Sunday Morning Book Thread 09-09-2018

Library of Chuck 01.jpg

Good morning to all you 'rons, 'ettes, lurkers, and lurkettes. Oh, and we've got a new category of readers, escaped oafs and oafettes. Welcome once again to the stately, prestigious, internationally acclaimed and high-class Sunday Morning Book Thread, a weekly compendium of reviews, observations, and a continuing conversation on books, reading, and publishing by people who follow words with their fingers and whose lips move as they read. Unlike other AoSHQ comment threads, the Sunday Morning Book Thread is so hoity-toity, pants are required. Even if it's these pants, which should be burned with fire and the ashes thrown down a mineshaft.



Pic Note

Chuck, a lurker, sent me this pic of his library/man cave which is "full of books and other stuff that spans polar, military, maritime, colonial, archaeology etc etc."

Got a scanner on the desk (been digitizing family photos), the large framed picture on the left is the deck plan to the polar exploration ship SS TERRA NOVA which took Scott south to Antarctica in 1910. Got my late father's USN service shadow box above the mahogany book case on the left, my Inuit snowshoes on the window ledge, my Dad's .22 rifle and my grandfather’s shotgun in the rack to the right of the door, my thesaurus and dictionary on its stand ready to confer with for my writing projects, some Falkland Islands metal signs warning of minefields (located above the windows), and my Weblos completion wooden plaque hanging on the wall beside my inflatable emperor penguin.

Chuck also asked me to put in a word for the book that he wrote:

I would also like to put in a shameless plug for my historical biography I wrote back in 1999. Entitled “The Fifth Man: Henry R. Bowers” it is about the life of one of the men who died alongside Captain Robert F. Scott in 1912 during the race to the geographic South Pole between Scott and the Norwegian Roald Amundsen. Bowers was considered one of the toughest polar men known. His short life is an incredible story.

The Fifth Man: The Life of H.R.Bowers appears to be no longer in print, but used hardbacks are available starting at $22.


It Pays To Increase Your Word Power®

An OTACOUSTICON is an ear trumpet.

Usage: You know what would be hilarious? If Judge Kavanaugh held up one of these otacousticons to his ear and responded to every stupid question asked by a Democrat senator with "Eh?"




Alt. History or Revisionism?

Just as an alternate take on Lord of the Rings, there's a Russian "alternate history" so to speak of LotR called The Last Ringbearer. It's told from the perspective of Sauron and Mordor, who look at LotR as "history written by the victors".

The book is unauthorized, and the original is in Russian, but there's an English translation roaming around out there on the intertubes that can be downloaded for free.

Can't give you a review of the actual story though. Downloaded it but haven't read the book yet.

Posted by: IllTemperedCur at August 12, 2018 12:26 PM (eXA4G)

The commie rag (UK) Guardian actually had a pretty good article about it:

David Brawn, estates publisher at HarperCollins, Tolkien's exclusive publisher, said: "To my knowledge, none of us have ever been approached to publish this book." Russia has operated outside copyright "for years", Brawn added, though the situation is now changing. "Online there are lots of infringements which it is extremely difficult to do anything about," he said. "When you get something as popular as Tolkien, fans want to create new stories. Most are pretty amateurish. Tolkien himself isn't around so it's the estate's view that it's best to say no to everything. If you let one in, you'd open the floodgates."

It's fan fiction. And it's being passed around for free. Nobody's making any money from it (just as nobody is making money from the thousands of really lousy Star Wars and Star Trek fanfics that have been clogging up the internet since the days of 1200 baud modems) so I don't have much sympathy for HarperCollins. At some point, characters enter into the public domain. Else you'd have the estate of Sophocles suing the estate of Shakespeare for stealing his stuff and unlicensed use of copyrighted material. Which might make a pretty funny story, come to think of it.

The Last Ringbearer is freely available for download at archive.org. Like IllTemperedCur, I've got it, but haven't read it yet.


book cartoon 35.jpg


Moron Recommendations

Lots of recommendations in the comments last week for this one:

92 Conflict of Visions is my favorite Sowell book. It isn't an economics book, more of a book on a theory of how people perceive the world.

It is one of those books that will make you look differently at people and the way they operate, and I always recommend it to people who ask the WHY? question with regards to the motivations of people who don't think like some of us on the Right.

Simply amazing, and once you've read it, you can see his theory playing out in real time.

Posted by: squeakywheel at August 26, 2018 09:35 AM (5Jt80)

The Vision of the Anointed: Self-Congratulation as a Basis for Social Policy was first published in 1995, and, in it,

Sowell presents a devastating critique of the mind-set behind the failed social policies of the past thirty years. Sowell sees what has happened during that time not as a series of isolated mistakes but as a logical consequence of a tainted vision whose defects have led to crises in education, crime, and family dynamics, and to other social pathologies. In this book, he describes how elites—the anointed—have replaced facts and rational thinking with rhetorical assertions, thereby altering the course of our social policy.

___________

Moron naturalfake has the hots for an Irish author not named James Joyce:

An Irish writer from the same era I think is much better than James Joyce is Joyce Cary.

His novel, "The Horse's Mouth" is easily in my top ten novels of all time.

It concerns an old artist Gully Jimson who will lie, cheat, steal, wheedle, seduce in pursuit of his art and his vision of his great masterpiece which he yearns to paint.

The story is a comedy with a dark streak of despair because Gulley knows he's running out of time and has almost no resources except his wits. And there's this vision, you see, this painting he needs to get out of his head and into the world.

It's frequently laugh out loud funny.

And the prose is beautiful and hilarious as Gulley's descriptions show us his painterly eye and mind.

A quick warning as there seems to be a contingent here who can't read a book without liking or loving the main character. This book isn't for you.

Gulley Jimson is an anti-hero. You might not love or even like him but you will understand his motives and perhaps will enjoy his pursuit of his masterpiece above all else.

Fabulous book. Check it out...

Posted by: naturalfake at August 26, 2018 11:17 AM (9q7Dl)

From the bio in his wikipedia entry, Cary led an interesting life.

The Horse's Mouth, as well as many of Cary's other books, are available on Kindle for $5.99.

___________

If you like, you can follow me on Twitter, where I make the occasional snarky comment.

___________

Don't forget the AoSHQ reading group on Goodreads. It's meant to support horde writers and to talk about the great books that come up on the book thread. It's called AoSHQ Moron Horde and the link to it is here: https://www.goodreads.com/group/show/175335-aoshq-moron-horde.

___________

So that's all for this week. As always, book thread tips, suggestions, bribes, rumors, threats, and insults may be sent to OregonMuse, Proprietor, AoSHQ Book Thread, at the book thread e-mail address: aoshqbookthread, followed by the 'at' sign, and then 'G' mail, and then dot cee oh emm.

What have you all been reading this week? Hopefully something good, because, as you all know, life is too short to be reading lousy books.

Posted by: OregonMuse at 09:00 AM




Comments

(Jump to bottom of page)

1 Hola!

Posted by: All Hail Eris, Literate Savage at September 09, 2018 09:01 AM (kQs4Y)

2 Just finished re-read of two westerns, Louis L'Amour and Zane Grey. Downloaded another Louis L'Amour book for now.

Posted by: Vic We Have No Party at September 09, 2018 09:01 AM (mpXpK)

3 I finished Heinlein’s “Time for the Stars”. Highly recommended. Teenage telepathic twins Tom and Pat are recruited by a private think tank to serve as a mode of instantaneous communication between Earth and ships light years away searching for habitable planets. Pat remains on Earth and Tom sends back mental messages.

Due to relativity the twins age at different rates, or rather their time lines diverge when Tom departs. Down through the years (four for Tom, decades for his family), he also develops telepathic relationships with Pat’s children and grandchildren.

For a juvenile it has some very mature themes, including that one may love but not really like one’s closest kin, and that pioneers are deemed irrelevant practically the moment their task is complete. Their success has made them anachronisms.

It was written in the mid-50’s so the technology and mores are a tad dated. Still, Heinlein has such a deft and droll touch that references to punch cards on an interstellar space ship can be waved away. He’s still right about basic human nature.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, Literate Savage at September 09, 2018 09:04 AM (kQs4Y)

4 and responded to every stupid question asked by a Democrat senator with "Eh?"
--------

This is about me, isn't it? I regard that as a highly insensitive comment.

Posted by: Mike Hammer, etc., etc. at September 09, 2018 09:06 AM (xSo9G)

5 Good Sunday morning, horde!

Chuck, nice library.

I am going to cop to having made and worn similar pants in the late 80s, and they were super comfortable. Thinking about making some more now, to hang around the house in. Jeans are kinda binding anymore. Don't @ me!

Posted by: April at September 09, 2018 09:06 AM (OX9vb)

6 "Got my late father's USN service shadow box above the mahogany book case on the left,"

I was just about to ask about the rack with those-

"my Dad's .22 rifle and my grandfather's shotgun in the rack to the right of the door,"

and those sig-

"some Falkland Islands metal signs warning of minefields (located above the windows),"

what's the fleur d-

"and my Weblos completion wooden plaque hanging on the wall"

what is th-

"beside my inflatable emperor penguin."

*waits a beat*

what is the penguin's name?

Posted by: hogmartin at September 09, 2018 09:08 AM (y87Qq)

7 Finished, 'Black Rednecks and White Liberals' this week. Still working through 'Alan Turing:Enigma', and 'Stalingrad'.

If you're feeling put upon by life, I can assure you that things couldn't be better than they are, contrasted with the conditions in and around Stalingrad.during the winter of '42-'43.

Posted by: Mike Hammer, etc., etc. at September 09, 2018 09:10 AM (CDGwz)

8
I've been going through my Kindle library rereading old favorites and enjoying them as much as the first time. Also reading things in the Kindle library that I don't remember much of and finding out, after a few pages, that I really don't care to read them.

Posted by: Loan Star Wadi at September 09, 2018 09:10 AM (I9Sw7)

9 what is the penguin's name?
Posted by: hogmartin
---------

I'm going with 'Emperor'.

Posted by: Mike Hammer, etc., etc. at September 09, 2018 09:11 AM (CDGwz)

10 Hiya

Posted by: JT at September 09, 2018 09:12 AM (hvAUG)

11 Must hie me to church. The Sunday School class becomes unruly in the absence of a firm guiding hand.

Posted by: Mike Hammer, etc., etc. at September 09, 2018 09:13 AM (CDGwz)

12 Read "The Scent of Metal" by Sabrina Chase, book 1 of her Argonauts of Space trilogy.

Computer scientist Lea Santorin (the heroine) is part of an expedition to Pluto to investigate an alien spacecraft under the ice. Turns out she has abilities she's unaware of, but the expedition leaders seem to be (typical government, treating those that need to know like mushrooms), and she wakes up the spacecraft and off into the galaxy they go.

I had a hard time putting this book down. Chase doesn't overly explain the science a la Tom Clancey. She also has great lines such as; "Of course Gonafrio decided to show up then, looking as pissed off as a porcupine with jock itch."

Unfortunately book 3 is not out yet. Someday....someday.

Some head music.

J.J. Cale - Durango
https://youtu.be/3G_msX9iHwg

The Rolling Stones-The Last Time (Live)
https://youtu.be/kvIIM2AZgCA

Heaters - Mean Green
https://youtu.be/PpNsB2p748o

Tiny Tim - Snake Gully Swagger
https://youtu.be/iL32qUs4fS0

Posted by: Jake Holenhead at September 09, 2018 09:14 AM (5jAa5)

13 Just finished re-read of two westerns, Louis L'Amour and Zane Grey. Downloaded another Louis L'Amour book for now.



Posted by: Vic


Did you ever read "Last of the Breed", his last book ?

That was a good one.

Posted by: JT at September 09, 2018 09:14 AM (hvAUG)

14 Nice Lieberry!........

Posted by: Hairyback Guy at September 09, 2018 09:15 AM (EoRCO)

15 Ha! I just noticed the inflatable penguin, chuck.

I used to have one years ago and would place it next to my amour as a surprise when he woke up, or outside the shower curtain. Hilarity ensued!

Posted by: All Hail Eris, Literate Savage at September 09, 2018 09:15 AM (kQs4Y)

16 Just finished re-read of two westerns, Louis L'Amour and Zane Grey.


Hah! You walked into my trap. I was going to talk about Zane Grey today in comparing good writers to bad writers.

I read Grey for the first time a couple of weeks ago, Riders of the Purple Sage. It was so bad that I couldn't put it down and also we got one look at a girl's tit, which was pretty risque at the time.

But not only was the story awful, the details were utterly unconvincing. He's in southern Utah and there are an infinity of hidden canyons. There's a canyon that you can only get into by passing under a waterfall. There's a canyon where the rustler has room for 50,000 head of rustled cattle. There's a canyon with a stream that disappears into a crack in the rock and so there's no exit to that canyon.

None of the geography sounds like it could exist.

I have been reading a lot of Twain lately and have come back to Huck Finn. (It's been about ten years). When Huck is drifting down the Mississippi describing what a snag looks like by the ripple on the surface or how the islands change when the water rises after a heavy rain you believe every word of it. He's talking about a lived truth.

Posted by: Bandersnatch at September 09, 2018 09:17 AM (fuK7c)

17 Ha! I just noticed the inflatable penguin, chuck.

I used to have one years ago and would place it next to my amour as a surprise when he woke up, or outside the shower curtain. Hilarity ensued!

Posted by: All Hail Eris,


!

Posted by: JT at September 09, 2018 09:18 AM (hvAUG)

18 Love the Edgar Allen Pooh cartoon!

No book recommendations - I've been on a reading drought for about a year now. I'm not sure why. I did finish last week "The Weed that Strings the Hangman's Bag," the second book in the Flavia deLuce mystery series, which is a delight.

Posted by: biancaneve at September 09, 2018 09:18 AM (A/iod)

19 13 Did you ever read "Last of the Breed", his last book ?



That was a good one.

Posted by: JT at September 09, 2018 09:14 AM (hvAUG)

Yes, I have read everyone of his books. Had them all in paperback and Hardcover. I am now gradually acquiring copies for the Kindle. I can no longer read paperbacks and have to use 2x magnifying glasses to read hardbacks. With my Samsung I can enlarge the type to a size I can read.

Posted by: Vic We Have No Party at September 09, 2018 09:18 AM (mpXpK)

20 Hello, JT.

Have a good day, Mike Hammer.

Chuck - that wood floor baseboard heater, and linteled doorway are good signs IMO. Very nice home there.

Posted by: hogmartin at September 09, 2018 09:18 AM (y87Qq)

21 Nice to see a mancave that's not dominated by NFL swag.

Posted by: kallisto at September 09, 2018 09:19 AM (GOoUs)

22 Mawnin' Hogmartin !

Posted by: JT at September 09, 2018 09:20 AM (hvAUG)

23 In any discussion about the important artists of the 20th Century, all must eventually bow heads in deference to the greatest, MAD Magazine’s Mort Drucker. Here was a man who made the most adroit likenesses of celebrities based on a few grudgingly offered press release photos (not everyone thought a MAD parody was good publicity). All Mort needed was a full face photo and maybe a profile and then he could draw that person in any way needed over a seven-page spread.

Reading “Mort Drucker: Five Decades of His Finest Works” is like being sucked down a time tunnel to my childhood.

Michael J. Fox was asked by Johnny Carson “When did you really know you’d made it in show business?”, and Michael replied “When Mort Drucker drew my head”. Like me, as a kid he had filtered the outside adult world through the pages of MAD.

A Mort documentary:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8zNk6-2c75Q

Posted by: All Hail Eris, Literate Savage at September 09, 2018 09:21 AM (kQs4Y)

24 16 Posted by: Bandersnatch at September 09, 2018 09:17 AM (fuK7c)


Yes, Zane Grey is a little dated now, but I do enjoy going through some of his books. Especially since it is getting harder and harder finding new stuff to read that cost less than $10. And you can get a lot of Zane Grey's stuff from Gutenberg free.

Posted by: Vic We Have No Party at September 09, 2018 09:21 AM (mpXpK)

25 Just checking in before heading off to the gym. This week. I'm primarily reading The Economists' Diet, by Christopher Payne and Rob Barnett. Two formerly fat economists show how using the laws of economics can change the way you think about eating!

BBL

Posted by: SandyCheeks at September 09, 2018 09:21 AM (ihzOe)

26 Oddly coincidental but "The Scent of Metal" by Sabrina Chase was one of the old favorites just reread. So I add a supporting vote to Jake @12/

It is a bit too fantastical; I usually prefer the science to be a little more plausible, but this one is just fun to read.

In the same vein, "Perilous Waif" by E. William Brown is a bit too fantastical but equally fun to read. And a welcome escape from current events.

I dislike Science Fantasy and Science Fiction being lumped into the same genre, but that has become the conventional classification.

Posted by: Loan Star Wadi at September 09, 2018 09:22 AM (I9Sw7)

27 I've been reading blogs and websites about backpacking. Got all my gear and my base weight is coming in at 14lbs. 4.5ozs. Not bad considering my pack is 4lbs. By itself. Any suggestions on where to look for good trail maps of Gila Wilderness? Also, what resources do backpackers have for finding water sources. Do GPS's really help on the trail?
Also, attempting my first reading of the Bible. Kind of stuck in Exudus... when they start on genealogies, I start to drift....

Posted by: lin-duh at September 09, 2018 09:23 AM (kufk0)

28 A Mort documentary:

Saved for later.

I read a lot of MAD when I was a yute.

Posted by: JT at September 09, 2018 09:24 AM (hvAUG)

29 "The Horse's Mouth" is a terrific novel, well worth reading. It's even better when read in context, as the third book of a trilogy. The other two are "Herself Surprised", which is narrated by the woman who was Gully Jimson's model in his best-known painting; and "To Be a Pilgrim", which is narrated by the man who collected Jimson's paintings.
I should add that the novel bears little resemblance to the movie "The Horse's Mouth". Alec Guinness starred in it and wrote the script for it (the only script he ever wrote), and in it turns Jimson into a saccharine eccentric, rather than the crazy (though talented) murderer he is in the novel.
As for books this week, I've been exploring some of the old, weird stuff available on Project Gutenberg. One curiosity is "The Lady Doc" by Caroline Lockhart. It's a western, published in 1912, set in a Montana cowtown early in the 20th century. The protagonist of the title is one of the evilest characters you'll ever see - a selfish, greedy quack, a lesbian who is introduced when she has just killed her lover while performing an abortion on her. (Or, at least, so it is broadly hinted.) And many of the residents of said cowtown are ignorant, stupid, and snobbish. Definitely not the idyllic old West of myth; and having an evil female is definitely not permitted nowadays. But it's a well-told story, and Lockhart knows how to keep the pages turning. If you're looking for a really off-beat Western, you may enjoy "The Lady Doc" - available for free from gutenberg.org.

Posted by: Brown Line at September 09, 2018 09:25 AM (S6ArX)

30 Good morning my fellow Book Threadists. Hope all had a wonderful week of reading.

Posted by: JTB at September 09, 2018 09:25 AM (V+03K)

31 Also, attempting my first reading of the Bible. Kind of stuck in Exudus... when they start on genealogies, I start to drift....
Posted by: lin-duh
------

heh. Begin the begats.

Posted by: Mike Hammer, etc., etc. at September 09, 2018 09:26 AM (xSo9G)

32
Good morning, fellow Bookenologists!

All hail, F. Scott Fitzgerald!



And fear the Overlord Zelda!

Posted by: naturalfake at September 09, 2018 09:26 AM (CRRq9)

33 Not so much reading of meaningful books this week, as working on a project for the Teeny Publishing Bidness, and scribbling the last couple of pages for Luna City #7, wherein the viewpoint character commits to catering a wedding supper for a couple of celebrities, and only realizes at the last minute that the bride is one of his ex-girlfriends, (Yeah, the viewpoint character is oblivious to things that he wishes to be oblivious to.)
At the end of the week, the Daughter Unit and I will be in Giddings, Texas, for the annual Giddings Word Wrangler book festival! It's going to start with a gala at the community center Thursday evening, and then all day Friday and Saturday, with local authors and books. I never really sell a lot of books, but the community involvement is enthusiastic! On Friday, they bring in students by the busload from the local schools to go around and talk to the authors, which can really be an ego boost. For the first time, they're continuing the event to Saturday, so that people who have jobs can come around and look over the books and authors as well. Alan of the Texas Association of Authors set up this additional day, so we're hoping it goes well. He's been working at setting up all kinds of local events like this over the last six or seven years, and I'd have to say that yes, there is a great deal of interest in books and reading, although you wouldn't know it from the New York-based publishing industry.

Posted by: Sgt. Mom at September 09, 2018 09:26 AM (xnmPy)

34 And you can get a lot of Zane Grey's stuff from Gutenberg free.


Oh, I have become the absolute Whore of Free Kindle Books.

Grey, every word that Mark Twain wrote, all of James Joyce, people that get mentioned here a lot like Chesterton and Waugh, Conrad, Freud, Thomas Mann...

It goes on. Free Kindle books are like a wrinkle in time. I assume they will go away at some point because we can't have nice things, but I've been reading so many classics lately and I don't even have to worry about a nickel a day in late fees.

Posted by: Bandersnatch at September 09, 2018 09:26 AM (fuK7c)

35 The only book people are talking about this weekend is Woodward's. Two weeks ago it was Omarosa's. And two weeks before that it was Wolf's.

Funny how that works.

Posted by: Marshall Wyatt Urp at September 09, 2018 09:27 AM (giAl1)

36 26 I dislike Science Fantasy and Science Fiction being
lumped into the same genre, but that has become the conventional
classification.

Posted by: Loan Star Wadi at September 09, 2018 09:22 AM (I9Sw7)

You can separate them at Amazon when looking through their available catalogs.

Posted by: Vic We Have No Party at September 09, 2018 09:27 AM (mpXpK)

37 Oh, and I Re-recommend Joyce Cary and "The Horse's Mouth".

A double recommendation if you will.

Posted by: naturalfake at September 09, 2018 09:27 AM (CRRq9)

38 " ... pants are required'

I'll fit right in!

Posted by: Hillary! Because it's my turn, doggonit! at September 09, 2018 09:28 AM (DMUuz)

39 I read a lot of MAD when I was a yute.

Posted by: JT at September 09, 2018 09:24 AM


I still sometimes look at a picture and wonder if I fold it a certain way if it will reveal something else.

Posted by: Forgot My Nic at September 09, 2018 09:28 AM (LOgQ4)

40 34 It goes on. Free Kindle books are like a wrinkle in
time. I assume they will go away at some point because we can't have
nice things, but I've been reading so many classics lately and I don't
even have to worry about a nickel a day in late fees.

Posted by: Bandersnatch at September 09, 2018 09:26 AM (fuK7c)

Gutenberg Australia has a lot larger selection of "free" stuff. They have not been strangled by Mickey Mouse.

Posted by: Vic We Have No Party at September 09, 2018 09:29 AM (mpXpK)

41 Morning Horde!

Posted by: mpfs, Deplorable Goblin at September 09, 2018 09:29 AM (InoRs)

42 Ah, Chuck, to have an office with that many windows on a corner to let the breeze through would be my dream. Maybe in the remodel . . . .


What a wonderful office. But I have to point out the lack of the elephant's foot umbrella stand filled with sabres and cavalry lances. Dreadful oversight.

Posted by: Kindltot at September 09, 2018 09:30 AM (2K6fY)

43 I understand what will likely be the last Tolkien book, The Fall of Gondolin, has just been released.

Posted by: Northernlurker lurkier than ever at September 09, 2018 09:30 AM (nBr1j)

44 Mort: There were often times when we wanted our take-off to be on the stands at the same time the movie was making the rounds and the satire was written with guesswork, projection, and comic twists and turns to camouflage the fact that none of us involved had seen the actual film.

Nick Meglin: Thanks for blowing MAD's cover as being a responsible, honest magazine.

Mort: We all know MAD never had that reputation!

Posted by: All Hail Eris, Literate Savage at September 09, 2018 09:30 AM (kQs4Y)

45 43
I understand what will likely be the last Tolkien book, The Fall of Gondolin, has just been released.

Posted by: Northernlurker lurkier than ever at September 09, 2018 09:30 AM (nBr1j)

Yes, now available at Amazon for the very low <not> price of $15.

http://tinyurl.com/y82cc9gg

Posted by: Vic We Have No Party at September 09, 2018 09:32 AM (mpXpK)

46 I went on something of a L. Beam Piper binge this last week and read everything gutenberg has by him.

Always kind of interesting to see what authors of speculative fiction of the past questioned and didn't question. I noticed with some amusement that mainstream religion was going to morph or disappear, but thirty centuries from now everyone would still smoke tobacco regularly....

What really struck me, though, was the treatment of the alien shamans/witch doctors in "Oomphel in the Sky." In this story our protagonists have to convince the locals on a primitive planet that the world is not ending. Piper is very anti-socialist as a rule, and bleeding-heart liberal types are a frequent foil for his protagonists. The interesting thing is in this story the bleeding heart types are trying to break the hold the shaman class holds over the local population and educate the younger generation, with little success. Our protagonist succeeds by treating the witch doctors with respect and convincing them to his point of view using their own logic and religious presuppositions....Kind of odd to see the lefties going cultural imperialist and the conservatives (or at least free-market-ist) advocating respecting the native culture!

And yet, the high-handed imposition of another culture in the name of science and progress was typical of the left earlier in this century, and it hasn't completely disappeared now...

Posted by: Grey Fox at September 09, 2018 09:34 AM (bZ7mE)

47 "having an evil female is definitely not permitted nowadays"

Maybe in some circles that's true, but I suspect there are certain folks who would regard the "Lady Doc" as an empowering proto-feminist anti-hero subverting the patriarchy, or something like that.

Posted by: Secret Square at September 09, 2018 09:35 AM (9WuX0)

48 LOL, "East Side Story":

Mao sings:

Make a place for us
A little space for us!
Let us in and such joy you'll get --
Like we gave Tibet!

Please be sweet to us
And give a seat to us!
We'll be quiet and meek and calm --
Like our troops are...in North Vietnam!

Posted by: All Hail Eris, Literate Savage at September 09, 2018 09:36 AM (kQs4Y)

49 Made some progress in A People Tragedy by Orlando Figes about the Rooski Revolution. Some of the background government stuff is necessarily tedious but the weird feudal system they had guaranteed discontent and lagging the world on industrialization. And the military was pissed because the lack of modern weapons sucked ass. Some Tsars realized things had to change and liberalized things but the two Alexanders preceding Nicholas said fuck that shit and redropped the hammer on the serfs. So you can see where things could turn to shit.

Posted by: Captain Hate at September 09, 2018 09:36 AM (y7DUB)

50 35 The only book people are talking about this weekend is Woodward's. Two weeks ago it was Omarosa's. And two weeks before that it was Wolf's.

Funny how that works.
Posted by: Marshall Wyatt Urp at September 09, 2018 09:27 AM (giAl1)

Publishing houses continue to murder trees by publishing unreadable leftwing drivel.

Treebeard weeps.

Posted by: Northernlurker lurkier than ever at September 09, 2018 09:37 AM (nBr1j)

51 Taking down signs, especially ones warning of mine fields, should not be encouraged.

Posted by: Senator Farticus at September 09, 2018 09:37 AM (VWE5i)

52 I'm currently reading and fascinated by "What is Real?" by Adam Becker. From the blurb - The untold story of the heretical thinkers who dared to question the nature of our quantum universe.

If you have always been troubled by the Copenhagen orthodoxy, or if the many-worlds interpretation of quantum mechanics makes your heads spin, this book is for you. I've always been a Bohm pilot-wave guy but did not know he was a communist, good reminder that expertise does not translate outside one's field. Interesting topic, well-written, no equations (damn it). Highly recommended.

Posted by: motionview at September 09, 2018 09:39 AM (pYQR/)

53 Also, attempting my first reading of the Bible. Kind of stuck in Exudus... when they start on genealogies, I start to drift....

Posted by: lin-duh

------

The way to read the Bible is to go through the New Testament first.

I'm also told that a good practice is do a few verses a day, every day. Keeps the slow parts from getting tedious.

This reminds me of a story...

When I was in Army Basic Training, we were allowed to have only two books. One was the 'smart book' of general orders, rules, etc. The other was whatever religious scripture you followed and they had camo-covered versions of these if you wanted one. So I picked up a Bible.

One thing I realized early on was that if you weren't doing anything, the drill sergeants took that as an invitation to mess with you. That is to say, unless one was actively busy, you were a target.

Reading your smart book gave you some cover, but the most effective way to avoid that was to read the Bible. I carried it in a plastic bag in my right cargo pocket. Whenever we halted, I pulled it out and started reading and whenever I did that, I was completely left alone.

For example, standing in the chow line, you had to be at parade rest, come to attention and march forward each time the line moved. The sergeants would go down the line and quiz people on general orders and other lore and if you failed - to the end of the line. When they got to me, I was standing at parade rest, one arm behind me back, the other holding the Good Book in front of my face. The sergeants walked right on past and tormented the guy behind me.

I went through Basic in winter (less allergens) and you weren't allowed to linger in the chow hall after you finished. You had to bus your tray and go out and wait in the cold until everyone was done.

So one day instead of doing that, I bussed my tray instead of going out, sat back down and started reading the Bible. No one said anything until it was time to go when I got a gentle tap on my soldier and this otherwise jerk of a sergeant told me it was time to go.

My company thought I was a religious nut.

Oh, and the best part was that I actually did read the Gospels for the first time and started to get serious about religion. The Lord works in mysterious ways...

Posted by: A.H. Lloyd at September 09, 2018 09:39 AM (cfSRQ)

54 Captain Hate, please see last comment in prior thread for your iPad issues.
*exeunt*

Posted by: hogmartin at September 09, 2018 09:40 AM (y87Qq)

55 Don't ask me why but I love well written books about epidemics: cholera, yellow fever, etc.

I can highly recommend this book by Steven Johnson if you're into this type of history.

This one is about the cholera epidemic in London.

The Ghost Map: The Story of London's Most Terrifying Epidemic--and How It Changed Science, Cities, and the Modern World

Posted by: mpfs, Deplorable Goblin at September 09, 2018 09:40 AM (InoRs)

56 "Free Kindle books are like a wrinkle in time. I assume they will go away at some point because we can't have nice things"

Which is one of the reasons I do what I do by reprinting some of these titles in paperback even though they are, for now, available for free online. However, with the imminent (?) merging of Create Space into Kindle Direct Publishing, we're kind of worried about what may happen to our public domain titles since KDP has been MUCH more strict about anything public domain.... worst case scenario we may have to do everything over again on another platform like Lulu or Ingram Spark.

Posted by: Secret Square at September 09, 2018 09:40 AM (9WuX0)

57 I read Tales of the Black Widowers by Isaac Asimov. This is an anthology of short story puzzles (only one is a murder mystery) set in early 1970s New York City. The Black Widowers is a dinner club that meets once a month and the puzzles are always solved by their waiter, Henry. Moderately interesting, one of the things that struck me was that the characters constantly complained about what a $h!t-hole NYC was with muggings and burglaries adding that bit of spice of life in the big city but the characters always just shrugged their shoulders and essentially said, "Eh, whatsya gonna do?" Rating = 3.0/5.

Currently reading The Battle for Moscow by Albert Seaton. Published in 1971, it is an analysis of Operation
Barbarrosa when Germany invaded the Soviet Union in 1941. Seaton shows the lack of any sort of cohesive plan on the part of the Germans and their over-confidence. He quotes German generals that demonstrates that, at the time, they were absolutely convinced that Adolf Hitler was a military genius (they wuz wrong!!!) and, with one exception, unimously agreed with the invasion. The lack of a cohesive plan led to bickering and diverted effort on the part of the upper ranks of the Germans and Seaton argues that they were foolish to think that they could invade the Soviet Union with an army that was mainly foot infantry with horse-drawn artillery and 3500 tanks. No rating yet.

Posted by: Retired Buckeye Cop is now an engineer at September 09, 2018 09:41 AM (5Yee7)

58 I'm continuing through "The Stainless Steel Rat Saves the World," the last novel in this three-volume collection I got from interlibrary loan.

I hadn't planned to read this one, because when I had my own copy (and still might), I saw that it had to do with time travel, and those tales always confuse me. But once I had the book, I decided to try it.

Glad I did. Right now SSR is going after the mastermind of the time attack, which was launched from the Napoleonic era in London. Problem, however-- the French have conquered England, with help from the mastermind.

Oh, and all this is happening thousands of years from Slippery Jim's era, after Earth was destroyed by atomic bombs.

Harry Harrison spins a great story.

Posted by: Weak Geek at September 09, 2018 09:42 AM (eudSQ)

59 I've just started reading Dune. I have read it before but that was so long ago this might as well be the first time.

Some time ago I started watching the movie on YouTube (the whole movie was available at that time) but it didn't capture my attention.

Posted by: Northernlurker lurkier than ever at September 09, 2018 09:42 AM (nBr1j)

60 55
Don't ask me why but I love well written books about epidemics: cholera, yellow fever, etc.



I can highly recommend this book by Steven Johnson if you're into this type of history.



This one is about the cholera epidemic in London.



The Ghost Map: The Story of London's Most Terrifying Epidemic--and How It Changed Science, Cities, and the Modern World

Posted by: mpfs, Deplorable Goblin at September 09, 2018 09:40 AM (InoRs)

---
You should read Defoe's Journal of the Plague Year. Fascinating study of how the last major plague outbreak spread and how people reacted to it.

Posted by: A.H. Lloyd at September 09, 2018 09:43 AM (cfSRQ)

61 ahlloyd,
I'm thinking of trying to do the New Testament first.

Posted by: lin-duh at September 09, 2018 09:44 AM (kufk0)

62 I started advertising my novel on Amazon in July. Seems to work, getting a few dozen buys a month now. Still losing money on it, but more reviews are trickling in. Emphasis trickling, but they're all *good.*

It's a real, real slow trendline, but it is upward. Dry spell this last week though, for some reason.

Posted by: Curious at September 09, 2018 09:44 AM (ZPKQh)

63 I read Son of the Black Sword by Moran favorite Larry Coreia. This is the first book in the Saga of the Forgotten Warrior series. Askor Vadal is a Protector, an elite militant order of roving law enforcers. Everything is good or evil until he discovers his entire life is a fraud and he finds himself of the wrong side of the law
Correia has developed and interesting, magical continent, divided into various houses who compete with each other for land and favor with the central government. The political themes put forth are Moron-approved: freedom, equality under the law, and the corruption of those in power. I'm looking forward to reading further in the series when book II, House of the Assassins, comes out in February.
I also read SPQR X: A Point of Law by John Maddox Roberts. Decius Metellus, the Younger, is back in Rome after his successful campaign versus pirates in Cyprus. He is running for his first office as praetor when he is accused of murder, certainly not a resume enhancement. He must find the real killer in the few days before the election. Reading this one learns much about Rome in 51 B. C. before the Perry Masonesque ending. As in all in this series an interesting, informative book.

Posted by: Zoltan at September 09, 2018 09:44 AM (5EfZz)

64 You should read Defoe's Journal of the Plague Year. Fascinating study of how the last major plague outbreak spread and how people reacted to it.
Posted by: A.H. Lloyd

Thanks for the info!

Posted by: mpfs, Deplorable Goblin at September 09, 2018 09:44 AM (InoRs)

65 Much appreciated, hogmartin.

Posted by: Captain Hate at September 09, 2018 09:45 AM (y7DUB)

66 Oh, and the best part was that I actually did read the Gospels for the first time and started to get serious about religion. The Lord works in mysterious ways...


I read them when the Mel Gibson movie came out and it became controversial.

I realized I couldn't weigh in on the controversy because I was really not up to snuff on my scripture, so I had to read the scripture and I read the whole New Testament. Then I got curious about translations and original sources and then I started digging in to other texts like the so called Gnostic Gospels.

Then I found out that the whole world had just read Dan Brown and I'd missed it, but that's not the point.

The point is that the movie was John, so if you had a problem with the movie you had a problem with John.

And also I really like the Gnostics. They give you a Zen Jesus.

Posted by: Bandersnatch at September 09, 2018 09:45 AM (fuK7c)

67 I understand what will likely be the last Tolkien book, The Fall of Gondolin, has just been released.


I once rode in a gondolin in Venice.

Mine didn't fall over so, I didn't get a novel out of it.

Posted by: naturalfake at September 09, 2018 09:46 AM (CRRq9)

68 The Ghost Map: The Story of London's Most Terrifying Epidemic--and How It Changed Science, Cities, and the Modern World
Posted by: mpfs, Deplorable Goblin at September 09, 2018 09:40 AM (InoRs)


TYVM, mpfs. This sort of thing is definitely my jam. And the local library system has three copies on shelves too! Neat.

Posted by: hogmartin at September 09, 2018 09:47 AM (y87Qq)

69 59 Some time ago I started watching the movie on
YouTube (the whole movie was available at that time) but it didn't
capture my attention.

Posted by: Northernlurker lurkier than ever at September 09, 2018 09:42 AM (nBr1j)

I liked the 1984 version of the Movie more than the made for TV version even though the made for TV version was more true to the book. I have the 1984 version on a VHS tape but I have become so use to HiDef I can no longer watch it. I also have the made for TV version on a DVD and I watch it periodically.

Posted by: Vic We Have No Party at September 09, 2018 09:49 AM (mpXpK)

70 I once rode in a gondolin in Venice.

Mine didn't fall over so, I didn't get a novel out of it.
Posted by: naturalfake at September 09, 2018 09:46 AM (CRRq9)


Common gondolin, or tree gondolin? I think spiny gondolins are extinct in the wild.

Posted by: hogmartin at September 09, 2018 09:49 AM (y87Qq)

71 Thanks for the info!

Posted by: mpfs, Deplorable Goblin at September 09, 2018 09:44 AM (InoRs)
---
I should add that while it's supposed to be fiction, it's pretty accurate. A lot of Defoe's work is based people he talked to and some suppose it was a real manuscript.

It's well written and pretty damn scary as the first cases start popping up. It's almost clinical in how he does the tally of victims by parish and you can see the 'hot spots' spread through London.

Another thing that stood out was the quarantine outside the city. You know the whole zombie outbreak thing? Yeah, that was the plague back in the day. Road blocks were put up and they'd shoot anyone who tried to break through. They also had patrols covering the countryside.

People were tough as nails back then. We have no idea how hard the world can be.

Posted by: A.H. Lloyd at September 09, 2018 09:50 AM (cfSRQ)

72 Seconding the suggestion of Defoe's Plague Year. While I did like (and recommend) The Ghost Map, that cholera outbreak was by no means London's "most terrifying epidemic." No, that was the Great Plague.

By the way, Samuel Pepys's blog (www.pepysdiary.com) is just getting into the plague year now. It's worth reading day-by-day, because of course Sam doesn't know how any of this is going to end.

Posted by: Trimegistus at September 09, 2018 09:51 AM (3Ezy2)

73 Grey Fox, Piper is one of my favorite writers, and is one of the best prose stylist in Science Fiction (IMHO). I re-read him to figure out what he was doing in building paragraphs.

He is not one of those writers that blatantly foreshadows events. When the crisis comes, it comes from a completely surprising direction, and it is never hand-waved away. I think part of that comes from writing mulit-part stories in Analog where each section has its own arc and twists, and pulling together short stories to make books, but I think a larger part was his view of history and his reading and researching history.

He appeared to believe that not only does the individual make history, but if the individual can make history, a bunch of individuals creates a lot of chop and interference. And a lot of getting blind-sided because someone is focusing on the goal, and not able to see the whole situation.

Posted by: Kindltot at September 09, 2018 09:51 AM (2K6fY)

74 That library looks full of toxic masculinity. I heartily approve.

Posted by: josephistan at September 09, 2018 09:51 AM (Izzlo)

75 "Oh, and we've got a new category of readers, escaped oafs and oafettes."

How much longer will this still be called new? Or is it just boilerplate now?

Posted by: Anonymous White Male at September 09, 2018 09:52 AM (9BLnV)

76 Fixing to get ready to commence to begin reading "Target Rich Environment", Larry Correia's new short story collection.

Posted by: That Deplorable SOB Van Owen at September 09, 2018 09:52 AM (lApJ5)

77 27 I've been reading blogs and websites about backpacking. Got all my gear and my base weight is coming in at 14lbs. 4.5ozs. Not bad considering my pack is 4lbs. By itself. Any suggestions on where to look for good trail maps of Gila Wilderness? Also, what resources do backpackers have for finding water sources. Do GPS's really help on the trail? "

Been a few years since I did backpacking, but since I was in Phoenix at the time did a lot of desert hiking. I would rely on really good topographic maps rather than GPS maps - I don't know how rough the area you're going to hike in is, but in box canyons and other narrow spots I could find ways in and out on a detailed topo map that weren't even visible on more ordinary map, and I doubt GPS could do that.

Water - it's probably not allowed now, but never depend on being able to find water in the desert. You won't. If you want to find water, make a trip a week or so before and cache some under some rocks ahead of time.

Funny all this bit about cutting pack weight - when I was a teen, I considered it good as long as I kept my pack weight under 40 lbs. But that included water, at 8 lbs per gallon, and I always carried a minimum of 1 1/2 gallons. If you're hiking in the desert, you may want to think seriously about carrying 2.

Posted by: Tom Servo at September 09, 2018 09:52 AM (V2Yro)

78 Hogmartin,

There is another book I have about the yellow fever epidemic in Philadelphia. Can't remember the title but is was a good read.

Posted by: mpfs, Deplorable Goblin at September 09, 2018 09:52 AM (InoRs)

79 Posted by: lin-duh at September 09, 2018 09:23 AM (kufk0)

2 things- the gps could only be a help. Better to have and not need...blah blah blah

whatever weight you end up with, carry the pack around ALL THE TIME! at home, in the yard, up and down the stairs. Whenever you can. Get used to the weight. Note- I am not a hiker etc., I do know a little about carrying around extra weight. Carry the weight as often as you can. Maybe even an extra 3-5 lbs.

Posted by: weirdflunky at September 09, 2018 09:52 AM (KflMN)

80
The point is that the movie was John, so if you had a problem with the movie you had a problem with John.



And also I really like the Gnostics. They give you a Zen Jesus.

Posted by: Bandersnatch at September 09, 2018 09:45 AM (fuK7c)

---
I think the best line about Gibson's movie was: "If you hated the book, you won't like the movie, either." I think Mark Steyn came up with it. Certainly he used it.

Posted by: A.H. Lloyd at September 09, 2018 09:53 AM (cfSRQ)

81 Almost forgot, I finished Annie's Bones. I had totally forgotten about it until I saw a naturalfake's above-mentioned graf about characters you either love or hate. Not too many likable characters in this one. I feel a tad cheated because the actual murderer was no one mentioned in the first 200 pages. Grudgingly recommended.

Posted by: SandyCheeks at September 09, 2018 09:53 AM (zSRRl)

82 If you are interested there are a variety of Bible reading plans available on the Internet. Every possible area or timeline is available from reading the whole Bible in a year to reading it in three years. Longer time lines might be available but I don't know.
You can also find plans focusing on specific parts of the Bible such as the New Testament or Psalms and Proverbs.

Posted by: Northernlurker lurkier than ever at September 09, 2018 09:54 AM (nBr1j)

83 44 Mort: There were often times when we wanted our take-off to be on the stands at the same time the movie was making the rounds and the satire was written with guesswork, projection, and comic twists and turns to camouflage the fact that none of us involved had seen the actual film.
Nick Meglin: Thanks for blowing MAD's cover as being a responsible, honest magazine.
Mort: We all know MAD never had that reputation!
Posted by: All Hail Eris, Literate Savage at September 09, 2018 09:30 AM (kQs4Y)


The story I heard was that the MAD staff would all go see the movie on opening day. Even though it was usually a serious movie, they'd all be in the back row laughing their heads off (which annoyed everyone else in the theater) because they were busy thinking up ideas for the parody they would be writing when they got back to MAD HQ.

Posted by: OregonMuse, AoSHQ Thought Leader & Contributing Editor, Vanity Fair Magazine at September 09, 2018 09:54 AM (uuPZm)

84 By the way, Samuel Pepys's blog (www.pepysdiary.com) is just getting into the plague year now. It's worth reading day-by-day, because of course Sam doesn't know how any of this is going to end.
Posted by: Trimegistus at September 09, 2018 09:51 AM (3Ezy2)


It's cruel, but please, nobody go and tell him or it'll ruin it.

Posted by: hogmartin at September 09, 2018 09:55 AM (y87Qq)

85 I cannot stress the importance of taking a weather radio with you when hiking... especially in the desert. Did a lot of hiking in the desert when I lived in Vegas. It can rain 20 miles away but if you're in the wrong place at the wrong time....

Things turn on a dime out there and it can be deadly.

Posted by: mpfs, Deplorable Goblin at September 09, 2018 09:56 AM (InoRs)

86 43 ... About the Fall of Gondolin, Christopher Tolkien is around 95 years old now. He states in the preface that this will be the last book. For Tolkien nerds like me it is wonderful that he could do this so long.

Posted by: JTB at September 09, 2018 09:56 AM (V+03K)

87 The 1984 version of "Dune" is terrible. I mean, unwatchable. The best part is the first segment where the Spacing Guild does the risk analysis. After that everything goes down hill.

It's seriously incoherent and turns the books inside out. I rented it back in the day and despised it, re-watched it when the Sci-fi miniseries came out and guess what? It still sucked.

I admit the miniseries has some issues, but also some great casting choices. The Harkonnens are spot on.

Of course, this being a book thread I have to mention "Doon."

Arruckus. Dessert planet. The beer must flow.

Posted by: A.H. Lloyd at September 09, 2018 09:56 AM (cfSRQ)

88 Don't ask me why but I love well written books about epidemics: cholera, yellow fever, etc.



I can highly recommend this book by Steven Johnson if you're into this type of history.



This one is about the cholera epidemic in London.



The Ghost Map: The Story of London's Most Terrifying Epidemic--and How It Changed Science, Cities, and the Modern World

Posted by: mpfs, Deplorable Goblin at September 09, 2018 09:40 AM (InoRs)



When a wee tad, I read :

"The Incurable Wound"

and

"Eleven Blue Men"

by Berton Roueche.

Wonderful true life short stories of medical detection, mostly involving public health.

The technology is dated, of course, but the detection methodology is fascinating as the various parties try to piece together the solution to the medical mystery.

Available (probably) on Amazon. They've been in and out of print a few times.

Posted by: naturalfake at September 09, 2018 09:57 AM (CRRq9)

89 I went on something of a L. H. Beam Piper binge this last week and read everything gutenberg has by him.

... Piper is very anti-socialist as a rule, and bleeding-heart liberal types are a frequent foil for his protagonists.
Posted by: Grey Fox at September 09, 2018 09:34 AM (bZ7mE)


H. Beam Piper was a very good science fiction author back in the "Golden Age" of the 1950s. Sadly, he took his own life back around 1964; so limited output. His politics would be very sympatico with most of us here at the HQ and he would have been a founding member of the Horde.

Posted by: Retired Buckeye Cop is now an engineer at September 09, 2018 09:58 AM (5Yee7)

90 Agree that the David Lynch film of Dune is more weird than good. I did have to do a Google image search to show my daughter that I wasn't joking about Sting's winged codpiece costume.

Posted by: Trimegistus at September 09, 2018 09:58 AM (3Ezy2)

91 Tolle Lege
Oh to spend a day at Chuck's or that Austrian Monastery Library.
Still working on but almost finished Alexander Mikaberidze's The Battle of Borodino.

Posted by: Skip at September 09, 2018 09:58 AM (T4oHT)

92 @89 well, crap -- that strike didn't go well at all.

Posted by: Retired Buckeye Cop is now an engineer at September 09, 2018 09:59 AM (5Yee7)

93 86
43 ... About the Fall of Gondolin, Christopher Tolkien is around 95
years old now. He states in the preface that this will be the last book.
For Tolkien nerds like me it is wonderful that he could do this so
long.

Posted by: JTB at September 09, 2018 09:56 AM (V+03K)

---
The Children of Hurin is one of the most bleak stories I've ever read. It's the kind of thing that a guy would write after witnessing the Somme and having almost all his friends killed.

Do not attempt unless you are feeling abnormally happy.

It's good, but...really, really dark.

Posted by: A.H. Lloyd at September 09, 2018 09:59 AM (cfSRQ)

94 The story I heard was that the MAD staff would all go see the movie on opening day. Even though it was usually a serious movie, they'd all be in the back row laughing their heads off (which annoyed everyone else in the theater) because they were busy thinking up ideas for the parody they would be writing when they got back to MAD HQ.


They were always doing parodies of movies that I was too young to see or wasn't allowed to see so all I knew about the movie would be the MAD version until I saw the real movie five or ten years later. (I'm looking at you, Clockwork Orange).

I think the Poop-Side Down Adventure was the first one I saw in any proximity to the MAD piece.

Posted by: Bandersnatch at September 09, 2018 09:59 AM (fuK7c)

95 86 43 ... About the Fall of Gondolin, Christopher Tolkien is around 95 years old now. He states in the preface that this will be the last book. For Tolkien nerds like me it is wonderful that he could do this so long.
Posted by: JTB at September 09, 2018 09:56 AM (V+03K)

Tolkien's been dead for over 40 years and is still publishing more books than George R.R. Martin.

Posted by: josephistan at September 09, 2018 10:00 AM (Izzlo)

96 Posted by: mpfs, Deplorable Goblin at September 09, 2018 09:52 AM (InoRs)

In Philadelphia?!! I would have thought that was too far north. The Yellow Fever book I read started with an outbreak that completely destroyed Memphis, TN (killed even those who'd had it before), for there to be an outbreak in PA is disturbing. My deep affection for the modern sewer system was greatly enhanced by reading that book, since the disease itself is ineradicable.

Posted by: Polliwog the 'Ette at September 09, 2018 10:00 AM (uquGJ)

97 I know that short stories aren't for everyone, and I've put up with far too many fucking whiners about them, but if you enjoy that splendid art form I highly recommend Something Rich and Strange by Ron Rash. They all seem to take place in the sticks of North Carolina, west of Berkeley East bka Asheville and close to the Tennessee line and involve vivid people who pretty much want to be left the fuck alone. Rash is a wacademic at Western Carolina University but he probably does that to pay the bills because he's not looking down on the people in his stories at all except for the lowlifes. It's been a long time since I've read stories this compellingly readable and I highly recommend at least this collection (he also writes long fiction which my oldest daughter read "Serena" not about a fatassed Nike tennis player and enjoyed it).

Posted by: Captain Hate at September 09, 2018 10:00 AM (y7DUB)

98 It's seriously incoherent and turns the books inside out. I rented it back in the day and despised it, re-watched it when the Sci-fi miniseries came out and guess what? It still sucked."

Aw come on, Lady Jessica was Hawt!!! and it has Sting prancing around at his best, "I WILL kill him!!!"

Posted by: Tom Servo at September 09, 2018 10:00 AM (V2Yro)

99 85 I cannot stress the importance of taking a weather radio with you when hiking... especially in the desert. Did a lot of hiking in the desert when I lived in Vegas. It can rain 20 miles away but if you're in the wrong place at the wrong time....

Things turn on a dime out there and it can be deadly.

Posted by: mpfs, Deplorable Goblin at September 09, 2018 09:56 AM (InoRs)

The book Deep Survival has a segment about a rock climbing expedition that became a disaster because of bad weather information. The group arrived at the the starting point later than planned and the weather information on the bulletin board had not been updated. Lightening strikes and hypothermia resulted.

Posted by: Northernlurker lurkier than ever at September 09, 2018 10:02 AM (nBr1j)

100 Of course, it's rather sad but true that most of those magnificent-looking European libraries don't actually have content to match their architecture. Endless bound volumes of obscure journals, hairsplitting theological works, volumes of legal precedents, transcripts of political debates, army lists, military campaign histories . . . most of it could be boiled down to a few sentences.

Posted by: Trimegistus at September 09, 2018 10:02 AM (3Ezy2)

101 Can we all agree to ban books with excessive cleavage?

Posted by: Old German Accountant at September 09, 2018 10:02 AM (vXPUJ)

102
Tolkien's been dead for over 40 years and is still publishing more books than George R.R. Martin.

Posted by: josephistan at September 09, 2018 10:00 AM (Izzlo)

---
He also did this strange thing where he finished writing the series before selling the movie rights.

Anyone who thinks Martin is too hard on his characters should read Children of Hurin. It's a freaking bloodbath.

Posted by: A.H. Lloyd at September 09, 2018 10:03 AM (cfSRQ)

103 The 1984 Harkonnens were my standard for evil throughout my childhood.

Posted by: Curious at September 09, 2018 10:03 AM (ZPKQh)

104
They were always doing parodies of movies that I was too young to see or wasn't allowed to see so all I knew about the movie would be the MAD version until I saw the real movie five or ten years later. (I'm looking at you, Clockwork Orange).
---
Or "Midnight Wowboy", which was an X when it came out. So I was a little kid laffing at a parody of a movie about a male prostitute.

My mom loves that the only X-rated movie she's eve seen was downgraded to a PG within about a year.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, Literate Savage at September 09, 2018 10:04 AM (kQs4Y)

105 The Children of Hurin is one of the most bleak stories I've ever read. It's the kind of thing that a guy would write after witnessing the Somme and having almost all his friends killed.

Do not attempt unless you are feeling abnormally happy.

It's good, but...really, really dark."

I've read that one of Tolkien's motivations was to write a story showing the fate of even the best of Men without any redemptive force like Christ to save them.

It is not a "Christian" book by any sense, but it's power is shown by its absence.

Posted by: Tom Servo at September 09, 2018 10:05 AM (V2Yro)

106 "They were always doing parodies of movies that I was too young to see or wasn't allowed to see so all I knew about the movie would be the MAD version until I saw the real movie five or ten years later. (I'm looking at you, Clockwork Orange).

I think the Poop-Side Down Adventure was the first one I saw in any proximity to the MAD piece."

Same situation here. Though just the titles are still pretty classic, such as "Star Blecch III: The Search for Plot", "Jurass-Has-Had-It Park," "Harry Plodder Has Got to Retire," and "The Slobbit: This Adaptation's a Slog" .

Posted by: Secret Square at September 09, 2018 10:06 AM (9WuX0)

107 Lynch's Baron Harkonnen wasn't fat enough. He was just a fat guy, not even as fat as some of those world-record people you occasionally see on the news. The Baron has to be the fattest man you can imagine.

Posted by: Trimegistus at September 09, 2018 10:06 AM (3Ezy2)

108 LOVE the dgar Allan Pooh cartoon!

Yay book thread!!

Posted by: votermom pimping NEW Moron-authored books! at September 09, 2018 10:06 AM (CE6iV)

109 First Sunday Morning Book Thread I've been around for in a while! Jon del Arroz is about to release the third volume of his Young Adult Steampunk Fantasy series. The link can't be shared on Twitter because of a harassment campaign against him, but you can check it out at delarroz.com.

Posted by: Hans G. Schantz at September 09, 2018 10:06 AM (1pQvR)

110 In Philadelphia?!! I would have thought that was too
far north. The Yellow Fever book I read started with an outbreak that
completely destroyed Memphis, TN (killed even those who'd had it
before), for there to be an outbreak in PA is disturbing. My deep
affection for the modern sewer system was greatly enhanced by reading
that book, since the disease itself is ineradicable.
Posted by: Polliwog the 'Ette at September 09, 2018 10:00 AM (uquGJ)



I think the Philadephia Yellow Fever outbreak had something to do with the planters, white and coloreds, fleeing the Haitian rebellion/revolution. A lot of the planters and shippers had contacts in Philadelphia, and a lot of them sailed there.

Posted by: Kindltot at September 09, 2018 10:06 AM (2K6fY)

111 well, crap -- that strike didn't go well at all.

Posted by: Retired Buckeye Cop


Lol. I wondered what the heck you were doin'.

Posted by: JT at September 09, 2018 10:07 AM (hvAUG)

112 Tolkien's been dead for over 40 years and is still publishing more books than George R.R. Martin.
---
"I cut my teeth in the trenches of the Somme
You LARPed your Santa Claus ass through Vietnam!"

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XAAp_luluo0

Posted by: All Hail Eris, Literate Savage at September 09, 2018 10:08 AM (kQs4Y)

113 I still have "A Mad Look at Old Movies" around here somewhere.
Featuring The Thin Man.

Posted by: JT at September 09, 2018 10:10 AM (hvAUG)

114 I think the Philadephia Yellow Fever outbreak had
something to do with the planters, white and coloreds, fleeing the
Haitian rebellion/revolution. A lot of the planters and shippers had
contacts in Philadelphia, and a lot of them sailed there.


Posted by: Kindltot at September 09, 2018 10:06 AM (2K6fY)

---
Not a book, but Bette Davis is amazing in "Jezebel," which is about a yellow fever outbreak in New Orleans. You can see why people wanted her as Scarlett O'Hara in "Gone with the Wind."

After you see it, watch "All About Eve" and see if you can pick up the references to earlier flick. Lots of meta going on in pictures back then.

Posted by: A.H. Lloyd at September 09, 2018 10:10 AM (cfSRQ)

115 Lynch is pretty fucking weird. I pretty much hate most movies but Blue Velvet piqued my interest because Gene Siskel loved it while Fat Egbert had a hissy fit over it because it was "demeaning to Isabella Rosselini" (this from somebody who wrote scripts for Russ Meyer), so my marching orders were clear. I loved every second of it.

Posted by: Captain Hate at September 09, 2018 10:12 AM (y7DUB)

116 113
I still have "A Mad Look at Old Movies" around here somewhere.

Featuring The Thin Man.

Posted by: JT at September 09, 2018 10:10 AM (hvAUG)

---
My father has some of the paperback compilations from way back in the day.

Posted by: A.H. Lloyd at September 09, 2018 10:13 AM (cfSRQ)

117 They were always doing parodies of movies that I was too young to see or wasn't allowed to see so all I knew about the movie would be the MAD version until I saw the real movie five or ten years later. (I'm looking at you, Clockwork Orange).
---
Or "Midnight Wowboy", which was an X when it came out. So I was a little kid laffing at a parody of a movie about a male prostitute.

My mom loves that the only X-rated movie she's eve seen was downgraded to a PG within about a year.
Posted by: All Hail Eris, Literate Savage at September 09, 2018 10:04 AM (kQs4Y)


MAD was great back in the mid-1970s. Those guys poked equal-opportunity fun at everybody regardless of politics. Yeah, I got to read the parody of a movie that my folks would never let be go see and they had no idea how adult-themed MAD actually was. Oh a big plus for a pubescent boy was the fact that MAD tended to exagerate the boobages.

I haven't looked at a MAD magazine in years but have gotten the impression from comments here at the HQ that MAD has devolved into a Lefty-sypmathetic rag.

Posted by: Retired Buckeye Cop is now an engineer at September 09, 2018 10:13 AM (5Yee7)

118 FWIW I was innoculated against yellow fever two years ago. I believe that inoculation is still. I think Uganda has nearly eliminated yellow fever.

Back to books.

Posted by: Northernlurker lurkier than ever at September 09, 2018 10:13 AM (nBr1j)

119 President Obama presented an alternate history last week.

Posted by: Anonosaurus Wrecks, Tyrannosaur Wrangler at September 09, 2018 10:13 AM (+y/Ru)

120 I've read that one of Tolkien's motivations was to write a story showing the fate of even the best of Men without any redemptive force like Christ to save them.
Posted by: Tom Servo at September 09, 2018 10:05 AM (V2Yro)


I was going to mention an earlier discussion about how even the "winners" are gravely and even fatally wounded by the events of LoTR but then I found the comment I had in mind and it turns out that I would have been quoting you TO yourself, and it would have been like that infinite-mirrors thing.

http://acecomments.mu.nu/?blog=86&post=375455#c28914717

Posted by: hogmartin at September 09, 2018 10:14 AM (y87Qq)

121 115
Lynch is pretty fucking weird. I pretty much hate most movies but Blue
Velvet piqued my interest because Gene Siskel loved it while Fat Egbert
had a hissy fit over it because it was "demeaning to Isabella Rosselini"
(this from somebody who wrote scripts for Russ Meyer), so my marching
orders were clear. I loved every second of it.

Posted by: Captain Hate at September 09, 2018 10:12 AM (y7DUB)

---
Yes, and Lynch + Herbert = unwatchable strange.

Posted by: A.H. Lloyd at September 09, 2018 10:15 AM (cfSRQ)

122 Wonderful true life short stories of medical detection, mostly involving public health.

The technology is dated, of course, but the detection methodology is fascinating as the various parties try to piece together the solution to the medical mystery.

Available (probably) on Amazon. They've been in and out of print a few times.
Posted by: naturalfake at September 09, 2018 09:57 AM (CRRq9)

-----------------------------

Couple of anecdotes that I read years ago and, unfortunately, cannot attribute.

1. Mid 1700 (I think) there was an outbreak of typhus, I think it was. A very smart man, doctor, who, while he didn't know what caused typhus, knew enough to know there was a source. Through tracking down patients, he found the source of the outbreak, which was a contaminated well, which he promptly put out of limits. (again, don't remember the specifics) The typhus outbreak subsided. I believe the doctor is known as one of the first to use idea of a "disease vector" when it comes to tracking down the source of an outbreak.

2. Jooo hate. Again, I want to say London, mid-1700. Cholera or whatever everywhere except the Jewish community. Jews are persecuted as witches. Turns out, the reason the the Jews weren't getting whatever disease was running rampant was due to following the laws of the Torah in regards to clean food and water and, I would imagine, getting anywhere near someone who has died of or contracted a disease.

Again, going from memory and may have the specifics wrong.

Posted by: Blake - used scripting salesman at September 09, 2018 10:16 AM (WEBkv)

123 Eh, I'll stick up for Lynch's version of "Dune".

It's a movie that I can rewatch over and over.

If you really really love the novel, "Dune", yeah this two hours condensed version isn't going to do it for you.

But, as its own thing, yeah, it's pretty great.

It looks like nothing else and really gives you an idea of the totally foreign type of "technology" in that world.

The story has been boiled down to a messianic revenge flick.

And, I love the way exposition is handled by us hearing the whispered thoughts of the various character.

A flawed masterpiece in my book.

A big broad sloppy Jackson Pollock of a movie, instead of the pointillistic dot by dot reconstruction some might wish for.

Posted by: naturalfake at September 09, 2018 10:17 AM (CRRq9)

124 110 In Philadelphia?!! I would have thought that was too
far north. The Yellow Fever book I read started with an outbreak that
completely destroyed Memphis, TN (killed even those who'd had it
before), for there to be an outbreak in PA is disturbing. My deep
affection for the modern sewer system was greatly enhanced by reading
that book, since the disease itself is ineradicable.
Posted by: Polliwog the 'Ette at September 09, 2018 10:00 AM (uquGJ)


I think the Philadephia Yellow Fever outbreak had something to do with the planters, white and coloreds, fleeing the Haitian rebellion/revolution. A lot of the planters and shippers had contacts in Philadelphia, and a lot of them sailed there.
Posted by: Kindltot at September 09, 2018 10:06 AM (2K6fY)

The Yellow Fever epidemic in Philadelphia in 1793, carried to the city by those fleeing the Haitian Revolution, killed around 5,000 people in 4 months.
Wiki may have it's faults, but I love looking at the bibliographies of history articles to find new books.

https://tinyurl.com/y89w66kq

Posted by: josephistan at September 09, 2018 10:17 AM (Izzlo)

125 well, crap -- that strike didn't go well at all.

Posted by: Retired Buckeye Cop


Lol. I wondered what the heck you were doin'.
Posted by: JT at September 09, 2018 10:07 AM (hvAUG)


Grey Fox got Pipers name slightly incorrect and I was trying to make the edit transparent: L. H./ Beam Piper --- and then write how great he is as a science fiction author.

We really need a Preview function.

Posted by: Retired Buckeye Cop is now an engineer at September 09, 2018 10:17 AM (5Yee7)

126 More than a few years ago, I took a Creative Writing class taught by a guy named Will C. Knott, who wrote Westerns under that name. They weren't bad. And he was a pretty cool guy.

He also wrote the Longarm series with 2 others. Longarm, referring to the character's schlong.
I didn't care for those.

Anyway, from time to time, he would denigrate Louis L'Amour, and for that reason, I didn't read any of his book for years, but when I did, I was amazed at what a great writer he was.

Posted by: JT at September 09, 2018 10:17 AM (hvAUG)

127 @125 grrrrrrrr ... we really DO need a preview function

Posted by: Retired Buckeye Cop is now an engineer at September 09, 2018 10:18 AM (5Yee7)

128 Posted by: Kindltot at September 09, 2018 10:06 AM (2K6fY)

So a one-off brought about by a particular series of events. The book I read said the disease is endemic in rainforest monkey populations at this point. The fact that someone coming from a tropical place hasn't triggered an outbreak is nearly miraculous, although good sewer systems and mosquito spraying (both of which "environmentalists" want to get rid of) make that miracle a lot easier.

Posted by: Polliwog the 'Ette at September 09, 2018 10:18 AM (uquGJ)

129 You just flirtin' with the Barrel, Buckeye, or is this serious courtin'?

Posted by: Bandersnatch at September 09, 2018 10:18 AM (fuK7c)

130 Yes, and Lynch + Herbert = unwatchable strange.

Posted by: A.H. Lloyd at September 09, 2018 10:15 AM (cfSRQ)


I'm sure this is true because I never had any desire to see it. And frankly Twin Peaks bored the hell out of me so I'm not a completist nor apologist.

Posted by: Captain Hate at September 09, 2018 10:18 AM (y7DUB)

131 (119) I assume he came out (!?) looking good.

Posted by: Burger Chef at September 09, 2018 10:19 AM (RuIsu)

132 Here's a blog post with scans of a MAD issue from 1976, including some classic Christmas carol parodies:

https://mymediadiary.com/?p=4650

Posted by: Secret Square at September 09, 2018 10:20 AM (9WuX0)

133 grrrrrrrr ... we really DO need a preview function

Posted by: Retired Buckeye Cop


I suspected that you're writing in some kind of code.

Posted by: JT at September 09, 2018 10:20 AM (hvAUG)

134 Eh?

Posted by: Fritz at September 09, 2018 10:21 AM (ANJe6)

135 I was going to mention an earlier discussion about
how even the "winners" are gravely and even fatally wounded by the
events of LoTR but then I found the comment I had in mind and it turns
out that I would have been quoting you TO yourself, and it would have
been like that infinite-mirrors thing.



http://acecomments.mu.nu/?blog=86post=375455#c28914717

Posted by: hogmartin at September 09, 2018 10:14 AM (y87Qq)

---
Tolkien knew war and he wrote what he knew. People who focus on elves and dragons ignore just how realistic it is. After each battle he posts the casualty lists and not everyone gets the hero treatment. Hama not only dies but the orcs mutilate the corpse.

And Forlong the Fat? Unhorsed away from his men and cut down.

None of the characters are untouched by war because no one who goes through it comes out the way they went in. So much of today's fiction (and movies) ignore that.

Sometimes the change can be positive - Sam, Merry and Pippin grow in wisdom and become responsible leaders. But they were still changed.

I have zero interest in reading Martin, but do any of his characters show that kind of evolution? I've watched some of the show and it seems that everyone starts bloodthirstly and lusty and just get more bloodthirsty and more lusty.

Seems really superficial.

Posted by: A.H. Lloyd at September 09, 2018 10:23 AM (cfSRQ)

136 The way to read the Bible is to go through the New Testament first.

-
SPOILER ALERT! The Devil did it.

Posted by: Anonosaurus Wrecks, Tyrannosaur Wrangler at September 09, 2018 10:26 AM (+y/Ru)

137 The Devil made me do it!

Posted by: Geraldine at September 09, 2018 10:29 AM (fuK7c)

138 I saw somebody with a Precious Moments bible. Is it illustrated throughout?

Is the Book of Revelation done PM style?

Posted by: All Hail Eris, Literate Savage at September 09, 2018 10:29 AM (kQs4Y)

139

"Outside of a dog, a book is man's best friend.

Inside of a dog, it's too dark to read."

- Groucho Marx


Greetings literate fappers and fappees. Just dropped in to see what condition my condition was in.


Yeah.

Posted by: BackwardsBoy at September 09, 2018 10:29 AM (HaL55)

140 The story has been boiled down to a messianic revenge flick.



And, I love the way exposition is handled by us hearing the whispered thoughts of the various character.



A flawed masterpiece in my book.



A big broad sloppy Jackson Pollock of a movie, instead of the pointillistic dot by dot reconstruction some might wish for.



Posted by: naturalfake at September 09, 2018 10:17 AM (CRRq9)

---
As I recall, it doesn't even have an ending per se, it just sort of stops and Paul makes it rain.

It's like they bought film by the foot and realized that all the oddball crap they threw in with heart plugs and the voice-amp guns had used up almost all of it so they had to wrap it in one minute.

Which, to be fair, is somewhat similar to the book, though at least the book's ending makes sense.

Posted by: A.H. Lloyd at September 09, 2018 10:30 AM (cfSRQ)

141 Not book related but Patterico is getting trolled by relatively sane people. He probably welcomes the uptick in traffic.

Posted by: Captain Hate at September 09, 2018 10:32 AM (y7DUB)

142
Book thread? Like betting on the ponies?

*hic*




Posted by: Hillary Clinton at September 09, 2018 10:33 AM (JEHPy)

143 138 I saw somebody with a Precious Moments bible. Is it illustrated throughout?

Is the Book of Revelation done PM style? "

Oh I'm dying to see the Precious Moments illustrated Story of Onan. And the taking of the First Born in Egypt.

Posted by: Tom Servo at September 09, 2018 10:33 AM (V2Yro)

144 I am . . .

the HOUSE!

. . . keeper!

Posted by: Linda Hunt at September 09, 2018 10:33 AM (3Ezy2)

145 Tolkien knew war and he wrote what he knew. People who focus on elves and dragons ignore just how realistic it is. After each battle he posts the casualty lists and not everyone gets the hero treatment. Hama not only dies but the orcs mutilate the corpse.

And Forlong the Fat? Unhorsed away from his men and cut down.

None of the characters are untouched by war because no one who goes through it comes out the way they went in. So much of today's fiction (and movies) ignore that.

Sometimes the change can be positive - Sam, Merry and Pippin grow in wisdom and become responsible leaders. But they were still changed.

I have zero interest in reading Martin, but do any of his characters show that kind of evolution? I've watched some of the show and it seems that everyone starts bloodthirstly and lusty and just get more bloodthirsty and more lusty.

Seems really superficial.

I watched the third of The Hobbit movies with the kids and granddaughters Friday. Very few people seem to like the movie but there's a scene during the battle in which the elf king sees the all dead elves, which I think captured what you're talking.
On an aside one of the granddaughters said a character couldn't be dead because his eyes were open. I didn't tell her gramma died with her eyes open. Gave me a sad.

Posted by: Northernlurker lurkier than ever at September 09, 2018 10:34 AM (nBr1j)

146 I was going to mention an earlier discussion about
how even the "winners" are gravely and even fatally wounded by the events of LoTR

-
In the end of The Return of the King, heroes Samwise and Frodo leave the Shire that they fought and sacrificed for because they no longer fit in. It's reminiscence of All Quiet On the Western Front when Paul goes home on leave and finds that he no longer fits in there.

Posted by: Anonosaurus Wrecks, Tyrannosaur Wrangler at September 09, 2018 10:35 AM (+y/Ru)

147



And Chuck, I have long contended that no mancave is complete unless it has an inflatable emperor penguin in it.

Posted by: BackwardsBoy at September 09, 2018 10:35 AM (HaL55)

148 'Mornin', Hordelings.

Not much reading last week. Started "Charlotte's Story", about a couple who lived on one of the Florida Keys in the 1930's. Not great literature but entertaining enough.

Posted by: creeper at September 09, 2018 10:35 AM (l0mIQ)

149 Patterico is too big of an egotist to realize his time on the net has come and gone. He once was a semi-serious blogger, over the last two years he has beclowned himself so completely that he's now just another 14 year old girl with a facebook page.

Posted by: Tom Servo at September 09, 2018 10:35 AM (V2Yro)

150 The Emperor Penguin on top of your television set will now explode.

Posted by: That Old Monty Python Sketch at September 09, 2018 10:36 AM (fuK7c)

151 I think Dune actually needs the Blade Runner treatment: jettison all of Herbert's stylistic tics and windy dialogue and boil it down to the core of the story.

Posted by: Trimegistus at September 09, 2018 10:36 AM (3Ezy2)

152 149
Patterico is too big of an egotist to realize his time on the net has
come and gone. He once was a semi-serious blogger, over the last two
years he has beclowned himself so completely that he's now just another
14 year old girl with a facebook page.

Posted by: Tom Servo at September 09, 2018 10:35 AM (V2Yro)
---
There's a blog I haven't visited in forever.

Which reinforces your point.

Posted by: A.H. Lloyd at September 09, 2018 10:37 AM (cfSRQ)

153 And Chuck, I have long contended that no mancave is complete unless it has an inflatable emperor penguin in it.
Posted by: BackwardsBoy at September 09, 2018 10:35 AM (HaL55)


I had never thought of it before, but now it seems so obvious in retrospect.

Posted by: hogmartin at September 09, 2018 10:37 AM (y87Qq)

154 Well, time for mass. Back later if this thing's still live.

Posted by: A.H. Lloyd at September 09, 2018 10:38 AM (cfSRQ)

155 I am the Yellow Peril.

Posted by: Fu Manchu at September 09, 2018 10:38 AM (+y/Ru)

156 Bye, A.H. Lloyd.

Posted by: hogmartin at September 09, 2018 10:38 AM (y87Qq)

157 My Emperor penguin isn't inflatable. It's stuffed. But the same size. I think they'd mak e a cute couple.

Posted by: creeper at September 09, 2018 10:39 AM (l0mIQ)

158 Anybody here ever read Robert E. Howard's novella "Skull-Face"? It's basically his take on a Fu Manchu story. Great stuff. Some of the passages would probably give some of the SJW snowflakes of today fatal heart attacks.

Posted by: Trimegistus at September 09, 2018 10:40 AM (3Ezy2)

159 Good morning,Horde, and L'shannah tova to my fellow Members of the Tribe!

Sorry for the O/T, but:

Once again, I am raising money to help in the fight against breast cancer with my team: Love, Hope and Faith. Our walk is on Saturday, October 20th in Dayton, Ohio (which, coincidentally, is also the date of this year's Southwest Ohio Moron Meetup - see sidebar for contact info).

Will you please help out by making a donation - any amount helps:

https://tinyurl.com/yd65da8k

Thank you!!

Posted by: ibguy at September 09, 2018 10:42 AM (vUcdz)

160 As much as I'd like to stay and read more coded messages, I gotta go get some stuff done between monsoons.

Ans BTW ERIS- from the previous blog, I recommended the headlamp to ya, but I suspect you already knew that dincha ???

Posted by: JT at September 09, 2018 10:42 AM (hvAUG)

161 Finished the last "'Cottage Tale of Beatrix Potter"'. Got the sads. Will miss the animal characters the most. The narrator of these books is immensely talented. She created a distinct personality for each human and animal. Amazing. Anyway, I've moved on to T.E. Kinsey's Lady Hardcastle mysteries. Interesting relationship between the main character and her ladies maid, Florence. Basically the maid is considered her equal in all things. Both have kind of mysterious pasts which the author refers to little by little.

Posted by: Tuna at September 09, 2018 10:42 AM (jm1YL)

162 158
Anybody here ever read Robert E. Howard's novella "Skull-Face"? It's
basically his take on a Fu Manchu story. Great stuff. Some of the
passages would probably give some of the SJW snowflakes of today fatal
heart attacks.

Posted by: Trimegistus at September 09, 2018 10:40 AM (3Ezy2)


I read a lot of his Conan stuff but nothing else.

Posted by: Vic We Have No Party at September 09, 2018 10:43 AM (mpXpK)

163 I was going to mention an earlier discussion about how even the "winners" are gravely and even fatally wounded by the events of LoTR but then I found the comment I had in mind and it turns out that I would have been quoting you TO yourself, and it would have been like that infinite-mirrors thing. "

LOL! You actually remembered that? I think I've gotten too used to my relatives, where no one remembers anything I say for more than 5 minutes. Even the important stuff, or more accurately, especially the important stuff. I don't get no respect, I tell ya, no respect!

Posted by: Tom Servo at September 09, 2018 10:45 AM (V2Yro)

164 Months back the horde recommended a reading list to me at my request. I have been working through it slowly.
Right now I am reading Fielding's, Tom Jones. I am only 100 pages in. It takes a while to get used to the sentence structure, say compared to a Patterson "action novel". LOL. I have been avoiding it for a while because it is so big.


I got a nice footnoted copy, so I can understand it as well as possible. So far so good.

Somewhere a long the way I became aware that it is considered the first English language novel of the "modern style".

If the person who recommended it to me is out there, can you tell me why you recommend it to me? I'd be interested in knowing. Or more generally if anyone wants to comment about the importance of this novel, I'd be happy to hear about it.



Posted by: Cuthbert the Witless at September 09, 2018 10:46 AM (9dzlp)

165 I'd read dune only a few years before the movie came out.
I knew it wasn't going to be great when they handed out a glossary before the movie (has that been done with any other movie?)
While there are parts I don't like including all of the vehicles, it does have some great lines and moments:
Again it is the Legend.
I thought you were dead.
You know how to wear a stillsuit.
& whatever Sting said.

Posted by: InspiredHistoryMike at September 09, 2018 10:46 AM (PpAPO)

166 My father has some of the paperback compilations from way back in the day.
Posted by: A.H. Lloyd at September 09, 2018 10:13 AM (cfSRQ)


MAD really screwed their "maddest" artist Don Martin by including his work in these compilations but refusing him any of the royalties (!)

I don't know how this was resolved, perhaps a lawsuit. Another result is that Martin said screw you to Bill Gaines and worked for "Cracked" for a time (as "Cracked's crackedest artist").

Posted by: OregonMuse, AoSHQ Thought Leader & Contributing Editor, Vanity Fair Magazine at September 09, 2018 10:47 AM (uuPZm)

167 151
I think Dune actually needs the Blade Runner treatment: jettison all of
Herbert's stylistic tics and windy dialogue and boil it down to the core
of the story.

Posted by: Trimegistus at September 09, 2018 10:36 AM (3Ezy2)

It's all about drinking your own urine and riding giant worms.

Posted by: Cuthbert the Witless at September 09, 2018 10:47 AM (9dzlp)

168 it does have some great lines and moments:
Again it is the Legend.
I thought you were dead.
You know how to wear a stillsuit.
& whatever Sting said.
Posted by: InspiredHistoryMike at September 09, 2018 10:46 AM (PpAPO)


Usul has called a big one.

Posted by: hogmartin at September 09, 2018 10:48 AM (y87Qq)

169 One of the adaptations of Dune (I forget which one) screwed the pooch by revealing, at the very beginning of the movie, why the spice was important to the Guild navigators. I just sat there with my mouth open after I heard that in the opening narration. In the book, you don't find out about that until close to the end. I have no idea why the screenwriters thought it best to spoil a major plot point early.

Posted by: OregonMuse, AoSHQ Thought Leader & Contributing Editor, Vanity Fair Magazine at September 09, 2018 10:50 AM (uuPZm)

170 168 it does have some great lines and moments:
Again it is the Legend.
I thought you were dead.
You know how to wear a stillsuit.
& whatever Sting said.
Posted by: InspiredHistoryMike at September 09, 2018 10:46 AM (PpAPO)

Usul has called a big one.

His Name is a Killing Word!!!

Posted by: Tom Servo at September 09, 2018 10:51 AM (V2Yro)

171 Finished reading Kurt Schlichter's People's Republic last night. An entertaining fast-read. Schlichter certainly has his finger on the pulse of the so-called progressive left. The book, along with Indian Country, reinforces the idea that there will be no talking our way out of the future the Borg left appear to want at any cost.

Posted by: Old Dude at September 09, 2018 10:53 AM (LGXGf)

172
I don't know how this was resolved, perhaps a lawsuit. Another result is that Martin said screw you to Bill Gaines and worked for "Cracked" for a time (as "Cracked's crackedest artist").
Posted by: OregonMuse, AoSHQ Thought Leader & Contributing Editor, Vanity Fair Magazine at September 09, 2018 10:47 AM (uuPZm)
---
That's terrible. To me, Drucker and Martin were MAD Magazine. And my Don Martin compilation books were cherished possessions. I still remember one bit about a sadistic limberger cheese-eating dentist struggling to remove a "fleshy obstruction" from his patient's mouth (it was his tongue).

I wonder if this is when MAD started to decline and Cracked began to up its game.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, Literate Savage at September 09, 2018 10:53 AM (kQs4Y)

173 Anybody here ever read Robert E. Howard's novella "Skull-Face"? It's
basically his take on a Fu Manchu story. Great stuff. Some of the
passages would probably give some of the SJW snowflakes of today fatal
heart attacks.
Posted by: Trimegistus at September 09, 2018 10:40 AM (3Ezy2)


Any Fu Manchu story would cause modern day SJWs to organize a book burning. Because "yellow peril" and all that.

Posted by: OregonMuse, AoSHQ Thought Leader & Contributing Editor, Vanity Fair Magazine at September 09, 2018 10:53 AM (uuPZm)

174 LOL! You actually remembered that?
Posted by: Tom Servo at September 09, 2018 10:45 AM (V2Yro)


I remembered that it was pretty much what I wanted to say but wasn't able to articulate.

Posted by: hogmartin at September 09, 2018 10:53 AM (y87Qq)

175 143 138 I saw somebody with a Precious Moments bible. Is it illustrated throughout?

Is the Book of Revelation done PM style? "

Oh I'm dying to see the Precious Moments illustrated Story of Onan. And the taking of the First Born in Egypt.
Posted by: Tom Servo at September 09, 2018 10:33 AM (V2Yro)


How about the Song of Songs?

National Lampoon did it in their Boys' Real Life parody, of course.

Posted by: George LeS at September 09, 2018 10:53 AM (59GGI)

176 Chuck, a lurker, sent me this pic of his library/man cave which is "full
of books and other stuff that spans polar, military, maritime,
colonial, archaeology etc etc."


It's Dirk Pitt's study!

Posted by: I do wish I had a room like that. at September 09, 2018 10:54 AM (c0oRm)

177

...& whatever Sting said.



"I will kill him!" in reference to Paul, IIRC.

I too read Dune some years before they made the move and liked it a lot. I figured they'd never be able to compress a book that size even down into a three-hour-long movie, but they did a fairly good job IMHO.

Posted by: BackwardsBoy at September 09, 2018 10:54 AM (HaL55)

178 Lovely Feyd...

Posted by: Apostate at September 09, 2018 10:54 AM (ZPKQh)

179 If it wasn't for the books by Horde members and a very few others, I would completely despair of recent modern fiction. There are several novels I heard about that got plenty of good reviews. I was able to get them from the library. Never got past the first 50 pages. Clearly my taste in fiction and that of much of the public is different. It's not that my tastes are all high faluting (sp?) as can be seen from my collections of Matt Helm books and 'MASH Goes to ...' stories among others. But I have several centuries of fine fiction to choose from starting, more or less, with The Canterbury Tales and going up through the Patrick O'Brian and Bernard Cornwell books.

Also, I no longer read 'torn from the headlines' political books. (Thomas Sowell is in a class of his own.) I've read many of them over the years and they are usually so ephemeral they aren't worth the time.

Posted by: JTB at September 09, 2018 10:55 AM (V+03K)

180 Small point: Frodo does leave the Shire for good, but Sam returns. That's how the whole thing ends. (He kind of has to, given that he's married, and father of the hottest Hobbette in the history of the Shire, isn't he?)

Posted by: George LeS at September 09, 2018 10:56 AM (59GGI)

181 Your tax dollars at work!

Prosecutors say they were "mistaken" about the meaning of text messages sent by Maria Butina, a Russian woman accused of acting as an unregistered agent of the Russian government and a Republican operative, that purported to show Butina offering sex in exchange for political access.

The acknowledgement by U.S. prosecutors came in court filings late Friday, CNN reported. The government, in July, claimed in a court filing that Butina offered "sex in exchange for a position within a special interest organization."

Posted by: Anonosaurus Wrecks, Tyrannosaur Wrangler at September 09, 2018 10:57 AM (+y/Ru)

182 For some reason Fonebone was always one of my favorite pages. It wasn't a Mad Magazine if it didn't have Fonebone in it.

Posted by: Tom Servo at September 09, 2018 10:57 AM (V2Yro)

183 Well now I need to see the 1984 "Dune" again. It helps to think of it as a David Lynch jam inspired by the novel.

SyFy had an extended version with added scenes, some of them merely voice-overs with concept art.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, Literate Savage at September 09, 2018 10:58 AM (kQs4Y)

184 "James Flexner, George Washington's greatest biographer, called him the "indispensable man" of the American Founding. Without Washington, America would never have won our War of Independence. He played the central role in the Constitutional Convention and, as our first President, set the precedents that define what it means to be a constitutional executive: strong and energetic, aware of the limits of authority but guarding the prerogatives of office. Washington not only rejected offers to make him king, but was one of the first leaders in world history to relinquish power voluntarily. His peaceful transfer of the presidency to John Adams in 1797 inaugurated one of America's greatest democratic traditions."-Dr. Matthew Spalding, Heritage

We live in the Arrogant Age. We judge George Washington to see if he measures up to our high standards and many find him wanting.

In an era when slavery was as common as breathing, and in every corner of the world, Washington trained his slaves for independence and then freed them. Ask yourself; would you have done so? We all assume we would have, we hope we would have--but would we have? Really?

We see faceless bureaucrats boast of abusing their position, and judges who scribble their preferences on the Constitution and call it law. But Washington said "The Constitution which at any time exists, till changed by an explicit and authentic act of the whole people, is sacredly obligatory upon all. The very idea of the power and the right of the people to establish Government presupposes the duty of every individual to obey the established Government. All obstructions to the execution of the Laws, all combinations and associations, under whatever plausible character, with the real design to direct, control, counteract, or awe the regular deliberation and action of the constituted authorities, are destructive of this fundamental principle, and of fatal tendency."

We see academics teach young people to suppress speech they disagree with. But Washington said this: "If the freedom of speech is taken away then dumb and silent we may be led, like sheep to the slaughter."

Now, the businessmen who run giant Social Media Corporations are routinely suppressing traffic, censoring and shadowbanning even mainstream conservative bloggers, educators, candidates and sitting congressmen. Just to be arrogant jerks, they even shut down the president's Twitter feed. They claimed it was an accident. It wasn't. They don't dare do it--yet. But they want to.

And when the Deep State of his day whispered "Let us make you Ruler!", Washington rebuked them. The Father of our Country resisted the temptation to tyranny. Hillary Clinton and Barack Obama did not.

He was not perfect. He could swear, gamble, carouse and womanize. But when it counted, he always put his country first. Kind of reminds me of someone...

Maybe we should be measuring ourselves to see if we live up to his standard.

Posted by: The Gipper Lives at September 09, 2018 10:58 AM (Ndje9)

185 What's all this about books now?

Posted by: Cicero (@cicero) at September 09, 2018 10:59 AM (pOCaF)

186 Vic: if you've only read Conan stories, then RUN to the nearest bookstore and pick up a compilation of Howard's Solomon Kane tales.

As to Skull-Face, oh boy -- it's pretty damned racist, no lie. Basically everyone on Earth who isn't white is part of a giant evil conspiracy. But the leader is (spoiler alert) an UNDEAD ATLANTEAN WIZARD! Beat that, Sax Rohmer!

Posted by: Trimegistus at September 09, 2018 11:00 AM (3Ezy2)

187 Love the library pic lurker Chuck.
If penguins are added as a requirement are they compatible with cats?

Posted by: InspiredHistoryMike at September 09, 2018 11:00 AM (PpAPO)

188 I see that Chuck's man cave has an impressive artificial penguin. I hope he just admires penguins and this isn't a hint of something darker.

Posted by: Cicero (@cicero) at September 09, 2018 11:01 AM (pOCaF)

189 Vic, thanks for the tip on Gutenberg Australia up above !

A treasure trove indeed.

Posted by: sock_rat_eez - they are gaslighting us 24/365 at September 09, 2018 11:03 AM (58Au8)

190 I'll just go ahead and say what I assume we've all been thinking for the past two hours: I want to see AtC win that penguin at a carnival game or something and then bring it home on the bus with her. This is what I want.

Posted by: hogmartin at September 09, 2018 11:04 AM (y87Qq)

191 Dance party!

Dickless Nixon, Occasional Fiasco, et al. shake their booties!

https://bit.ly/2MXy7tM

Posted by: Anonosaurus Wrecks, Tyrannosaur Wrangler at September 09, 2018 11:04 AM (+y/Ru)

192 Those monks in Austria didn't really get the whole "austerity" thing, did they?

Posted by: Cicero (@cicero) at September 09, 2018 11:04 AM (pOCaF)

193 162 ... Robert Howard wrote a lot of non-Conan stories. There's the Kull series of course. But he wrote pure horror, some of which is still terrifying, and humorous country yokel and cowboys pieces that are still funny. It's worth checking out all his works.

Posted by: JTB at September 09, 2018 11:05 AM (V+03K)

194 Glad to read all these memories of Mad Magazine movie parodies. One I recall showed three frames of Marlon Brando on his Harley from The Wild One before writing "this is someone we understood unlike Lawrence of Arabia".

Posted by: Captain Hate at September 09, 2018 11:06 AM (y7DUB)

195 The floor of that Austrian monastery makes me dizzy.

Posted by: irright at September 09, 2018 11:06 AM (RVcmP)

196 164

If the person who recommended it to me is out there, can you tell me why you recommend it to me? I'd be interested in knowing. Or more generally if anyone wants to comment about the importance of this novel, I'd be happy to hear about it.



Posted by: Cuthbert the Witless at September 09, 2018 10:46 AM (9dzlp)


Exactly why someone would emphasize "modern" I don't know. It would almost certainly involve the speaker's own theory of what "modern" and "novel" involve. And thus be pretty weak, in all probability. In some ways it's even a bit like a "postmodern" book, in that Fielding is constantly reminding you "I'm the narrator, and I'm telling the story."

Or maybe it's a reference to the way Tom's character does decline. In the Lady Bellaston episode, Tom is not acting spontaneously, as with Molly or Mrs Fitzgerald. He's a kept boy toy, and knows it.

But I'll cite another reader. Coleridge thought it was one of the greatest plots of all time. And it is a classic clockwork plot.

And it's funny. It's easy to miss this if you're not used to reading 18th C prose. I'm not sure why this is, but an unfamiliar style can sometimes hide things like that, so you don't catch things like Square being caught in a triangular closet. At least not until a later reading.

Posted by: George LeS at September 09, 2018 11:06 AM (59GGI)

197 George RR Martin has some great sci-fi short stories.

Sand Kings, Guardians, A Song for Lya.

Posted by: BourbonChicken at September 09, 2018 11:06 AM (rnAwa)

198 Any Fu Manchu story would cause modern day SJWs to organize a book burning. Because "yellow peril" and all that."

The first Fu Manchu movie, with Myrna Loy and Boris Karloff, is cringeworthy at almost every point, probably the most racist movie since "Birth of a Nation." And that makes it hilarious, at least to me. (Mask of Fu Manchu, 1932)

I've posted about this one before, it's basically a pretty bad movie with a terrible script, with two incredibly great actors who got contractually shoehorned into starring in it. And it's clear that they decided to both just go completely over the top in every scene they're in, chewing up the scenery and spitting it out. I imagine that I can almost see them looking at each other, giving a wink as if to say "hey watch what I'm gonna do next!" Kinda what John Lithgow did in Buckaroo Banzai.

Posted by: Tom Servo at September 09, 2018 11:07 AM (V2Yro)

199 Mike Rowe's mom wrote a book.

Its basically a biography about her mom and her life, but what's interesting is this, which Rowe posted this morning:

Until yesterday, the #1 book on Barnes and Noble was called, "Fear," a rather depressing tome designed to scare and divide the country even further than it already is. This morning, "Fear" has been upended - temporarialy, anyway - by a book about laughter and love. And hope.

Mom's book is #1 on Barnes and Noble. The pre-orders have defied expectations. I called her on the way to church to give her the news.


Pre-order info and book synopsis here
http://mikerowe.com/momsbook/

Doesn't sound like my particularly sort of book but it might be yours. Plus, stick it to the publishers.

Posted by: Christopher R Taylor at September 09, 2018 11:08 AM (39g3+)

200 It's been decades but the classic MAD title style is still there: "CS Oy: Miami", "Mission: Insufferable".

Posted by: All Hail Eris, Literate Savage at September 09, 2018 11:09 AM (kQs4Y)

201 Please secure the electrical cord trailing across the floor near the desk.

Posted by: OSHA at September 09, 2018 11:10 AM (DMUuz)

202 I am not a Zane Gray fan, hes a bit too pulpy and melodramatic for me. The descriptions are lush but not in an immersive way. L'Amour's descriptions feel like you're riding through them. Gray's are just sort of poured over your head.

Posted by: Christopher R Taylor at September 09, 2018 11:10 AM (39g3+)

203 If you're feeling put upon by life, I can assure you that things couldn't be better than they are, contrasted with the conditions in and around Stalingrad.during the winter of '42-'43.
Posted by: Mike Hammer, etc., etc. at September 09, 2018 09:10 AM (CDGwz)


I don't remember if I read that one first, or Harrison Salisbury's "The 900 Days: The Siege of Leningrad."

Beevor paints such a devastating portrait of the Russians, as they dealt with the Germans on their front, but...

SPOILER ALERT

When the tables are turned, it's sweet sweet revenge.

Whereas the story of Leningrad, while obviously the Rooskies eventually broke the siege, and as we all know now, the Germans eventually lost the war, the city itself have never really recovered from what they had to experience. The now re-renamed city, St. Petersburg, is a stunningly beautiful place, and a pall of sadness hangs over it.

So yeah, if you think you have it tough... read that one, what those civilians had to deal with, as the Hun held a noose around their necks.

Posted by: BurtTC at September 09, 2018 11:11 AM (cY3LT)

204 Greetings:

Readings:

1) "The Field of Blood" by Nicholas Morton tells the story of the 12th Century attempts by the Crusaders to capture Aleppo, Syria. And the parallels with today's Syria are so exacting that the author had to add an Afterword acknowledging that Syria is now what it ever was and probably always will be.

2) "Skin in the Game" by Nassim Nicholas Taleb is kind of a dense read initially but is the Anti-Obama "Skin" and tells how "risk" which is being totally removed from our Prog Elites lives is the thing that keeps humanity on the straight and narrow or at least on the road-bed.

Posted by: 11B40 at September 09, 2018 11:11 AM (evgyj)

205 190 I'll just go ahead and say what I assume we've all been thinking for the past two hours: I want to see AtC win that penguin at a carnival game or something and then bring it home on the bus with her. This is what I want.
Posted by: hogmartin at September 09, 2018 11:04 AM (y87Qq)
---
And the looks on the other passengers' faces as she strokes the penguin and says "Soon, my child...SOON"

Posted by: All Hail Eris, Literate Savage at September 09, 2018 11:12 AM (kQs4Y)

206 I remember a Mac parody of Dirty Harry. After Dirty kills the bad guy in the movie in a questionable shooting, he throws his badge away. In the parody he says that they'll never let him keep this after this and throws his actor's union card away. A few weeks later, Clint Eastwood sent in a photo of himself reading Mad upside down.

Posted by: Anonosaurus Wrecks, Tyrannosaur Wrangler at September 09, 2018 11:12 AM (+y/Ru)

207 With all the thunderstorms, I am once again afflicted by brutal cluster headaches. (Migraines for men.) And that has made my reading turn lighter; I just can't handle serious stuff. (After Virtue has been put aside, and even Norman Friedman's latest is just too much.)

So my last was rereading Michael Gilbert's Black Seraphim, which is fun, Gilbert being a long-time favorite of mine. But after this appalling summer, I'm running out of old favorites. I've been through all my Bill James, all the Nero Wolfe I could find, Saki, etc. PG too. Now it seems we've got at least another week of this shit.

Well, at least we got our roof patched.

Posted by: George LeS at September 09, 2018 11:15 AM (59GGI)

208 What the film version of Dune got right, it got really right, but it got a lot very wrong, including some massive violations of the story and totally mistaken additions. But those sets and the casting (except Paul), the effects, etc. It was a really difficult movie to make and they did okay given the source material.

Posted by: Christopher R Taylor at September 09, 2018 11:15 AM (39g3+)

209 The acknowledgement by U.S. prosecutors came in
court filings late Friday, CNN reported. The government, in July,
claimed in a court filing that Butina offered "sex in exchange for a
position within a special interest organization."
Posted by: Anonosaurus Wrecks, Tyrannosaur Wrangler at September 09, 2018 10:57 AM (+y/Ru)


They mixed the [place Weinstein starlet here] intercepts into the Russian Collaborator files by accident.

oops

Posted by: Kindltot at September 09, 2018 11:15 AM (2K6fY)

210 191
Dance party!



Dickless Nixon, Occasional Fiasco, et al. shake their booties!



https://bit.ly/2MXy7tM





Posted by: Anonosaurus Wrecks, Tyrannosaur Wrangler at September 09, 2018 11:04 AM (+y/Ru)


And this is the time on Sporckets when the commies dance.
Dance Commies Dance.


SPROCKETS!


Posted by: Dieter at September 09, 2018 11:15 AM (9dzlp)

211 I'll just go ahead and say what I assume we've all been thinking for the past two hours: I want to see AtC win that penguin at a carnival game or something and then bring it home on the bus with her. This is what I want.
Posted by: hogmartin at September 09, 2018 11:04 AM


Not to harsh your mellow, but the fly in that ointment is the 'You must be this tall' sign in front of the carnival game.

Posted by: Duncanthrax at September 09, 2018 11:16 AM (DMUuz)

212 Greetings:

Have you all HeadQuarters type ever thought about adding a "Book Club" type feature to your Thread ???

Perhaps a fiction one and/or a non-fiction one ???

Requesting suggestions from readers (or others) and announcing the selection(s) a couple of weeks ahead ???

And then having a Discussion Sunday ???

Posted by: 11B40 at September 09, 2018 11:16 AM (evgyj)

213 The movie Airplane! was a full-length Mad Magazine parody of an earlier movie that had been played straight

Posted by: Ignoramus at September 09, 2018 11:16 AM (1UZdv)

214 Doesn't sound like my particularly sort of book but it might be yours. Plus, stick it to the publishers.
Posted by: Christopher R Taylor at September 09, 2018 11:08 AM (39g3+)


Having nothing to do with Mike Rowe's mom, but my impression is that, lists of bestseller books are a lot like the pop music charts. In that they contain, not so much what is good, but what some subset of the population have been hooked into, which often reflects, again, not quality, but a groupthink mentality, which as often as not is indicative of just how easily duped people can be, by hooks that are familiar, and not anything deeper than that.

Posted by: BurtTC at September 09, 2018 11:17 AM (cY3LT)

215 National Lampoon did it in their Boys' Real Life parody, of course.
Posted by: George LeS at September 09, 2018 10:53 AM (59GGI)


Oh wait, is that the one where there's a drawing of a bunch of happy, smiling boy scouts sitting around a campfire and then you look closer and you suddenly realize... AARGH IT'S A CIRCLE JERK!?

Posted by: OregonMuse, AoSHQ Thought Leader & Contributing Editor, Vanity Fair Magazine at September 09, 2018 11:18 AM (uuPZm)

216 I like that you can pretty much tell how old everyone is by which MAD parodies they remember.

Some of you are children, some are geezers, and some a Just the Right Age.

Posted by: Bandersnatch at September 09, 2018 11:19 AM (fuK7c)

217 I see that Chuck's man cave has an impressive artificial penguin. I hope he just admires penguins and this isn't a hint of something darker.
Posted by: Cicero (@cicero) at September 09, 2018 11:01 AM


Come over to the dark side, sudo.

Posted by: Linux at September 09, 2018 11:20 AM (DMUuz)

218 Having nothing to do with Mike Rowe's mom, but my impression is that, lists of bestseller books are a lot like the pop music charts.

Especially back in the days of payola. Almost all the best seller lists are rigged, with an occasional outlier getting through.

I just started reading a book called "The Silver Pigs" its the first in a series of Roman-era mysteries (set earlier than the SPQR and Sub Rosa series). Its pretty well done in terms of history and plot, but on top of that its hilarious, and I'm really enjoying it.

Posted by: Christopher R Taylor at September 09, 2018 11:20 AM (39g3+)

219

The new/old The Outer Limits did a great episode of that story with a bunch of the Bridges family on it back in the '90's.

Posted by: BackwardsBoy at September 09, 2018 11:20 AM (HaL55)

220 The movie Airplane! was a full-length Mad Magazine parody of an earlier movie that had been played straight
Posted by: Ignoramus at September 09, 2018 11:16 AM (1UZdv)


The first time I saw it, I legitimately thought Kentucky Fried Movie was a Mad spinoff (it was the first ZAZ movie I ever saw).

Posted by: hogmartin at September 09, 2018 11:21 AM (y87Qq)

221 212 Greetings:

Have you all HeadQuarters type ever thought about adding a "Book Club" type feature to your Thread ???

Perhaps a fiction one and/or a non-fiction one ???

Requesting suggestions from readers (or others) and announcing the selection(s) a couple of weeks ahead ???

And then having a Discussion Sunday ???
Posted by: 11B40 at September 09, 2018 11:16 AM (


I've avoided doing a "book club" thing because ace has done them in the past and is threatening to do one again. So if I start one up, he'll start another one up the next day.

Hmmm...

What does that remind me of...?

Posted by: OregonMuse, AoSHQ Thought Leader & Contributing Editor, Vanity Fair Magazine at September 09, 2018 11:21 AM (uuPZm)

222 The book Deep Survival has a segment about a rock climbing expedition that became a disaster because of bad weather information. The group arrived at the the starting point later than planned and the weather information on the bulletin board had not been updated. Lightening strikes and hypothermia resulted.

----------

Lightning and hypothermia? Must have been awful.

Posted by: George Donner at September 09, 2018 11:22 AM (pOCaF)

223 I just checked, the 1984 Dune is available, full length, on YouTube.

Posted by: Northernlurker, but call me Teem at September 09, 2018 11:22 AM (nBr1j)

224 I see OM Is a contributing editor to Vanity Fair Magazine as well. But then, aren't we all?

Posted by: Christopher R Taylor at September 09, 2018 11:23 AM (39g3+)

225 Just now re-reading Keith Laumer's "A Trace of Memory"

Boy howdy could that man write.

Retief.

The Bolo stories.

The Imperium novels.

And one of my all time favorite sci-fi novels, "A Plague Of Demons"

Posted by: TANSTAAFL at September 09, 2018 11:23 AM (T09ml)

226 Lightning and hypothermia? Must have been awful.
Posted by: George Donner at September 09, 2018 11:22 AM (pOCaF)

The group, expecting a quick and easy climb, dressed in cotton. They got caught in rain, which led to the hypothermia.

Posted by: Northernlurker, but call me Teem at September 09, 2018 11:23 AM (nBr1j)

227 Whereas the story of Leningrad, while obviously the Rooskies eventually broke the siege, and as we all know now, the Germans eventually lost the war, the city itself have never really recovered from what they had to experience. The now re-renamed city, St. Petersburg, is a stunningly beautiful place, and a pall of sadness hangs over it.

Posted by: BurtTC at September 09, 2018 11:11 AM (cY3LT)


That's actually a pretty good description of Russian literature.

Posted by: OregonMuse, AoSHQ Thought Leader & Contributing Editor, Vanity Fair Magazine at September 09, 2018 11:23 AM (uuPZm)

228 Cotton kills. It is known.

Posted by: Bandersnatch at September 09, 2018 11:24 AM (fuK7c)

229 Having nothing to do with Mike Rowe's mom, but my impression is that, lists of bestseller books are a lot like the pop music charts.
----------------------------
Especially back in the days of payola. Almost all the best seller lists are rigged, with an occasional outlier getting through.

I just started reading a book called "The Silver Pigs" its the first in a series of Roman-era mysteries (set earlier than the SPQR and Sub Rosa series). Its pretty well done in terms of history and plot, but on top of that its hilarious, and I'm really enjoying it.
Posted by: Christopher R Taylor at September 09, 2018 11:20 AM (39g3+)


That's where the peace of it comes, I suppose. If you like something, you can ignore the hoohah of the music industrial complex and the publishing industrial complex, find your interests, and go to town, with an almost endless supply of good stuff that would never ever even get a hint of interest on the popularity lists.

Posted by: BurtTC at September 09, 2018 11:24 AM (cY3LT)

230 224 I see OM Is a contributing editor to Vanity Fair Magazine as well. But then, aren't we all?
Posted by: Christopher R Taylor at September 09, 2018 11:23 AM (39g3+)


If Kurt Eichenwald can do it, so can you.

Posted by: OregonMuse, AoSHQ Thought Leader & Contributing Editor, Vanity Fair Magazine at September 09, 2018 11:24 AM (uuPZm)

231
And it's funny. It's easy to miss this if you're
not used to reading 18th C prose. I'm not sure why this is, but an
unfamiliar style can sometimes hide things like that, so you don't catch
things like Square being caught in a triangular closet. At least not
until a later reading.

Posted by: George LeS at September 09, 2018 11:06 AM (59GGI)


The prose has slowed me down. I think when a inexperienced reader like me delves into such a book, we tend to think that the author must be communicating stuffy big thoughts, when in fact it's comedy/humor.
The hard parts for me to figure out are when the narrator goes on about the familiar religious dogma of the day, explaining that you know he "agrees with Aristotle" on this or that fact. I know I am missing some of the humor. I also read that the book in it's day was a bit over the top in its depictions of sexual situations and such. But yeah, over the top has a different meaning these days.
Gonna finish it though, even though I am afraid I am missing a whole lot of it. Expand my horizon's I must.

Posted by: Dieter at September 09, 2018 11:25 AM (9dzlp)

232 Lightning and hypothermia? Must have been awful.
Posted by: George Donner at September 09, 2018 11:22 AM (pOCaF)

The group, expecting a quick and easy climb, dressed in cotton. They got caught in rain, which led to the hypothermia.
Posted by: Northernlurker, but call me Teem at September 09, 2018 11:23 AM (nBr1j)

------

Meh. There was supposed to be a joke in there somewhere.

Posted by: Cicero (@cicero) at September 09, 2018 11:25 AM (pOCaF)

233 Dieter sock off

Posted by: Cuthbert the Witless at September 09, 2018 11:25 AM (9dzlp)

234

The Sand Kings that is.

Posted by: BackwardsBoy at September 09, 2018 11:25 AM (HaL55)

235 Re: Mike Rowe's mom's book...he once posted a youtube video of him reading a letter from his mom. She was chastising him for not contacting her or his dad for too long of a time, and then was relaying the events going on since he had last spoken to her. I don't do it justice, but just suffice to say that it was HILARIOUS.

She's got some skills.

Posted by: squeakywheel at September 09, 2018 11:25 AM (BMweM)

236 If Kurt Eichenwald can do it, so can you.
Posted by: OregonMuse, AoSHQ Thought Leader & Contributing Editor, Vanity Fair Magazine at September 09, 2018 11:24 AM (uuPZm)

Speaking of Kurt Eichenwald. I watched an episode of Parts Unknown last night, which took Anthony Bourdain to Tokyo.

He got into the origin of tentacle pron.

Posted by: Northernlurker, but call me Teem at September 09, 2018 11:26 AM (nBr1j)

237 NYT Best Seller list is based on copies moved in a given week at a super-secret (=widely-known) list of bookstores in greater NYC. I don't know what B&N's best-seller list is based on -- is it sales in the chain, sales overall (via BookScan), or just what they want to push this week?

Point is, ALL of them are bogus in some way. That's why I love the recommendations here every week: I can find out about books I might like, rather than books someone wants me to buy.

Posted by: Trimegistus at September 09, 2018 11:26 AM (3Ezy2)

238 MAD had a lot of cultural influence. It was also involved in court cases that defined expansive bounds for parody as an exception to copyright. And it took no ads!

Posted by: Ignoramus at September 09, 2018 11:27 AM (1UZdv)

239 Some of you are children, some are geezers, and some a Just the Right Age.
Posted by: Bandersnatch at September 09, 2018 11:19 AM (fuK7c)

---

And what age might that be?

Posted by: SMH - Future proprietress of Bartertown at September 09, 2018 11:27 AM (HWisp)

240 Posted by: BurtTC at September 09, 2018 11:11 AM (cY3LT)

That's actually a pretty good description of Russian literature.
Posted by: OregonMuse, AoSHQ Thought Leader & Contributing Editor, Vanity Fair Magazine at September 09, 2018 11:23 AM (uuPZm)


I have a Kindle sitting here in front of me, and can barely get myself to turn it on. I'm a stubborn old cuss, and still prefer my paper books...

And yet, I grabbed a free version of Dostoevsky's short stories, have only yet read a couple of them... and do not recall anything else I've read in many many years touching me the way these stories do. I was actually crying at the end of one of them, more because of its beauty than because of the sadness. Such a simple thing, it was too.

Posted by: BurtTC at September 09, 2018 11:28 AM (cY3LT)

241 223 I just checked, the 1984 Dune is available, full length, on YouTube.
Posted by: Northernlurker, but call me Teem at September 09, 2018 11:22 AM (nBr1j)

Walk without rhythm and you won't attract the worm.

Posted by: Insomniac at September 09, 2018 11:29 AM (NWiLs)

242 Jake Holenhead -- you will be pleased to hear book 3 of Argonauts is nearly completed. I've already pinged my cover artist and editor to be ready for action. Unfortunately said editor is a bit booked so it probably will be early next year when I put the book out for sale...but it is coming!
Yep, this series is not hard science fiction so the science doesn't get explained much. This is more in the "planetary romance" genre like Leigh Brackett and Burroughs. (BTW, S.M. Stirling's In the Courts of the Crimson Kings is an *excellent* planetary romance) For you Morons giggling in the back, "romance" in this context does not mean it is a kissing book, so there.
Just finished up writing a very silly short story involving sentient pigs, so now it's back to the secret hominid space war, already in progress

Posted by: Sabrina Chase at September 09, 2018 11:30 AM (L59/U)

243 "That's actually a pretty good description of Russian literature."


Robert A. Heinlein's wife Ginny studied and studied and crammed the Russian language so she could read the great Russian novels in the original language.

She reported they were even more bleak and boring in Russian.

Posted by: TANSTAAFL at September 09, 2018 11:30 AM (T09ml)

244 I started SPELLMONGER a warmage sick of war accepts an offer to be the local SPELLMONGER find lost cows, keeping grain from spoiling until the Goblins invaded his Village and changed his quiet life and he has to pick up being a Warmage again and he kills a Goblin shaman with a stone that can multiply his magic powers.

I am enjoying this series so far if you are into Audiobook this is a good long long series 18 hours and the next book (Warmage) is 24 hours long .

Posted by: Patrick from Ohio at September 09, 2018 11:31 AM (dKiJG)

245 198
Posted by: Tom Servo at September 09, 2018 11:07 AM (V2Yro)

Well, no movie with Myrna Loy is entirely cringeworthy. Actually, it'd be a good topic: movies worth watching ONLY because of the actors.

I read one Fu Manchu novel. Can't remember which title, they're like Jeeves stories and hard to keep straight, at least as I age. But Rohmer commits an unforgiveable sin. It ends at the Great Pyramid, with a kind of reverse locked-room situation. Fu is inside the burial chamber, and Nayland-Smith has him completely boxed in. Then he escapes, and we never find out how! You just can't do that in a book of that sort. So I've never been back.

Posted by: George LeS at September 09, 2018 11:31 AM (59GGI)

246 Walk without rhythm and you won't attract the worm.
Posted by: Insomniac at September 09, 2018 11:29 AM (NWiLs)

True on many levels.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, Literate Savage at September 09, 2018 11:33 AM (kQs4Y)

247 "The movie Airplane! was a full-length Mad Magazine parody of an earlier movie that had been played straight"

Airplane was a ZAZ production. The only movie I know of that Mad Magazine ever actually produced was "Up the Academy," a critical and box office flop that the magazine itself parodied ("Mad Magazine Resents Throw Up The Academy") and later disowned.

Posted by: Secret Square at September 09, 2018 11:33 AM (9WuX0)

248 National Lampoon did it in their Boys' Real Life parody, of course.
Posted by: George LeS at September 09, 2018 10:53 AM (59GGI)

Oh wait, is that the one where there's a drawing of a bunch of happy, smiling boy scouts sitting around a campfire and then you look closer and you suddenly realize... AARGH IT'S A CIRCLE JERK!?
Posted by: OregonMuse, AoSHQ Thought Leader & Contributing Editor, Vanity Fair Magazine at September 09, 2018 11:18 AM (uuPZm)


I remember seeing that. An educational experience, it was.

I looked at the picture of the boys, then I looked around at the boys with whom I attended school, and thought "what the hell is WRONG with you people??"

I don't think it ever occurred to me or my friends to engage in such activities, but it was eye opening to realize, there are people OUT THERE who do.

Posted by: BurtTC at September 09, 2018 11:33 AM (cY3LT)

249 Robert A. Heinlein's wife Ginny studied and studied and crammed the Russian language so she could read the great Russian novels in the original language.


I read some Joseph Campbell, the mythology guy, recently. He did that. "Oh, I wanted to read the Russians in the original so I moved to Monterrey and studied Russian for two years".

I would love to be able to do that.

Posted by: Bandersnatch at September 09, 2018 11:34 AM (fuK7c)

250 Fu Manchu books are the most lurid, pulpy, breakneck, over the top things I've ever read. There's literally no point at which you can take a breath, practically every single sentence is a cliffhanger.

Posted by: Christopher R Taylor at September 09, 2018 11:34 AM (39g3+)

251 239 Some of you are children, some are geezers, and some a Just the Right Age.
Posted by: Bandersnatch at September 09, 2018 11:19 AM (fuK7c)

---

And what age might that be?
Posted by: SMH - Future proprietress of Bartertown at September 09, 2018 11:27 AM (HWisp)


Now I am six I'm as clever as clever
So I think I'll be six now for ever and ever.

Posted by: George LeS at September 09, 2018 11:35 AM (59GGI)

252 Robert A. Heinlein's wife Ginny studied and studied and crammed the Russian language so she could read the great Russian novels in the original language.

She reported they were even more bleak and boring in Russian.
Posted by: TANSTAAFL at September 09, 2018 11:30 AM (T09ml)


Boring, eh?

Well, I've read more than a few Russian novels (in English), and nothing by her. Or her husband.

Posted by: BurtTC at September 09, 2018 11:36 AM (cY3LT)

253 There's a canyon with a stream that disappears into a crack in the rock and so there's no exit to that canyon.

Definitely exists, go for a wander in the Maze district. Relatively easy to get ledged up or drop into a box canyon without an exit.

There's one like that outside of Palm Springs, there is a SAR account of a couple found in it. Along with the campsite/body of an experienced hiker who got stuck earlier.

Posted by: Jean at September 09, 2018 11:38 AM (j0Mw7)

254 Poor Eeyore...

Posted by: SMH - Future proprietress of Bartertown at September 09, 2018 11:38 AM (HWisp)

255 Robert A. Heinlein's wife Ginny studied and studied and crammed the Russian language so she could read the great Russian novels in the original language.

------------------------------
I read some Joseph Campbell, the mythology guy, recently. He did that. "Oh, I wanted to read the Russians in the original so I moved to Monterrey and studied Russian for two years".

I would love to be able to do that.
Posted by: Bandersnatch at September 09, 2018 11:34 AM (fuK7c)


Yeah, it would be wonderful to live a life so free of other obligations, to be able to study another language thoroughly enough to be able to then read works one finds "bleak and boring" in their original language.

I guess there weren't enough interesting works in English for her. Perhaps she'd already read them all. Being the soopergenius she must have been.

Posted by: BurtTC at September 09, 2018 11:39 AM (cY3LT)

256 Well, no movie with Myrna Loy is entirely cringeworthy. Actually, it'd be a good topic: movies worth watching ONLY because of the actors.

I don't know if this adheres to what you mean but I've watched almost everything Jim Caviezel is in. Some are just ok but all have positive messages and a few of them were unexpectedly excellent.

Posted by: Captain Hate at September 09, 2018 11:39 AM (y7DUB)

257 Pooh finally snapped.

Pretty sure Disney had something to do with it.

Posted by: SMH - Future proprietress of Bartertown at September 09, 2018 11:40 AM (HWisp)

258 Yesterday, on one of the open threads, I mentioned that I had, but had not yet read, a copy of Erik Larson's "Isaac's Storm" about the catastrophic 1900 Galveston hurricane, which killed at least 6000 people and possibly more.

Other commenters said that it was a good book. I picked it up and started looking thorough it, and almost immediately noticed that September 8 was the anniversary of the hurricane's landfall!

So I dropped everything and set about reading it. I just finished it this morning. It's a detailed account of the people, places, and events. It is arranged into many short chapters that switch back and forth. I recommend it.

It has been raining almost all weekend here, and while certainly not a hurricane, it has added to the ambience.

Posted by: rickl at September 09, 2018 11:41 AM (sdi6R)

259 Poor Eeyore...
Posted by: SMH - Future proprietress of Bartertown at September 09, 2018 11:38 AM (HWisp)


Don't worry about Eeyore. Someone dug him up, and now he writes for a website called Hot Air.

Posted by: BurtTC at September 09, 2018 11:41 AM (cY3LT)

260 The acknowledgement by U.S. prosecutors came in
court filings late Friday, CNN reported. The government, in July,
claimed in a court filing that Butina offered "sex in exchange for a
position within a special interest organization."
Posted by: Anonosaurus Wrecks, Tyrannosaur Wrangler at September 09, 2018 10:57 AM (+y/Ru)

That's basically how things work in Russia. She probably didn't realize that its frowned upon in the west (outside of Hollywood).

Posted by: Jean at September 09, 2018 11:41 AM (j0Mw7)

261 lol

Posted by: SMH - Future proprietress of Bartertown at September 09, 2018 11:41 AM (HWisp)

262 I hereby suggest, nominate, plead and beg, that Mike Rowe be selected to take 'holt of the reins of Parts Unknown, and ride 'er out for a season or three.

No, he's not a famous chef or gastronome, but given that professional kitchens have some of the Dirtiest Jobs, requiring brutally tough work, long hours and often thankless toil, it'd be a natural fit.

And to watch as he darts the egos of countless food snobs would be Ratings Gold.

Plus, he wouldn't be a third world apologist in the manner of Bourdain.

Alas, Bourdain. He left too soon, before mending that feud between him and Fieri. Never understood that one, those two were opposite sides of the same coin, in my view.

So, and Order of Rowe on the Show.

What say ye, Horde?



Jim
Sunk New Dawn
Galveston, TX

Posted by: Jim at September 09, 2018 11:42 AM (QzJWU)

263 I don't know if this adheres to what you mean but I've watched almost everything Jim Caviezel is in. Some are just ok but all have positive messages and a few of them were unexpectedly excellent.
Posted by: Captain Hate at September 09, 2018 11:39 AM (y7DUB)


I try to watch everything Alison Brie is in. Probably not for the same reasons.

Posted by: BurtTC at September 09, 2018 11:42 AM (cY3LT)

264 He got into the origin of tentacle pron.

Posted by: Northernlurker, but call me Teem at September 09, 2018 11:26 AM (nBr1j)


He must've talked about "The Dream of the Fisherman's Wife", then?

Posted by: OregonMuse, AoSHQ Thought Leader & Contributing Editor, Vanity Fair Magazine at September 09, 2018 11:43 AM (uuPZm)

265 Pooh finally snapped.

Posted by: SMH - Future proprietress of Bartertown at September 09, 2018 11:40 AM (HWisp)


Coming from ANYONE but you, at ANY TIME but right now, this would not be so pants-wettingly hilarious. I just laughed so hard I woke the cats.

Posted by: hogmartin at September 09, 2018 11:43 AM (y87Qq)

266 249 ... "Robert A. Heinlein's wife Ginny studied and studied and crammed the Russian language so she could read the great Russian novels in the original language."

As I recall, Heinlein had one of his female characters who did that. In the story he has the character say that sometimes something can be gained in translation. Also, something about she didn't know the purpose of Russian literature but entertainment wasn't it.

Posted by: JTB at September 09, 2018 11:47 AM (V+03K)

267 Oh, the Poo stuff reminds me. I have dipped into The Wind in the Willows.

I'm not sure yet what I think. It's a book my grandmother (born 1896) pushed on me and I didn't quite get as a kid.

I've mentioned here before that while I thought Grammy was quite literate for all that she shoved my way I now know was just pop lit for Victorians.

Anyway, it's quaint. I've already come across the "there's nothing as good as messing around in boats" part that gets quoted everywhere that people who mess around in boats cavort.

I'm thinking now that it's not so much a book children should read as it is a book which should be read aloud to children. There's a lyricism, a poetry, to the text, but the meaning is obscure. I don't today know what a wager-boat is. No wonder I was frustrated at seven.

Posted by: Bandersnatch at September 09, 2018 11:48 AM (fuK7c)

268 Galveston was becoming Manhattan South until the hurricane hit in 1900. The businesses were rebuilt inland in a cow town named Houston.

Houston itself was a real estate promotion by the Allen brothers who had came down from New York to profiteer from running guns during the Texas War of Independence. They had the marketing sense to name the town after a war hero instead of themselves.

Posted by: Ignoramus at September 09, 2018 11:48 AM (1UZdv)

269 I don't think it ever occurred to me or my friends
to engage in such activities, but it was eye opening to realize, there
are people OUT THERE who do.

Posted by: BurtTC at September 09, 2018 11:33 AM (cY3LT)


Same thing is the Frank McCourt's autobio "Angela's Ashes". He talks about how he and a group of his buds used to go to this one hill outside of town and choke the chicken. Their own, not each other's. Like masturbation was some kind of group activity. I'm going AAAARRGGHH what are you doing?

Totes not gay, though. Because he also talks about sneaking a peak through a window at a house with a large family of girls his own age during their bath night.

Posted by: OregonMuse, AoSHQ Thought Leader & Contributing Editor, Vanity Fair Magazine at September 09, 2018 11:48 AM (uuPZm)

270 http://www.traditionalmountaineering.org/Report_Lost_TwoHikers.htm

They found the other hiker's body a few days later.

Posted by: Jean at September 09, 2018 11:49 AM (j0Mw7)

271 I try to watch everything Alison Brie is in.


I trust that you saw she took her shirt off in Glow.

Posted by: Bandersnatch at September 09, 2018 11:49 AM (fuK7c)

272 Always late to the thread but anyway if you are hiking in an unknown area and you have a tablet or phone I recommend back country navigator. It's a great app that has topo maps and acts like a GPS. Much better than paper maps and will give you your location on your screen over laid on the topo.

Posted by: muchas buchas at September 09, 2018 11:51 AM (12cR2)

273
He must've talked about "The Dream of the Fisherman's Wife", then?
Posted by: OregonMuse, AoSHQ Thought Leader & Contributing Editor, Vanity Fair Magazine at September 09, 2018 11:43 AM (uuPZm)

I wasn't paying a huge amount of attention but he interviewed the founder of tentacle pron anime.

Posted by: Northernlurker, but call me Teem at September 09, 2018 11:51 AM (nBr1j)

274 262. Mike Rowe is better eye candy than Bourdain.

Posted by: kallisto at September 09, 2018 11:53 AM (tFdF9)

275 >>>The group, expecting a quick and easy climb, dressed in cotton. They got caught in rain, which led to the hypothermia.<<<

Eh?

FIRE good!

Posted by: Fritz at September 09, 2018 11:53 AM (ANJe6)

276 I'm thinking now that it's not so much a book children should read as it is a book which should be read aloud to children. There's a lyricism, a poetry, to the text, but the meaning is obscure. I don't today know what a wager-boat is. No wonder I was frustrated at seven.
Posted by: Bandersnatch at September 09, 2018 11:48 AM (fuK7c)
---
The chapter on Pan's Island is luminous.

Keep reading.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, Literate Savage at September 09, 2018 11:54 AM (kQs4Y)

277 I wasn't paying a huge amount of attention but he interviewed the founder of tentacle pron anime.


There might be a "founder" of the anime school, but tentacle pron goes way back in Japan.

Bert Cooper has a Japanese woodcut on his wall in Mad Men which is 19th century tentacle pron.

Posted by: Bandersnatch at September 09, 2018 11:54 AM (fuK7c)

278 Coming from ANYONE but you, at ANY TIME but right now, this would not be so pants-wettingly hilarious. I just laughed so hard I woke the cats.
Posted by: hogmartin at September 09, 2018 11:43 AM (y87Qq)

---

E.A. Pooh pretty much did me in.

Apologies to the kittehs.

Posted by: SMH - Future proprietress of Bartertown at September 09, 2018 11:54 AM (HWisp)

279 275 >>>The group, expecting a quick and easy climb, dressed in cotton. They got caught in rain, which led to the hypothermia.

Eh?

FIRE good!
Posted by: Fritz at September 09, 2018 11:53 AM (ANJe6)

It was a rock climb of, I believe, six lengths of the climbing rope.

Posted by: Northernlurker, but call me Teem at September 09, 2018 11:55 AM (nBr1j)

280 The chapter on Pan's Island is luminous.

Keep reading.



Thank you, dear. I shall.

Posted by: Bandersnatch at September 09, 2018 11:55 AM (fuK7c)

281 Speaking of Antarctic tragedies, there is the Mt. Erebus crash of flight TE901.

A DC-10 on a sight seeing tour crashes killing 257. What emerges is an airline that engaged in a cover-up to blame the flight crew when what emerges is slip-shod operations by the air carrier that never briefed the crash crew that the INS coordinates programmed into the plane had changed the night before and were never briefed of the change. The crew were never given a check ride to experience the weather conditions. The airline tried to deny in court that they knew their pilots were flying at low altitude to view Mt. Erebus even though the President of McDonnel-Douglas had sent a personal letter of thanks to the airline for such a flight.

And when the judge, Mahon, issued his ruling; the airline and the government which owned most of the airline set about trying to destroy the judge and sweep the findings under the rug.

One hour documentary
https://youtu.be/yP36X0BsMQ0
Part 1 of a teledrama. 90 minutes
https://youtu.be/VImFx0GrjHE
Part 2 of the teledrama. 90 minutes
https://youtu.be/avnBAtLvVqY

Posted by: Anna Puma (HQCaR) at September 09, 2018 11:55 AM (SW1s2)

282 "I try to watch everything Alison Brie is in. "

Funny how they made her look dowdy as Trudy Campbell in Mad Men.

Posted by: Ignoramus at September 09, 2018 11:56 AM (1UZdv)

283 Slightly OT but look what I just found on my Facebook feed.... what looks like the ultimate historical reenactment mash-up, taking place in Mexico, Missouri, Sept. 28-30. Every era from the Vikings to Vietnam all in one place!

https://www.audrain.org/walk-back-in-time



Posted by: Secret Square at September 09, 2018 11:56 AM (9WuX0)

284 Mike Rowe is better eye candy than Bourdain.
Posted by: kallisto at September 09, 2018 11:53 AM (tFdF9)

---

Considering that Bourdain is mort, Rowe kinda wins by default.

Posted by: SMH - Future proprietress of Bartertown at September 09, 2018 11:56 AM (HWisp)

285 >>>In this book, [Sowell] describes how elites--the anointed--have replaced facts and rational thinking with rhetorical assertions, thereby altering the course of our social policy.

He's given a perfect description of twitter, 11 years before twitter was invented.

Posted by: Steve and Cold Bear at September 09, 2018 11:57 AM (/qEW2)

286 Bourdain doesn't look the best in Parts Unknown.

Posted by: Northernlurker, but call me Teem at September 09, 2018 11:58 AM (nBr1j)

287 Mike Rowe is better eye candy than Bourdain.


Posted by: kallisto at September 09, 2018 11:53 AM (tFdF9)


Probably smells better too.

Posted by: CharlieBrown'sDildo at September 09, 2018 11:58 AM (wYseH)

288 267 Oh, the Poo stuff reminds me. I have dipped into The Wind in the Willows.

I'm not sure yet what I think. It's a book my grandmother (born 1896) pushed on me and I didn't quite get as a kid.

I've mentioned here before that while I thought Grammy was quite literate for all that she shoved my way I now know was just pop lit for Victorians.

Anyway, it's quaint. I've already come across the "there's nothing as good as messing around in boats" part that gets quoted everywhere that people who mess around in boats cavort.

I'm thinking now that it's not so much a book children should read as it is a book which should be read aloud to children. There's a lyricism, a poetry, to the text, but the meaning is obscure. I don't today know what a wager-boat is. No wonder I was frustrated at seven.
Posted by: Bandersnatch at September 09, 2018 11:48 AM (fuK7c)


When asked what I think the greatest modern novel is, I normally answer "Wind in the Willows". You haven't mentioned the humor, probably peaking with the sentencing of Mr Toad. But the first instance is Toad's reaction on first seeing a motor car.

I don't really get the "problem" of unfamiliar language. I do recall that, as a child, I found that one of the joys of reading, finding out about the unfamiliar. And entering a world different than the one I inhabited. Of course, I too had a very literate grandmother. She actually taught me to read with Pooh.

Posted by: George LeS at September 09, 2018 11:58 AM (59GGI)

289 Pooh v. Rowe v. Bourdain. Must be Sunday.

Posted by: Burger Chef at September 09, 2018 11:59 AM (RuIsu)

290 289 Pooh v. Rowe v. Bourdain. Must be Sunday.
Posted by: Burger Chef at September 09, 2018 11:59 AM (RuIsu)

Pooh. By miles.

Posted by: George LeS at September 09, 2018 12:02 PM (59GGI)

291 ...289 Pooh v. Rowe v. Bourdain. Must be Sunday.
Posted by: Burger Chef at September 09, 2018 11:59 AM (RuIsu)

Pooh. By miles.

Posted by: George LeS at September 09, 2018 12:02 PM (59GGI)




Pooh, doing Parts Unknown:

"... Needs more honey. Where's the honey? Oh, bother."

But at least Eeyore could do some of Bourdain's darker, more pessimistic schtick.



Jim
Sunk New Dawn
Galveston, TX

Posted by: Jim at September 09, 2018 12:04 PM (QzJWU)

292 I see director Denis Villeneuve (Blade Runner 2049) is working on a new version of Dune.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, Literate Savage at September 09, 2018 12:04 PM (kQs4Y)

293 "Being the soopergenius she must have been.

Posted by: BurtTC at September 09, 2018 11:39 AM (cY3LT)"

She was infinitely smarter then you.

Posted by: TANSTAAFL at September 09, 2018 12:04 PM (T09ml)

294
Just saw a Twitter poll making the rounds -- ''Whom Do You Consider is Responsible for the Strong U.S. Economy?''

With the options of Obama or Trump.

Nice strategy there; cut all the conservatives voices off, then run a poll.

Or perhaps it's just a honey trap. Answer wrong and you're gone.

Posted by: Forgot My Nic at September 09, 2018 12:04 PM (LOgQ4)

295 259 Poor Eeyore...
Posted by: SMH - Future proprietress of Bartertown at September 09, 2018 11:38 AM (HWisp)


Don't worry about Eeyore. Someone dug him up, and now he writes for a website called Hot Air.
Posted by: BurtTC at September 09, 2018 11:41 AM (cY3LT)

Never laughed so hard

Posted by: Patrick from Ohio at September 09, 2018 12:05 PM (dKiJG)

296 Wikipedia article on Conflict of Visions is interesting. Sounds like he figured out in 1987 what I've been scratching my head over and figuring out in bits and pieces over the last decade or so. It's annoying that leftists have been a known quantity for decades, yet they were allowed to fester.

Posted by: Steve and Cold Bear at September 09, 2018 12:05 PM (/qEW2)

297 Speaking of Antarctic tragedies, there is the Mt. Erebus crash of flight TE901.
Posted by: Anna Puma (HQCaR) at September 09, 2018 11:55 AM (SW1s2)


One of the things that makes reading about air disasters so morbidly fascinating is CVR transcripts. There's actually a stage play that's nothing but seated readings of the final moments of six aviation incidents. TE901 (not one of those in the play):

"I reckon Bird's through here and Ross Island there. Erebus should be there."
"Actually, these conditions don't look very good at all, do they?"
"No they don't."

Posted by: hogmartin at September 09, 2018 12:05 PM (y87Qq)

298 I try to watch everything Alison Brie is in.

------------------
I trust that you saw she took her shirt off in Glow.
Posted by: Bandersnatch at September 09, 2018 11:49 AM (fuK7c)


Why was I not told of this before now?

I may have to get Netflix.

Posted by: BurtTC at September 09, 2018 12:06 PM (cY3LT)

299 Posted by: All Hail Eris, Literate Savage at September 09, 2018 09:04 AM (kQs4Y)

Oh look, a Heinlein I haven't read yet.

[uploads to kindle]

A couple pages in, and the dad is Tea Party through and through.

Posted by: Jeff Weimer at September 09, 2018 12:06 PM (cvabZ)

300 Waiting at deli line wondered
Is the scotch better at Chucks, or the beer better at the Austrian Monastery Library?

Posted by: Skip at September 09, 2018 12:06 PM (T4oHT)

301 "Being the soopergenius she must have been.

Posted by: BurtTC at September 09, 2018 11:39 AM (cY3LT)"

She was infinitely smarter then you.
Posted by: TANSTAAFL at September 09, 2018 12:04 PM (T09ml)


Of course she was.

Posted by: BurtTC at September 09, 2018 12:07 PM (cY3LT)

302 Eris, so Dune Runner?

There was enough sand in 2049

Posted by: Anna Puma (HQCaR) at September 09, 2018 12:09 PM (SW1s2)

303
Speaking of Winnie the Pooh, I was watching some fairly recent concert footage of a Loggins and Messina outdoor concert somewhere in the south. They started singing 'House at Pooh Corner' and stopped at a certain point mid-song. The camera panned onto the audience which seemed to be comprised mainly of folks from 45 to 65 years old and everyone was singing along. Loudly.

Who doesn't know the words to that song?

Posted by: Forgot My Nic at September 09, 2018 12:10 PM (LOgQ4)

304 It bothered me when I found out that Bourdain was an addict and was trying to stop drinking, and every show they show him Drinking.

Mike Rowe has the same working man vibe but Rowe is more upbeat.

Posted by: Patrick from Ohio at September 09, 2018 12:11 PM (dKiJG)

305 Next Up: NRA Redneck Pooh will assemble a posse to hunt Piglet from helicopters with AR-15s.

Posted by: Fritz at September 09, 2018 12:12 PM (ANJe6)

306 Speaking of Winnie the Pooh, I was watching some fairly recent concert footage of a Loggins and Messina outdoor concert somewhere in the south. They started singing 'House at Pooh Corner' and stopped at a certain point mid-song. The camera panned onto the audience which seemed to be comprised mainly of folks from 45 to 65 years old and everyone was singing along. Loudly.


I know that song from the Nitty Gritty Dirt Band. Whose was it orginally?

Also, my kid who sees everything saw the newish Christopher Robin movie and even though he likes everything he didn't like that.

Posted by: Bandersnatch at September 09, 2018 12:12 PM (fuK7c)

307 294
Or perhaps it's just a honey trap. Answer wrong and you're gone.
Posted by: Forgot My Nic at September 09, 2018 12:04 PM (LOgQ4)

Or maybe it's just time for a little smakerel of something.

Posted by: George LeS at September 09, 2018 12:13 PM (59GGI)

308 I know that song from the Nitty Gritty Dirt Band. Whose was it orginally?

Posted by: Bandersnatch at September 09, 2018 12:12 PM


Wiki:
"House at Pooh Corner" is a song written by Kenny Loggins, based on the popular children's book of the same name. The song was first performed by the Nitty Gritty Dirt Band on their 1970 album Uncle Charlie & His Dog Teddy and then performed by Loggins and Messina on their 1971 album Sittin' In.

I didn't know that. I was sure it was a L&M song. Didn't know someone else performed it first.

Posted by: Forgot My Nic at September 09, 2018 12:16 PM (LOgQ4)

309 nood

Posted by: hogmartin at September 09, 2018 12:19 PM (y87Qq)

310 I don't know if this adheres to what you mean but I've watched almost everything Jim Caviezel is in. Some are just ok but all have positive messages and a few of them were unexpectedly excellent.

Posted by: Captain Hate at September 09, 2018 11:39 AM (y7DUB)


Silly, but maybe fun fact: I went to high school (for a year) with Jim Caveizel. He was a Junior, I a Sophomore, so we didn't have any classes together (way the school was set up), but hey - I went to a Catholic all-boys high school with Jesus Christ.

Posted by: Jeff Weimer at September 09, 2018 12:19 PM (cvabZ)

311 "Willows" has been one of my favorite books for more than four decades now. I guess it's time for a re-read.

Posted by: Trimegistus at September 09, 2018 12:23 PM (3Ezy2)

312 The Igno-Daughter was an extra on Person of Interest and got to touch the sleeve of God.

Posted by: Ignoramus at September 09, 2018 12:23 PM (1UZdv)

313 As anyone can tell, I am a Pooh fan. But when it comes to music, I am "a traitor to my generation." Don't know the song at all. I vaguely remember the names Loggins and Messina and Nitty Gritty Dirt band. But can't recall what they did, and don't want to.

Just the other day, I was talking to my wife about the fact that there are very few singers our groups from my youth, for whom I can name even two songs. And many of whose I cannot name one. And I like it that way. (IMO the best music ever was mentioned in last night's movie thread.)

Posted by: George LeS at September 09, 2018 12:25 PM (59GGI)

314 I, too, am beginning the Bible for a church class.

I've been a Christian and churchgoer for decades, but I've never done the Disciple studies. To my shame, I had to buy a Bible for this. The one I received in grade school has vanished, and we only had illustrated volumes in the house.

This is going to be a big commitment. Other forms of entertainment will have to give.

Posted by: Weak Geek at September 09, 2018 12:29 PM (UQij2)

315 Of course she was.

Posted by: BurtTC at September 09, 2018 12:07 PM (cY3LT


Could YOU figure out a orbital fraction, using a pencil & a roll of butcher paper?

Virginia Heinlein did.

Posted by: TANSTAAFL at September 09, 2018 12:34 PM (T09ml)

316 Back the day a wannabe 'man' held the arctic/antarctic explorers his model(sorry ladies). There was/is a thriving book biz in response> In fact , a lot of expedition volunteers did so to be able to write and sell their story : Cherry Gerard " The Worst Journey in the World" (as I recall ???. yes?). Secondary sources should begin with "Endurance" about Shackleton's try at the Pole. As to Scott , I have often excused myself to the loo with" I am just going outside now , I should think I might be awhile" . In fifty years about three people get the reference. As to the Subject's "The Fifth Man" . I prefer the third man: "Who is the third who walks always beside you///When I count there are only you and I together///But when I look up the white road///There is always another one walking beside you///. (TS Eliot on a Shackleton thing)
Sorry to be such an ass , but the lit of polar exploration is really really good stuff

Posted by: jay hoenemeyer at September 09, 2018 12:37 PM (3GR94)

317 I recognized the Eliot but I hadn't known it was a Shackleton reference.

Posted by: Bandersnatch at September 09, 2018 12:39 PM (fuK7c)

318 I vaguely remember the names Loggins and Messina and Nitty Gritty Dirt band. But can't recall what they did, and don't want to.



House at Pooh Corner is a quite nice song.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zzW3rb57Ks0

Posted by: grammie winger at September 09, 2018 12:41 PM (lwiT4)

319 The only book people are talking about this weekend is Woodward's. Two weeks ago it was Omarosa's. And two weeks before that it was Wolf's.

Funny how that works.

Posted by: Marshall Wyatt Urp at September 09, 2018 09:27 AM (giAl1)

There's your problem right there, Sport. You have to talk to people not just commies and fags.

Posted by: Alberta Oil Peon at September 09, 2018 12:42 PM (iwUO9)

320 I had to buy a Bible for this. The one I received in grade school has
vanished, and we only had illustrated volumes in the house.



What translation did you choose, if I might ask, Weak Geek?

Posted by: grammie winger at September 09, 2018 12:43 PM (lwiT4)

321 I've been switching back and forth from this thread to a podcast at Town Hall, interviewing the author of the new Custer novel. It's a book I am very unlikely to read, as I've given up fiction by living authors.

But it was interesting in that the author, H W Crocker, is strongly conscious of what's wrong with the cartoon history which is so popular. People draw strong and clear lessons from events in which there was nothing like such strong clarity. He errs only in thinking that it's (a) new and (b) characteristic of the left.

Nope. You see it all the time. Now, some writers can get away with it if they write well enough (Gibbon, obviously, and all too often, Churchill - great as he was.) But even they end up installing extremely simplistic and warped interpretations in people's minds, about events, and especially about people, who just weren't so simple.

I've said this many times, but once again, C S Lewis's intro to his Oxford History volume should be mandatory reading. And I do mean that: no one should get out of HS without reading it; and certainly no one should be allowed to teach who hasn't been tested in it. Yes, it's (ostensibly) only about the history of literature in 16th C English. But the lesson is far wider, a fact enhanced by the fact that "literature" is used far more widely than we use it today. And this, too, is by a truly great writer.

It's online. The title is "The New Learning and the New Ignorance". Look it up and read it.

Posted by: George LeS at September 09, 2018 12:50 PM (59GGI)

322 House at Pooh Corner is a quite nice song.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zzW3rb57Ks0
Posted by: grammie winger at September 09, 2018 12:41 PM (lwiT4)

Not my type of song. I just don't like the styles of my youth, and never have.

Really, I'm a Magic Flute guy.

Posted by: George LeS at September 09, 2018 12:54 PM (59GGI)

323 Forgot to include Lewis links.

For a good review, with many important quotes:

http://windoffthehilltop.com/e-RenaissanceLewis.html

(Although the review sometime confuses when Lewis is speaking of Puritans and when of Protestants generally.)

For the whole thing:

https://www.scribd.com/document/25296510/Lewis-C-S-English-Literature

Posted by: George LeS at September 09, 2018 01:02 PM (59GGI)

324 love that rug

Posted by: happyfeet at September 09, 2018 01:09 PM (mLfQi)

325 I have a CD-ROM collecting every issue of MAD in its first iteration.

I've had it for years but have barely dug into it. Think I got through issue 4.

It also has a search function, which is how I usually use it. It even does the Fold-Ins!

I need to get back into that before the technology makes it unusable.

But we are so lucky to have so many entertainment options that it's difficult to select which one to do next.

Posted by: Weak Geek at September 09, 2018 01:10 PM (Le848)

326 321 ... Absolutely agree. I would add Lewis' "Preface to Paradise Lost" which provides context to epics throughout history. In about 150 pages he gives the reader a year's worth of classes in literature.

Posted by: JTB at September 09, 2018 01:17 PM (V+03K)

327 If you want to read Old Testament, I'd suggest Samuel1. I keep getting sucked into it. It's David's story, about his struggles with Saul and his accumulation of multiple wives.

I read an article online about tracking down Dolly Freed. As a teenager, she wrote a book "Possum Living" about frugality and her father. I didn't read the book st the time but was curious about it after reading a blurb in the Whole Earth catalog. I tracked down a copy online eventually. She was an interesting writer. She went on to work for NASA but decided to become a naturalist instead. And her father's life seemed to spiral out of control after she grew up and left.

Posted by: Notsothoreau at September 09, 2018 01:22 PM (Lqy/e)

328 @238 --

MAD took nothing, including prisoners.

And I'm putting in a vote for Dave Berg for the MAD pantheon. Plus, Sergio Aragones!

Posted by: Weak Geek at September 09, 2018 02:10 PM (GgmdC)

329 If you want to read Old Testament, I'd suggest Samuel1. I keep getting sucked into it. It's David's story, about his struggles with Saul and his accumulation of multiple wives.
---------

Well, it's kind of jumping into the middle, but it will promote interest, and it's fairly readable, as a story. I would say that Samuel 2 is also.

It's troublesome to try and keep up with all of the tribes, quarrelsome neighbors and etc., so don't bother, just read the story.

Alas, poor Uriah.

Posted by: Mike Hammer, etc., etc. at September 09, 2018 02:11 PM (CDGwz)

330 I and II Samuel are okay, but for a fun read, you really can't beat Leviticus.



Posted by: grammie winger at September 09, 2018 02:14 PM (lwiT4)

331 My favorite Mad spoof, 'Rockhead', with character 'Appalling Greed'.

Posted by: Mike Hammer, etc., etc. at September 09, 2018 02:17 PM (CDGwz)

332 Posted by: Jake Holenhead at September 09, 2018 09:14 AM (5jAa5)

Book 2 of Sabrina Chase's Pluto series I think is her best book, I'm also waiting on book 3.

Posted by: waelse1 at September 09, 2018 02:21 PM (JWm4T)

333 @320 --

Grammie, NKJV. It was the most readable on Mardel's shelves. Others had larger type, but the pages were so thin that the letters on the other side of the page bled through, obscuring the text.

No theologian, I.

Posted by: Weak Geek at September 09, 2018 02:26 PM (GgmdC)

334 Same thing is the Frank McCourt's autobio "Angela's Ashes". He talks about how he and a group of his buds used to go to this one hill outside of town and choke the chicken.

-
Dude, I'm vegan. Please use the phrase, "Squeeze the broccoli."

Posted by: Anonosaurus Wrecks, Tyrannosaur Wrangler at September 09, 2018 03:21 PM (+y/Ru)

335 Question for anybody besides me that rechecks the books throughout the day-

I seem to read in spits and spurts. I may pick up a book and read it and two or three more in just a couple of days. Then go months and months with books right beside the chair I'm in right now and not even look at the cover.

No rhyme or reason to this. Anybody else do something like this? Just me isn't it. Admit it!

Posted by: weirdflunky at September 09, 2018 03:47 PM (KflMN)

336 Weirdflunky --

Nope, ain't just you. I'll go on a reading binge, then feel guilty because I'm not writing, then research for my current Skyrim bit, then write ... rinse 'n' repeat.

Currrently remaking my way through the Aldenata stuff, though I think I'll skip the Cally books this time around. Gross.

Posted by: empire1 at September 09, 2018 03:56 PM (jZzeV)

337 Posted by: empire1 at September 09, 2018 03:56 PM (jZzeV)

Thanks for the response.

That's the perfect word. Binge.


I binge read then nothing. Just how it is I guess. I sure can't control the timing. Not reading now. Will again at some point.

Posted by: weirdflunky at September 09, 2018 04:03 PM (KflMN)

338 Happens all the time, weirdflunky.

Worst is when it's a library book/comic. I'll bring it home and let it sit on the shelf designated for library items. Sometimes it'll go through two or three renewals before I crack it open, and occasionally I'll have to return it unread.

Maybe I should cut back on Ace threads.

*Theodoric of York voice*

Naaaahhhh!

Posted by: Weak Geek at September 09, 2018 04:04 PM (Emlt5)

339 Ricki,
Isaac's Storm was one of the books plus the other Larson books I have that I kept when I cleaned out my library. I have read all of his books except for Lethal Passage (and am kind of afraid to read that one since I think it may make me thrown the book against the wall and not like the author so much since most books on gun culture seem to be written by the "guns are evil" crowd).
I am wondering when and if Larsen is going to write another book. It has been quite a few years.


258
Yesterday, on one of the open threads, I mentioned that I had, but had
not yet read, a copy of Erik Larson's "Isaac's Storm" about the
catastrophic 1900 Galveston hurricane, which killed at least 6000 people
and possibly more.


Other commenters said that it was a good book. I picked it up and
started looking thorough it, and almost immediately noticed that
September 8 was the anniversary of the hurricane's landfall!



So I dropped everything and set about reading it. I just finished
it this morning. It's a detailed account of the people, places, and
events. It is arranged into many short chapters that switch back and
forth. I recommend it.



It has been raining almost all weekend here, and while certainly not a hurricane, it has added to the ambience.

Posted by: Charlotte at September 09, 2018 04:15 PM (mt65F)

340 I don't buy books that should be kept as heirlooms or high literature because moron.

If you have an Ollie's in your area you can get hardback best sellers after they've been out for a while for $3, 4, 5. I buy those and drop then them in the book return at the local library after I read them.

Thought all y'all would want to know.

Posted by: weirdflunky at September 09, 2018 04:19 PM (KflMN)

341 As the East coast prepares for the incoming hurricane, I've started following Joe Bastardi on the twits.

He is pimping his book "The Climate Chronicles".

Anybody know anything about his book? 4.5 stars on Amazon.

Not an endorsement. I don't know anything about the book.

Posted by: weirdflunky at September 09, 2018 07:59 PM (KflMN)

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