Saturday Gardening Thread, June 8 [KT]

bleednghrtlizb.jpg

Intrigued by nature but not ready to climb Mount Everest?
Try Gardening!

About the photo above:

From Lizabth: Bleeding Hearts, a beautiful late spring perennial in NW IL.

Also called "Tears of the Heart" in Europe. I think it fits.

Critters

Bird Dog posted this week at Maggie's Farm about Hummingbird Moths and D-Day.

Hummingbird-Hawk-Moth.jpg

It is said that the D-Day armada witnessed a swarm of Hummingbird Moths (aka Hummingbird Hawk Moths) over the English Channel. Sign of good luck.

I recently planted a few Cleomes in the garden, partly to attract those moths.

The hummingbird moths in the Eastern US appear to be Clearwings.

There are more than than 50 species of Sphinx Moths (Hawk Moths) in Missouri. Here in the Central Valley of California, I have seen a "flock" of Sphinx Moths (don't know which species) feeding on Larkspur nectar in bright morning sunlight. As well as other Sphinx moths on the side of the house at first light. And at twilight or at night.

Bought some Dianthus yesterday. Last chance today to get them planted before the temperature zips up again.

If you follow the link in Bird Dog's post, it notes that Hummingbird Moths in Europe are important to the pollination of Dianthus. And that the adults live up to 7 months. Unusual for moths.

ByTor recently visited the Louis Robidoux Nature Center in Southern California (which had fallen on some hard times). He took these remarkable shots:

Cooper's Hawk, from about 40 ft. away

Canon 50d
Sigma 100-33mm EX lens
Bogen 3021 Tripod

coopershawkbtrob.jpg

House Sparrow

housesparwbytorrob.jpg

A regular little house sparrow. Recognize the plants in the background?

A little earlier, Snowdog took these shots, which must have required some patience:

35 year old tortoise. I think this photo was taken at the Tucker Wildlife Sanctuary.

tortotucksnow.jpg

Rufous Hummingbird

Rufoussnotuc2.jpg

News Briefs, Landscape Architecture

Is there a way in and out of this swimming pool? Alive, I mean?

Fake News - artificial rock gardens.

There is an effort underway to re-discover how to make a very special kind of artificial rock. One ingredient is clinkers. If we end the use of coal, there goes that recipe. Beautiful photos at the link.

Have you ever attempted a rock garden? Were the rocks themselves a challenge?

Roses

badgerwx gets us going on rose season with some observations about various cultivars:

have a row of roses in the left-side bed but their first bloom is
always in May, after the iris. L-R: Here are Orange Impressionist & Macy's Pride. They were both planted the same year so this shows the effect from black spot. Macy's Pride is more resistant to it & more vigorous.

roses2019badgerwx.jpg

Further down is Double Knockout, Salmon Impressionist & Centennial. Salmon Impressionist suffers the most from black spot as you can tell from its small size.

roses3.2019badgerwx.jpg

Here is Sunny Knockout next to my porch where hopefully I can smell it (this is the only knockout with any smell to it). To the immediate
right is a clump of Egyptian Walking Onions. They are perennial & seed
themselves, which is as close as I get to growing veggies. To the rear
left & right are salvia greggii I planted for the hummingbirds. They
really like the black & blue salvia I have in my back yard so I hope
they'll like these too, once they get a little bigger.

roses2.2019badgerwx.jpg

salvia2.2019.jpg

Doesn't look like the Salvia greggii (Autumn Sage) is fully in bloom yet.

Aloe there!

The Aloe Vera is in full bloom at CSGBigBirds.

aloealabama.jpeg

Handy, there by the barbecue. Looks tropical with the little blooms next to it.

Sunset notes that Aloe vera is one of the best aloes for the desert. ASU notes that it attracts hummingbirds. But they also tell it like it is at ASU. Black widows like to nest in the plants. And the fruit is ugly.

Aloe ve.jpg

An interesting note:

As a medicinal crop, medicinal aloe is intensively cultured in the West Indies (Netherlands Antilles) of the Caribbean. Aloe is a known remedy for dermatitis, peptic ulcers, tuberculosis, reduction of blood sugar levels, and as a laxative. In general, aloe taxonomy is quite complex and confusing. Aloe is derived from the Greek word 'alsos' which means the 'bitter juice from the leaves'.

A veterinarian who likes plants did an overview to Aloes which includes a fair percentage of the many species in this genus, plus some hybrids. What a lot of work. There is more variation in plant and flower form than I had anticipated.

Part 1, Introduction and Species A - C

This is Aloe castanea.

aloe castanea.jpg

Part 2, D - L

Part 3, M - R

Part 4, S - Z

Unbranched Tree Aloes

Branching Tree Aloes

Aloe vera is in Part 4.

Here is a piece by the same guy on growing spotted aloes, inky-dinky ones to larger ones. Some of them are dang cute. He has a hard time telling them apart.

littlealoe.jpg

Edibles from the Farm and Garden

Gordon has had to plant the squash he started indoors.

squashgg.jpg

Illiniwek has asparagus in its second year, with a visitor.

asprachick.jpg

Wee Kreek Farm Girl's update will have to wait until next week, but she got garlic scapes.

I have Apriums. They didn't get stolen during the night this year! And strawberries from the roadside stand. Yesterday and today are the last days for baking strawberry shortcake before the weather heats up again. You getting any fruit?

We appreciate all the photos we have received even if we haven't gotten to them yet. If you would like to send information and/or photos for the Saturday Gardening Thread, the address is:

ktinthegarden
at g mail dot com

Include your nic unless you want to remain a lurker.

Posted by: Open Blogger at 01:11 PM




Comments

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1 Cute little puppies . . . not!

Posted by: m at June 08, 2019 01:14 PM (Ts3fP)

2 Top 5? WHOOHOO!

Posted by: Charlotte the sailor at June 08, 2019 01:15 PM (YGTVI)

3 This is my retirement! 5 weeks. Yes!

Posted by: Charlotte the sailor at June 08, 2019 01:16 PM (YGTVI)

4 Great content as usual KT.

Got some roadside strawberries a few weeks back. SOOO much better than store bought.

Posted by: Golfman at June 08, 2019 01:16 PM (OE84+)

5 Afternoon

Posted by: Bye Gone at June 08, 2019 01:17 PM (C4WwT)

6 Appreciate the garden thread, KT.

Posted by: m at June 08, 2019 01:18 PM (Ts3fP)

7 Aloe, garden morons!

Posted by: Cicero (@cicero) at June 08, 2019 01:19 PM (9SkN+)

8 We had our own little adventures with a House Sparrow. These are very aggressive birds. We had a Blue Bird house in the back yard by the garden. A pair nested, their young left, and so did the parents. A week or two later, another Blue Bird couple were checking out the box. A House Sparrow decided it was his. He drove off the Blue Birds and started to build a nest in the house. My wife would open the box and remove his work. A couple of weeks of this, she told me she thought there was a dead bird in the box. I went to look, and, sure enough, there was a dead Blue Bird in the box. Apparently, House Sparrows will kill other birds and use their carcass. I also saw him chase off a Mockingbird. I've seen Mockingbirds pester Hawks, so this is not a small thing for a Mockingbird to ignore a challenge. I finally covered the box with a trash bag. He's still around but not as much.

Posted by: Anonymous White Male at June 08, 2019 01:23 PM (m79Dg)

9 I think this must be the latest I've been able to put my vegetable garden in because of all the rain we've had. Meanwhile, the weeds got an extra hold on things so I'm putting landscape fabric down where I can. Cut an X, dig a hole and drop the plant in. A lot of work putting the fabric down but its holding the weeds back so far. Planted mostly San Marzano tomatoes for sauce this winter. Still not done getting everything in.

Posted by: dartist at June 08, 2019 01:28 PM (K22Va)

10 This is my retirement! 5 weeks. Yes!
Posted by: Charlotte the sailor

-----

WooHoo!! Good for you! I am on the same schedule if I don't get thrown out first.

No planting this weekend rather, trimming and pulling out ivies and hacking down nasty, overgrown bushes.

My elephant ears have gone crazy this week though. Nice!

Posted by: Tonypete at June 08, 2019 01:35 PM (Y4EXg)

11 I did get garlic scapes and made pesto from them and I have to say it was delicious. I just ate it on crackers and couldn't stop. Really amazing. I hope I get scapes again next year. Getting loads of zucchini and Armenian cucumbers right now. Have had to find new recipes for all the zucchini. I like the challenge.

Posted by: wee kreek farm girl at June 08, 2019 01:37 PM (P+pc3)

12 Anyone else have cottonwood trees around their yard? Neighbor 2 doors down has a giant one that throws down cotton inches deep in places around the beginning of June. Every one of those little tufts of cotton has a seed attached that will sprout anywhere it can, like my garden. I feel like I'm living inside a snow globe, lol.

Posted by: dartist at June 08, 2019 01:37 PM (K22Va)

13 Hola from not at the farm this weekend due to heavy rain.

Posted by: Weasel at June 08, 2019 01:44 PM (MVjcR)

14 10.... Retirement rocks! Love gardening, but live on a sailboat. I lust from afar!

Posted by: Charlotte the sailor at June 08, 2019 01:48 PM (G7tax)

15 Miller Moths are moving through to the mountains. A good crop of them this year. I hate those things.

Posted by: Ronster at June 08, 2019 01:48 PM (JbxTp)

16 Hiya KT !

Posted by: JT at June 08, 2019 01:50 PM (Nh6So)

17 Hiya gardeners !

Posted by: JT at June 08, 2019 01:50 PM (Nh6So)

18 Wee kreek farm girl at June 08, 2019 01:37 PM

Let us know if you find a good zucchini recipe.

Posted by: KTbarthedoor at June 08, 2019 01:53 PM (BVQ+1)

19 Hola from not at the farm this weekend due to heavy rain.
Posted by: Weasel at June 08, 2019 01:44 PM (MVjcR)

Hope to play golf up that way in about 10 days. Forecast says 5-6 inches of rain. Even if it clears up by then, it will be a little soggy.

Posted by: golfman at June 08, 2019 01:54 PM (OE84+)

20 We stayed at a vacation rental in the Davis Mountains of Texas several years ago and it had a hummingbird feeder. There was a resident rufous hummingbird that that had staked out the feeder as HIS. He didn't eat all that much, mostly just perched on the nearby fence so that he could ambush any other hummer that tried to feed.

For its size, it had to be the most aggressive bird I've ever seen. But they are striking looking.

Posted by: Art Rondolet of Malmsey at June 08, 2019 01:54 PM (S+f+m)

21 CSGBigBird really got me going into the world of Aloes. Amazing amount of variety. Not many that are hardy to frost. Makes you realize how much of the world rarely sees a frost.

Posted by: KTbarthedoor at June 08, 2019 01:56 PM (BVQ+1)

22 Astonishing amounts of rain in parts of the country. Sometimes I wish we could just even the weather out over the regions of the country.


We got over triple digits, but are now having two days below 90 degrees. Our last planting days. And probably our last baking days for a while.

Posted by: KTbarthedoor at June 08, 2019 01:59 PM (BVQ+1)

23 dartist at June 08, 2019 01:37 PM

Most people plant male cottonwood trees. But then you get all that pollen . . . .

I remember waking up in Bryce Canyon as a child on a cold night. We were in a motel. The parking lot lights picked up the fluff falling from the cottonwoods. Looked like it was snowing.

Posted by: KTbarthedoor at June 08, 2019 02:01 PM (BVQ+1)

24 Snowdog likes to pay attention to the light striking his photographic subjects. The tortoise has an interesting expression.

Posted by: KTbarthedoor at June 08, 2019 02:03 PM (BVQ+1)

25 We have a couple of Bleeding Hearts plants out at our lake cottage. The wife wants to plant at least one more out there. Maybe, find some space for some here, at the house, too.

Posted by: Evasiveboat42 at June 08, 2019 02:05 PM (Rz2Nc)

26 wee kreek farm girl at June 08, 2019 01:37 PM

I had never heard of garlic scapes before the Gardening Thread.

Posted by: KTbarthedoor at June 08, 2019 02:05 PM (BVQ+1)

27 Aloe, JT!

Posted by: KTbarthedoor at June 08, 2019 02:06 PM (BVQ+1)

28 Middlest Kidlet planted some green bean seeds she got from the plants she helped her grandparents with last summer. There was also some garlic starting to sprout in the drawer so she planted them and the beans in a 3-tier planter I had originally gotten to display yarn. Three of the beans and two garlic sprouted.

Her sisters and I got to eat a few beans, because she was back in Colorado visiting again when they came ripe (I felt bad about that), but it looks like they are getting new leaves and new blossoms so hopefully she'll get to eat some of them (or at least save them for seed next year.).

Posted by: Polliwog the 'Ette at June 08, 2019 02:07 PM (uquGJ)

29 Posted by: dartist at June 08, 2019 01:37 PM (K22Va)

I have terrible eye allergies to that cotton. A lot of people must because my hometown ended up banning them (right after completely landscaping the new, at the time, municipal library and rec center with them, naturally).

Posted by: Polliwog the 'Ette at June 08, 2019 02:10 PM (uquGJ)

30 So, our annual Strawberry Shortcake is real, you know, shortbread.

I first made a large one as a teen from a Betty Crocker recipe. Split a warm 8 inch biscuit, buttered it, loaded it with berries and whipped cream inside and on top. Sliced and served.


Did individual biscuits this time. Just a little sweeter and richer than regular biscuit dough. Should have buttered the tops.


I used a lot of sweetened berries, finger-crushed. Didn't make enough whipped cream, so I poured a little extra heavy cream on it. Worked fine.


It is kind of a meal replacement. Once or twice a year.

Posted by: KTbarthedoor at June 08, 2019 02:12 PM (BVQ+1)

31 >>25 We have a couple of Bleeding Hearts

We have many in Southern California. Most would benefit from being planted.

Posted by: 40 miles north at June 08, 2019 02:13 PM (o2vOl)

32 Polliwog the 'Ette at June 08, 2019 02:10 PM

You know that the cotton and the pollen release at about the same time. Sure you're not allergic to the pollen?

Posted by: KTbarthedoor at June 08, 2019 02:14 PM (BVQ+1)

33 Uh-oh. Storm brewing from the east. Never a good thing.

Those move too slow.

Posted by: golfman at June 08, 2019 02:15 PM (OE84+)

34 >> 24 The tortoise has an interesting expression.

Was it falling asleep or creating fertilizer?

Posted by: 40 miles north at June 08, 2019 02:16 PM (o2vOl)

35 Polliwog the 'Ette at June 08, 2019 02:07 PM

Is it an heirloom green bean variety? Sounds fun.


Don't eat raw beans once the seeds get big. At least not too many of them.

Posted by: KTbarthedoor at June 08, 2019 02:17 PM (BVQ+1)

36 Polliwog--

I'm quite allergic to cottonwoods, too. We used to go to the annual Eeyore's Birthday celebration in Austin, but I always paid the price since the park where it is held if full of cottonwoods.

Posted by: Art Rondolet of Malmsey at June 08, 2019 02:18 PM (S+f+m)

37 Posted by: KTbarthedoor at June 08, 2019 02:14 PM (BVQ+1)

Whichever it is, it causes me to get pink-eye. Standard OTC drops make a *huge* difference.

Posted by: Polliwog the 'Ette at June 08, 2019 02:19 PM (uquGJ)

38 Greetings all.

Not sure if anyone cares, but here is an update on my cherries.

Today I will put paper bags on the ripening fruit. They are for peach and grape, but I will use to protect the 10 or so cherries on the tree. Had there been a full tree, I would have used a net over the whole thing.

Built a bee house. Bought a fuzzy thing to hand pollinate. Ready for next year.

May have seen one of the horn faced bees on my irises, but has been too rainy to confirm with a photo.

Posted by: Gentlemen, this is democracy manifest at June 08, 2019 02:20 PM (LWu6U)

39 Posted by: KTbarthedoor at June 08, 2019 02:17 PM (BVQ+1)

Don't know if they were heirloom or hybrid, I never remember to ask my M-i-l. Middlest Kidlet only got about a 50% germination rate so it could have been because they were hybrids or she may just have had bad luck.

I sauteed the beans when we got enough to cook, since it still wasn't very many, and Eldest Kidlet ate the single ones raw but they weren't forming seeds yet.

Posted by: Polliwog the 'Ette at June 08, 2019 02:23 PM (uquGJ)

40 >> Gordon has had to plant the squash he started indoors.

I bury our Halloween pumpkins for fertilizer every year. Quite a few little pumpkins popping up right now. Fortunately, they don't last long here.

Posted by: 40 miles north at June 08, 2019 02:25 PM (o2vOl)

41 >> A veterinarian who likes plants did an overview to Aloes

My parents have one in their garden. It doesn't say much.

Posted by: 40 miles north at June 08, 2019 02:27 PM (o2vOl)

42 I had never heard of Egyptian Waling Onions, and they look so cool.

I want to try that. an onion that grown upside down with the bulb where the flower should be.

Posted by: Gentlemen, this is democracy manifest at June 08, 2019 02:32 PM (LWu6U)

43 38: G, you are the one growing cherries in Japan? A huge amount of work to get cherries, but if you enjoy the process as a hobby that is great. My 'gardening' hobby is just trying to eradicate noxious weeds on our wee ranchette.

Not eliminate all weeds, I don't have time and money for that on this sand hill, just try to keep the noxious thistles and burrs at bay and have a better class of weeds like bee weeds, aka as Navajo spinach in the paddocks and dandelions and other lower profile weeds that don't have spines or set burrs in the farm yard.

Posted by: PaleRider is simply irredeemable at June 08, 2019 02:36 PM (rhI1M)

44 cool shot of the hawk ... twice I've been out when a hawk (I think it was a Cooper's both times) came swooping down on my chicken. Pretty cool to watch, as long as they don't get the chicken. One I have on my security cam, but can't see much ... chickens duck down in the tall grass, then came running up to me on the porch.


There are many more red-tailed hawks around (than Cooper's) ... they don't seem to go after the chickens ... so far at least.


Saw the first fawns the other day ... scared two small ones up when mowing, one jumped in the pond and swam across to get away. Mom came looking for them later ... hopefully found them.

Posted by: illiniwek at June 08, 2019 02:36 PM (Cus5s)

45 Taking a photo of a hummingbird is showing off some serious photography skills!

As far as the garden... not as much rain this past week (thank goodness), and this weekend temps are in the high 70s with sun, so I expect some real growth on all the veggies.

My flowers are loving the cool temperatures, even with the lack of sun.

(WNY report)

Posted by: Ann at June 08, 2019 02:37 PM (NDO5Q)

46 Gentlemen, this is democracy manifest at June 08, 2019 02:20 PM

Thanks for the update. Interesting about the particular species of bees which are thought to pollinate fruiting cherries.

Posted by: KTbarthedoor at June 08, 2019 02:40 PM (BVQ+1)

47 Polliwog the 'Ette at June 08, 2019 02:23 PM

There aren't very many F1 hybrid beans on the market because each blossom pollinates itself under normal conditions.

I was just wondering if it was a variety that had been passed down in your family.

Posted by: KTbarthedoor at June 08, 2019 02:42 PM (BVQ+1)

48 Well time to actually drag out the sprayer and do some actual spot spraying of weeds.

Posted by: PaleRider is simply irredeemable at June 08, 2019 02:42 PM (rhI1M)

49 PaleRider,

Yes, cherries in Japan.

Weeds are a constant battle. My main goal is eliminating the horsetail and another perennial weed that stinks something awful. I don't mind most weeds (although in Japan having weeds on your lot one step above being a crack house) but the ones with rhizomes that spread like bamboo are awful

Posted by: Gentlemen, this is democracy manifest at June 08, 2019 02:43 PM (LWu6U)

50 I have terrible eye allergies to that cotton. A lot of people must
because my hometown ended up banning them (right after completely
landscaping the new, at the time, municipal library and rec center with
them, naturally).

I wish the thing would die here. It's so big it would cost thousands to take down. I don't think the neighbor cares that much. It really is laughable the amount of cotton it drops. It's so bad you can hardly stand to be out in it.

Posted by: dartist at June 08, 2019 02:44 PM (K22Va)

51 42
I had never heard of Egyptian Waling Onions, and they look so cool.

Watch out for those guys, they'll walk all over your property and take it over. If you cut the seed heads off most of them, they can't "walk" and the onion bulb will be bigger.

Posted by: dartist at June 08, 2019 02:48 PM (K22Va)

52 >> Interesting about the particular species of bees which are thought to pollinate fruiting cherries.

It's a type of mason bee, the hornfaced bee, and I see they even import it into the US to work there. (immigrant farm labor...) but blue orchard bee is more common. there are places that sell both types of cocoons to orchards.

It is prized for waking up early in spring when the cherry is in bloom.

Posted by: Gentlemen, this is democracy manifest at June 08, 2019 02:48 PM (LWu6U)

53 Nice thread, KT. Hope you and Mr. Barthedoor are doing well.

Posted by: 40 miles north at June 08, 2019 02:52 PM (o2vOl)

54 I am a very bad gardener and I don't know very much about plants, but I want my home to look its best. I appreciate the wonderful appearance flowers and plants make adorning a home. I pass a home with a vine wrapped around their mail box post that has some very beautiful violet flowers. Would the Gardening Thread in Ace of Spades have some idea what this vine is and how can I or can hire someone to plant this vine. I live in NJ and the winters are severe, but the vine always seems to bloom in spring and it looks great. I wanted to place it around my light post instead of a mail box post in front of my home. Any help would be greatly appreciated.

Posted by: John Eremita at June 08, 2019 03:04 PM (Fb3Ji)

55 >> Any help would be greatly appreciated.
>> Posted by: John Eremita

Send in a picture of the vine to KT. Tap into the power of the Horde.

Posted by: 40 miles north at June 08, 2019 03:06 PM (o2vOl)

56 Thanks
OK
I'll try

Posted by: John Eremita at June 08, 2019 03:09 PM (Fb3Ji)

57 Any help would be greatly appreciated.
>> Posted by: John Eremita

Send in a picture of the vine to KT. Tap into the power of the Horde.
Posted by: 40 miles north at June 08, 2019 03:06 PM (o2vOl)

Clematis?

https://bit.ly/2IsDqw9

Posted by: golfman at June 08, 2019 03:10 PM (OE84+)

58 Clematis looks right on.
Thank you golfman

Posted by: John Eremita at June 08, 2019 03:21 PM (Fb3Ji)

59 Hey KT,
This is my latest zucchini recipe favorite. I have tweaked it a bit by adding quinoa, but I can use my zucchini, parsley, mint and garlic all from the garden so it is a winner in my book. https://tinyurl.com/yypuarjp

Posted by: wee kreek farm girl at June 08, 2019 03:23 PM (P+pc3)

60 And here is the garlic scape recipe I used, but substituted pinenuts for cashews. https://tinyurl.com/yxtbknrr

Posted by: wee kreek farm girl at June 08, 2019 03:25 PM (P+pc3)

61 Sorry here is a link to the zucchini recipe again, this one works. https://tinyurl.com/y3hy6ddk

Posted by: wee kreek farm girl at June 08, 2019 03:30 PM (P+pc3)

62 >> 58 Clematis looks right on.

Clematis is a good-looking plant, but if you have small kids, don't let them eat any of it.

Posted by: 40 miles north at June 08, 2019 03:30 PM (o2vOl)

63 Just finished putting the garden in.
Just taters.
"What's taters?"
"Po-ta-toes."

Posted by: RI Red at June 08, 2019 03:31 PM (Hfi05)

64 Still not done getting everything in.
Posted by: dartist at June 08, 2019 01:28 PM (K22Va)

Northern Indiana gardener here. Yep, nearly twice the average rainfall in May. Started raining in March and never dried out enough for me and my dear black-muck soil. 80 pepper plants out and 45 tomatoes. Will plant 12 eggplants and 50 foot of beets and 50 foot of beans plus some teepee setups for pole beans. 25 foot of zucchini also need to go into the ground. I think I have a good shot at being finished sometime Sunday.

Then the grass.

Planted Malabar spinach for the first time. I have 16 feet of trellis for cucumbers and bitter melon and may have space on one end for the Malabar as it is a climber. Crystal and Tetnager hops bines are all the way to the top of the pole barn already.

Posted by: Cicero Kaboom! Kid at June 08, 2019 03:42 PM (Vy7tf)

65 Also, got a hummingbird feeder for my birthday. Only took a day for them to find it. What an amazing impossible aeronautical design!
I have no idea what type live in Siberian NH (although it's 79 right now).
Guess I'll have to research.

Posted by: RI Red at June 08, 2019 03:43 PM (Hfi05)

66 40 miles north at June 08, 2019 02:52 PM

Thanks. Hope you and yours are doing well.

Posted by: KTbarthedoor at June 08, 2019 03:50 PM (BVQ+1)

67 Ok, internet comes through: Ruby-Throated, Rufous and Calliope hummingbirds are the only three found in NH. The last is the smallest breeding bird in the world, and only recently has come as far east as NH.
I'm gonna have to go do some birdwatching.

Posted by: RI Red at June 08, 2019 03:50 PM (Hfi05)

68 I have to say, my roses in NW IL have never looked better!

After a month and a half of Portland, Oregon type weather(rain and cool), and then a few days of mid-west sun and warmth, the blooms are amazing and so many...wow.

It was a bad spring for many things where I live(including planting corn and such) but the roses LOVED it.

I grow mostly old garden roses, and can't recommend High Country Roses out of Denver enough for these very special roses. highcountryroses dot com.

Posted by: lizabth at June 08, 2019 03:53 PM (RFh5Y)

69 80 pepper plants out and 45 tomatoes. Will plant 12 eggplants and 50
foot of beets and 50 foot of beans plus some teepee setups for pole
beans. 25 foot of zucchini also need to go into the ground. I think I
have a good shot at being finished sometime Sunday.

Holy moly, do you run a farm stand? I planted 12 tomatoes for sauce, 6 feet of beets, one zucchini and 2 rows of borlotti beans. I'll have troubles eating all of that myself.

Posted by: dartist at June 08, 2019 03:54 PM (K22Va)

70 John Eremita at June 08, 2019 03:21 PM

Golfman has good instincts. If you are interested in growing a clematis, let us know. There are a couple of tricks.

Posted by: KTbarthedoor at June 08, 2019 03:55 PM (BVQ+1)

71 wee kreek farm girl at June 08, 2019 03:30 PM

Thanks for the recipes! They will come in handy as summer progresses.

Posted by: KTbarthedoor at June 08, 2019 03:57 PM (BVQ+1)

72 Badgerwx here, late to the thread after mowing my lawn.

I don't know why I keep getting my right left confused but for the record RE my 1st rose picture: Orange Impressionist is the one on the LEFT and Macy's Pride is the one on the RIGHT.

It's time to feed my roses again for their next bloom cycle (I use Espoma rose tone), though it won't be as good as the first bloom because the Japanese beetles are about due to show up to chomp on my roses. They especially like to eat the buds petals. I don't like to spray because I plant for the bees, butterflies hummingbirds, but I had to spray the roses the hardy hibiscus because sawflies were turning the leaves into lace doilies. "Nature red in tooth claw" applies to plants too.

Posted by: badgerwx at June 08, 2019 03:58 PM (3HZVl)

73 Cicero Kaboom! Kid at June 08, 2019 03:42 PM

Wow! Impressive.

Posted by: KTbarthedoor at June 08, 2019 03:58 PM (BVQ+1)

74 Badger, the only chemical I use in my gardens is on my roses. I hate to do it, but I must. Sevin powder to kill the Japanese Beetles. Those suckers just ruin the roses, otherwise.

Posted by: lizabth at June 08, 2019 04:01 PM (RFh5Y)

75 I did try all the 'natural' concoctions and recipes first, but none of them worked. The Sevin does.

Posted by: lizabth at June 08, 2019 04:03 PM (RFh5Y)

76 Golfman has good instincts. If you are interested in growing a clematis, let us know. There are a couple of tricks.
Posted by: KTbarthedoor at June 08, 2019 03:55 PM (BVQ+1)

I can thank Bryce Lane. H/T Bryce.

http://www.brycehlane.com

Posted by: golfman at June 08, 2019 04:09 PM (OE84+)

77 badgerwx at June 08, 2019 03:58 PM

Thanks for sending in the photos. Guess you noticed that I separated out the ones where roses were the main deal.

I like Salvia greggi and its hybrids. Don't have any right now. Have some coral and white Salvia coccinia for the hummingbirds.

Posted by: KTbarthedoor at June 08, 2019 04:12 PM (BVQ+1)

78 CSGBigBird's yard looks like a great place to have a barbecue.

Posted by: KTbarthedoor at June 08, 2019 04:18 PM (BVQ+1)

79 golfman at June 08, 2019 04:09 PM

Looks like you chose a great teacher.

Posted by: KTbarthedoor at June 08, 2019 04:20 PM (BVQ+1)

80 lizabth at June 08, 2019 03:53 PM

I seem to remember something about them growing roses on their own roots. Is that correct?

Posted by: KTbarthedoor at June 08, 2019 04:22 PM (BVQ+1)

81 Lizabth,
I've used sevin in the past but I'm currently out. I had some bonide eight liquid spray so I used that. I hope it will work. I used to use the bayer advanced rose care you water in so the plant will absorb it thru the roots, but I've heard it's bad for the bees. It never helped with Japanese beetles though. Nothing seems to kill them though I've tried a bunch of different things.

Posted by: badgerwx at June 08, 2019 04:23 PM (3HZVl)

82 Yes, that they do, KT. Beautiful roses, and really great customer service as well.

Posted by: lizabth at June 08, 2019 04:24 PM (RFh5Y)

83 RE the walking onions:

dartist is right that they are aggressive and will start spreading like crazy after a couple of years. I pull a bunch of them in spring as green onions will harvest more in summer. I'll cut the tops off a bunch too. I always have plenty to give away at work and church. I'm very popular with the Asian and Indian scientists at work and the Filipino Army wives at my church.

Posted by: badgerwx at June 08, 2019 04:27 PM (3HZVl)

84 We're a couple weeks away from the JB invasion where I am.

I am kinda hoping either the extreme winter cold killed 'em, or all the rains drowned 'em, but I know that is not likely, dernit.

I have Sevin on my list for my next Walmart trip. The powder works best, I've found.


Posted by: lizabth at June 08, 2019 04:29 PM (RFh5Y)

85 hiya lisabeth !

Posted by: JT at June 08, 2019 04:32 PM (Nh6So)

86 KT,
I like salvias too and have been trying different kinds of greggi in hopes that the hummingbirds will like them. I planted the Black n Blue salvia almost 10 years ago and the hummers really like it - even though the flowers are blue. I'm trying some red and pink varieties for them - the plant in the rose picture is still young and small. My worry is how winter hardy they are in zone 7. So I planted some along the west foundation of my house and mulch them in the fall.

Posted by: badgerwx at June 08, 2019 04:35 PM (3HZVl)

87 JT...it's not morning, yet there you are. Hiya!

Posted by: lizabth at June 08, 2019 04:37 PM (RFh5Y)

88 Looks like you chose a great teacher.
Posted by: KTbarthedoor at June 08, 2019 04:20 PM (BVQ+1)

Pure luck.

Great guy. One of his plant ID mentors was blind.

Bryce shared. Bigly.

He told us first day of class you'll be able to ID a particular oak at 400 yards.

Pin oak. Top limbs stretch up. Middle limbs straight out. Lower limbs droop.

Still remember missing one of five extra credit on final. 35 years ago.

Taxodium Distichum cone.

Dammit.

Posted by: golfman at June 08, 2019 04:42 PM (OE84+)

89 Good Afternoon Greenthumbs
Been slacking, should even just go water the garden

Posted by: Skip at June 08, 2019 05:01 PM (BbGew)

90 Been trying to get a picture of my Broad Wing hawks but either there close and no tablet or tablet and no hawks.

Posted by: Skip at June 08, 2019 05:03 PM (BbGew)

91 >> 89 Been slacking, should even just go water the garden

Happens, but I can promise you that a little too much wine at lunch makes the afternoon chores go by much faster.

Posted by: 40 miles north at June 08, 2019 05:03 PM (o2vOl)

92 Is there gonna be a movie thread tonite ?

Posted by: JT at June 08, 2019 05:12 PM (UW+MI)

93 dartist at June 08, 2019 03:54 PM

Holy moly is a plant. Allium moly, used by witches in potions at one time.

Posted by: KTbarthedoor at June 08, 2019 06:04 PM (BVQ+1)

94 From Idaho's Treasure Valley: I should mention that I will miss the next 3 Saturdays due to travel. Husband and I are among the instructors for a very good youth rifle team - and we are going to be attending both a state and a national championship this month. Please wish these hardworking and talented Idaho youths all the best! (If I can get WiFi as we go, I'll bookmark those 3 Garden Threads to read at leisure.)

I finally finished pulling off the dead leaves in the strawberry beds, and got nets put on over them. I'll be checking for berries very soon now!

Last week I planted 60 feet of sweet corn 'Bodacious' - today I planted another 60 feet, plus 20 more feet of Blue Lake 274 bush green beans (I had 16 feet planted already). Other than filling in for seeds that didn't sprout, I think I'm done with all the "spring" planting.

When I get the first strawberries, it will be the start of the summer harvest! (Spring harvest continues, as I still have lettuce, spinach, radishes, green onions, herbs, and chamomile flowers.) I'll have to inventory the chest freezer, before we add anything else to it this summer, so I know what's down in there. Hmm, actually the Asian peas and shelling peas might beat out the strawberries. The red raspberries will be coming along a bit later. The friend caring for my garden while I'm gone will have her pick of delicious produce!

The first daylily opened out front today, a short type with gold/maize flowers. Also spotted the first red penstemon flowers in the clump by my shed which includes fireweed (and is surrounded by those Johnny Jump-Up pansies I often mention).

Posted by: Pat* at June 08, 2019 06:20 PM (2pX/F)

95 Good for Pat and the Hubby.

Helping the youth see the way.

God bless.

Posted by: golfman at June 08, 2019 07:19 PM (OE84+)

96 Ventura Report: Amarylillis are finishing up. Cannas are going nuts Tiger, and Red. Golden lotus are getting leaves now, a few gladioulas are flowering, the ones from this year are growing great ,d will flower in about a month. Clivia is done until next year, best blooms I have ever got this year. Daylillys are growing good but not many flowers added superbloom. The hibiscus are all jacked up, spidermites and iron deficiency !! They are such a pain in the ass ! Plumerias are leafing out. Blahblahblah. Today is fertilizing and bug patrol.

Posted by: Somewhere on Ventura Highway at June 08, 2019 07:19 PM (Bh6pi)

97 Somewhere on Ventura Highway at June 08, 2019 07:19
Thanks for the report. Many years ago, Park advertised seed for a Clivia that bloomed twice a year. Ever seen evidence of that plant since?

Posted by: KT at June 08, 2019 08:17 PM (BVQ+1)

98 We're gonna miss you around here for a while. Thanks for the great volunteer work, though.

Posted by: KT at June 08, 2019 08:18 PM (BVQ+1)

99 Here in Denver, when the bleeding-hearts start flowering you know it's HAIL SEASON. These dear little plants come back year after year, despite getting
smashed to bits 3 years out of 5.

We're just-now done with another round of hail: about 10 minutes of marble-sized ice-bullets strafing everything in the garden. And, yep, my poor bleeding-heart has only one stalk still standing.

Siiiighhhhhh.

Posted by: Doo-Dah, Doo-Dah at June 08, 2019 08:28 PM (RMcHQ)

100 Bleeding heart flowers are so unusual looking.

Posted by: S.Lynn at June 09, 2019 11:24 PM (xT1QR)

101 Trip to NorCal last week picked up strawberries at a roadside stand. Hands down, the best tasting berries. I hate the trash they sell at the grocery stores-like store bought tomatoes. Ugh. Can't wait for my vine ripened ones. Yum.

Posted by: S.Lynn at June 09, 2019 11:28 PM (xT1QR)

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