and applied it to a different ship. In fact, it made me like Jaws a little less -- does anyone else ever feel that way? when a movie steals something from a favored book and kind of hacks it. Even though it makes the movie better it makes me like it less because I know the allusion and think they disrespected the original.

Posted by: Gentlemen, this is democracy manifest at June 09, 2019 05:16 PM (LWu6U)

328 "First published to great acclaim in 1951, The Cruel Sea remains a classic novel of endurance and daring."

The Cruel Sea was acclaimed by the generation who had lived it.

D-Day was a great sacrifice and a great victory, but it was only possible by winning the years-long Battle of the Atlantic. It took staggering Allied losses: 72,000 sailors dead, 3,500 merchant ships and 175 warships lost. This book is their story.

The Cruel Sea is also a story of that generation; all the kids who came of age in that time. The entire economies of Britain and the US focused on the war, every facet of life altered by it. In May '45 Germany surrendered, and then in August it was all over.

A lady told me after the victory celebrations there was the sobering recognition of the human cost:
"We grew up with it [WWII] and it was almost all we knew and worked for. Now what? The Cruel Sea echoed how we felt."



Posted by: hooodathunkit at June 09, 2019 05:32 PM (VA1qr)

329 *an
*fending

Still early in my time zone. sorry.

Posted by: Gentlemen, this is democracy manifest at June 09, 2019 05:35 PM (LWu6U)

330 I think my favorite book that might be a "howcatchem" is Nelson DeMille's Lion's Game. I guess it's probably more of a thriller than a proper mystery, but I've really enjoyed listening to the audio version several times.
Disappointed that Tim Dorsey went full-on left in '08; I just found his books and have really liked reading them. At least I'm getting them from the public library so I'm not giving him more money...

Posted by: Misanthropic Extrovert at June 09, 2019 06:07 PM (xXTnR)

331 Still reading comments.

I think you need to include the whole Poe mystery trilogy as the origin on the genre. Between the three stories much of what we consider as key elements to the genre are there. The locked room mystery, the hiding in plain sight, the presentation of facts to the reader for them to decipher,... Especially important is the stand-in character who is analytical but mostly there to present incorrect theories. This is the Dr. Watson or the inspector Plod of the yard used as an excuse for the brilliant mind to explain things to the reader. That is another key element -- the character who sees everything, and so knows everything the reader knows, but does not know all and does not know who done it, but is trying to figure it out just like the reader.


Over the years I have battled Wikipedia editors about their absurd claims that the Chinese, or Arabs, or whoever was the first to do the mystery story. For many years Poe was not even mentioned in the mystery entry. My attempt to add it were quickly deleted because I could not find a good citation but I think mainly because the progressives at wiki really wanted to believe the Arabs invented that genre.

As for the Chinese, I am so sick of their half-wit claims of inventing everything. Every claim I look into turns out to be some vague and contested reference that no one except the author of some state sponsored paper has seen. Like the use of a "fish" character when talking about rice fields as their claim to have originated Koi carp breeding. Their claim to the mystery story mostly goes back (as I recall, but not sure it has been a while since I looked into it) to a story where flies on a sickle proved it had blood on it and was used for a murder, but that is just a single quirk and has really nothing to do with the genre. You could give it credit for observation and deduction in use to solve a murder, but those elements go back to the Greeks and the bible so they are nothing new.

No, Poe was the master. I give him credit for this genre in totality, and there are others where I think he was the main innovator as well.


:end of rant

Posted by: Gentlemen, this is democracy manifest at June 09, 2019 06:50 PM (LWu6U)

332 I ordered "Chernobyl" on Kindle yesterday and have been reading it happily ever since. Love Frederick Pohl.

We both read "Native Tongue" when it first came out many years ago and enjoyed it. I often find Hiassen over the top, but this was hilarious. We'll never forget Vance and Violet, the indigo-tongued mango voles.

Posted by: Texan99 at June 09, 2019 07:00 PM (nzs57)

333 The first book I read by Hiaasen was Skinny Dip. It was a riot! I haven't read Native Tongue yet, but it's going on my list.

Posted by: Violet at June 09, 2019 07:42 PM (pxpp+)

334 'HOWCATCHEM'? Barnaby Jones

Posted by: rick at June 09, 2019 08:30 PM (NaMu1)

335 "HOWCATCHEM" -- Two-Minute Mysteries

Posted by: Weak Geek at June 09, 2019 08:45 PM (M5h3L)

336 Finished this week - Above the Waterfall by Ron Rash, 5 outta 5 stars, loved it
Posted by: MMcK at June 09, 2019 03:12 PM (xHxJf)


Glad you enjoyed it. I've still yet to read anything by him that didn't come off as pitch perfect in terms of capturing his characters realistically, even some "difficult" ones.

Posted by: Captain Hate at June 09, 2019 09:12 PM (y7DUB)

337 How unfortunate your characterization of Porretto's Saga. By no means is it XXX or even Nc-17. His characters are not sexualized but young women facing horrible discrimination and ignorance that Porretto carefully addresses from a Christian's faithful perspective. You have done him a disservice and the few commentors have just jumped on the bandwagon. Poo to you.

Posted by: Tracy Coyle at June 10, 2019 06:50 PM (w0QpZ)

338 Tracy, I could not agree with you more!

Porretto has a unique voice and usually writes from a faith perspective. While the term "futanari" might seem salacious, the characters in this trilogy, and their situations, are presented with a respectful tone as human beings first. What person capable of rational thought could object to that? The storyline, while unusual, is no more "NC-17" than Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs.

I am left to the inescapable conclusion that Ace never read beyond the word "futanari" in the summary. It seems axiomatic that the first step to critiquing a book is to actually read it. I have read all three, and quite enjoyed the sojourns.

Posted by: Dave at June 11, 2019 08:38 PM (gfjxC)

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