Sunday Morning Book Thread 03-11-2018

Library of William J Ray 525.jpg
Library of wjr123


Good morning to all you 'rons, 'ettes, lurkers, and lurkettes. Welcome once again to the stately, prestigious, internationally acclaimed and high-class Sunday Morning Book Thread, a weekly compendium of reviews, observations, and a continuing conversation on books, reading, and publishing by people who follow words with their fingers and whose lips move as they read. Unlike other AoSHQ comment threads, the Sunday Morning Book Thread is so hoity-toity, pants are required. Even if it's these pants, which look like she saw something in the window and had to wear it.

Pic Note

From wjr123, whom I think mostly lurks:

That is only half of the library. To the right is a window with a low table holding a tube based stereo and more books and art going further...I spend a lot of time there.

Heh. I'd like to live there and have all my food delivered.

A fine library, that. Click on it to see the larger version.


The Bible, Condensed

Here's an amusing bit you can read on a nice, relaxing Sunday afternoon: The TL;DR Edition Of All 66 Books Of The Bible. You don't have to be a Christian or Jewish to understand the humor, but it probably helps.


It Pays To Increase Your Word Power®

A SQUAMIGEROUS creature is one that has scales.

Usage: The squamigerous James Carville is unable to be part of this week's panel discussion because he's molting.

And Now, This Public Service Announcement:

commas save lives.jpg



Learning to Read

A comment from a couple of weeks ago:

260 Hi, Weasel! I remember vividly the first time I comprehended a word on my own. We were sitting at a stop sign, and I actually read the word stop instead of just seeing the big red octagon. It was life changing.

Posted by: no good deed at February 18, 2018 11:07 AM (eIQHF)

This got me thinking: can any of you remember a time when you couldn't read? That is, do you remember, in the dim recesses of your youth, ever looking at a book, or newspaper, and not knowing what those black squiggles were supposed to be? Me, I have no such memory. It is as I always knew how to read. I just wonder if any of you can actually remember.

Defending the Unborn

The fight over abortion wasn't always a Republican vs. Democrat thing. As Defenders of the Unborn: The Pro-Life Movement before Roe v. Wade argues, the battle was not drawn on conventionally partisan lines:

For decades, the media portrayed the pro-life movement as a Catholic cause, but by [1972], that stereotype was already hopelessly outdated. The kinds of people in attendance at pro-life rallies ranged from white Protestant physicians, to young mothers, to African American Democratic legislators-even the occasional member of Planned Parenthood...The language with which pro-lifers championed their cause was not that of conservative Catholic theology, infused with attacks on contraception and women's sexual freedom. Rather, they saw themselves as civil rights crusaders, defending the inalienable right to life of a defenseless minority: the unborn fetus. It was because of this grounding in human rights, Williams argues, that the right-to-life movement gained such momentum in the early 1960s. Indeed, pro-lifers were winning the battle before Roe v. Wade changed the course of history.

Meanwhile, an Episcopalian priest sez abortions are just fine:

Tennessee Episcopal Priest Kira Schlesinger believes so strongly in legalized abortion that she wrote a book to reconcile her Christian beliefs with the killing of unborn babies.

In her new book “Pro-Choice and Christian: Reconciling Faith, Politics, and Justice,” Schlesinger criticizes churches that “shame” and stigmatize women who abort their unborn babies. She said church congregations should have more open conversations about abortion, and support women who have them.

Odds are that her argument is careful enough to mitigate against Gosnell-style infanticide? Slim to none.


Moron Recommendation


From SandyCheeks:

383 This week I read More Beautiful Than Before: How Suffering Transforms Us, by Steve Leder, a rabbi in L.A. Not that I am suffering by any means, but because of a recent interview Leder did with Dennis Prager.

You know how some books are tough to put down because of the plot? This little tome is tough to put down because it feels like Leder is having a heartfelt discussion with the reader. I got it from the library but was wishing throughout that I could highlight about 50 percent of it.

Leder spends a lot of time with the dying, with parents of deceased children and those battling illness, divorce and various forms of heartbreak. The insights in this book were golden.

The quotes are noteworthy on nearly every page. Ironically, one that I remember without the book in front of me was Leder recounting a quip by Dennis Prager while addressing an atheist convention! Prager said, "As a believer in a moral God, I am often asked to explain human suffering; but as atheists, you are forced to explain everything."

Gem after gem. Highly recommended. In fact, I'm going to get my own copy and buy a few extras for those who will eventually find themselves in need.

Posted by: SandyCheeks at March 04, 2018 12:38 PM (ihzOe)

More Beautiful Than Before: How Suffering Transforms Us is availble on Kindle or hardback.


What I'm Reading

A few months back, Barnes & Noble settled some stupid "let's enrich the lawyers" class-action lawsuit, and being a B&N Nook customer and purchaser of e-bookw, my share was a few cents north of $3. So I used it to defray the cost of Nothing Lasts Forever by Roderick Thorp (link is to Amazon). Alert readers might recognize this thriller as the basis for the first Die Hard movie. I would rate this book 3 stars out of 5. I would say this is one of those rare books which movie version is actually better, but perhaps this is because I saw the movie first. I had fun noting what was different and what's unchanged as I read the book. Without getting into a lot of spoilers, the main character isn't named John McClane, and he's not an NYC street cop, but rather a retired LEO who now runs a consulting firm for law enforcement agencies, which is why he goes in with prior knowledge of a new breed of criminal gangster called "terrorists" (the book was published in 1979) which is why he recognizes the main bad guy, "Anton 'Red Tony' Gruber" when he first sees him. The ending is a bit different, too. But, all-in-all, it's worth reading.

___________


Don't forget the AoSHQ reading group on Goodreads. It's meant to support horde writers and to talk about the great books that come up on the book thread. It's called AoSHQ Moron Horde and the link to it is here: https://www.goodreads.com/group/show/175335-aoshq-moron-horde.

___________

So that's all for this week. As always, book thread tips, suggestions, bribes, rumors, threats, and insults may be sent to OregonMuse, Proprietor, AoSHQ Book Thread, at the book thread e-mail address: aoshqbookthread, followed by the 'at' sign, and then 'G' mail, and then dot cee oh emm.

What have you all been reading this week? Hopefully something good, because, as you all know, life is too short to be reading lousy books.

Posted by: OregonMuse at 09:01 AM




Comments

(Jump to bottom of page)

1 Envy!

Posted by: All Hail Eris, Gamestress of Triskelion at March 11, 2018 08:55 AM (qJtVm)

2 Tolle lege
Nice library,

Posted by: Skip at March 11, 2018 08:56 AM (aC6Sd)

3 A book thread or two previous somebody brought up The Arnheiter Affair by Neil Sheehan, about a real-life Captain Queeg named Marcus Aurelius Arnheiter, captain of the destroyer escort U.S.S. Vance. Arnheiter was tasked with patrolling the coast of South Vietnam. He was a strict disciplinarian and a spit-shine martinet, but that’s not what made him a liability. It was the arbitrary nature of his demands that set everyone on edge. He acted on whim and ruled by fiat.

But putting his quirks aside, he issued false position reports, falsified daily summaries on the number of vessels sighted and boarded for inspection, and conducted shore bombardments for no reason other than to give the boys some ‘splosions (and to film himself posing heroically). In one instance he shelled empty abandoned shrines on the shore and reporting them as machine gun nests.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, Gamestress of Triskelion at March 11, 2018 08:56 AM (qJtVm)

4 Mostly still re-reading old stuff during the past week but I did get two new books that had come up on Book Bub for the majestic price of 'fee'.


Age of Myth: Book One of The Legends of the First Empire; Michael J. Sullivan. This one was OK but I don't think I will continue the series.



The Enemy of an Enemy (Lost Tales of Power Book 1) Vincent Trigili. This one turned out to be multiple short stories around a central theme. Once I found that I closed the book w/o reading it. I don't like short stories.

Posted by: Vic We Have No Party at March 11, 2018 08:58 AM (mpXpK)

5 Still working on Patrick O'Brien's Surgeons Mate of the Aubrey/Maturin series, but will be onto the next very soon.

Posted by: Skip at March 11, 2018 08:59 AM (aC6Sd)

6 First?

Posted by: JTB at March 11, 2018 08:59 AM (V+03K)

7 Wow; ton 'O books.

Posted by: Vic We Have No Party at March 11, 2018 09:00 AM (mpXpK)

8 Oh well. Good morning Fellow Book Threadists. Another wonderful week of reading.

Posted by: JTB at March 11, 2018 09:01 AM (V+03K)

9 I don't care what the Commandments say, I covet that library!!!

Posted by: JTB at March 11, 2018 09:02 AM (V+03K)

10 I read a Gentleman in Moscow by Amor Towles. This is really an excellent novel. I think that the best word to describe it is "elegant". It's an elegantly written story about an elegant Russian count caught up in the Russian revolution and his life under house arrest in the Metropole, a grand hotel near the Kremlin and Bolshoi theater.

I also finished Abaddon's Gate, the third in the Expanse series, by S. A. Corey. This is an interesting, exciting space opera full of action and tension. I'm looking forward to reading the next in the series, Cibola Burn.

Posted by: Zoltan at March 11, 2018 09:04 AM (T8WeQ)

11 If I had that library there would be a nice comfortable recliner with a table near it and I would be there all day. Pretty much what I have now but instead of being surrounded by shelves of books I am surrounded by junk and cats.

Posted by: Vic We Have No Party at March 11, 2018 09:05 AM (mpXpK)

12 Very nice library. See some old friends on the shelves.

Posted by: NaCly Dog at March 11, 2018 09:06 AM (hyuyC)

13

Sigh, someday I'll have a library again. Till then I'll have to make do with the one I carry in heart and brain.

Posted by: In Vino Veritits, Up Range at March 11, 2018 09:07 AM (qul7b)

14 Best book to ever be destroyed by a movie, "All The Pretty Horses". I am not just saying the film was a bad adaption. I am saying the film completely voided the point of the book. To see that film is to know LESS about "All the Pretty Horses" than if you had never even heard the story existed.

Posted by: quint at March 11, 2018 09:08 AM (n13/j)

15 wjr123, that's one classy library. Great shelves. A whole lot of military history stuff, but there's some overlap here between your stack and mine, I recognize a few titles.

And I love the character of the room -- the distressed persian rug, the funky navajo-looking throw on the ottoman. Very cool.

Posted by: Pastafarian at March 11, 2018 09:08 AM (sgHEm)

16 That library ticks off all the essentials: Built in shelves, antique globe, comfy chair and ottoman, artwork, Persian carpet, and I assume a pet lurking in the background.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, Gamestress of Triskelion at March 11, 2018 09:08 AM (qJtVm)

17 Good morning all,
Related to OM's thread last week:
Bloody Red Tabs - General Officer Casualties of the Great War 1914-18, by Frank Davies & G.Maddocks.
Written to counter the myth of the 'chateau General'.
First part discuses the myth that most generals stayed well behind the lines with no clue of conditions at the front. Most of book is short bios (1/3 to 1&1/2 pgs) of British generals killed or wounded by enemy action.

It does NOT dispute that there were incompetent generals, and one of the bios I read specifically recounts a general who purposely exposed himself to likely death after being reprimanded from above for his 'lack of fighting spirit', after refusing to order attacks with no chance of success.

I had great difficulty finding the book. Internet searches were completely unsuccessful until I found the actual title in my Amazon order history. (2 yrs ago) Once I knew the Title I found my copy in a few minutes. Also because I clicked on the product page, searches that previously did not include the book (& I'm talking looking thru dozens & dozens of results) were showing the book on the first page, using the same search terms used previously.

Posted by: InspiredHistoryMike at March 11, 2018 09:11 AM (vFHFh)

18 I can't recall if I've mentioned this before, as I've not participated in the book tread for a good while.

'The Wrecking Crew' by Kent Hartman is an amazing bit of pop music history, specifically about the players who were the actual studio musicians on almost every major rock album recorded in Los Angeles from the late 1950s to the early 1970s. Most bands just weren't good enough players for the studio work and their participation was frequently just vocals.

One notable aspect is that Glen Campbell, who most would think of as a country performer, played on a huge number of rock hits and was a Beach Boy for a couple years, at least on the concert circuit. The book is loaded with stories like this.

Posted by: epobirs at March 11, 2018 09:12 AM (AJKgl)

19 Nice lieberry wj!

Let's eat the kitty.

More coffee.

Posted by: Hairyback Guy at March 11, 2018 09:12 AM (EoRCO)

20 I just started reading "Life in a Medieval City" by Frances Gies & Joseph Gies; a description of life in Troyes (France) around 1350 A.D. Interesting so far and worth the $1.99.


Posted by: Skandia Recluse at March 11, 2018 09:13 AM (roQNm)

21 Greetings!

Our family reading group is closing on in finishing off Lord of the Rings. Before starting the project I thought that four copies of the book were sufficient, but turns out one of the paperbacks came apart so I had to buy a replacement.

While everyone else has an upscale edition, I'm reading the battered old first-printing Ballentine edition I stole unread from my father's shelves 31 years ago. All three volumes are held together with tape and I'm dabbing them with rubber cement as I go to prevent further page loss, but it's fascinating to read the same typeface that introduced me to this work all those years ago.

It's hard to describe, but the layout and presentation are like a visual texture, and seeing it again is like feeling a familiar fabric, almost a tactile sensation of the eyes.

Has anyone else ever noticed this? The words are also a little different because Tolkien hadn't had a chance to go make corrections (i.e. "Galadrim" vs "Galadhrim" ), which adds to it.

Posted by: A.H. Lloyd at March 11, 2018 09:13 AM (cfSRQ)

22 And since I brought the subject up. Here is the rare movie that was better than the book. This should not shock, ... the book is Jaws.

Posted by: quint at March 11, 2018 09:13 AM (n13/j)

23 wjr123,

Wow, what a library.

Posted by: Jake Holenhead at March 11, 2018 09:13 AM (8EJVd)

24 perhaps it's inappropriate to mention here, or even offensive, but since i mentioned some things coming up at bonham's last week, here's how they did:

the newton mss. detailing instructions for making a philosopher's stone - $275,000

the washington letter of 1779 - $56,000

the franklin prism - $60,000

the einstein violin - $510,000

Posted by: musical jolly chimp at March 11, 2018 09:14 AM (Pg+x7)

25 Reading 'A Diplomatic History of the American People' by Thomas A. Bailey. My father got it when he was in the USAF. It's the 7th edition published in 1964 and has JFK still as president.

It's a great history of our foriegn policy, how the country expanded via treaties, backroom deals and other types of intrigue. One treaty is the 1872 Treaty of Washington which among other things also defined the ownership of the San Juan Islands located between Washington St. and Vancouver Is. which had been disputed since the 1846 treaty that defined our northern border. It closed out what was called the 1859 Pig War. The only casualty was a British pig, and soldiers from Britain and the U.S. were stationed on San Juan Is. from 1859 until 1872. Because the soldiers of both sides got along so well the location of the English Camp is a National Park where the British Union Jack is still flown by the Park Service.

The first U.S. soldiers to arrive on San Juan Is. were commanded by Capt. George Pickett. He would later gain fame during a minor skirmish near the small town of Gettysburg. Another U.S. soldier was Henry M. Robert who wrote Robert's Rules of Order.

The Pig War
https://tinyurl.com/lnnbx4t

Some head music.

Herb Alpert and the Tijuana Brass-A Taste of Honey
https://youtu.be/NC38-qqiVgg

Devo-I Can't Get No Satisfaction
https://youtu.be/jadvt7CbH1o

Posted by: Jake Holenhead at March 11, 2018 09:17 AM (8EJVd)

26 Great recommendation from SandyCheeks. I will pick it up today. I have watched my parents endure suffering with grace. They lost one child in a car accident and have basically lost another to drug addiction, though he is still living. They have used their experiences to help others in the same situations. It is truly humbling to watch. I can only hope to be half of what they are to this world.

Posted by: no good deed at March 11, 2018 09:20 AM (eIQHF)

27 This past week I reread "Last of the Breed",
Louis L'Amour's last book.

Man, what a story.

Posted by: JT at March 11, 2018 09:21 AM (WgpFt)

28 Morning!

I got over $30 bucks from Barnes & Noble in that settlement... Which shows how much I have moved to electronic books.

I used it rather quickly.

Posted by: Chi-Town Jerry at March 11, 2018 09:22 AM (5tSKk)

29 "Devo-I Can't Get No Satisfaction"

I saw somewhere that Mick said that was his favorite version of that song.

Posted by: fraeked at March 11, 2018 09:22 AM (UdKB7)

30 27 - I have his entire collection.

Posted by: quint at March 11, 2018 09:23 AM (n13/j)

31 I don't remember a time when I couldn't read. I do have plenty of memories of looking up a LOT of words. My grandfather never got past eighth grade and he completed his education on his own, including learning advanced math. (He did not pass those math genes to me!) He was hell on wheels about his daughters and grandkids learning to read at the earliest possible age, even if that was with a child's picture book. Gramps showed us how to sound out words and answered endless questions. He made it a game even a three year old enjoyed.

It was the greatest legacy he could have left.

Posted by: JTB at March 11, 2018 09:23 AM (V+03K)

32 Kitty for breakfast?

Yum!

More coffeve...

and to the op, yes - "milk" was the word - saw it on a delivery truck, and recall it to this day...

Posted by: Anon a mouse at March 11, 2018 09:24 AM (7LY+6)

33 I'm only halfway through the Arnheiter book and here's a partial listing of his weirdness. Arnheiter crammed a heck of a lot of cray in just a few months:

At one captain’s mast for four brawlers, which he made public with mandatory attendance, he handed down harsh punishments for three sailors and asked his unwilling audience to signal with thumbs up or down, a la the Coliseum, whether they found the fourth petty officer guilty. Most sat on their hands, appalled.

He required all those not on duty to attend services -- Protestant services -- on Sunday. After some Catholic officers and men protested, he called them moral guidance lectures and still demanded attendance.

No smoking or coffee on the bridge for the enlisted. And no coffee mugs. Coffee must be sipped out of a cup and saucer, like gentlemen.

He swapped out the morning bosun’s whistle for blasting “Hellcat’s Reveille”, and played “Roast Beef of Olde England” at top volume for five minutes before lunch and dinner. The sailors would stuff the loud speakers to get some relief from his constant harangues. Nobody got enough sleep on this ship.

Here’s the beef: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rXp3qqbtpwA

The officers had to endure 2-3 hour lunches and dinners listening to the captain expound on some topic. He demanded his junior officers deliver short lectures on topics he provided, like “proper use of a finger bowl”.

Making his ASW officer act as the captain’s personal photographer and shoot movies of the skipper being saluted, giving orders during gunnery practice, etc.

Demanding that a white toilet seat be procured ASAP while the crew was busy getting the ship ready to shove off. When it arrived with some dings and discoloration, he demanded that it be sanded and repainted NOW. While they were preparing to get underway.

He insisted that grimy engine room techs change out of their greasy uniforms before going topside for a quick smoke and a spot of sunshine. They soon stopped going on the deck and just stayed below.

It was a bunch of little things that just kept accumulating, on top of his trying to engage the enemy against his orders to just patrol and observe (this is in 1966), insisting on shelling targets that turn out to be fishing villages or abandoned locales.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, Gamestress of Triskelion at March 11, 2018 09:25 AM (qJtVm)

34 Finished Victor Davis Hansons The Second World Wars this week.

I had to set it aside without finishing - made it part way through the last chapter, Chapter 19 The Dead, before I couldn't go on.

A number of good friends and family are in crisis and I guess the idea that 27,000 people, on average, died every day simply overwhelmed me.

Extraordinary work however.

Posted by: Tonypete at March 11, 2018 09:27 AM (4mIHO)

35 22 And since I brought the subject up. Here is the rare movie that was better than the book. This should not shock, ... the book is Jaws.
Posted by: quint at March 11, 2018 09:13 AM (n13/j)
---
Yes! The book was a piece of crap. The scriptwriters jettisoned a lot of BS like Brody's wife having a fling with the biologist.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, Gamestress of Triskelion at March 11, 2018 09:27 AM (qJtVm)

36 For those who enjoy a good mystery and detective novel City of Endless Night by Douglas Preston and Lincoln Child is a thrilling read. Each of these authors writes novels separately, but their best work is when they combine their efforts in the Pendergast series. City of Endless Night is the 18th book in this series, which began with Relic in 1995. This latest book follows the adventures of FBI Special Agent Pendergast and his friend NYPD Lieutenant Vincent D'Agosta solve a series of grusome crimes in NYC. Decapitated bodies of wealthy entrepreneurs, powerbrokers, their families and workers are found around town. Terror strikes the powers that be. The media plays a powerful role in adding to the hysteria. This book, like all in the Pendergast series, can be read as a standalone even though it continues the series storyline.

Posted by: Mrs JTB at March 11, 2018 09:29 AM (V+03K)

37 Wow. He sounds like a banana.

Posted by: JT at March 11, 2018 09:29 AM (WgpFt)

38 35 yep, and Hooper was killed by the shark in the book as I guess cosmic payback for the affair lol. I read Benchley's book "Beast" too, it was jus ok.

Posted by: quint at March 11, 2018 09:30 AM (n13/j)

39 uay book thread!

that is a luxurious and lovely Moron library

Posted by: votermom certified russian matryoshka bot at March 11, 2018 09:31 AM (hMwEB)

40 Very nice library pic wjr123,
Extensively organized wall of non or classic fiction.

For my reading this week, most enjoyable book was audio version of Starman Jones. I'm really regretting not reading Heinlein earlier. I'll be bumping some of his other books higher up in the to be read stack.

Posted by: InspiredHistoryMike at March 11, 2018 09:31 AM (vFHFh)

41 That library is quite girthy.

Posted by: Insomniac - chopped liver at March 11, 2018 09:33 AM (NWiLs)

42
It's hard to describe, but the layout and presentation are like a visual texture, and seeing it again is like feeling a familiar fabric, almost a tactile sensation of the eyes.

Has anyone else ever noticed this? The words are also a little different because Tolkien hadn't had a chance to go make corrections (i.e. "Galadrim" vs "Galadhrim" ), which adds to it.
Posted by: A.H. Lloyd at March 11, 2018 09:13 AM (cfSRQ)
---
The typeface, paper, and smell of a book make a lasting impression. I am instantly transported back to when I first read a particular book, and to how I felt reading it. It's a time machine!

Posted by: All Hail Eris, Gamestress of Triskelion at March 11, 2018 09:34 AM (qJtVm)

43 Tube stereo?


This needs more detail. Perhaps another picture, too.

Posted by: garrett at March 11, 2018 09:36 AM (465Vx)

44 'The Wrecking Crew' by Kent Hartman is an amazing bit of pop music history, specifically about the players who were the actual studio musicians on almost every major rock album recorded in Los Angeles from the late 1950s to the early 1970s. Most bands just weren't good enough players for the studio work and their participation was frequently just vocals.

One notable aspect is that Glen Campbell, who most would think of as a country performer, played on a huge number of rock hits and was a Beach Boy for a couple years, at least on the concert circuit. The book is loaded with stories like this.
Posted by: epobirs
............
Thanks! I'll look for that.

Have you seen the documentary "Muscle Shoals" about Fame studios and all the stars that went through there? I believe it was still on Netflix streaming not too long ago.

I believe they were working on a video series on the Wrecking Crew.. I saw teasers last year on YouTube, but never really saw anything about a full release or where it would be shown.

Those were some great musicians! Not the least among them Glenn Campbell.. he was a session player on so many albums.. mostly uncredited.

Posted by: Chi-Town Jerry at March 11, 2018 09:36 AM (5tSKk)

45 We were sitting at a stop sign, and I actually read the word stop instead of just seeing the big red octagon. It was life changing.


I remember the first time I saw the word: fuck. It was scratched into a stop sign. I kept reading it out loud in the car and asking what did that mean. My father and older brother said nothing but kept snickering.

Posted by: Grump928(C) at March 11, 2018 09:37 AM (yQpMk)

46 Here's an amusing bit you can read on a nice, relaxing Sunday afternoon: The TL;DR Edition Of All 66 Books Of The Bible. You don't have to be a Christian or Jewish to understand the humor, but it probably helps.


If you're interested in the original take on the nature of God, nature of man, morality, eschatology etc. you'll naturally gravitate towards certain books. But what about, say, the statistics in Numbers? I don't see how that's edifying. There are just long, dreary stretches that are like that.

Posted by: Steve and Cold Bear at March 11, 2018 09:37 AM (/qEW2)

47 Best book to ever be destroyed by a movie, "All The Pretty Horses". I am not just saying the film was a bad adaption. I am saying the film completely voided the point of the book. To see that film is to know LESS about "All the Pretty Horses" than if you had never even heard the story existed.
Posted by: quint at March 11, 2018 09:08 AM (n13/j)


Never saw the movie because I figured Whoreyweird would completely fuck it up, although I liked the movie version of No Country For Old Men. Ironically All the Pretty Horses was the first McCarthy I read and ultimately liked the least, but it still piqued my interest for his other books. I thought his description of a relationship between a young man and woman was embarrassingly awkward.

Posted by: Captain Hate at March 11, 2018 09:38 AM (y7DUB)

48 >>>Usage: The squamigerous James Carville is unable to be part of this week's panel discussion because he's molting.


Mr. Carville, squamigerous, squamous and squalid is no way to go through life, son.

Posted by: Dean Wormer at March 11, 2018 09:39 AM (/qEW2)

49 21 ... I absolutely agree! My original LotR paperbacks disintegrated decades ago but my boxed hardback set from the mid-60s is my favorite way to read them. The set was the first hardback books for adults bought with my own money and represent a lot of mowed yards and redeemed soda bottles. They show the years of use and many moves but they still have the dust jackets and the big fold out maps. Reading them is a connection to that first sense of wonder and enjoyment all those years ago.

Posted by: JTB at March 11, 2018 09:40 AM (V+03K)

50 18 ne notable aspect is that Glen Campbell, who most
would think of as a country performer, played on a huge number of rock
hits and was a Beach Boy for a couple years, at least on the concert
circuit. The book is loaded with stories like this.


Posted by: epobirs at March 11, 2018 09:12 AM (AJKgl)
that sounds like a good book. Campbell was certainly a great and varied performer.

Posted by: quint at March 11, 2018 09:40 AM (n13/j)

51 Did something fun yesterday - Collings Foundation show was in town, toured the bombers, and for the grandson's 6th birthday, paid for both of us to take a 15 minute ride on their UH-1 Huey chopper. (1965 model, saw service in Vietnam)

That was wild! Never rode in a helicopter before, especially one with no doors. Loud! The difference between the ride in that chopper and an ordinary airplane is like the difference between riding in a 4 door sedan and on the back of powered up Harley. And the pilot put on a show for us - when he would turn, he would flip that thing on its side so we were starting straight down at the ground, nothing but what felt like a real thin lapbelt keeping me from flying out the door. It was worth it!

Posted by: Tom Servo at March 11, 2018 09:41 AM (V2Yro)

52 UFO?
https://nypost.com/2018/03/10/footage-of-mysterious-object-above-ocean-stuns-military-personnel/

Posted by: rhennigantx at March 11, 2018 09:41 AM (BtQd4)

53 I just started reading "Life in a Medieval City" by Frances Gies & Joseph Gies; a description of life in Troyes (France) around 1350 A.D. Interesting so far and worth the $1.99.


Posted by: Skandia Recluse at March 11, 2018 09:13 AM

Sorry, that should be '1250 A.D.' I apologize for being sloppy.

Posted by: Skandia Recluse at March 11, 2018 09:41 AM (roQNm)

54 Lovely library. With a coffee machine and a bar, you could live there.

Posted by: Huck Follywood, ready for my dog hike now, Mr. DeMille at March 11, 2018 09:43 AM (rBnYq)

55 This got me thinking: can any of you remember a time when you couldn't read?

==

yes, I remember my oldest sister getting very frustrated trying to teach me to read
there was a mini blackboard and chalk

I'm not sure how old I was - three or four?
which would have made my sister around 12 years old - really she should not be yelling at little kids

anyway she thought it would be a mark of shame on the famrif I started kindergarten not knowing how to read

Posted by: votermom certified russian matryoshka bot at March 11, 2018 09:43 AM (hMwEB)

56 Our power just came back or I would've been here sooner to plug "More Beautiful Than Before," but since OM was gracious enough to do it...Thanks, OM! Judging from the massive prayer list that Slapweasel compiles, it could help someone.

I'm nearly finished with Hellbent by Greg Hurwitz. It's in the "Orphan" series and is up to the usual high standards. Hurwitz is going the John Sandford route by introducing a new character (like Letty in the "Prey" books) and new direction for the protagonist instead of winding down the series. (At least that's what I think he's doing, but a lot can happen in the last 100 pages.)

Posted by: SandyCheeks at March 11, 2018 09:43 AM (ihzOe)

57 Morning, fellow book threadists!

I finished "The Jungle Books" by Kipling. I wish we could have read stuff like that in school. Classic, entertaining, and short enough for classwork. Definitely one of those books that you pick up and wonder, "How did I manage to reach this age without having read this already?"

And I did something that is rare for me: I decided not to finish a novel. It was "Sarum" by Edward Rutherfurd. It's the story of Britain, from about 7,000 BC until present, and I thought it would be interesting, but it turned into one of those doorstopper books where the characters and events are completely predictable. I've run into a few of these lately (one was about colonial Australia) and I can't help wondering how they get published. No doubt the author has connections in the industry so their book doesn't have to go through the slush pile.

Posted by: right wing yankee at March 11, 2018 09:43 AM (obZ4W)

58 Posted by: Tom Servo at March 11, 2018 09:41 AM (V2Yro)
---
Fun! But I'd probably wear discreet absorbent undergarments if I did that.

I always wondered if guys fell out of the helos.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, Gamestress of Triskelion at March 11, 2018 09:44 AM (qJtVm)

59 Oldest kids read Wrinkle In Time a few months ago. One liked it, one thought it was dumb.

They saw the movie yesterday, both thinking and hoping it would be better than the book, for different reasons.

Both were very disappointed, for the same reason. A rare moment of agreement by sibling rivals.

Posted by: WitchDoktor, AKA VA GOP Sucks at March 11, 2018 09:45 AM (G8hDY)

60 44 Have you seen the documentary "Muscle Shoals" about
Fame studios and all the stars that went through there? I believe it
was still on Netflix streaming not too long ago.



I believe they were working on a video series on the Wrecking Crew..
I saw teasers last year on YouTube, but never really saw anything about
a full release or where it would be shown.



Those were some great musicians! Not the least among them Glenn
Campbell.. he was a session player on so many albums.. mostly
uncredited.



Posted by: Chi-Town Jerry at March 11, 2018 09:36 AM (5tSKk)



Posted by: Vic We Have No Party at March 11, 2018 09:45 AM (mpXpK)

61 Have you seen the documentary "Muscle Shoals" about Fame studios and all the stars that went through there? I believe it was still on Netflix streaming not too long ago.

I believe they were working on a video series on the Wrecking Crew.. I saw teasers last year on YouTube, but never really saw anything about a full release or where it would be shown.

Those were some great musicians! Not the least among them Glenn Campbell.. he was a session player on so many albums.. mostly uncredited.
Posted by: Chi-Town Jerry at March 11, 2018 09:36 AM (5tSKk)


There are at least two documentaries on Muscle Shoals, one that was done for PBS and another by a private film outfit that has done other music docs. Both are very good but the latter might be slightly better.

There's at least one documentary on the Wrecking Crew done by guitarist Tommy Tedesco's son. Despite the obvious family ties he brings to the film, it gives a good accounting of all the major musicians including a short haired and clean shaven Leon Russell who you can't even recognize from his later appearance.

Posted by: Captain Hate at March 11, 2018 09:47 AM (y7DUB)

62 Have you seen the documentary "Muscle Shoals" about
Fame studios and all the stars that went through there? I believe it
was still on Netflix streaming not too long ago.



I believe they were working on a video series on the Wrecking Crew..
I saw teasers last year on YouTube, but never really saw anything about
a full release or where it would be shown.



Those were some great musicians! Not the least among them Glenn
Campbell.. he was a session player on so many albums.. mostly
uncredited.



Posted by: Chi-Town Jerry at March 11, 2018 09:36 AM (5tSKk)


There is a movie out there about the Wrecking Crew. My bother has it on DVD. there are parts of it on youtube.

I think this is it here on Amazon.

http://tinyurl.com/ybhzup4e

Posted by: Vic We Have No Party at March 11, 2018 09:51 AM (mpXpK)

63 Does the globe on the stand in WJR123 image have liquor in it?

Posted by: X-ray at March 11, 2018 09:51 AM (4fiCC)

64 Too bad Marcus Aurelius Arnheiter didn't 'accidently' fall overboard. Fortunately, before that happened, the Navy relieved him after a few months.

Posted by: Jake Holenhead at March 11, 2018 09:51 AM (8EJVd)

65 Tennessee Episcopal Priest Kira Schlesinger believes so strongly in legalized abortion that she wrote a book to reconcile her Christian beliefs with the killing of unborn babies.


She's a newcomer compared to Katy Rags.

https://tinyurl.com/ycvv5pfx

She was named president and dean of Episcopal Divinity School on July 1, 2009.[5][6] Her appointment was criticized by religious conservatives, including Anglicans, who have been particularly critical of her endorsement of the "blessing" of abortion.[6][7]

She once boasted about driving a minor across state borders so that she could get an abortion.

Posted by: Steve and Cold Bear at March 11, 2018 09:52 AM (/qEW2)

66 All Hail Eris, Gamestress of Triskelion

And I thought i had stores of COs and XOs.

Arnheiter should have had fanroom maintenance from the Ship's Bosun. Too early for Command Master Chief.

We has a very obnoxious junior enlisted who "fell" off of the fantail at 0300. The ship got quite when it was announced "The man is in the water for two hours." Amazingly enough, another ship's helo got him back physically safe after 6 hours in the water.

Posted by: NaCly Dog at March 11, 2018 09:52 AM (hyuyC)

67 A SQUAMIGEROUS creature is one that has scales.


************


Corny AND Flaky - a limerick

This dry skin is inopportune
Despite my attempts at shampooin'
Though I wash my skin daily
I'm still dry and scaly
My friends call me "Squamous" Muldoon

Posted by: Muldoon at March 11, 2018 09:53 AM (wPiJc)

68 'Morning, readers!

Posted by: Weasel at March 11, 2018 09:54 AM (MVjcR)

69 That library ticks off all the essentials: Built in shelves, antique globe, comfy chair and ottoman, artwork, Persian carpet, and I assume a pet lurking in the background.


I don't see any edged weapons.

Posted by: Bandersnatch at March 11, 2018 09:55 AM (fuK7c)

70 Wow, salty. Six hours!

Posted by: All Hail Eris, Gamestress of Triskelion at March 11, 2018 09:55 AM (qJtVm)

71 51 Tom Servo

Wow what fun!

I used to like traveling in 30,000 spare parts flying in close formation that seemed as old as I was. Didn't get much chance to do that, so my helo trips were very memorable.

Posted by: NaCly Dog at March 11, 2018 09:57 AM (hyuyC)

72 I was an early reader, and had learned to read before starting Kindergarten.

So rather than block time, they made me sit with the teacher and practice my reading. While literally 5 feet away, all my classmates were playing blocks. I couldn't take the temptation and threw such a fit, they relented and let me play instead of read. Fifty years later, my buddies still like to ride me about being such a nerd.

Posted by: San Franpsycho at March 11, 2018 09:57 AM (EZebt)

73 I've come across 'squamigerous' in my reading. No idea where or when but the amount of weird and trivial stuff in my brain is sometimes alarming.

Posted by: Mrs JTB at March 11, 2018 09:57 AM (V+03K)

74 he first U.S. soldiers to arrive on San Juan Is.
were commanded by Capt. George Pickett. He would later gain fame during a
minor skirmish near the small town of Gettysburg. Another U.S. soldier
was Henry M. Robert who wrote Robert's Rules of Order.



The Pig War

https://tinyurl.com/lnnbx4t



Some head music.



Herb Alpert and the Tijuana Brass-A Taste of Honey

https://youtu.be/NC38-qqiVgg



Devo-I Can't Get No Satisfaction

https://youtu.be/jadvt7CbH1o

Posted by: Jake Holenhead at March 11, 2018 09:17 AM (8EJVd)
Very interesting, I knew nothing of this Pig War. Pickett sure had his share of experiences with this Pig War and the Mexican War. Not that the Pig War was hot, but that is a lot of experience for a young officer at that time. It goes to show that talent is so often the key. Because most learned and respected historians rank Pickett as a poor leader during the Civil War. This has nothing to do with Pickett's charge. He is just not considered to be a talented General.

Posted by: quint at March 11, 2018 09:58 AM (n13/j)

75 A SQUAMIGEROUS creature is one that has scales.


*****


Lady Liberty is squamigerous?

Posted by: Muldoon at March 11, 2018 09:59 AM (wPiJc)

76 Beautiful library.

I wish I had saved a picture of my grandfather's library from when I was a kid. He was professor of politics, foundation head and advisor to various politicians as well as author and as you might imagine he had a beautiful library.

Walls of books, fireplace, massive cherry desk, comfortable reading chairs and a stereo that would have made Garrett weep with joy. It overlooked his prized rose garden and it was an oasis of solitude. I have a lot of fond memories of wandering into his library while he was reading some dense political treatise while sitting in front of a blazing fire while Mozart or Bach was playing in the background. He would always put his book down when one of his grandkids wandered in because of course he would.

He collected books like a squirrel getting ready for winter and his massive collection was too big for his library and much of it was stored in crates in his attic. When he died, we spent weeks going through his collection and dispersing it to various family members.

While going through one old, obscure political tome we found a letter from Alexander Hamilton to George Washington regarding raising funds for defense needs of the young new nation proving once again that there are treasures in books.

Posted by: JackStraw at March 11, 2018 10:00 AM (/tuJf)

77 no good deed (in the post above) was responding to my question about recalling learning to read. I do remember vaguely not being able to read and I absolutely recall sitting with someone, probably a teacher, and learning to sound out words that began with 'B'. I'm all the way up to 'L' now.

Posted by: Weasel at March 11, 2018 10:00 AM (MVjcR)

78 All Hail Eris, Gamestress of Triskelion

He was lucky. Caribbean waters in the summer.

The next year in the same Op Area we had a nearby ship lose a guy in full NBC protective gear over the side. We got there fast, but he never surfaced.

Statistically, the Navy loses more people to man overboard in port.

Posted by: NaCly Dog at March 11, 2018 10:00 AM (hyuyC)

79 Now THAT is a real library!

I'm not envious, because I kept my own library like that for years, until we had to move to a smaller home. I gave up my books reluctantly, but pared them down from thousands to hundreds.

But I get a visceral satisfaction from seeing those beautiful books resting on shelves, knowing that whoever owns them READS.

It's like excercizing a horse, with loving attention.

Posted by: True the Note at March 11, 2018 10:03 AM (HLTe8)

80 Bander!

Oh, I also just started "Big Two-Hearted River". Now that I know the protagonist had PTSD, you can see the significance of the fire-blasted environment he has to walk through before getting to the lush green hills.

Pythonite Michael Palin did many travel shows and one was called "Hemingway Adventure". I need to look around to see where it's available.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, Gamestress of Triskelion at March 11, 2018 10:03 AM (qJtVm)

81 The first word I remember reading was also on a stop sign. I spelled it out loud to my dad, who was driving: "S-T-O-P. Stop." He was impressed and it's funny that I remember that so clearly. The image is fixed in my mind - the cloud cover, the view from the car window, everything. Strange how some things stay with us and some things don't.

Someone brought up movies better than the book. "Jaws" has been mentioned. Also up for consideration:

M*A*S*H
Last of the Mohicans

Posted by: A.H. Lloyd at March 11, 2018 10:04 AM (cfSRQ)

82 All Hail Eris, Gamestress of Triskelion

Which reminds me of the book Three Men on a Raft.

Part of my Scholastic Book Sales horde I got in 5th grade. I still have that book. I think the book downplayed the part Christian faith and Navy training played in their survival in a raft for 34 days. In the Pacific Ocean during WWII.

Posted by: NaCly Dog at March 11, 2018 10:04 AM (hyuyC)

83 59: I am planning on not seeing it, as I can't fathom that all the changes made by the screenwriters make the story better.

L'Engle was a strange piece of work by all accounts, and I recall an article on her in which her surviving children admit being horrified by her work and the impact it had on their lives

Posted by: CN at March 11, 2018 10:05 AM (5gaNQ)

84 I'm rereading Wrinkle In Time. Not going to watch the movie and ruin it. It was one of the first books I've ever read.

Posted by: lin-duh @ work, really...I'm working at March 11, 2018 10:05 AM (kufk0)

85 Finally! Science and the sidebar provide a solution to the Abortion Dilemma:

Step 1:

Scientists develop viable man-chimp embryos.

Step 2:

Make bringing man-chimp embryos to full term illegal

Step 3:

Open "King Louie's Wild Abortion Ride" at Disneyland.

Step 4:

Libtard Wymyn of all ages can get a man-ape embryo implanted in their uterus at KLWAR.

Step 5:

For the next few weeks, Man-Chimp hybrid Pregnant Libtard Wymyn can march around the environs of King Louie's Wild Abortion Ride screaming "my body, my choice" along with Disney Approved signs featuring lovable Disney princesses from the movies - available for a nominal fee as well as Lady and the Tramp Siamese Cat Pussy Hats.

Step 6:

Libtard Wymyn experience the Sacred Libtard Sacrament of Abortion for a nominal fee.

Libtard Wymyn go home happy in the knowledge that they really showed those horrible Men and Men-Chimps, and Chimps that their bodies were really theirs cuz they got to kill their fetus for a nominal fee.

Yet no human was killed in the process!

Step 7:

Disney offers to bronze the Aborted Man-Chimp hybrid for a nominal fee as a memento.


Posted by: naturalfake at March 11, 2018 10:05 AM (9q7Dl)

86 Statistically, the Navy loses more people to man overboard in port.
Posted by: NaCly Dog at March 11, 2018 10:00 AM (hyuyC)
---
Yeah, I saw a few sauced sailors fall overboard just in my few TADs!

Also, saw a kid get crushed between the ship and a junk that was ferrying us to shore. The waves were frisky that day. Luckily he was okay except for a few broken bones.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, Gamestress of Triskelion at March 11, 2018 10:06 AM (qJtVm)

87 The waves were frisky that day.

Posted by: All Hail Eris
----
I couldnt help but read this in George Costanzas voice.

Man, I need some sleep.

Posted by: Tonypete at March 11, 2018 10:08 AM (Q/obp)

88 "Posted by: naturalfake at March 11, 2018 10:05 AM"

Ahem. Men can have abortions too you know.

Posted by: fraeked at March 11, 2018 10:08 AM (UdKB7)

89 Chuck Todd is very pissy this morning going after Mnuchin. Seems like Trump got under his skin bigly last night.

Posted by: JackStraw at March 11, 2018 10:08 AM (/tuJf)

90 Certainly an enviable library, and those shelves! Also seems to be well-organized. Just needs a sleeping kitteh to be perfect.

Posted by: Hokiemom at March 11, 2018 10:09 AM (WUYxS)

91 Posted by: lin-duh @ work, really...I'm working at March 11, 2018 10:05 AM (kufk0)

Loved that book when I was a young naturalfake.

I was sure in being Disneyfied during the Year of the Wymyn part of the Shambling Zombie of the Undead Never to Be Hillary! Presidency-

it would be ruined and I was right.

I may read it again like you to see what young me liked so much about it.

Posted by: naturalfake at March 11, 2018 10:09 AM (9q7Dl)

92 Going through my newly purchased set of Marshall Cavendish WW 2 Encyclopedias. Outdated sure but they still have a lot of useful info.

Besides, I have wanted a set since I first discovered them forty or so years ago.

Posted by: :) at March 11, 2018 10:09 AM (Fikbq)

93 I learned to read at a very early age.

No, I don't remember exactly when I learned to read. I just know I learned early in life.

When one spends a good portion of ones youth inside a hospital, especially back then, reading is about the only form of entertainment available.

More of a defense mechanism than anything.

Posted by: Blake at March 11, 2018 10:10 AM (WEBkv)

94 And now I must repair to my plushly appointed reading room. The sun is streaming through the windows just so and it is at peak reading-to-pleasure ratio.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, Gamestress of Triskelion at March 11, 2018 10:10 AM (qJtVm)

95 I don't *remember* reading my first word because I was two years old, but I do know the story. My dad had been doing some missions work with a deaf church, so all three of us were learning a bit of ASL from a book called The Joy of Signing, which has pictures of the finger-spelling of "joy" on the cover. (I still have it.) We went to a Fall Festival with my grandmother, and Gramma had picked me up to look at some wooden magnets that had hand-drawn pictures of butterflies and little pleasant words on them. I pointed to one (that we also still have) and said, "Look, Gramma! J-O-Y, 'joy'!" Gramma almost dropped me.

It wasn't long after that that I first read a book on my own: The Fire Cat. Still have that, too.
---
Haven't been reading much book-wise, but I'm about to have my work cut out for me. I'm teaching a course on Agatha Christie this fall. Oh, the hardship.

Still trying to get enough ducks in enough rows to get back to work on Loyal Valley: Diversion--had meant to start on it this past week, but I've been too under the weather. I'd *like* to have it ready to launch May 1, but I have no idea whether I'll be able to make that deadline. Depends on how much I can get done next week during Spring Break, I think. And while we don't yet have an official release date for Of Myths and Men: An Anthology, we're starting more of a pre-release marketing push on the FB page (https://www.facebook.com/mythsandmen/). Right now, the lead editor is planning on a mid-May release, but that may change.
---
*waves to all and sundry, especially JTB (whom I inadvertently ignored a while back--sorry, friend!) and Mrs. JTB*

Posted by: Elisabeth G. Wolfe at March 11, 2018 10:10 AM (wbY28)

96 All Hail Eris, Gamestress of Triskelion

Yikes. That brings back, unbidden, memories of dodgy liberty launches in heavy swells trying to tie up to the accom ladder. And I'm the senior guy on the boat. Responsible, but not in charge. *Shudder*

I was fortunate, more than once.

Posted by: NaCly Dog at March 11, 2018 10:11 AM (hyuyC)

97 "Posted by: naturalfake at March 11, 2018 10:05 AM"

Ahem. Men can have abortions too you know.
Posted by: fraeked at March 11, 2018 10:08 AM (UdKB7)


wow.

Who knew imaginary future Disneyland was so trans unfriendly?

Damn them all to trans-friendly hell!

Posted by: naturalfake at March 11, 2018 10:11 AM (9q7Dl)

98 They have Meet The Press on the TV at my gym. Fortunately with the volume muted.

Why is sleepy eyes Cuck Todd interviewing failed senator and alleged pedophile Jeff Flake?

Posted by: Fascist Pikachu - Now with Getting Angrier at March 11, 2018 10:15 AM (kdLF2)

99 Chuck Todd is very pissy this morning going after Mnuchin. Seems like Trump got under his skin bigly last night.
Posted by: JackStraw at March 11, 2018 10:08 AM (/tuJf)


Before Billyboy Kristol lost his mind to an egg borne neurotoxin, he seemed to relish ridiculing that asshole with dentures on the Morning Homewreckers.

Posted by: Captain Hate at March 11, 2018 10:16 AM (y7DUB)

100 If there is one guy I'd like to punch in the face, it is that Robert's Rules of Order guy!

With great satisfaction I note that no one has recommended Robert's Rules of Order on the book thread.

If you are interested in the topic there is a book called something like the Guerilla's Guide to Robert's Rules of Order. LOL

Posted by: The Poster Formerly Known as Mr. Barky at March 11, 2018 10:17 AM (fuBei)

101 Bander!

Oh, I also just started "Big Two-Hearted River". Now that I know the protagonist had PTSD, you can see the significance of the fire-blasted environment he has to walk through before getting to the lush green hills.



Exactly. Yay, Eris!

I'll wait til I see the Dildo guy around before I go full Hemingway geek, but I'm reading "A Moveable Feast" in which he describes writing Big 2H. He says "it was about the war, but the war was never mentioned".

Posted by: Bandersnatch at March 11, 2018 10:17 AM (fuK7c)

102 This has been a great week for book acquisition. The local used book store had a bunch of the Sharpe's books by Cornwell. I've been enjoying the TV series with Sean Bean when the rabbit ears get the station so thought I would try the books.

Also, I just received CS Lewis' "English Literature in the Sixteenth Century (Excluding Drama). This was one of his major academic works, done for the Oxford series in the 1950s. Lewis called the series OHEL for the Oxford History of English Literature. Love his sense of humor.

I'm only into the first chapter and am entranced and challenged. (The bastard didn't translate the Latin phrases for me!) This is going to take some time to finish since I have to research matters every other paragraph. Glad there is no time limit.

Decent copies of this book are not cheap. My paperback version is 45 years old and the pages are starting to darken but the binding is sound. That I consider myself lucky to have found an aging, academic book on a rather obscure aspect of 500 year old literature for under 25 bucks just confirms my nerd status.

Meanwhile, I'll brew a cup of tea, light a bowl of good pressed Virginia tobacco and settle in for some pleasurable reading.

Posted by: Mrs JTB at March 11, 2018 10:17 AM (V+03K)

103 Hi

Posted by: Mr_Eagle at March 11, 2018 10:18 AM (lxRFF)

104 Still going through The Birth of the Modern: World Society 1815-1830 by Paul Johnson. Hey, its a big book, and I've been busy.

Im reading about the political upheavals in Britain in 1819. All of those famous poets like Shelly and Wordsworth are having a flamewar with each other. If they wrote like that on AoSHQ, they would be banned.

Times look very dark. Subjects are forming militias, drilling with ex-British Army sergeants, and arming themselves, because they do not like the Government.

Plus ca change plus c'est la meme chose.

Posted by: NaCly Dog at March 11, 2018 10:18 AM (hyuyC)

105 Speaking of Man-Chimp hybrids and this being the book thread-

Long ago and far away, I read a black comedy titled-

"The Carefully Considered Rape of the World"

wherein all the world's women become pregnant one day, sort of like "The Midwich Cuckoos" (Village of the Damned for your movie folk) writ large,

with man-alien baboon hybrids as the invasion force.

It was written by, of all things, the guy who wrote "How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying", Shepard Mead.

A-a-a-anywho, I remember it as being funnyish in a downbeat sort of way.

And t's available on the Kindle if that sounds like your kind of thing.

Posted by: naturalfake at March 11, 2018 10:19 AM (9q7Dl)

106 I'm still dry and scaly
My friends call me "Squamous" Muldoon

Posted by: Muldoon at March 11, 2018 09:53 AM (wPiJc)



There's a position to which I just can't buy in:
That the "largest organ" is the skin
Eff surface area
I must needs declare to ya
There's no volume: it's just too thin.

Separately, I have a question about human frailty- why is our digestive system and immune system so lame? I keep seeing youtube videos about lizards or tigers (in captivity - presumably well kept by experts) that are served whole animals off the dirty ground, raw, fur, bones, intestines (ewww), and they are eaten whole, no problems. No human could do that without choking or getting some horrible bacterial or parasite problem. Is it because we've gone soft for so many years that we evolved to have no tolerance for it? Seems there would be a lot less regulations and meat would be cheaper if we could just eat things without consequences of infection. Vultures are warm blooded and they can eat carrion, ffs. I realize you're not a zoologist, but it just seems humans are pathetic compared to the rest of the animal kingdom.

Posted by: Steve and Cold Bear at March 11, 2018 10:20 AM (/qEW2)

107 I'm rereading Wrinkle In Time.


******

Since I pushed the notion of "Muldoon's Library of Limericks, Vol. 1" as being the ultimate bathroom book, perhaps I should have subtitled it...

...(wait for it)...


"A Tinkle in Rhyme"

Posted by: Muldoon at March 11, 2018 10:21 AM (wPiJc)

108 47 Never saw the movie because I figured Whoreyweird
would completely fuck it up, although I liked the movie version of No
Country For Old Men. Ironically All the Pretty Horses was the first
McCarthy I read and ultimately liked the least, but it still piqued my
interest for his other books. I thought his description of a
relationship between a young man and woman was embarrassingly awkward.

Posted by: Captain Hate at March 11, 2018 09:38 AM (y7DUB)
That is interesting. All the Pretty Horses is my favorite of his books. The second book in the Border Trilogy, "The Crosssing" would be a very close second. I found "No Country for Old Men" to read like a screenplay. And then there is Blood Meridian, certainly his magnum opus. Oh yeah, you were right to not see the film. My criticism of that movie simply could not be harsher. There is NO Mccarthy in that film.
I plan to reread ATPH soon. . I will think about your comment when reading the parts on the guy gal relationship. I do remember that the relationship did not stand out in any way, other than to casue a crisis and move the story forward. To me, the book was about a young man wanting to live in a glorified past, a past that may or may not have been fully real, but certainly was eclipsed in his time.

Posted by: quint at March 11, 2018 10:21 AM (n13/j)

109 Muldoon. Groan.

That's the title for your second book of limericks.

Have a great day, everyone. Spring is sprung, for varying amounts of spring.

Posted by: NaCly Dog at March 11, 2018 10:23 AM (hyuyC)

110 If there is one guy I'd like to punch in the face, it is that Robert's Rules of Order guy!

With great satisfaction I note that no one has recommended Robert's Rules of Order on the book thread.

If you are interested in the topic there is a book called something like the Guerilla's Guide to Robert's Rules of Order. LOL

Posted by: The Poster Formerly Known as Mr. Barky


I have Robert's Rules of Order to thank for my disinterest in ever running for political office, even though my family had a couple of generations of politicians. My Dad left it lying around and was excited when I took it to my room to read. Clunk. Read a few pages and said, "To hell with this."

Mad Magazine made more sense.

Posted by: Forgot My Nic at March 11, 2018 10:23 AM (LOgQ4)

111 great library.....i love the indian blanket....

i remember not being able to read....i don't remember when i was able to read....

Posted by: phoenixgirl at March 11, 2018 10:23 AM (0O7c5)

112
Nice close link there.

Posted by: Forgot My Nic at March 11, 2018 10:23 AM (LOgQ4)

113 Posted by: Steve and Cold Bear at March 11, 2018 10:20 AM (/qEW2)


*******


My answer? No tiger or buzzard ever ate my mom's cooking and survived. So I'm not too worried about the frailty of my digestive system.



P.S. Sorry Mom! I know you meant well, but geez-

Posted by: Muldoon at March 11, 2018 10:25 AM (wPiJc)

114 Posted by: phoenixgirl at March 11, 2018 10:23 AM (0O7c5)
-------
Hi phoenixgirl!

Posted by: Weasel at March 11, 2018 10:25 AM (MVjcR)

115 Re: the Wrecking Crew: Anyone remember the opening riff of the Monkees' "Mary, Mary"? Yup, that was played by Glen Campbell. Micky Dolenz frequently plugged the Wrecking Crew documentary on his FB page while it was being filmed.

Re: OHEL: I need to finish reading that at some point. Lots of fascinating stuff in it--I was mostly looking for CSL's views on Sidney for a research paper (which I ought to revise and try to publish someday), but the introduction alone is thought-provoking.

Posted by: Elisabeth G. Wolfe at March 11, 2018 10:25 AM (wbY28)

116 86 Statistically, the Navy loses more people to man overboard in port.
Posted by: NaCly Dog at March 11, 2018 10:00 AM (hyuyC)
____________________________________

Such an outdated term.

It's person overboard now.

Please retake your mandatory training in gender sensitivity.

Posted by: Ray Mabus at March 11, 2018 10:26 AM (arhmY)

117 I do have plenty of memories of looking up a LOT of words


Bane of my childhood. What does this word mean? Look it up!

I got good a relying on context because lazy. Also, the house dictionary (it was a Mirriam Webster) was so dry in tone that looking it up often did little good.

Posted by: Bandersnatch at March 11, 2018 10:26 AM (fuK7c)

118
Wait, so 'metin' on a draft poat is an offense now?!?!

Posted by: Soothsayer SLX Pro Series II Platinum Turbo at March 11, 2018 10:27 AM (jJx+x)

119 95
---
It wasn't long after that that I first read a book on my own: The Fire Cat. Still have that, too.
---

Posted by: Elisabeth G. Wolfe at March 11, 2018 10:10 AM (wbY2

***

I loved reading about Pickles the Fire Cat to my kids! Such a wonderful story!

Posted by: Elinor, Who Usually Looks Lurkily at March 11, 2018 10:27 AM (NqQAS)

120
Such an outdated term.

It's person overboard now.

Please retake your mandatory training in gender sensitivity.

Posted by: Ray Mabus
----
They don't call it the *head* for nothing.

Posted by: Crew of the USNS Harvey Milk at March 11, 2018 10:28 AM (Q/obp)

121 I remember the first time I understood a word. First grade. Probably a Dick and Jane book or whatever the Catholic version was. Sister Mary Edith was a big proponent of phonics and made sure we understood what all these letters sounded like. I remember looking at the blackboard and the letters of the word (probably Jane) and sounding them out and then suddenly it all made sense! Reading thereafter became something I loved. Math not so much, which still makes me sad. Wish I had had such a defining math moment.

Posted by: Mrs. Leggy at March 11, 2018 10:28 AM (prxs+)

122 I don't remember learning to read.

What I do remember vividly-

was the moment when we were learning about prefixes, and suffixes and the greek and latin roots of words in the second grade.

and suddenly a light went on in my brain.

I felt like I could understand everything and anything I came across reading because I could take with the word apart into it's components.

I felt like I'd suddenly discovered one of the keys to Life and Adulthood,

and instantly went on a mad learning spree of all the Latin and Greek roots I could find.

Posted by: naturalfake at March 11, 2018 10:29 AM (9q7Dl)

123 81 Someone brought up movies better than the book. "Jaws" has been mentioned. Also up for consideration:

M*A*S*H

That was a very good movie for sure. I have not read the book. However, I have heard that the book is based on real people and that Hawkeye Pierce was a pro American conservative. That is a long way from the sitcom lol

Posted by: quint at March 11, 2018 10:30 AM (n13/j)

124 Excellent libary !

tl;dr Bible is funny !

Back to honeydew list ...

Stay safe & well, Book People !

Posted by: sock_rat_eez, help us, pixy misa, you're our only hope! at March 11, 2018 10:30 AM (e11dj)

125 the bible thing is pretty funny



Posted by: phoenixgirl at March 11, 2018 10:30 AM (0O7c5)

126 I honestly can't remember a time when I couldn't read. Like many here I was an early reader.

Posted by: Insomniac - chopped liver at March 11, 2018 10:31 AM (NWiLs)

127 >>Bane of my childhood. What does this word mean? Look it up!

This was my mom's favorite teaching technique. The first was to make sure I got at least a couple books for birthdays and Christmases, the second was always to make sure they were books with new words and they only way I was going to learn them was by looking them up because she was not going to tell me.

Crafty woman.

Posted by: JackStraw at March 11, 2018 10:32 AM (/tuJf)

128 M*A*S*H


I read that in Jr. High, the TV show was on and I was too young to have seen the movie. In hindsight I wondered if it were a novelization of the movie or an original book.

I had read and loved Dr. Strangelove and was shocked to learn that it was a movie first.

Posted by: Bandersnatch at March 11, 2018 10:32 AM (fuK7c)

129 84
I'm rereading Wrinkle In Time. Not going to watch the movie and ruin it. It was one of the first books I've ever read.

Posted by: lin-duh @ work, really...I'm working at March 11, 2018 10:05 AM (kufk0)
same here, the movie can add nothing, it can only take away.

Posted by: quint at March 11, 2018 10:33 AM (n13/j)

130 Posted by: Steve and Cold Bear at March 11, 2018 10:20 AM (/qEW2)


Pretty much all wild animals, tigers, lions, and bears, included, are loaded with parasites.

They're just well-behaved parasites for the most part that don't outright kill their host.

Posted by: naturalfake at March 11, 2018 10:33 AM (9q7Dl)

131 Learned to read so early that it's hard to say whether my fuzzy earliest memories were before or after.

Posted by: sock_rat_eez, help us, pixy misa, you're our only hope! at March 11, 2018 10:33 AM (e11dj)

132 I plan to reread ATPH soon. . I will think about your comment when reading the parts on the guy gal relationship. I do remember that the relationship did not stand out in any way, other than to casue a crisis and move the story forward. To me, the book was about a young man wanting to live in a glorified past, a past that may or may not have been fully real, but certainly was eclipsed in his time.
Posted by: quint at March 11, 2018 10:21 AM (n13/j)


I think your take on ATPH is well stated. Have you read any of his earlier books located in the southeast? I particularly liked Suttree and Child of God. I likewise liked Blood Meridian although others here have slagged it, which is ok.

The Road is atypical stylistically in that it's a page turner with a straight ahead narrative.

Posted by: Captain Hate at March 11, 2018 10:35 AM (y7DUB)

133 And now sleep eyes is micronapping his way past Goofy Liz Warren.

People still do non-parody interviews with xer? It's current year.

On a side note. Fack you auto-correct for thinking xer is an actual word.

Posted by: Fascist Pikachu - Now with Getting Angrier at March 11, 2018 10:35 AM (kdLF2)

134 1. I really really envy that library.

2. One of my earliest memories: sitting on the living room couch snuggled next to my mom. She held the big book with pictures while we read to each other.. She helped me with the words I didn't yet know. It was one of her finest moments.

3. Best move of the week: learned how to download books from the library on my Nook.

4. Current book: just finished, 15 minutes ago, my first Nook library book in a marathon read. Initially carried away by the brilliant author, later by curiosity if the racial animosity would continue to grow by the page. The Underground Railroad by Colson Whitehead is a bag of cookies with arsenic filling. There is one sympathetic white character. The rest are brutal slave owners, slave drivers/hunters, lynch mob enthusiasts. Although the book makes clear that whites who help runaway slaves risk their lives and property (and lose them), the book characterizes them as cowardly closet racists. Abolitionists send money south to buy books, but not libraries. William Lloyd Garrision? Who he?
Plus, America stole land from the Indians and the foundation of American was built by slave labor.
This is an Oprah selection. Meh.

Posted by: vivi at March 11, 2018 10:35 AM (11H2y)

135 I think the first word I learned to read was "Cheerios".

Posted by: Muldoon at March 11, 2018 10:35 AM (wPiJc)

136 over at Townhall funny
Hillarys Hipster Army Prepares For The Second Civil War

Posted by: rhennigantx at March 11, 2018 10:36 AM (BtQd4)

137
135 I think the first word I learned to read was "Cheerios".
Posted by: Muldoon at March 11, 2018 10:35 AM (wPiJc)
---------
Dear Penthouse:

Posted by: Weasel at March 11, 2018 10:36 AM (MVjcR)

138 129: I try to stay away from biographical sketches of L'Engle too. Sort of destroys the illusion of the person

Posted by: CN at March 11, 2018 10:37 AM (5gaNQ)

139 I sprang forth from the womb, fully formed, with a book of Shakespearean sonnets in my hand!

Posted by: Muldoon at March 11, 2018 10:38 AM (wPiJc)

140 76 jackstraw:

the bonham's sale i mentioned also had a letter from hamilton to von steuben discussing troop movements. sold for $16,000.

Posted by: musical jolly chimp at March 11, 2018 10:38 AM (Pg+x7)

141 139 I sprang forth from the womb, fully formed, with a book of Shakespearean sonnets in my hand!
Posted by: Muldoon at March 11, 2018 10:38 AM (wPiJc)

More like Libinsky's Lewd Limericks.

Posted by: Insomniac - chopped liver at March 11, 2018 10:39 AM (NWiLs)

142 I read Nothing Lasts Forever way back when Die Hard came out, after seeing the movie, and didn't like it at all. I thought it was beyond cynical, almost nihilistic. Everything sucks!!! or such like. ... not sure if I'd enjoy it more on re-reading, but yeah, it's unlike the movie it spawned.

Posted by: Helena Handbotsket at March 11, 2018 10:39 AM (Jq2Yj)

143 I remember reading Dick and Jane, so it's possible the first word I learned to read was dick.

Posted by: Northernlurker Worldwide Moron Tour at March 11, 2018 10:39 AM (nBr1j)

144 143: I remember those books, "see spot run, run spot run. Run, run run"

Posted by: CN at March 11, 2018 10:41 AM (5gaNQ)

145 I remember reading Dick and Jane, so it's possible the first word I learned to read was dick.


*********

Which brings us back to the "commas save lives" meme.


See dick, run!

Posted by: Muldoon at March 11, 2018 10:42 AM (wPiJc)

146 If you need a limerick Muldoon's on it
Drawing from Shakespearean sonnets
But don't be amazed
When he posts on this page
His talents seems to be chronic

Posted by: fraeked at March 11, 2018 10:43 AM (UdKB7)

147 I can remember climbing into my Dad's lap on Sundays and asking him to read me the "funny papers".

My Dad is now 96 years old. He still takes two newspapers and reads multiple books at a time.

Books are stacked all around his house and sagging many shelves and bookcases.

He also keeps an old, battered dictionary by his favorite reading spot and has kept track of words he has looked up over the years by placing an asterisk by the word.

Posted by: Elinor, Who Usually Looks Lurkily at March 11, 2018 10:44 AM (NqQAS)

148 With the LGBTWTFBBQ agenda it'll be Dick and Dick.

See Dick.
See Dick.
See Dick's dick.
See Dick dick Dick.
Dick Dick, Dick.

Posted by: Insomniac - chopped liver at March 11, 2018 10:44 AM (NWiLs)

149
I sprang forth from the womb, fully formed, with a book of Shakespearean sonnets in my hand! Posted by: Muldoon at March 11, 2018 10:38 AM (wPiJc)
=====

I always see you with Alexander Pope.

Posted by: mustbequantum at March 11, 2018 10:45 AM (MIKMs)

150 >>the bonham's sale i mentioned also had a letter from hamilton to von steuben discussing troop movements. sold for $16,000.

My folks had their letter framed with a drawing of Hamilton and it hung in our house for many years and then funded a good part of their retirement. Turns out is was worth a bit more than $16,000.

Posted by: JackStraw at March 11, 2018 10:45 AM (/tuJf)

151 I read a Wrinkle in Time in school. I can't remember anything from it except that one of the characters referred to mitochondria and a confused teacher said "the mighty what?" It reminds me of the silliness of Lucas' "midichlorians". I'm not going to see it- and for Episcopalians/Anglicans out there, she's a universalist. Ie. one of those people that doesn't take it seriously.

Posted by: Steve and Cold Bear at March 11, 2018 10:46 AM (/qEW2)

152 Nice library wjr123. I find myself looking at it as if I was going to choose a book (or six) to read from it.

I homeschool my boys and our reading this year has been tied to U.S. History. We just finished "Butcher's Crossing" by John Williams and they really enjoyed it. It's about an 1870s Harvard student who heads west and funds a buffalo hunt.

It's the second time I've read it and I enjoyed it more this time. Considered to be the weakest of Williams' three available novels (the other two are "Stoner" and "Augustus"...both highly recommended, too), "Butcher's Crossing" still packs a punch. Williams avoids judgment in the book, preferring to present the struggle to tame the West as a mirror of the human soul. Just as man is capable of heroic and horrific deeds, often at the same time, so reads our history.

Posted by: Dwight at March 11, 2018 10:47 AM (iAl7a)

153 Just finished Hallow Mass yesterday and loved it and am praying for a follow-up, though not sure if there will be one.

Listened to Kipling's The Man Who Would Be King from LibriVox, but was a bit disappointed as the narrator was an Englishwoman with a very high-pitched and squeaky voice who didn't ENUNCIATE very clearly. Seems the wrong voice in which to Kiple, if you catch my meaning.

Now listening to John Dos Passos' Three Soldiers, which I am informed is a Classic©, but which is remarkable mostly for the dialogue having at least one "G-ddamn!" every 50 words or so. Sigh.

Finally, reading Why The Universe Is The Way It Is, by Hugh Ross. Came highly recommended by Dan Bongino on his podcast. Which podcast, if you are not listening to it daily, you are missing the true story of the Russia-Collusion Fraud.

Posted by: Sharkman at March 11, 2018 10:48 AM (dDMQ9)

154 Bane of my childhood. What does this word mean? Look it up!
---

What I do remember vividly-
was the moment when we were learning about prefixes, and suffixes and the greek and latin roots of words in the second grade.
------

The bane of my childhood was asking Dad the meaning of a word and getting a full-blown lecture: "...taken from the Latin meaning..."

Now I wish I hadn't sighed and rolled my eyes as much as I did, because I find it fascinating.

Dad was taught by the Domini Canes and they took that stuff seriously.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, Gamestress of Triskelion at March 11, 2018 10:52 AM (qJtVm)

155 I had been reading Fever by Deon Meyer and stopped about half way through. It is a very interesting post-apocalypse novel set in South Africa. The problem is that I am at the point where very bad things are going to happen to the good people who are trying to restore civilization and I am just too invested in the characters to let that happen.

Posted by: motionview at March 11, 2018 10:55 AM (pYQR/)

156 I see our servers are still on strike.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, Gamestress of Triskelion at March 11, 2018 10:55 AM (qJtVm)

157 I know I couldn't read when I was watching Batman, because mom had to read "Bam!" and "Pow!" during all the fight scenes.

Posted by: San Franpsycho at March 11, 2018 10:55 AM (EZebt)

158
Is there a link to the article(s) about the Madeleine L'Engles children being upset with her books, etc?

SCB: from what I've read of her work she took God seriously, she just didn't feel like she believed. She thought it was important enough to act like she believed though- sort of like Jordan Peterson maybe?

Posted by: momsalurkin at March 11, 2018 10:56 AM (IaIkg)

159 Listened to Kipling's The Man Who Would Be King from LibriVox, but was a bit disappointed as the narrator was an Englishwoman with a very high-pitched and squeaky voice who didn't ENUNCIATE very clearly. Seems the wrong voice in which to Kiple, if you catch my meaning.
---
It should be read by Christopher Plummer.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, Gamestress of Triskelion at March 11, 2018 10:56 AM (qJtVm)

160 Check out:

https://www.steynonline.com/8512/hammer-and-tongues

wherein Mark Steyn reprints a parody of Micky Spillane writing that he composed a while back. Hilarious.

Posted by: MichiCanuck at March 11, 2018 10:57 AM (y6zoY)

161 158: I found this one, but I recall something from another paper that was a bit angrier, but that was after she died.

https://tinyurl.com/ycwvuzcg

Posted by: CN at March 11, 2018 10:59 AM (5gaNQ)

162 Does anyone really know what time it is? Does anyone really care?

Posted by: RI Red - well-red at March 11, 2018 11:01 AM (lpQr2)

163 That was fast, thanks CN.

Posted by: momsalurkin at March 11, 2018 11:02 AM (IaIkg)

164 Wait, so 'metin' on a draft poat is an offense now?!?!

Posted by: Soothsayer SLX Pro Series II Platinum Turbo at March 11, 2018 10:27 AM (jJx+x)

Didn't several peeps get time-outs for doing this a month or so back?

Posted by: BignJames at March 11, 2018 11:02 AM (0+nbW)

165 the condensed Bible made me LOL

Posted by: votermom certified russian matryoshka bot at March 11, 2018 11:02 AM (hMwEB)

166 Does anyone really know what time it is? Does anyone really care?

Posted by: RI Red - well-red at March 11, 2018 11:01 AM (lpQr2)

I can't imagine why.

Posted by: BignJames at March 11, 2018 11:03 AM (0+nbW)

167 148 With the LGBTWTFBBQ agenda it'll be Dick and Dick.


See Dick.
See Dick.
See Dick's dick.
See Dick dick Dick.
Dick Dick, Dick.
Posted by: Insomniac - chopped liver at March 11, 2018 10:44 AM (NWiLs)
more likesee jane? jane doesn't have a dick yet......see dick? he wants to wear jane's dresses......

Posted by: phoenixgirl at March 11, 2018 11:04 AM (0O7c5)

168 163: I'm rereading some L'Engle books too, so I've been thinking about it. I recall being pretty shocked that she and Hugh Franklin were not "Donna Reed Show" perfect parents

Posted by: CN at March 11, 2018 11:04 AM (5gaNQ)

169 > This got me thinking: can any of you remember a time when you couldn't read?

I can't.

But I do have a vivid memory of the first time I remember reading a word. (I must have known how to read before this - but this is the first word I remember reading)
Hulk. It was the cover of Hulk #1 in the early 1960s.
I remember being excited because I knew it as a word.

Posted by: ArthurK at March 11, 2018 11:05 AM (24wOG)

170 Good morning, Elisabeth. I bet that class on Agatha Christie will be fun!

Posted by: JTB at March 11, 2018 11:05 AM (V+03K)

171 Listened to Kipling's The Man Who Would Be King from LibriVox, but was a bit disappointed as the narrator was an Englishwoman with a very high-pitched and squeaky voice who didn't ENUNCIATE very clearly. Seems the wrong voice in which to Kiple, if you catch my meaning.
---
It should be read by Christopher Plummer.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, Gamestress of Triskelion at March 11, 2018 10:56 AM (qJtVm)

I watched a doc. on the Beatles' secretary a few weeks ago....almost needed sub-titles.

Posted by: BignJames at March 11, 2018 11:07 AM (0+nbW)

172 Oh yeah, Cappy Arnheiter liked to take shots at sharks and sea snakes wherever/whenever, so some poor deck ape is going about his business and *BLAM* right next to his ear.

He kept loaded guns and rifles on the bridge that would rattle around loosely. His officers would discretely unload them and place the ammo somewhere separate.

The enlistedmen liked hiding the boomsticks so they wouldn't have to hear him blasting away at sea critters.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, Gamestress of Triskelion at March 11, 2018 11:08 AM (qJtVm)

173 Now that's what a private library should look like!

Posted by: josephistan at March 11, 2018 11:08 AM (ANIFC)

174 It's the story of Britain, from about 7,000 BC until present, and I thought it would be interesting, but it turned into one of those doorstopper books where the characters and events are completely predictable.
Posted by: right wing yankee at March 11, 2018 09:43 AM

It sounds fascinating!

Posted by: Zombie James Michener at March 11, 2018 11:09 AM (2NqXo)

175 I think your take on ATPH is well stated. Have you
read any of his earlier books located in the southeast? I particularly
liked Suttree and Child of God. I likewise liked Blood Meridian
although others here have slagged it, which is ok.



The Road is atypical stylistically in that it's a page turner with a straight ahead narrative.

Posted by: Captain Hate at March 11, 2018 10:35 AM (y7DUB)
These guys slagged Blood Meridian! That is messed up. I don't even know what to say about the book other that to tell someone to "watch out". It is a classic and not for the faint-hearted lol.
I have read the Border Trilogy, No Country For Old Men, BM, and part of The Road. I am a bit scared of Child of God, it might be a bit too weird for me, and I thought the Crossing was normal lol. No seriously I do plan to read it. I will probably read Suttree first because it is supposed to have some light hearted moments. You have to cherish those when reading McCarthy

Posted by: quint at March 11, 2018 11:10 AM (n13/j)

176 FYI -- Regarding the comment by SandyCheeks and the quip by Dennis Prager while addressing an atheist convention:

I've heard Dennis say this a couple of times on his show (and, even though an a-theist) found it so noteworthy that I made a note of it among the thousands of quotes I've saved.

Dennis properly attributes the quote to Rabbi Milton Steinberg, who wrote: "The believer in God has to account for the existence of unjust suffering; the atheist has to account for everything else."

Posted by: ShainS at March 11, 2018 11:10 AM (BiLU+)

177 Now that's what a private library should look like!

Posted by: josephistan at March 11, 2018 11:08 AM (ANIFC)

I bet there's a hidden bar he's not telling us about.

Posted by: BignJames at March 11, 2018 11:10 AM (0+nbW)

178 177 Now that's what a private library should look like!

Posted by: josephistan at March 11, 2018 11:08 AM (ANIFC)

I bet there's a hidden bar he's not telling us about.
Posted by: BignJames at March 11, 2018 11:10 AM (0+nbW)

It's inside the standing globe.

Posted by: josephistan at March 11, 2018 11:11 AM (ANIFC)

179 I bet there's a hidden bar he's not telling us about.


If you spin the globe to the right longitude it opens the door to the BatCave.

Posted by: Bandersnatch at March 11, 2018 11:13 AM (fuK7c)

180 Almost finished with the bio of Clementine Churchill -- no doubt all women like her were ignored on Int'l Women's Day. Also started a bio of Almina Carnarvon by the 8th Countess. I only saw the first two seasons of Downton Abbey, which was set in Highclere Castle, the seat of the Carnarvon's, but I did see a documentary about the Castle, with interviews of the current Lord and his lady (the author of the book about Almina). Quite well written and lively. Almina was the love-child of Alfred de Rothschild and Marie Wombwell. Almina's husband was the fifth Lord -- the one who funded Howard Carter who discovered the tomb of King Tut. During World War I, Almina turned the Castle into a hospital, and was quite a successful nurse. Wonderful story.
The current lord and lady seem like very good people, and work hard to keep the place intact. Among other things, they raise feed for HM the Queen's horses.

Posted by: Alifa at March 11, 2018 11:14 AM (0JLzq)

181 Since I pushed the notion of "Muldoon's Library of Limericks, Vol. 1" as being the ultimate bathroom book, perhaps I should have subtitled it...

...(wait for it)...


"A Tinkle in Rhyme

=======
*Knock 'Knock*

*Opens door and sees seething mob waving torches and pitchforks*

*points at Muldoon*

"He's over there"

Posted by: Vlad the Impaler, whittling away like mad. at March 11, 2018 11:14 AM (ipo2u)

182 My line about Blood Meridian is that on one page you are reading the most country, corn bread, hick dialogue on, and then on the other it is like reading the King James Bible. I don't know if that means anything or is even accurate. but that was my response to it. Also, wow, I can't imagine not having read that book, for good or ill.

Posted by: quint at March 11, 2018 11:15 AM (n13/j)

183 >>My line about Blood Meridian is that on one page you are reading the most country, corn bread, hick dialogue on, and then on the other it is like reading the King James Bible. I don't know if that means anything or is even accurate. but that was my response to it. Also, wow, I can't imagine not having read that book, for good or ill.

More like endured it. I found it a painful slog and never understood the praise it got.

I much preferred his other stuff particularly All the Pretty Horses but to each his own.

Posted by: JackStraw at March 11, 2018 11:18 AM (/tuJf)

184 From wjr123, whom I think mostly lurks:

That is only half of the library. To the right is a window with a low table holding a tube based stereo and more books and art going further...I spend a lot of time there.

***************

Is that the Great Books collection on your shelves?

Posted by: Taco Shack at March 11, 2018 11:20 AM (C+qQ0)

185 "He's over there"

Posted by: Vlad the Impaler, whittling away like mad. at March 11, 2018 11:14 AM (ipo2u)

Always the helpful one.

Posted by: Mikey NTH at March 11, 2018 11:20 AM (0QYMt)

186 Good morning. For some reason, this morning it's an hour later than it should be. *winks at Congress*

Posted by: Hands at March 11, 2018 11:21 AM (EzdLW)

187 Meanwhile, I'll brew a cup of tea, light a bowl of good pressed Virginia tobacco and settle in for some pleasurable reading.

Posted by: Mrs JTB at March 11, 2018 10:17 AM (V+03K)
throw some Perique in their too.

Posted by: quint at March 11, 2018 11:21 AM (n13/j)

188 I've been in a mood for history lately. The library had a sale and I got a facsimilie copy of "Advice to the Officers of the British Army" published in 1773. It has the lower case 's' that looks like an 'f' these days. From my reading so far, it is an interesting glimpse into the type of humorless prig setting standards for the Red Coats. I don't know if the term 'fragging' existed back then, but it should have. But it is definitely worth reading.

Also, dug out my copy of "Champlain's Dream" that I've been meaning to get to. I have a general interest in the history of exploration of the area and a family connection to the settlement of Quebec, so it should be fun.

I'll be reading the Lewis OHEL book, mentioned above, in chapters then taking a break to digest all the information. These history books should provide a nice counterpoint.

Posted by: Mrs JTB at March 11, 2018 11:21 AM (V+03K)

189 I'm just gonna say it: The Terror was a painful slog.

Still going to watch the t.v. show of same.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, Gamestress of Triskelion at March 11, 2018 11:21 AM (qJtVm)

190
Tennessee Episcopal Priest Kira Schlesinger believes so strongly in legalized abortion that she wrote a book to reconcile her Christian beliefs with subordinate her apostate beliefs to the killing of unborn babies.


FIFY

Posted by: Hands at March 11, 2018 11:22 AM (EzdLW)

191 Lets eat doggie.

Delish.

Posted by: Baracks cooking show at March 11, 2018 11:22 AM (70cRb)

192 Well, I found something new in reading technology, Kindle Motion. It's rather like newspaper in the Harry Potter movies; the pictures move. For example, in the book I got, Hell's Princess by Harold Schechter the true story of an early 20th century serial killer, at one point a house burns and you can see the the glowing embers rising from the flames. Another example is a map showing sightings of the fleeing suspect in chronological order.

Posted by: Anonosaurus Wrecks, Broke, Woke, Toke, Joke at March 11, 2018 11:22 AM (+y/Ru)

193 "Let's eat kitty" "Let's eat, kitty"

Some would say the first option is much better (and the picture is wrong), IYKWIMAITYD.

Posted by: jim at March 11, 2018 11:22 AM (gjGvH)

194 Some "priest".

Posted by: steevy at March 11, 2018 11:23 AM (LiyEm)

195 I bet there's a hidden bar he's not telling us about.


PUT. THE CANDLE. BACK.

Posted by: Cicero (@cicero) at March 11, 2018 11:23 AM (HiQSt)

196 Watched the Frankenstein Chonicles. Liked it. Many unanswered questions at then end. Like it was just cut short.

Posted by: Cannibal Bob at March 11, 2018 11:25 AM (70cRb)

197 'Some would say the first option is much better '

Uh yea, no.

Posted by: Michael Douglas at March 11, 2018 11:25 AM (UdKB7)

198 I was pleased to learn while watching a Billy Graham documentary that he used The Living Bible.

I have had mine for since 1974.

Posted by: Sebastian Melmoth at March 11, 2018 11:26 AM (2DOZq)

199 168: Yeah, I got the first Crosswick book on a kindle deal and enjoyed it very much.

Is it bad that I am hoping the New Yorker article is an exaggeration? I mean, it _is_ the New Yorker.

Posted by: momsalurkin at March 11, 2018 11:28 AM (IaIkg)

200 My wife are reading the meticulously crafted "The Boys in the Boat." by Daniel James Brown. It's about Washington States remarkable winning season of 1936, including a trip to Adolph's Olympic games. It's an amazing story, that pulls in all sorts of historical detail about the Depression that was unknown to me.
If there was ever a book made for making a movie, this is it. Amazing characters, and it's all true.

Posted by: Brave Sir Robin at March 11, 2018 11:30 AM (ty7RM)

201 testing

Posted by: JTB at March 11, 2018 11:30 AM (V+03K)

202 I remember reading Dick and Jane, so it's possible the first word I learned to read was dick.


*********

Which brings us back to the "commas save lives" meme.


See dick, run!
Posted by: Muldoon at March 11, 2018 10:42 AM (wPiJc)


I do tend to overuse commas, I think, but the one I recall that makes me fear not having a comma where it's needed:

I had to help my uncle Jack off his horse.

Posted by: BurtTC at March 11, 2018 11:31 AM (Pz4pT)

203 '201 testing'

You may pass.

Posted by: The Args and the Kwargs at March 11, 2018 11:32 AM (UdKB7)

204 Just the thought of eating a cat turns my stomach.

Posted by: Barky O'Fuckstick at March 11, 2018 11:32 AM (NL6wI)

205 The condensed bible was pretty funny but they could of came up with something better for Job. They ended it with a winner though.

Posted by: Sebastian Melmoth at March 11, 2018 11:32 AM (2DOZq)

206 elizabeth warren is still claiming her native heritage

Posted by: phoenixgirl at March 11, 2018 11:33 AM (0O7c5)

207 In case anyone is wondering, the reference to tea and tobacco should have gone out under my nic. Mrs. JTB doesn't smoke a pipe.

Multiple nics on the same machine can lead to complications.

Posted by: JTB at March 11, 2018 11:33 AM (V+03K)

208 My wife and I adored the British television series "All Creatures Great And Small" based on a series of books by James Harriot (pen name of country veterinarian James Alfred "Alf" Wight) some years ago.

I finally got around to listening to the one of the audiobooks (really enjoyable with a good voice actor), and the stories and storytelling are just delightful.

Highly recommended, but WARNING: will leave you pining for the good-old, fashionably-mocked, post-WWII days when men were still men, women were still women, and characters still had character.

Posted by: ShainS at March 11, 2018 11:34 AM (BiLU+)

209 Re: Pr-choice Christian B.S. Her premise that churchs "shame" women who have abortions is absolutely NOT true. My church treats it as another sin, and is profoundly interested in helping women unburden themselves of the ongoing emotional damage that abortion inflicts.
Another infected institution.

Posted by: Brave Sir Robin at March 11, 2018 11:34 AM (ty7RM)

210 Oh, if we're OT, Katy Perry killed a nun.

Posted by: Bandersnatch at March 11, 2018 11:34 AM (fuK7c)

211 Chuck Todd insultingly aggressive when questioning Trump officials.

Where was he from '08 through '16?

Posted by: Les Kinetic at March 11, 2018 11:35 AM (5OEn4)

212 Now watching 'someone' Dreadful. I like it. Zany ceatures, Dr. Frankenstein, vampires, zombies, shooting, stabbing, autopsies, scary seances. They threw all sorts of shit in it. I dont really care wat the plot is, they got it all. I'm a shallow guy.

Posted by: Cannibal Bob at March 11, 2018 11:35 AM (70cRb)

213 That's not a euphemism. Katy Perry killed a nun. An 89 yearl old nun.

Posted by: Bandersnatch at March 11, 2018 11:35 AM (fuK7c)

214 211: kneeling under the desk?

Posted by: CN at March 11, 2018 11:37 AM (5gaNQ)

215 My wife are reading the meticulously crafted "The Boys in the Boat." by Daniel James Brown. It's about Washington States remarkable winning season of 1936, including a trip to Adolph's Olympic games. It's an amazing story, that pulls in all sorts of historical detail about the Depression that was unknown to me.
If there was ever a book made for making a movie, this is it. Amazing characters, and it's all true.

Posted by: Brave Sir Robin at March 11, 2018 11:30 AM (ty7RM)

It was UW not WSU.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1Yrd6wwG4JE

Posted by: BignJames at March 11, 2018 11:37 AM (0+nbW)

216 Posted by: Brave Sir Robin at March 11, 2018 11:34 AM (ty7RM)

They can use their 'shame' allegation about any sin since they think telling anyone that something is wrong constitutes 'shaming' . As usual these people are dishonest mental lightweights.

Posted by: Sebastian Melmoth at March 11, 2018 11:37 AM (2DOZq)

217 The official plural of the (Toyota) Prius is Prii.

(This was determined in an online vote in 2011.)

Posted by: Moron News YOU can use! at March 11, 2018 11:38 AM (DMUuz)

218 One of my patients asked why Chuck Todd "has a pussy on his face". I suspect blowing dems is as good a reason as any

Posted by: CN at March 11, 2018 11:39 AM (5gaNQ)

219 James Harriet has a (chapter? Short story?) called "Just One Bark." It is an absolute tear jerker, in the happy, fulfilling kind of way.
Also, the woman who played Helen on the BBC series was buxom and hot.

Posted by: Brave Sir Robin at March 11, 2018 11:39 AM (ty7RM)

220 Herriot, btw.

Posted by: Bandersnatch at March 11, 2018 11:39 AM (fuK7c)

221 "Katy Perry killed a nun."

Well hell's bells. She really knows how to go all the way don't she?

Posted by: fraeked at March 11, 2018 11:39 AM (UdKB7)

222 It was UW not WSU.

oooo, thanks for the catch.

Posted by: Brave Sir Robin at March 11, 2018 11:40 AM (ty7RM)

223 183 >My line about Blood Meridian is that on one page
you are reading the most country, corn bread, hick dialogue on, and
then on the other it is like reading the King James Bible. I don't know
if that means anything or is even accurate. but that was my response to
it. Also, wow, I can't imagine not having read that book, for good or
ill.



More like endured it. I found it a painful slog and never understood the praise it got.



I much preferred his other stuff particularly All the Pretty Horses but to each his own.

Posted by: JackStraw at March 11, 2018 11:18 AM (/tuJf)
Understood. In fact I would say that most people should NOT read Blood Meridian. I just can't imagine myself having not read it. Also, All the Pretty Horses is my fave McCarthy book too.

Posted by: quint at March 11, 2018 11:40 AM (n13/j)

224 Morning, JTB! Yes, the Christie class should be fun--I'm starting them with Come, Tell Me How You Live, which I don't think is on most people's radar but should be. The hard part is narrowing down the reading list!

Posted by: Elisabeth G. Wolfe at March 11, 2018 11:40 AM (wbY28)

225 216: Why should people not feel any shame over very bad actions? Eliminating any sense of shame would seem to increase the likelihood of repeat bad performances

Posted by: CN at March 11, 2018 11:40 AM (5gaNQ)

226 Katy Perry and the Archdiocese killed a nun.

Posted by: Sebastian Melmoth at March 11, 2018 11:41 AM (2DOZq)

227 'One of my patients asked why Chuck Todd "has a pussy on his face'

I've been calling him "Beaver Mouth" for some time now.
And it's not because he has an overbite.

Posted by: fraeked at March 11, 2018 11:41 AM (UdKB7)

228 Like others, early reader. But I do remember doing the See
Spot Run books. Early memory of kindergarten or first grade lying on rugs on floor for nap time. And looking up the dress of the teacher. True story.

Posted by: RI Red - well-red at March 11, 2018 11:42 AM (lpQr2)

229 My mom loved James Herriot's books. She still has a few of them in her library.

Posted by: josephistan at March 11, 2018 11:43 AM (ANIFC)

230 226 Katy Perry and the Archdiocese killed a nun.
Posted by: Sebastian Melmoth at March 11, 2018 11:41 AM (2DOZq)

OK, now I'm really confused.

Posted by: josephistan at March 11, 2018 11:43 AM (ANIFC)

231 And looking up the dress of the teacher. True story.
Posted by: RI Red - well-red at March 11, 2018 11:42 AM (lpQr2)



You were a born Moron.

Posted by: Cicero (@cicero) at March 11, 2018 11:43 AM (HiQSt)

232 But I do remember doing the See
Spot Run books.


I remember all the early reader books and my reaction to them. Eggs are white. No, they're not, they're brown. Dogs say bow wow. No, that sounds nothing like a dog.

I concluded right away that grownups were lying to us.

Posted by: Bandersnatch at March 11, 2018 11:44 AM (fuK7c)

233 229: I have a few too! I loved the series with Robert Hardy and Christopher Timothy. "Only One Woof" was a favorite of my kids who also enjoyed the series, especially Tricki-woo, the pampered peke

Posted by: CN at March 11, 2018 11:44 AM (5gaNQ)

234 210 Oh, if we're OT, Katy Perry killed a nun.
Posted by: Bandersnatch at March 11, 2018 11:34 AM (fuK7c)
---
And is wearing her hide.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, Gamestress of Triskelion at March 11, 2018 11:44 AM (qJtVm)

235 What does Schlesinger think we do in our churches? We try to help women heal from the shame and trauma and guilt of abortion. We don't cause the shame, we help women deal with it.

Something tells me she thinks shame is an inappropriate response to taking a human life through abortion (even though it is a normal response and indicates the conscience is still working) while trying to shame people who still look to God for their moral compass.

That's an argument I see frequently - if someone abstains from some immorality, it makes the indulgers fell bad. And that's mean. So you must participate! Fund PP! Bake the cake!

Posted by: Emmie -- please, no public display of insanity at March 11, 2018 11:45 AM (/A+Cl)

236 I am slowly picking my way through a reissue of Murray Leinster's Med Ship anthology, they were all short stories for the magazines, telling about a representative of the interstellar medical service, visiting planets and dealing with the human side of epidemics.

Leinster's career went from 1919 to the early 70's, and he went from very good, to competent, to commercial. He always had his eye on the latest trends of technology and science fiction. This series, though, lacks his usual sparkle.

It does have some good points and some humor, and in a 1957 story it references the CO2 planetary greenhouse effect.

Posted by: Kindltot at March 11, 2018 11:45 AM (2K6fY)

237 I concluded right away that grownups were lying to us.
Posted by: Bandersnatch at March 11, 2018 11:44 AM (fuK7c)


There is no doubt that Big Phonics had its own agenda.

Posted by: Cicero (@cicero) at March 11, 2018 11:45 AM (HiQSt)

238 In a similar vein to James Herriot's books are Cleveland Amory's books, about a NYC vet. One I remember is "All of My Patients are Under the Bed."

Posted by: josephistan at March 11, 2018 11:45 AM (ANIFC)

239 I enjoyed all the Herriot books. Some of the stories are laugh out loud funny and some will make the room dusty. Never tried listening to the books but I bet they would do well with the right narrator.

Posted by: JTB at March 11, 2018 11:46 AM (V+03K)

240 "Katy Perry killed a nun."

Well hell's bells. She really knows how to go all the way don't she?
Posted by: fraeked at March 11, 2018 11:39 AM (UdKB7)


I got confused!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TjSyCpygSNg

Posted by: Morrissey at March 11, 2018 11:46 AM (Pz4pT)

241 219 James Harriet has a (chapter? Short story?) called "Just One Bark." It is an absolute tear jerker, in the happy, fulfilling kind of way.
Also, the woman who played Helen on the BBC series was buxom and hot.
Posted by: Brave Sir Robin at March 11, 2018 11:39 AM (ty7RM)

Watched the series. Now readng The Best of Herriot i found at Goodwill. The show was remarkably close to the books stories imho.

Posted by: Cannibal Bob at March 11, 2018 11:46 AM (70cRb)

242
Katy killed a Nun
The whole world's come undone

Posted by: fraeked at March 11, 2018 11:47 AM (UdKB7)

243 There is no doubt that Big Phonics had its own agenda.Posted by: Cicero (@cicero) at March 11, 2018 11:45 AM (HiQSt)

#sounditout!

Posted by: phoenixgirl at March 11, 2018 11:47 AM (0O7c5)

244 I learned to read before I started school. It wasn't because I'm such a sooper genius or something, I just lived in a house with 3 older brothers and a mom and dad who loved to read, so I wanted to be a part of that, too. So, according to my parents, I sat on my daddy's lap and asked him to teach me from the newspaper. I really do not recall ever not being able to read as a result, I was very young, I think around 3 when I started.

I remember reading books with mom, like Charlotte's Web, with her reading one character's part and me reading another. Mom was very clever with kids, she always got us and encouraged us to play with stuff rated above our age level so we were always reaching and trying intellectually to do beyond what people said we could do.

Posted by: Christopher R Taylor at March 11, 2018 11:47 AM (39g3+)

245 On a lighter note, finished audiobook of The Devil's Punchbowl by Greg Iles. Great story, but damn, it was long. I think I read about 10 times faster than listening, but Mrs. Red listens while she does chores.

Posted by: RI Red - well-red at March 11, 2018 11:48 AM (lpQr2)

246 I have an early reading story. Fall, 1960, my father and I went down to Republican headquarters to get a Nixon bumpersticker. On the way home, I accidentally held it upside down and thought that they had misspelled it "NOXIN". I also remember watching the Roadrunner and Wiley Coyote was always buying stuff from Acme. "Acme" was a non-word so I figured it must be Ace and couldn't figure out why there was an M in it.

Posted by: Anonosaurus Wrecks, Broke, Woke, Toke, Joke at March 11, 2018 11:49 AM (+y/Ru)

247 Katy Perry and the Archdiocese killed a nun.
Posted by: Sebastian Melmoth at March 11, 2018 11:41 AM (2DOZq)

OK, now I'm really confused.
Posted by: josephistan at March 11, 2018 11:43 AM (ANIFC)


I say no, you say yes and you will change your mind!

Posted by: Morrissey at March 11, 2018 11:49 AM (Pz4pT)

248 That library ticks off all the essentials: Built in
shelves, antique globe, comfy chair and ottoman, artwork, Persian
carpet, and I assume a pet lurking in the background.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, Gamestress of Triskelion at March 11, 2018 09:08 AM (qJtVm)

And the tube-type stereo on the low table by the window. Perfect!

Posted by: Alberta Oil Peon at March 11, 2018 11:49 AM (Dbv1R)

249 OK, now I'm really confused.


True story. Archdiocese in LA is selling an old nunnery. Katie Perry is buying it for $14 mm. Two nuns who've lived there since Gutenburg was still doing illuminated manuscripts sued to prevent that.

Katy Perry is like, I have an actual Jesus tattoo. Nuns are like, we looked up some of your videos.

So in the middle of court the other day one of the nuns just keeled over dead.

Posted by: Bandersnatch at March 11, 2018 11:49 AM (fuK7c)

250 230 226 Katy Perry and the Archdiocese killed a nun.
Posted by: Sebastian Melmoth at March 11, 2018 11:41 AM (2DOZq)

OK, now I'm really confused.
Posted by: josephistan at March 11, 2018 11:43 AM (ANIFC)

The Archdiocese was on the same side as Perry in the lawsuit against the nuns.

Posted by: Sebastian Melmoth at March 11, 2018 11:50 AM (2DOZq)

251 I re-read The Mark of Zorro last week. I'd read it in junior high, I think which is in the misty distant past of the 70s, so I had forgotten a lot of details. I had a bad habit back then of skimming a lot to get to the more interesting parts like sword fights, so I missed a lot too.

Its more a romance than I remembered, and a lot more realistic than the movies. Zorro is very careful to avoid fights unless its one-on-one, he uses a gun a lot to keep groups back, he's just a guy. The book is quite good and very entertaining, and the attitudes and behavior are very appropriate for the times, something modern writers cannot seem to be able to bring themselves to write.

The ending was a bit weak and too "it all worked out great!" but overall, great mix of Scarlet Pimpernel and Robin Hood that has spawned a zillion imitators like Batman.

Posted by: Christopher R Taylor at March 11, 2018 11:50 AM (39g3+)

252 First!

Posted by: Alcoholic Asshole Shut In at March 11, 2018 11:51 AM (rzS39)

253 Addendum to the end of 235: Use the pronoun!

Posted by: Emmie -- please, no public display of insanity at March 11, 2018 11:51 AM (/A+Cl)

254 "This Dark Endevour: the Apprenticeship of Victor Frankenstein" by Kenneth Oppel is a fun book if you can bear the shame of reading YA fiction.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, Gamestress of Triskelion at March 11, 2018 11:51 AM (qJtVm)

255 "Acme" was a non-word so I figured it must be Ace and couldn't figure out why there was an M in it.

It was once of ace's early business efforts, using cheap Slovenian knockoffs.

Posted by: Christopher R Taylor at March 11, 2018 11:52 AM (39g3+)

256 That library ticks off all the essentials: Built in
shelves, antique globe, comfy chair and ottoman, artwork, Persian
carpet, and I assume a pet lurking in the background.
Posted by: All Hail Eris, Gamestress of Triskelion at March 11, 2018 09:08 AM (qJtVm)


I am suspecting he keeps the tulwars and the Persian armor in the other room.

Posted by: Kindltot at March 11, 2018 11:52 AM (2K6fY)

257 92 If the same one that I have that were weekly periodicals from the early 70's they will never go out of style, they are often first person eye witness articals. I have about 3/4 of them and maybe 20 duplicates after getting some more of what I was missing from EBAY.

Posted by: Skip at March 11, 2018 11:52 AM (aC6Sd)

258 207 In case anyone is wondering, the reference to tea and tobacco should have gone out under my nic. Mrs. JTB doesn't smoke a pipe.



Multiple nics on the same machine can lead to complications.

Posted by: JTB at March 11, 2018 11:33 AM (V+03K)
heh, I noticed that. Thought she might be one of those really old school Virginia Tennessee types, but I was perplexed a bit.

Posted by: quint at March 11, 2018 11:52 AM (n13/j)

259 151
I read a Wrinkle in Time in school. I can't remember anything from it
except that one of the characters referred to mitochondria and a
confused teacher said "the mighty what?"


Jr. Chronda had an experience like that. We'd gotten into one of those "what's this made of" recursions and I had explained to him that ultimately everythng is made of quarks, but we don't know what quarks are made of because we can barely tell that there *are* quarks.

One day he comes home from school with a newspaper clipping announcing a major discovery related to quarks. One of his teachers had given it to him; she had thought he made up the quark thing.

Posted by: Anachronda at March 11, 2018 11:53 AM (2//jc)

260 Damn it's 11:00am already.

Posted by: Sebastian Melmoth at March 11, 2018 11:53 AM (2DOZq)

261 That is a really beautiful, ideal library, I agree. If I sold a kajillion books that's the kind of thing I'd spend money on, not cars and boats.

Posted by: Christopher R Taylor at March 11, 2018 11:53 AM (39g3+)

262 I don't remember when I first learned to read....But I do remember an interesting tidbit from when I was being taught. One the the school's learn-to-read books was entitled 'We Go Together.' But even as a kid I realized the title could also be read as 'We Go To Get Her.' I was a nerd from the beginning.

Posted by: Castle Guy at March 11, 2018 11:53 AM (Lhaco)

263 One the the school's learn-to-read books was entitled 'We Go Together.' But even as a kid I realized the title could also be read as 'We Go To Get Her.'

Get her? That's your plan??

Posted by: Christopher R Taylor at March 11, 2018 11:55 AM (39g3+)

264 "This got me thinking: can any of you remember a time when you couldn't read?"

Yes! I can remember when I couldn't read. My mother told me that I would be going to school soon. There wasn't a year of Kg at this school, just two weeks, maybe three, of a sort of school orientation, and I was to attend this. It was to get us pre-First Graders into the school where we learned how to be away from home for the morning, how to sit at a desk, all the things that might be overwhelming to a new kid at school. We learned how to write our names with those big fat pencils. I think this was done sometime in the summer, when the school was empty of other kids.

I was excited about the idea of going to school, then I remember the shame I felt when I realized I was illiterate. I told Mom that I couldn't go to school, because I didn't even know how to read. (My older sister had carved "voom zoom room" into the top of a piece of furniture and was proud of it, and I couldn't even read that!) Mom told me, "That is the purpose of going to school, so you can learn how to read!"

I am now the mother of grown lads, and I remember all the funny things they used to do and say. I suppose my mother was trying not to send Coca-Cola out of her nose with my worry about my illiteracy.

BTW, I am no longer illiterate. I took easily to reading, and at the end of First Grade had the longest bookworm by at least double in my class - it went all the way around the room, on all four walls. I had read every book available in the first, second, and third grade rooms, and was nearly through fourth grade when the year ended.

Now, teachers can't put bookworms up because some children would feel bad. I remember many of the bookworms had only two or three links, so I realize now those kids may have felt bad by comparison. Still, refusing to celebrate accomplishment isn't helping education, is it?

Posted by: MathMom at March 11, 2018 11:56 AM (dU+m0)

265 A dedicated library, rather than bookcases jammed into every room, is one reason I wish I owned a house rather than rent an apartment

Posted by: josephistan at March 11, 2018 11:56 AM (ANIFC)

266 The Archdiocese was on the same side as Perry in the lawsuit against the nuns.

-
Strange bedfellows.

Posted by: Anonosaurus Wrecks, Broke, Woke, Toke, Joke at March 11, 2018 11:56 AM (+y/Ru)

267 It was a bunch of little things that just kept
accumulating, on top of his trying to engage the enemy against his
orders to just patrol and observe (this is in 1966), insisting on
shelling targets that turn out to be fishing villages or abandoned
locales.



Posted by: All Hail Eris, Gamestress of Triskelion at March 11, 2018 09:25 AM (qJtVm)

Surprising he didn't fall overboard, it is.

Posted by: Alberta Oil Peon at March 11, 2018 11:57 AM (Dbv1R)

268 Get her? That's your plan??
Posted by: Christopher R Taylor at March 11, 2018 11:55 AM (39g3+)

Shut up.

Posted by: Dr. Ray Stantz at March 11, 2018 11:57 AM (ANIFC)

269 224 ... Elisabeth, Thanks for mentioning Christie's "Come, Tell Me How You Live". I had not heard of it. Just placed an order for a hardcover edition which is cheaper than the Kindle version. Mrs. JTB and I are big fans of Elizabeth Peters' "Amelia Peabody" series and this should fit right in with those.

Posted by: JTB at March 11, 2018 11:57 AM (V+03K)

270 As a yound lad I remember the family going to the mall, they would dump me off at the book store and hours later come pick me up to go home.

Posted by: Skip at March 11, 2018 11:58 AM (aC6Sd)

271 Library of wjr123

? You can't dribble very well on a rug. And a true man of substance would be able to get Netflix in there...

Posted by: Barack Obama, An Ivy League Of One at March 11, 2018 12:01 PM (ir1+X)

272 One thing that helped in our house was that we had family reading time before bed. All of us would sit around my mom and she read us series like Little House in the Big Woods (Laura Ingalls Wilder), then Swallows and Amazons (Arthur Ransome).
We all went on to read them on our own. I did the same with my son and read him the complete LOTR when he was around 5.

Posted by: RI Red at March 11, 2018 12:05 PM (lpQr2)

273 Oh, if we're OT, Katy Perry killed a nun.
Posted by: Bandersnatch at March 11, 2018 11:34 AM (fuK7c)
---
And is wearing her hide.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, Gamestress of Triskelion at March 11, 2018 11:44 AM (qJtVm)


Elizabeth Warren uses all parts of the nun. Nothing goes to waste.

Posted by: cool breeze at March 11, 2018 12:05 PM (UGKMd)

274 I remember my grandmother teaching me to read cursive. It was the word "Green" on Christmas card my mother had hung on a ribbon.

Posted by: Adriane the Movie Critic ... at March 11, 2018 12:05 PM (AoK0a)

275 227
One of my patients asked why Chuck Todd "has a pussy on his face


I've been calling him "Beaver Mouth" for some time now.

And it's not because he has an overbite.


I've long been convinced that the secret of Bill Clinton's mysterious charisma is that his nose looks like the end of a tallywhacker.

Posted by: Anachronda at March 11, 2018 12:06 PM (2//jc)

276 I remember my grandmother teaching me to read cursive. It was the word "Green" on Christmas card my mother had hung on a ribbon.
Posted by: Adriane the Movie Critic ... at March 11, 2018 12:05 PM (AoK0a)


Pro-tier grandma: it was written in red.

Posted by: hogmartin at March 11, 2018 12:07 PM (y87Qq)

277 I always wondered if guys fell out of the helos.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, Gamestress of Triskelion at March 11, 2018 09:44 AM (qJtVm)

When they make a turn like that, the G-forces keep you planted in your seat.

Posted by: Alberta Oil Peon at March 11, 2018 12:07 PM (Dbv1R)

278 https://petitions.whitehouse.gov/petition/remove-cnn-airport-network-all-united-states-airports-1

Posted by: ha at March 11, 2018 12:07 PM (MAstk)

279 Hey, leave my Chuckie alone. He's a real doll!

Posted by: Bride of Chuckie Todd at March 11, 2018 12:10 PM (2NqXo)

280 >>>i love the indian blanket..

me too.
i have a smaller version, with a cream background.

Posted by: concrete girl at March 11, 2018 12:11 PM (SJBL7)

281
Posted by: Alberta Oil Peon at March 11, 2018 12:07 PM (Dbv1R

One summer my unit was assigned to do UH-1 orientation flights for the third classmen at West Point. We introduced them to the miracles of g-forces and always felt that we hadn't done them justice if no one puked.

Posted by: RI Red at March 11, 2018 12:11 PM (lpQr2)

282 @278

I've been thinking that if cable and satellite companies allowed one to choose only the channels they want, CNN would go out of business in three months.

I am going to write to Ted Cruz (my senator) and ask him to start a bill to allow cable and satellite customers to choose channels they want a la carte and leave behind the trash like CNN, MSDNC and MTV.

Really - who would have paid to see MTV on purpose? It has degraded our society beyond description, because it came "free" with basic cable. That means that everyone who has cable has funded this garbage, whether they wanted it or not.

Posted by: MathMom at March 11, 2018 12:11 PM (dU+m0)

283 263 One the the school's learn-to-read books was entitled 'We Go Together.' But even as a kid I realized the title could also be read as 'We Go To Get Her.'

Get her? That's your plan??
Posted by: Christopher R Taylor at March 11, 2018 11:55 AM (39g3+)

Club her over the head and drag her back to the cave.

Posted by: Insomniac - chopped liver at March 11, 2018 12:14 PM (NWiLs)

284 Dish has smaller packages you can choose. I have a news pkg and western pkg. I wish it was strictly al-a-carte.

Posted by: Infidel at March 11, 2018 12:15 PM (a3OL0)

285 "Double Wide" by Leo W. Banks is a great read.

It's a murder mystery with baseball, set in and around Tucson. The narrator is a retired AAA pitcher named Prospero "Whip" Stark, who could strike out everybody, but lost his nerve. 99 mph with movement.

Posted by: Les Kinetic at March 11, 2018 12:15 PM (5OEn4)

286
The best I can remember is going over the ABC's with my mom, but the memory is that I already knew them, so learning them got overwritten in my hard drive.

Posted by: Guy Mohawk at March 11, 2018 12:16 PM (r+sAi)

287 I also tried to read a book called The Alienist by Caleb Carr, about a 1910's era psychologist helping NYC cops track down a serial killer. But its not very well written, interesting, or handled. The writer is so in love with Teddy Roosevelt (the police commissioner at the time) that I'm convinced the manuscript had TR with a heart around it scribbled all over the margins and he has a shrine in his closet with candles and pictures of Teddy all over the place.

I wrote a review, its an interesting concept poorly executed, and way too many pages. Plus he had the PC-mandated multiculti action team with strong woman and strong, noble black guy and Jewish brothers who are smarter than everyone else, and it just got ridiculous.

He also seems to really, really hate Irish. They were inevitably the bad guy by the point I gave up reading

Posted by: Christopher R Taylor at March 11, 2018 12:16 PM (39g3+)

288 Posted by: concrete girl at March 11, 2018 12:11 PM (SJBL7)

nice!!!

Posted by: phoenixgirl at March 11, 2018 12:17 PM (0O7c5)

289 The TLR Bible is pretty funny but it leaves out the Deuterocanonical/Apocrypha books that appear in Catholic Bibles but not Protestant Bibles (reason: they were in the Greek Old Testament canon but not the Hebrew canon). I would summarize them thus:

Tobit -- Job 2.0.

Judith -- The Hebrew Mata Hari, except she doesn't get captured and executed, she offs the enemy general and lives to a ripe old age.

Baruch, Wisdom and Sirach -- Lots Moar Proverbs.

1 & 2 Maccabees -- The backstory for Hannukah and for the Catholic belief in purgatory ("it is a holy and wholesome thought to pray for the dead").

Posted by: Secret Square at March 11, 2018 12:18 PM (9WuX0)

290 128
M*A*S*H





I read that in Jr. High, the TV show was on and I was too young to
have seen the movie. In hindsight I wondered if it were a novelization
of the movie or an original book.


I really wish someone would kindlize those James Blish Star Trek books. I lived in those things when I was an Army brat living overseas.

Posted by: Anachronda at March 11, 2018 12:18 PM (2//jc)

291 The Archdiocese was on the same side as Perry in the lawsuit against the nuns.

Strange bedfellows.

Posted by: Anonosaurus Wrecks, Broke, Woke, Toke, Joke at March 11, 2018 11:56 AM (+y/Ru)


Sometimes, it really is all about the Benjamins!

Posted by: Comrade Hrothgar at March 11, 2018 12:19 PM (gwPgz)

292 280 >>>i love the indian blanket..

me too.
i have a smaller version, with a cream background.
Posted by: concrete girl at March 11, 2018 12:11 PM (SJBL7)

With or without smallpox?

Posted by: Insomniac - chopped liver at March 11, 2018 12:19 PM (NWiLs)

293
Hey, what time is it?

Posted by: Guy Mohawk at March 11, 2018 12:19 PM (r+sAi)

294 After thinking about it, the first book I remember was "One Fish, Two Fish". I remember too being fascinated by "A Fish Out of Water". I'm not sure if that means anything.

Also when I was really little I remember having a record player and Winnie the Pooh record I played over and over. There were some others too, like Peter and the Wolf and collections of fairy tales.

Posted by: fraeked at March 11, 2018 12:19 PM (UdKB7)

295 He also seems to really, really hate Irish. They were inevitably the bad guy by the point I gave up reading
Posted by: Christopher R Taylor at March 11, 2018 12:16 PM (39g3+)

Irish would be too drunk to be serial killers anyway.

Posted by: Insomniac - chopped liver at March 11, 2018 12:20 PM (NWiLs)

296 One summer my unit was assigned to do UH-1
orientation flights for the third classmen at West Point. We introduced
them to the miracles of g-forces and always felt that we hadn't done
them justice if no one puked.
Posted by: RI Red at March 11, 2018 12:11 PM (lpQr2)


So that's why there are no doors.


Posted by: Kindltot at March 11, 2018 12:21 PM (2K6fY)

297 293
Hey, what time is it?
Posted by: Guy Mohawk at March 11, 2018 12:19 PM (r+sAi)

HOWDY DOODY TIME!!!

Posted by: Insomniac - chopped liver at March 11, 2018 12:21 PM (NWiLs)

298
284 Dish has smaller packages you can choose. I have a news pkg and western pkg. I wish it was strictly al-a-carte.
Posted by: Infidel at March 11, 2018 12:15 PM (a3OL0)
-------
I just signed up for the pay-as-you-go 50 channel package at WeaselAcres as an enticement for WeaselWoman to come visit.

Posted by: Weasel at March 11, 2018 12:21 PM (MVjcR)

299 Posted by: Christopher R Taylor at March 11, 2018 12:16 PM (39g3+)

I read that one Caleb Carr novel based on a recommendation of a friend, I've never read another one by him!

Posted by: Comrade Hrothgar at March 11, 2018 12:21 PM (gwPgz)

300 I am going to write to Ted Cruz (my senator) and ask him to start a bill to allow cable and satellite customers to choose channels they want a la carte and leave behind the trash like CNN, MSDNC and MTV.

Posted by: MathMom at March 11, 2018 12:11 PM (dU+m0)


Not saying you shouldn't write that letter, but customers have been demanding this kind of thing for decades and it's gotten nowhere because the big, useless content providers pay the cable companies to carry stuff you don't watch. It's like junk mail, the stuff you don't want subsidizes the stuff you do (that's the claim, at least). Anyway, cable companies will be bundling crap channels while wearing rat pelts under an overpass in post-apocalypse NeoTropolis 2152 even if nobody still owns a visual TV. They've had paying customers just stop subscribing for years; they're incapable of responding to stimuli.

Posted by: hogmartin at March 11, 2018 12:22 PM (y87Qq)

301 Dang, now that is a library...

Posted by: Anna Puma (HQCaR) at March 11, 2018 12:23 PM (1xAqM)

302 116
Such an outdated term.



It's person overboard now.



Please retake your mandatory training in gender sensitivity.


But "person" microaggresses against daughters!

Posted by: Anachronda at March 11, 2018 12:24 PM (2//jc)

303 I really wish someone would kindlize those James Blish Star Trek books. I lived in those things when I was an Army brat living overseas.
Posted by: Anachronda at March 11, 2018 12:18 PM (2//jc)
---
I loved those. I had the whole series. Wish I still did.

I just went to Abe Books and got misty-eyed at them.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, Gamestress of Triskelion at March 11, 2018 12:24 PM (qJtVm)

304 (reason: they were in the Greek Old Testament canon but not the Hebrew canon

Well and several other major reasons like "these are interesting stories but not mentioned in any other book and have basically nothing to do with the rest of the Bible.

Posted by: Christopher R Taylor at March 11, 2018 12:25 PM (39g3+)

305 It's like junk mail, the stuff you don't want subsidizes the stuff you do (that's the claim, at least).

I actually complained to my mailman one day about all of the junk mail. He said they would be out of business without it. I mentioned how much debt the post office was in and it didn't seem to be working. Heh, he is still nice and talks to me tho.

Posted by: Infidel at March 11, 2018 12:25 PM (a3OL0)

306 I have a bunch of kindle books but I just can't warm up to the format. I like the real thing.

Posted by: Weasel at March 11, 2018 12:26 PM (MVjcR)

307 Posted by: MathMom at March 11, 2018 11:56 AM (dU+m0)

So you weren't ashamed to flaunt your "Literate Privilege" as a child? Good thing modern public schools take care of that!

Posted by: Comrade Hrothgar at March 11, 2018 12:26 PM (gwPgz)

308 At least I am not the only one who disliked 'The Alientist'.

Earliest reading memory is a trip with grandma to Tennessee on the train, so I was almost 2. I am surprised they didn't put us off at the earliest station because she reread the two books she brought innumerable times (she learned from that trip to bring a lot more the next time). All I really remember are the books and the wonderful sheets in the sleeping car and an upper bunk. Parents shrugged and said I memorized the books, but then I started reading random stuff. They just let me go and read whatever. I got my library card at 4 because I demonstrated to the librarians that I could read. Couldn't walk across the street by myself until I was six and mom called ahead to she could watch me crossing from the back window and the librarian that day would wave at her. Growing up with the library in our backyard was different.

Posted by: mustbequantum at March 11, 2018 12:26 PM (MIKMs)

309 I remember seeing MASH in the drive in, couldn't have been but 10 years lld

Posted by: Skip at March 11, 2018 12:27 PM (aC6Sd)

310 It's not a book but Brawl in Cell Block 99, has a strong PRO-Life message. Vince Vaughn's wife is kidnapped and he must kill a prisoner or the abortionist the bad guys hired will send his unborn baby girl to him in pieces. It's a violent movie but every bad guy refers to the unborn baby as a baby except the abortionist.

Posted by: Patrick From Ohio at March 11, 2018 12:27 PM (DaoVl)

311 274 I remember my grandmother teaching me to read cursive. It was the word "Green" on Christmas card my mother had hung on a ribbon.
Posted by: Adriane the Movie Critic ... at March 11, 2018 12:05 PM (AoK0a)

omg.....you made me remember....an apron/pinafore my gram made for me...it was red and white....with three pockets in the front and she embroidered the numbers 1,2,3 on the pockets.....i remember learning to identify (read) recognize the numbers upside down at about 2 1/2 .....whenever i went to her house, she had that apron ready for me....my sister is 3 yrs younger....i remember being a bit jealous when it no longer fit me and SHE started wearing it......
thank you.....i don't really remember much of my early childhood....i'm happy when a gem like that pops up....i should probably start writing this stuff down so when i'm in the old peoples home my kids can remind me.....maybe it will cause my eyes to give away the fact i'm still alive using up their inheritance on long-term care....../

Posted by: phoenixgirl at March 11, 2018 12:28 PM (0O7c5)

312 Hey, what time is it?

Nap time!

Posted by: Jeff SezZzions at March 11, 2018 12:29 PM (Tyii7)

313 Yeah, I tried to like "The Alienist" - it was right up my historical alley, so to speak and shut. up. -- but put it down a third of the way through.

And I'm a TR fangurl.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, Gamestress of Triskelion at March 11, 2018 12:29 PM (qJtVm)

314 Sort of on the same topic -
Many years ago I had surgery and was in the hospital for about a week and on heavy painkillers. After a while I started having very vivid dreams about things from my childhood that happened when I was about 2 years old. My mom confirmed I was dreaming about places and things that really happened, and my doctor attributed it to the pain meds. Pretty cool.

Posted by: Weasel at March 11, 2018 12:30 PM (MVjcR)

315 CRC Reference books bottom center. Useful.

Posted by: Burger Chef at March 11, 2018 12:31 PM (RuIsu)

316 297 293
Hey, what time is it?
Posted by: Guy Mohawk at March 11, 2018 12:19 PM (r+sAi)

HOWDY DOODY TIME!!!
Posted by: Insomniac - chopped liver at March 11, 2018 12:21 PM (NWiLs

The Sun is Over the Yardarm. I say again, The Sun is Over the Yardarm.

Posted by: RI Red at March 11, 2018 12:31 PM (lpQr2)

317 He acted on whim and ruled by fiat.

Cinquecento or Spider?

Posted by: Fix It Again, Tony at March 11, 2018 12:34 PM (4zXIg)

318 Uh oh. Did the site stop updating?

Posted by: Bob the Bilderberg at March 11, 2018 12:38 PM (7oUUT)

319 The Audible version of the Herriot books are narrated by the actor who played him in the PBS series. Definitely worth a listen.

Posted by: tireddoc at March 11, 2018 12:38 PM (69DCz)

320 Posted by: Weasel at March 11, 2018 12:30 PM (MVjcR)

interesting how the mind works

Posted by: phoenixgirl at March 11, 2018 12:39 PM (0O7c5)

321 Hulk. It was the cover of Hulk #1 in the early 1960s.
I remember being excited because I knew it as a word.
Posted by: ArthurK at March 11, 2018 11:05 AM (24wOG)



Hulk person, not word. You no dehumanize Hulk or Hulk dehumanize YOU by smash. Maybe read comic, not book? Hulk no read book, but Hulk well read.

Posted by: Hulk at March 11, 2018 12:39 PM (7Ml7x)

322 elizabeth warren is still claiming her native heritage


Posted by: phoenixgirl at March 11, 2018 11:33 AM (0O7c5)

She is stuck with it, now. Otherwise, she has to admit her own bullshit. And actual fraud.

Posted by: Alberta Oil Peon at March 11, 2018 12:39 PM (Dbv1R)

323 Strangely enough around here the AoSHq time machine is its usual 8 minutes off, even with the time change.

Posted by: Skip at March 11, 2018 12:40 PM (aC6Sd)

324 She is stuck with it, now. Otherwise, she has to admit her own bullshit. And actual fraud.


Posted by: Alberta Oil Peon at March 11, 2018 12:39 PM (Dbv1R)

all in!

Posted by: phoenixgirl at March 11, 2018 12:41 PM (0O7c5)

325 31 I do have plenty of memories of looking up a LOT of words.

I don't remember looking up words, but a constant problem for me has been getting sucked into dictionaries and encyclopedias; I can't do research because I get distracted.

Posted by: Anachronda at March 11, 2018 12:41 PM (2//jc)

326
The official plural of the (Toyota) Prius is Prii.

(This was determined in an online vote in 2011.)


Posted by: Moron News YOU can use! at March 11, 2018 11:38 AM (DMUuz)

That's a funny way to spell "shitboxes".

Posted by: Alberta Oil Peon at March 11, 2018 12:42 PM (Dbv1R)

327 Ok, off to the real other world. See ya on the gub thread.
Or maybe in the Barrel.

Posted by: RI Red at March 11, 2018 12:42 PM (lpQr2)

328 The Alienist is the only book I have ever destroyed, I hated it so much. The promise of that destruction was the only thing that gave me the strength to finish it. Just a terrible book.

Finished, tore it to shreds, piled it up, poured whiskey on it and burned it. Even pissed on it while it was burning.

I still feel bad about burning it but console myself in that alcohol was definitely involved.

Posted by: Sharkman at March 11, 2018 12:43 PM (dDMQ9)

329 Kameltoe Harris is all in on being for lawless immigration

Posted by: Skip at March 11, 2018 12:43 PM (aC6Sd)

330 Re - learning how to read. I absolutely remember a time when I couldn't. I remember begging my mother, my babysitter and her teenage sons to teach me how to read. The answer was always the same - when you start school they'll teach you. (My mother doesn't enjoy reading and rarely read to me.) You cannot imagine my disappointment after the first day of kindergarten when we didn't learn how to read. In those days (the early 60's) we didn't learn to read until first grade. To this day, I remember how disappointed I was at having to wait.

Those of you who grew up in the same time period - did you like the Dick, Jane and Sally books? I absolutely hated them. If I had known what 'insipid' meant when I was 6, that's how I would have described those stories. They made me hate reading, which seemed like a cruel joke to play on a first grader. Dr. Seuss saved me. My mother signed up for the monthly Seuss books and that's what got me hooked on reading.

Posted by: NavyMom at March 11, 2018 12:44 PM (Oelm8)

331 >>>With or without smallpox?

even if it is, i was immunized by the army doc when i was little.

Posted by: concrete girl at March 11, 2018 12:44 PM (SJBL7)

332 121
I remember the first time I understood a word. First grade. Probably a Dick and Jane book


By the time I was in grade school, it was "Janet and Mark". I guess talking about Dick was no longer politically correct by then.

Posted by: jim at March 11, 2018 12:45 PM (gjGvH)

333
The Alienist was one of those books I was excited about reading before reading it, then disappointed after reading it. Suffice it to say, I'm not watching the TV series.

Posted by: Hands at March 11, 2018 12:45 PM (EzdLW)

Posted by: Hands at March 11, 2018 12:45 PM (EzdLW)

335 Dickless and Jane

Posted by: Insomniac - chopped liver at March 11, 2018 12:46 PM (NWiLs)

336 I believe the first words I ever read were Jergens and Kleenex. I was three at the time.

I'm also old enough to remember hard-copy encyclopedias, dictionaries and thesauruses. Back then, shelving space was premium real estate.

That was 26 years ago.

Posted by: Fritz at March 11, 2018 12:46 PM (bJ0w+)

337 Elizabeth Warren refuses DNA test to prove Native American heritage...

-
Well, I'll be go to hell. Did not see that coming.

Posted by: Anonosaurus Wrecks, Broke, Woke, Toke, Joke at March 11, 2018 12:47 PM (+y/Ru)

338
The official plural of the (Toyota) Prius is Prii.
(This was determined in an online vote in 2011.)
Posted by: Moron News YOU can use!


That's a funny way to spell "shitboxes".
Posted by: Alberta Oil Peon at March 11, 2018 12:42 PM



I'd love it if Trump called them that. MSM heads a-'splodin all over the place.

Posted by: Hands at March 11, 2018 12:47 PM (EzdLW)

339 'Did the site stop updating?'

I've been able to determine that there are two clans of hamsters, the Args and the Kwargs, that are engaged in some kind of rift over whether the wheel should spin clockwise or counter clockwise and that disputes often lead to bloody fights which disrupt the comments on an increasingly frequent basis.

Posted by: fraeked at March 11, 2018 12:47 PM (UdKB7)

340 336 I believe the first words I ever read were Jergens and Kleenex. I was three at the time.

I'm also old enough to remember hard-copy encyclopedias, dictionaries and thesauruses. Back then, shelving space was premium real estate.

That was 26 years ago.
Posted by: Fritz at March 11, 2018 12:46 PM (bJ0w+)

Encyclopedias. You could order by phone, buy them at the grocery store, or purchase them from door to door salesmen. Damn I'm getting old.

Posted by: Insomniac - chopped liver at March 11, 2018 12:50 PM (NWiLs)

341 By the time I was in grade school, it was "Janet and Mark". I guess talking about Dick was no longer politically correct by then.

Posted by: jim at March 11, 2018 12:45 PM (gjGvH)


When I was a wee lad, the public school school's readers featured Dick, Jane, and Sally. I went to Catholic school and our readers had John, Jean, and Judy.

Believe it.

Or not.

Posted by: OregonMuse, AoSHQ Thought Leader & Global Rethinker at March 11, 2018 12:51 PM (ikoCs)

342 All Hail Eris, have you read Phil Keith's Stay the Rising Sun? It is about USS Lexington CV-2, the Battle of the Coral Sea, pre-WWII US Navy, and even USS Lexington CV-16.

If this book wasn't a loaner I would use it as a doorstop. The story it presents is fascinating but I can't recommend it because of shoddy scholarship. Mainly poor discipline with the footnotes, of course I am going to read those,

First footnote is found in the list of people mentioned in book. Okay. Then we get into the Prologue and the footnotes go out of sequence as the next one listed is 4, 2 and 3 occur after 8. In chapter one, there is no 13th footnote though that number does lurk in the text.

Footnote 26 has a humdinger of a typo - Halligan, first in his 1998 UNSA class, was promoted in 1930. Guess we know where the time machine is.

But what is a rant on why I don't like a book without a factual goof? So here it is - as Lexington slips out of Pearl to deliver those planes to Midway before Dec 7th, Keith describes the planes of the carrier's air group. F2As and TBDs are mentioned with the Marine SB2U-3s.

And he says on page 43 that the SBD Dauntless is armed with four .50cal machine guns.

Posted by: Anna Puma (HQCaR) at March 11, 2018 12:52 PM (1xAqM)

343 Sorry for the long comment, but you definitely touched a nerve with that question. When our children were born, I started reading every night to them before they could understand any of it. Kept it up until they were in 5th or 6th grade. We went to the library and every school book fair. Ordered books from the Weekly Reader every time, even when we were living on one income. When my son went through a 'reading isn't cool' stage I helped him pick a book off the 'banned book list' which made him feel like a rebel. It got him back into reading and gave us a chance to talk about why it was on the list.

I think the time when I couldn't read, when I wasn't read to, made me want it and want to pass it on. Thanks for letting me vent.

Posted by: NavyMom at March 11, 2018 12:52 PM (Oelm8)

344 I don't think we had any of the 'classic' kids books like Wind in the Willows, Alice in Wonderland, or Beatrix Potter in the house. I didn't discover them until my 50s. They might have been fun when I was young but they have been delightful for me as an oldster.

I have a vague memory of reading "Treasure Island" in first grade IIRC. That may have cemented my love of reading dictionaries. Same with the Hardy Boys series at that time.

Posted by: JTB at March 11, 2018 12:52 PM (V+03K)

345 341 By the time I was in grade school, it was "Janet and Mark". I guess talking about Dick was no longer politically correct by then.

Posted by: jim at March 11, 2018 12:45 PM (gjGvH)

When I was a wee lad, the public school school's readers featured Dick, Jane, and Sally. I went to Catholic school and our readers had John, Jean, and Judy.

Believe it.

Or not.
Posted by: OregonMuse, AoSHQ Thought Leader & Global Rethinker at March 11, 2018 12:51 PM (ikoCs)

So you're saying Catholic school didn't teach you dick.

Posted by: Insomniac - chopped liver at March 11, 2018 12:52 PM (NWiLs)

346 To come to this conclusion I used applied numerology and intensive fact-based investigative techniques pioneered by Egypto-Irish researchers back in the 1920s.

Posted by: fraeked at March 11, 2018 12:53 PM (UdKB7)

347 Did the site stop updating?

That CherryPy was delicious. *burp*

Posted by: The AoSHQ Hamsters at March 11, 2018 12:53 PM (Tyii7)

348 i loved the big red dog books.
one of the best things about school was picking books from the scholastic selection.

i particularly liked 'caddie woodlawn' about a girl who lived in pioneer times. similar to the little house ones.

Posted by: concrete girl at March 11, 2018 12:54 PM (SJBL7)

349 And that should have been promoted to rear admiral in 1930

Yes this book annoys me.

Posted by: Anna Puma (HQCaR) at March 11, 2018 12:56 PM (1xAqM)

350 So you're saying Catholic school didn't teach you dick.

Posted by: Insomniac - chopped liver at March 11, 2018 12:52 PM (NWiLs)


Unfortunately, some Catholic boys and girls got taught all about dick.

Posted by: OregonMuse, AoSHQ Thought Leader & Global Rethinker at March 11, 2018 12:57 PM (ikoCs)

351 Posted by: josephistan at March 11, 2018 11:56 AM (ANIFC)

If you're a voracious reader, you will eventually still have bookcases jammed into every room.

Bookcases jammed into every room is in fact one of the great joys in life.

Posted by: Tammy al-Thor at March 11, 2018 12:57 PM (MjjCt)

352 Encyclopedias. You could order by phone, buy them at the grocery store, or purchase them from door to door salesmen. Damn I'm getting old.

Posted by: Insomniac - chopped liver at March 11, 2018 12:50 PM (NWiLs)


This. I remember reading encyclopedias for hours. Still have some dictionaries from when I was a kid. They are the dictionaries my folks used in kollege.

Posted by: Infidel at March 11, 2018 12:57 PM (a3OL0)

353 i particularly liked 'caddie woodlawn' about a girl who lived in pioneer times. similar to the little house ones.
Posted by: concrete girl at March 11, 2018 12:54 PM (SJBL7)

I loved Caddie Woodlawn! It would be a great one for my granddaughter who loved the Little House books. Thanks for the reminder!

Posted by: NavyMom at March 11, 2018 12:58 PM (Oelm8)

354 I remember Dick, Jane, and Sally.

And Spot! Don't forget Spot!

Posted by: rickl at March 11, 2018 12:58 PM (sdi6R)

355 our readers had John, Jean, and Judy.

-
When I come home, baby
My house is dark and my pots are cold
You're hangin' round, baby
With Jean and Joan and-a who knows who

Posted by: Anonosaurus Wrecks, Broke, Woke, Toke, Joke at March 11, 2018 12:58 PM (+y/Ru)

356 who remembers SRA's? those boxes of cards? different level, different color.....


Posted by: phoenixgirl at March 11, 2018 12:59 PM (0O7c5)

357 I just finished reading 'Nothing Lasts Forever', as well. The most striking contrast to the movie's plot is the different world mindset in the 1970's, as you noted.
I am starting now '58 Minutes', which is the basis for Die Hard 2. Hey, maybe we should start reading those 2 books around Christmas time every year, to expand the Die-Hard-is-too-a-Christmas-movie theme.

Posted by: Aeric at March 11, 2018 01:00 PM (ZbgGv)

358 352
Encyclopedias. You could order by phone, buy them at the grocery store,
or purchase them from door to door salesmen. Damn I'm getting old.



Posted by: Insomniac - chopped liver at March 11, 2018 12:50 PM (NWiLs)





This. I remember reading encyclopedias for hours. Still have some
dictionaries from when I was a kid. They are the dictionaries my folks
used in kollege.

Posted by: Infidel at March 11, 2018 12:57 PM (a3OL0)

Yeah, I remember looking through Encyclopedias in my fifth grade class. Teacher thought I was trying to learn, but I was looking at the pictures of naked ladies in sculptures and paintings included in those paintings.

Posted by: jim at March 11, 2018 01:01 PM (gjGvH)

359 Posted by: Anna Puma (HQCaR) at March 11, 2018 12:52 PM (1xAqM)
----
This is why your vast and encyclopeadic knowledge has its drawbacks.

Was the slipshod editing due to reliance on Spellcheck? I think if one has to eyeball it for mistakes one gets the correctitude of the organic whole rather than focusing on discrete points of fuckup.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, Gamestress of Triskelion at March 11, 2018 01:01 PM (qJtVm)

360 356 who remembers SRA's? those boxes of cards? different level, different color.....

Posted by: phoenixgirl at March 11, 2018 12:59 PM (0O7c5)


( *raises hand* )

Posted by: OregonMuse, AoSHQ Thought Leader & Global Rethinker at March 11, 2018 01:01 PM (ikoCs)

361 who remembers SRA's? those boxes of cards? different level, different color.....

Posted by: phoenixgirl at

*raises hand*

Posted by: Infidel at March 11, 2018 01:02 PM (a3OL0)

362 >>>I loved Caddie Woodlawn! It would be a great one for my granddaughter who loved the Little House books. Thanks for the reminder!

i hope she likes it.
they certainly taught me how to get along in life, and to be smart in trying times.

Posted by: concrete girl at March 11, 2018 01:02 PM (SJBL7)

363 I HATE progtards! They convinced Glad Trashbags to become GLAAD Trashbags to save freaking Gaia and to make life a bummer for anyone who wants to stuff some trash in a freaking bag. Not only did a bag rip along a seam when I tried to line my trashcan, when I tried to use the drawstrings, one side of a drawstring came loose. Tape and cursing solved the problems.

Posted by: Marooned at March 11, 2018 01:02 PM (8hRlF)

364 "The Alienist" got so-o-o-o-o much critical praise that I bought it in hardback the minute it came out.

And-

I remember almost nothing about it. Nothing stuck with me which is a sure sign of a poorly written book with a poor story.

I finished it and immediately forgot it.

Another case of log-rolling by Our Betters in support of a 3rd rate talent.

Posted by: naturalfake at March 11, 2018 01:02 PM (E3rQ4)

365 *** 356 who remembers SRA's? those boxes of cards? different level, different color.....


Posted by: phoenixgirl

Yes, I remember those. And also recall they made me aware that not all us kids had the same brains, and we were being sorted.

Posted by: 2009Refugee at March 11, 2018 01:03 PM (JyFLk)

366 Elizabeth Warren uses all parts of the nun. Nothing goes to waste.

That's a good habit.

Posted by: Chuck C at March 11, 2018 01:03 PM (0V2ki)

367 Yeah, I remember looking through Encyclopedias in my fifth grade class. Teacher thought I was trying to learn, but I was looking at the pictures of naked ladies in sculptures and paintings included in those paintings.


Posted by: jim at March 11, 2018 01:01 PM


We always thought that was what national geographic was for. Before they went off the deep end.

Posted by: Infidel at March 11, 2018 01:03 PM (a3OL0)

368 330 ... NavyMom,

I was a few years earlier but we had the Dick, Jane, See Spot run books. First, I was reading above that level already. Second, they were indeed insipid. Third, the vocabulary was so limited it slowed down the students' chances to learn more and faster. Finally, they seemed aimed at the lowest common denominator. I attended some excellent public schools but I wonder if some of my current disdain for public education started 60 years ago with those reading lessons.

Posted by: JTB at March 11, 2018 01:03 PM (V+03K)

369 Behold the power of Server Error 500!

Posted by: Sono, son of bi at March 11, 2018 01:04 PM (DMUuz)

370 What a lovely library.

Posted by: CaliGirl at March 11, 2018 01:04 PM (Ri/rl)

371 Just finished Sons and Soldiers: The Untold Story of the Jews Who Escaped the Nazis and Returned with the U.S. Army to Fight Hitler by Bruce Henderson. Highly recommended.

Posted by: Notorious BFD at March 11, 2018 01:05 PM (Tyii7)

372 356 who remembers SRA's? those boxes of cards? different level, different color.....


Posted by: phoenixgirl
---
Whoa, brain blast from the past! I'd forgotten those little fascist boxes.

Even as a kid I *hated* being classified and codified - just like the Prisoner!

You are supposed to read ABOVE your level.

Sorry, sorry...gettin' all het up.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, Gamestress of Triskelion at March 11, 2018 01:06 PM (qJtVm)

373 The Alienist is the only book I have ever destroyed, I hated it so much. The promise of that destruction was the only thing that gave me the strength to finish it. Just a terrible book.

I feel better about my response to the book. I don't often just quit reading a book but I stopped around 30% in like Eris. I was nervous because it go SO much praise and such great reviews, but its just not good. And I don't mean the excessive PC tones, I mean that it is poorly written.

Posted by: Christopher R Taylor at March 11, 2018 01:06 PM (39g3+)

374 Elizabeth Warren uses all parts of the nun. Nothing goes to waste.
That's a good habit.
Posted by: Chuck C at March 11, 2018 01:03 PM (0V2ki)

The Pudge Report has a blurb about that bitch not wanting to submit to a DNA test to prove her "indian"
heritage.

I think it should be mandatory for all who make that claim either for politics or cash.

Posted by: Hairyback Guy at March 11, 2018 01:06 PM (EoRCO)

375 Yes, I remember those. And also recall they made me aware that not all us kids had the same brains, and we were being sorted.Posted by: 2009Refugee at March 11, 2018 01:03 PM (JyFLk)

i was not a good student....but i was competitive.....i'd look at what box the smart kids were on and get down to business..... those made me a better student....i also became a good "filer"....when i'd get held after class for misbehaving....i had to organize them

Posted by: phoenixgirl at March 11, 2018 01:07 PM (0O7c5)

376 371 Just finished Sons and Soldiers: The Untold Story of the Jews Who Escaped the Nazis and Returned with the U.S. Army to Fight Hitler by Bruce Henderson. Highly recommended.
Posted by: Notorious BFD at March 11, 2018 01:05 PM (Tyii7)
---
This reminds me of one of my favorite history titles (which I haven't read): "G.I. Jew"

Posted by: All Hail Eris, Gamestress of Triskelion at March 11, 2018 01:07 PM (qJtVm)

377 who remembers SRA's? those boxes of cards? different level, different color.....




Posted by: phoenixgirl at March 11, 2018 12:59 PM (0O7c5)

Yes, vaguely.

Posted by: Alberta Oil Peon at March 11, 2018 01:09 PM (Dbv1R)

378 Posted by: Chi-Town Jerry at March 11, 2018 09:36 AM (5tSKk)


A bit late to the party here and someone probably already commented on this. The Wrecking Crew documentary is out there. I watched it shortly before last Christmas.

Posted by: Bill R. at March 11, 2018 01:09 PM (IuYIh)

379 See Bo run.

Posted by: Baracky O'Cracky at March 11, 2018 01:10 PM (Tyii7)

380 wjr123. Nice library you have there. Something I aspire to but after a 20 year military career, most of my books are paperbacks.

Based on your nic, I'm guessing you're a Michigander, although I could be totally off base here.

Posted by: Bill R. at March 11, 2018 01:12 PM (IuYIh)

381 Chicago so woke . . .

ABC 7 Chicago
@ABC7Chicago
First jail-wide, in-person voting held at Cook County Jail

Posted by: Anonosaurus Wrecks, Broke, Woke, Toke, Joke at March 11, 2018 01:13 PM (+y/Ru)

382 See spot? Run... to ophthalmologist! Ha! Hulk smarter than humans.

Posted by: Hulk at March 11, 2018 01:13 PM (7Ml7x)

383 The Pudge Report has a blurb about that bitch not wanting to submit to a DNA test to prove her "indian"
heritage.

I think it should be mandatory for all who make that claim either for politics or cash.
Posted by: Hairyback Guy at March 11, 2018 01:06 PM (EoRCO)

She was on Fox News Sunday Morning show this AM. They asked if she would take a DNA test to put all of this to rest. She said something along the lines of 'my heritage is the stories my parents and grandparents told me'. So I guess now our ethnicity is whatever we want it to be. We're all ethnic fluid.

Posted by: NavyMom at March 11, 2018 01:14 PM (Oelm8)

384 Whoa, brain blast from the past! I'd forgotten those little fascist boxes.

Even as a kid I *hated* being classified and codified - just like the Prisoner!

You are supposed to read ABOVE your level.

Sorry, sorry...gettin' all het up.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, Gamestress of Triskelion at March 11, 2018 01:06 PM (qJtVm)


I, on the other hand, loved SRA because reading was the one thing I was good at and I enjoyed being among the 3-4 classmates who were in the highest color.

Posted by: OregonMuse, AoSHQ Thought Leader & Global Rethinker at March 11, 2018 01:14 PM (ikoCs)

385 All Hail Eris, guess that is why I don't try and write any history books. I would drive myself crazy trying to get things correct.

Stuff in Keith's book about the pre-WWII fleet problems is fascinating. Even a mention of one Robert Heinlein.

But with all these obvious unforced errors what is going on in my mind as I read it is what else did he screw up? So the book becomes untrustworthy and the enjoyment is vastly diminished.

At this point I would prefer to read again Rendezvous at Midway: USS Yorktown and the Japanese Carrier Fleet which is book unfettered by any consideration other than CV-5 won the whole battle.

Posted by: Anna Puma (HQCaR) at March 11, 2018 01:15 PM (1xAqM)

386 So I guess now our ethnicity is whatever we want it to be. We're all ethnic fluid.

-
I want my ethnicity to be secret Trump love child.

Posted by: Anonosaurus Wrecks, Broke, Woke, Toke, Joke at March 11, 2018 01:17 PM (+y/Ru)

387 I, on the other hand, loved SRA because reading was the one thing I was good at and I enjoyed being among the 3-4 classmates who were in the highest color.

Posted by: OregonMuse, AoSHQ Thought Leader & Global Rethinker at March 11, 2018 01:14 PM (ikoCs)

Purple?

Posted by: BignJames at March 11, 2018 01:17 PM (0+nbW)

388 381
Chicago so woke . . .



ABC 7 Chicago

@ABC7Chicago

First jail-wide, in-person voting held at Cook County Jail

Posted by: Anonosaurus Wrecks, Broke, Woke, Toke, Joke at March 11, 2018 01:13 PM (+y/Ru)

More about Chicago being so Democrat.

Posted by: jim at March 11, 2018 01:17 PM (gjGvH)

389 Gendo-ethno-fluid...

Which is raycist against those who identify as "solids" and "gases"

Posted by: Anna Puma (HQCaR) at March 11, 2018 01:18 PM (1xAqM)

390 "The Alienist" got so-o-o-o-o much critical praise that I bought it in hardback the minute it came out.
I remember almost nothing about it. Nothing stuck with me which is a sure sign of a poorly written book with a poor story.
I finished it and immediately forgot it.
Another case of log-rolling by Our Betters in support of a 3rd rate talent.
Posted by: naturalfake at March 11, 2018 01:02 PM (E3rQ4)

File Under: The Da Vinci Code.
Terrible book.

Posted by: JoeF. at March 11, 2018 01:18 PM (7uYFy)

391 I, on the other hand, loved SRA because reading was the one thing I was good at and I enjoyed being among the 3-4 classmates who were in the highest color.
Posted by: OregonMuse, AoSHQ Thought Leader & Global Rethinker at March 11, 2018 01:14 PM (ikoCs)
---
My color was so high it was in a wavelength invisible to the naked eye.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, Gamestress of Triskelion at March 11, 2018 01:18 PM (qJtVm)

392 383 The Pudge Report has a blurb about that bitch not wanting to submit to a DNA test to prove her "indian"
heritage.

I think it should be mandatory for all who make that claim either for politics or cash.
Posted by: Hairyback Guy at March 11, 2018 01:06 PM (EoRCO)

The fact that she won't take the test is 100% proof she already did.

Posted by: Mr. Feverhead at March 11, 2018 01:18 PM (hUqh+)

393 See Jane eat spotted dick.

Posted by: Marooned at March 11, 2018 01:18 PM (8hRlF)

394 So I guess now our ethnicity is whatever we want it to be. We're all ethnic fluid.

Yes.

Posted by: Rachel Polezal at March 11, 2018 01:19 PM (Tyii7)

395 All Hail Eris was Ultra-ette?

Posted by: Anna Puma (HQCaR) at March 11, 2018 01:19 PM (1xAqM)

396 I want my ethnicity to be secret Trump love child.
Posted by: Anonosaurus Wrecks, Broke, Woke, Toke, Joke at March 11, 2018 01:17 PM (+y/Ru)
---
He'll have to let you sit next to him at the big parade!

Posted by: All Hail Eris, Gamestress of Triskelion at March 11, 2018 01:20 PM (qJtVm)

397 >>>See Bo run.<<<

Barry and Michelle went up the hill, each with a buck and a quarter.

Michelle came down with two fifty.

Posted by: Fritz at March 11, 2018 01:20 PM (bJ0w+)

398 One summer my unit was assigned to do UH-1 orientation flights for the third classmen at West Point. We introduced them to the miracles of g-forces and always felt that we hadn't done
them justice if no one puked.
Posted by: RI Red at March 11, 2018 12:11 PM

As a Mid 2/c during amphibious orientation, we had helo flights to/from exercises during which the pilots would do similar things. I remember a Marine CH-46 flight where there were several 'rolls'. The other Mids were getting excited; I watched the crew chief to see if it merited any concern. He had one of the most studied looks of boredom I've ever seen. After landing on the return trip, I took the opportunity to ask him what that was about, his answer was "The pilots know they can't roll the aircraft, but they seem to keep trying."

Of course, they were following the same playbook y'all were.

Posted by: Duncanthrax at March 11, 2018 01:20 PM (DMUuz)

399 Yes; That is a lovely library!

And I appreciate SandyCheeks suggestion for the book on how suffering transforms us; It sounds like it might be very helfpul for a Jewish woman who's the friend of a congregation member I have. Her husband just died unexpectedly.

I'm a still reading "40 days with John Wesley" by Rueben P. Job-a Lenten devotional. I don't think it has to be used for Lent, but I'm using for that. I love the selections from Wesley and deeply appreciate the prayers and refections from Rueben Job who sounds like he was a remarkable Christian man

Posted by: FenelonSpoke at March 11, 2018 01:20 PM (8+Ozj)

400 390
"The Alienist" got so-o-o-o-o much critical praise that I bought it in hardback the minute it came out.

I remember almost nothing about it. Nothing stuck with me which is a sure sign of a poorly written book with a poor story.

I finished it and immediately forgot it.

Another case of log-rolling by Our Betters in support of a 3rd rate talent.

Posted by: naturalfake at March 11, 2018 01:02 PM (E3rQ4)



File Under: The Da Vinci Code.

Terrible book.

Posted by: JoeF. at March 11, 2018 01:18 PM (7uYFy)

In "Angels and Demons", Dan Brown got his math wrong, underestimating the yield of the anti-matter/matter explosion by a factor 2. Then again he's a writer, not a mathematician or physicist.

Posted by: jim at March 11, 2018 01:20 PM (gjGvH)

401 And the cats with comma picture is great!

Posted by: FenelonSpoke at March 11, 2018 01:20 PM (8+Ozj)

402 'We're all ethnic fluid.'

You ain't seen nothing yet.

Posted by: A Humanzee at March 11, 2018 01:21 PM (UdKB7)

403 In "Angels and Demons", Dan Brown got his math wrong, underestimating the yield of the anti-matter/matter explosion by a factor 2. Then again he's a writer, not a mathematician or physicist.
Posted by: jim at March 11, 2018 01:20 PM (gjGvH)
---
He's not even a writer. That's the book I threw against the wall in disgust. Feh!

Posted by: All Hail Eris, Gamestress of Triskelion at March 11, 2018 01:21 PM (qJtVm)

404 When Dick, Jane and Sally Met John, Jean and Judy and Watched Davey and Goliath.

Posted by: JoeF. at March 11, 2018 01:21 PM (7uYFy)

405 My color was so high it was in a wavelength invisible to the naked eye.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, Gamestress of Triskelion at March 11, 2018 01:18 PM (qJtVm)


Show-off.

Posted by: OregonMuse, AoSHQ Thought Leader & Global Rethinker at March 11, 2018 01:22 PM (ikoCs)

406 So proud to live, so proud to lie.

Posted by: Liewatha Warren at March 11, 2018 01:22 PM (Tyii7)

407 393
See Jane eat spotted dick.

Posted by: Marooned at March 11, 2018 01:18 PM (8hRlF)

Hey, I tried a brand called "Aunty's" from a little British place. My wife certainly enjoyed it.

Posted by: jim at March 11, 2018 01:22 PM (gjGvH)

408 Purple?

Posted by: BignJames at March 11, 2018 01:17 PM (0+nbW)


I want to say light blue, but I honestly don't remember now.

Posted by: OregonMuse, AoSHQ Thought Leader & Global Rethinker at March 11, 2018 01:22 PM (ikoCs)

409 He's not even a writer. That's the book I threw against the wall in disgust. Feh!
Posted by: All Hail Eris, Gamestress of Triskelion at March 11, 2018 01:21 PM (qJtVm)

Dan Brown is really a lottery winner.

Posted by: JoeF. at March 11, 2018 01:23 PM (7uYFy)

410 Purple?

Posted by: BignJames at March 11, 2018 01:17 PM (0+nbW)
---
Ultramaroon.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, Gamestress of Triskelion at March 11, 2018 01:24 PM (qJtVm)

411 Then again he's a writer, not a mathematician or physicist.

-
Max Waters is a rocket surgeon.

Posted by: Anonosaurus Wrecks, Broke, Woke, Toke, Joke at March 11, 2018 01:24 PM (+y/Ru)

412 My color was so high it was in a wavelength invisible to the naked eye.
Posted by: All Hail Eris, Gamestress of Triskelion at March 11, 2018 01:18 PM


Ahem.

Posted by: Far Infrared at March 11, 2018 01:26 PM (DMUuz)

413 another memory of the SRA's.....there was a log jam, i want to say around green? in a class of 42, everyone was stuck waiting for the dimwits to hurry up and finish with the card.....

the other thing....they were kept in the back on a shelf that also housed the collection of national geographics......the boys....would pretend to be seeking out the next card....but were looking at the nekkid ladies of the far away lands......

Posted by: phoenixgirl at March 11, 2018 01:26 PM (0O7c5)

414 Posted by: Brave Sir Robin at March 11, 2018 11:34 AM (ty7RM)

Yes; I don't think as a rule churches shame woman who have abortions. I think there are many that offer support from the pain that often results from an abortion. There's no Biblical justification for abortion. People may have one for a variety of reasons that make sense to them at the time and I can't judge the state of mind of everybody that has one, but this idea that there's a justification from the Bible, is IMO, just totally wrong. Of course the former Dean of one Episcopal seminary said "Abortion was a blessing from God" so the Episcopalians have gone completely off the rail on this. FWIW, this clergywoman doesn't agree with either that premise -which I find appalling- or the Episcopal priest's POV.

Posted by: FenelonSpoke at March 11, 2018 01:27 PM (8+Ozj)

415 So, I thought the ALEINIST was good, it's depressing. Now if I try and read anything to do with kids being hurt now I can't do it anymore since I have a young son. I don't want to think about it.

Posted by: Patrick From Ohio at March 11, 2018 01:29 PM (dKiJG)

416 I think it should be mandatory for all who make that claim either for politics or cash.

Posted by: Hairyback Guy at March 11, 2018 01:06 PM (EoRCO)

Except such DNA tests are not necessarily reliable, and if they were made mandatory, and money were involved, there would be a strong incentive for fraud.
Look. Even if Fauxcahontas truly were 1/16 Indian, what difference should it make? She was raised as a white girl in a white family that had been a white family for the entire history of the country. She has zero, zilch, nada Indian cultural baggage. That would be true even if she were a full-blooded Indian, adopted by the family as an infant.
I object to affirmative-action carveouts for minorities on general principle, but if you are going to have such things, the bar should be pretty high: you need to be at least "half-blood" of the minority in question, and at least one of the parents/caregivers through childhood must be of that group. No less.

Posted by: Alberta Oil Peon at March 11, 2018 01:30 PM (Dbv1R)

417 415 So, I thought the ALEINIST was good, it's depressing. Now if I try and read anything to do with kids being hurt now I can't do it anymore since I have a young son. I don't want to think about it.
Posted by: Patrick From Ohio at March 11, 2018 01:29 PM (dKiJG)


I am in sympathy with this. Even if everything comes out all right in the end, stories involving little kids being hurt are just too painful for me to read.

Posted by: OregonMuse, AoSHQ Thought Leader & Global Rethinker at March 11, 2018 01:32 PM (ikoCs)

418 She said something along the lines of 'my heritage
is the stories my parents and grandparents told me'. So I guess now our
ethnicity is whatever we want it to be. We're all ethnic fluid.

Posted by: NavyMom at March 11, 2018 01:14 PM (Oelm

And I am betting her parents and grandparents are all conveniently dead, so that no independent verification (or debunking) of that family legend is possible.

Posted by: Alberta Oil Peon at March 11, 2018 01:33 PM (Dbv1R)

419 Ugh, not sure I even want to know what the Aleinist is about now.

Posted by: Infidel at March 11, 2018 01:34 PM (a3OL0)

420 Sorry for the long comment, but you definitely
touched a nerve with that question. When our children were born, I
started reading every night to them before they could understand any of
it. Kept it up until they were in 5th or 6th grade. [. . .]
Posted by: NavyMom at March 11, 2018 12:52 PM (Oelm


There was a radio PSA, or a mock radio PSA (I can't remember) with a woman in labor and the dialogue was:

"unnngggh!"
"Breath honey, remember to breath"

"aaaagh!"
"So, Flopsy, Mopsy, and Cottontail, who were good little bunnies, went
down the lane to gather blackberries:

But Peter, who was very naughty, ran straight. . ."
"WHAT ARE YOU DOING!?!"

". . .um, remember Dr. Jensen said we should start reading to our kids as soon as they are born?"

Posted by: Kindltot at March 11, 2018 01:34 PM (2K6fY)

421 Infidel, it doesn't sound like a very good book does it? More like a wrist slitter which probably explains why the glitterati liked it.

Posted by: Anna Puma (HQCaR) at March 11, 2018 01:35 PM (1xAqM)

422 418
She said something along the lines of 'my heritage

is the stories my parents and grandparents told me'. So I guess now our

ethnicity is whatever we want it to be. We're all ethnic fluid.



Posted by: NavyMom at March 11, 2018 01:14 PM (Oelm

And
I am betting her parents and grandparents are all conveniently dead, so
that no independent verification (or debunking) of that family legend
is possible.


Posted by: Alberta Oil Peon at March 11, 2018 01:33 PM (Dbv1R)

I joke with my kids that if I can be any race or gender I want to be, then I should be able to declare that I'm a gay black japanese eskimo. Tell me otherwise. Although I do tell them to be careful what they say in school, as some of their teachers are surely off-the-rails leftist radicals, so best to stay out of their cross-hairs.

Posted by: jim at March 11, 2018 01:36 PM (gjGvH)

423 **** Yes; I don't think as a rule churches shame woman who have abortions.

I gotta ask - how does the writer imagine a church finds out who has had an abortion? Planned Parenthood probably doesn't make a list available. Its not like looking up property tax records. So - how exactly does the shaming process start?

Posted by: 2009Refugee at March 11, 2018 01:38 PM (JyFLk)

424 Anna, it's like anything the talking heads or pundits or politicians tell me, I believe the opposite.

Posted by: Infidel at March 11, 2018 01:38 PM (a3OL0)

425 But Peter, who was very naughty, ran straight. . ."
Posted by: Kindltot at March 11, 2018 01:34 PM


Another nauseating example of the deleterious effects of indoctrinating infants into the imperialist white-supremacist capitalist cisheteropatriarchy at birth!

Posted by: Susan J. Wharrior at March 11, 2018 01:38 PM (DMUuz)

426 423
**** Yes; I don't think as a rule churches shame woman who have abortions.



I gotta ask - how does the writer imagine a church finds out who has
had an abortion? Planned Parenthood probably doesn't make a list
available. Its not like looking up property tax records. So - how
exactly does the shaming process start?

Posted by: 2009Refugee at March 11, 2018 01:38 PM (JyFLk)

Indeed, unlike the case of the social worker (woman) who got a concealed carry permit in VA and was fired because of it, despite the fact she never brought her gun with her to work.

Posted by: jim at March 11, 2018 01:39 PM (gjGvH)

427 Another issue about genetic testing for American Indian DNA - the Indians over the centuries adopted a lot of whites into their tribes, plus a lot of traders and travelers took Indian wives or at least had liaisons with Indian women, the offspring of which were considered full members of the tribe. Even a couple hundred years ago European DNA made up a fairly large part of the Indian gene pool, particularly among their leadership, depending on the tribe. So even a NA considered full-blooded today may in fact have quite a bit of non-Native genetic background.

Native American-ishness is an ethno-cultural identity more than a racial designation.

Posted by: Grey Fox at March 11, 2018 01:39 PM (bZ7mE)

428 elizabeth warren is still claiming her native heritage

Posted by: phoenixgirl


I was watching/listening this morning when she got asked the question. She went off on some long-winded rant and never gave a direct answer. Which the person who asked questioned noted.

Posted by: Forgot My Nic at March 11, 2018 01:39 PM (LOgQ4)

429
They took away my way of life
Gender wars and the racial strife

Posted by: Liewatha Warren at March 11, 2018 01:40 PM (Tyii7)

430 AOP, in regards to Warren and her injun blood: The left has always been a supporter of the "one drop of blood" approach

Posted by: Kindltot at March 11, 2018 01:40 PM (2K6fY)

431 I joke with my kids that if I can be any race or
gender I want to be, then I should be able to declare that I'm a gay
black japanese eskimo. Tell me otherwise. Although I do tell them to be
careful what they say in school, as some of their teachers are surely
off-the-rails leftist radicals, so best to stay out of their
cross-hairs.


Posted by: jim at March 11, 2018 01:36 PM (gjGvH)

How does one describe a frigid Eskimo lesbian:
Mishin' Impossible.

Try the veal.

Posted by: Alberta Oil Peon at March 11, 2018 01:40 PM (Dbv1R)

432 I want to say light blue, but I honestly don't remember now.
=====

I vaguely remember those boxes, but the elderly 2nd grade teacher told me not to do it. Sent me our in-school library instead. Kids cried when they learned they got her, but of all the teachers I have had, she was the most flexible and sensitive to all levels. Thank you, Mrs Stevenson, for not embarrassing me or any other kids in the class and doing your job of educating so well.

Posted by: mustbequantum at March 11, 2018 01:41 PM (MIKMs)

433 430
AOP, in regards to Warren and her injun blood: The left has always been a supporter of the "one drop of blood" approach


Posted by: Kindltot at March 11, 2018 01:40 PM (2K6fY)

Even when they wanted to exterminate the racially unpure, e.g. Hitler and Margaret Sanger.

Posted by: jim at March 11, 2018 01:41 PM (gjGvH)

434 >>>Another nauseating example of the deleterious
effects of indoctrinating infants into the imperialist white-supremacist
capitalist cisheteropatriarchy at birth!


Posted by: Susan J. Wharrior<<<

That's like Jimmie Kimmel grade insanity. Bravo!

Posted by: Fritz at March 11, 2018 01:42 PM (bJ0w+)

435 Yes, I remember very well trying to decipher the funny papers of "The Kansas City Star" on Sundays. I was out of bed first thing in the morning so I could get my hands on the paper before my parents. I was about 6 years old at the time. I couldn't read well enough to completely figure out the comics but had been reading "Dick and Jane" for a year or more.

Posted by: Kim Jong-fu at March 11, 2018 01:42 PM (artIV)

436 I'm probably about as much native American as Dizzy Lizzy and it never got me squat. It's not that big of a deal really.

Posted by: fraeked at March 11, 2018 01:43 PM (UdKB7)

437 I vaguely remember those boxes, but the elderly 2nd grade teacher told me not to do it. Sent me our in-school library instead. Kids cried when they learned they got her, but of all the teachers I have had, she was the most flexible and sensitive to all levels. Thank you, Mrs Stevenson, for not embarrassing me or any other kids in the class and doing your job of educating so well.


Ah, Mrs. Marquart was my 2nd grade teacher. I loved her. 5th grade Mrs. McGarvey, not so much. She had those flappy arms when she wrote on the board and was just a mean person.

Posted by: Infidel at March 11, 2018 01:44 PM (a3OL0)

438 5th grade Mrs. McGarvey, not so much. She had those flappy arms when she wrote on the board and was just a mean person.
---
My 4th grade music teacher had those! They were mesmerizing when she was writing music on the blackboard.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, Gamestress of Triskelion at March 11, 2018 01:46 PM (qJtVm)

439 She had those flappy arms when she wrote on the board

You could at least be polite and refer to them as arm wattles.

Posted by: Mrs. McGarvey at March 11, 2018 01:46 PM (Tyii7)

440 Flappy arms?

Was there squawking and egg laying involved?

Posted by: Anna Puma (HQCaR) at March 11, 2018 01:47 PM (1xAqM)

441 Thank you again for the Book Thread, OM.

*whispers: It's my favorite thread*

Posted by: All Hail Eris, Gamestress of Triskelion at March 11, 2018 01:47 PM (qJtVm)

442 *** 436 I'm probably about as much native American as Dizzy Lizzy and it never got me squat. It's not that big of a deal really.

Maybe not for you, but it was heap big wampum for Fauxahontas.

Posted by: 2009Refugee at March 11, 2018 01:47 PM (JyFLk)

443 I just read the Mark Steyn piece on Mickey Spillane. Typical great writing from Steyn, especially if you're a Spillane fan (and everyone here better be.... )

Posted by: Hands at March 11, 2018 01:49 PM (EzdLW)

444 I just read the Mark Steyn piece on Mickey Spillane. Typical great writing from Steyn, especially if you're a Spillane fan (and everyone here better be.... )
Posted by: Hands
----------------

Dick. Private Dick.

Posted by: Mike Hammer, etc., etc. at March 11, 2018 01:52 PM (w1zJX)

445 I'm probably about as much native American as Dizzy Lizzy and it never got me squat. It's not that big of a deal really.

In the muzzleloading/early American history reenacting community I've noticed a interesting pattern - the folks that are loudest in proclaiming their Natyve-ness, most self-righteous about historical abuses, and tend to put on the "you don't understand us, white-eye" attitude are the guys with 1/32 or 1/64 blood who grew up in suburbia, whereas the guys that grew up on the reservation aren't a whole lot different in attitude than rural whites (I recall one guy listing all the pathologies of reservation life and wondering why anyone would actually want to be an Indian).

Small sample size, not universal within the community, and the pattern hasn't held outside the community, but interesting nevertheless.

Posted by: Grey Fox at March 11, 2018 01:52 PM (bZ7mE)

446 My 4th grade music teacher had those! They were mesmerizing when she was writing music on the blackboard.
=====

We actually had music taught by our classroom teachers every day and had pianos in the rooms played by teachers during songtime. A big reward was to use the five-chalk staff maker on the board. I guess back in the day (early 60s) everybody learned music.

Posted by: mustbequantum at March 11, 2018 01:52 PM (MIKMs)

447
But maybe someday when they learn
Communist nation will return, will return, will return

Posted by: Liewatha Warren at March 11, 2018 01:53 PM (Tyii7)

448 Yes, I remember very well trying to decipher the funny papers of "The Kansas City Star" on Sundays. I was out of bed first thing in the morning so I could get my hands on the paper before my parents. I was about 6 years old at the time. I couldn't read well enough to completely figure out the comics but had been reading "Dick and Jane" for a year or more.
Posted by: Kim Jong-fu at March 11, 2018 01:42 PM (artIV)

I liked the song by Roger Miller.

Kansas City Star, that's what I are.....

Posted by: Hairyback Guy at March 11, 2018 01:53 PM (EoRCO)

449 Thank you again for the Book Thread, OM.

*whispers: It's my favorite thread*
Posted by: All Hail Eris
-------------

Wha...
*clutches chest, reels, falls gasping*

Posted by: Talk Like A Pirate Thread at March 11, 2018 01:54 PM (w1zJX)

450 *looks at the side-bar item about Homo Sapiens/Pan-Trog chimera and ponders*

Without going back to the Greek classics, was there a book earlier than The Island of Dr. Moreau in the past few centuries that centered on such a concept. I guess I should disqualify that reference in Pepy's diary and make it specifically another work of fiction.

Posted by: Anna Puma (HQCaR) at March 11, 2018 01:54 PM (1xAqM)

451 She had those flappy arms when she wrote on the board and was just a mean person.
Posted by: Infidel at March 11, 2018 01:44 PM


You say that like it's a Bad Thing.

Posted by: Cora "Trig" Segal at March 11, 2018 01:54 PM (DMUuz)

452 **** 443 I just read the Mark Steyn piece on Mickey Spillane. Typical great writing from Steyn, especially if you're a Spillane fan (and everyone here better be.... )

In keeping with the early-childhood memories sub-thread . . . I became aware of Mickey Spillage via Lite Beer commercials during football games.

Posted by: 2009Refugee at March 11, 2018 01:55 PM (JyFLk)

453 Spillane. Auto cucumber!!!!

Posted by: 2009Refugee at March 11, 2018 01:55 PM (JyFLk)

454 MrsJTB
36
For those who enjoy a good mystery and detective novel City of Endless
Night by Douglas Preston and Lincoln Child is a thrilling read. Each of
these authors writes novels separately, but their best work is when
they combine their efforts in the Pendergast series. City of Endless
Night is the 18th book in this series, which began with Relic in 1995.
This latest book follows the adventures of FBI Special Agent Pendergast
and his friend NYPD Lieutenant Vincent D'Agosta solve a series of
grusome crimes in NYC. Decapitated bodies of wealthy entrepreneurs,
powerbrokers, their families and workers are found around town. Terror
strikes the powers that be. The media plays a powerful role in adding
to the hysteria. This book, like all in the Pendergast series, can be
read as a standalone even though it continues the series storyline.

I had read many of the Pendergast mysteries early on and liked them, but it seemed that the series had run out of gas the last few. I was hesitant to pick this one up even though the plot sounds interesting. I may just give it a try.

Posted by: Charlotte at March 11, 2018 01:55 PM (sfBtM)

455 Spillage of Lite Beer is not a crime, in fact it is doing a great humanitarian service by saving people from suffering.

Posted by: Anna Puma (HQCaR) at March 11, 2018 01:56 PM (1xAqM)

456 I graduated from the Mickey Spillane School of Typing. Barely.

Posted by: Notorious BFD at March 11, 2018 01:57 PM (Tyii7)

457 When I say "It's not that big of a deal really" about my Native American heritage I mean of course to me personally It means about as much as the German part of me, but probably not as much as the Irish part, and certainly not as much as the redneck part.

Posted by: fraeked at March 11, 2018 01:58 PM (UdKB7)

458 Even a couple hundred years ago European DNA made up a fairly large part of the Indian gene pool, particularly among their leadership, depending on the tribe. So even a NA considered full-blooded today may in fact have quite a bit of non-Native genetic background.

Native American-ishness is an ethno-cultural identity more than a racial designation.

Posted by: Grey Fox at March 11, 2018 01:39 PM (bZ7mE)


========

You're conflating leadership/membership in a tribe with heritage.

I'd think if a DNA test were done they'd select someone with unmixed ancestry as the baseline and they'd be able to do this by looking at physical characteristics.

Just because we think there should be no identity politics such as Warren wants to promote, it's a fallacy to say "because some of the tribes contain people of various mixed ancestries, there are no physical differences between the indians and the colonists". That's clearly false.

Posted by: Steve and Cold Bear at March 11, 2018 01:58 PM (/qEW2)

459 Pounding the keys readied you for pounding the pavement, a few mugs faces, and lets be discreet about the dames right?

Posted by: Anna Puma (HQCaR) at March 11, 2018 01:58 PM (1xAqM)

460 For the life of me, I can't remember the name of the series of detective novels I used to read. They were good, he always got the bad guys. IIRC he was divorced and was always making sammiches. It was a long time ago.

Posted by: Infidel at March 11, 2018 01:59 PM (a3OL0)

461 Okay, more Arnheiter craziness:

A Chinese sub is suspected to surface and give arms to waiting VC vessels. Arnheiter is tasked to OBSERVE the situation. He tells his officers that he will engage the enemy. He is reminded that they are in international waters and that would be considered an act of war/piracy to fire on them. *Pfffftt!!*

So he sends some of his crew in a small craft to the area in question and instructs them to fire on the sub should it surface. Yeah, no. They are also undersupplied with water and food and the next day scrounge breakfast from a passing coast guard ship.

The best part is where Arnie asks his XO to write him up for a silver star for his shore bombardments of the enemy, which were all falsified accounts anyway.

It looks like his senior officers have finally had enough. This is such a great gossipy book.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, Gamestress of Triskelion at March 11, 2018 01:59 PM (qJtVm)

462 I guess back in the day (early 60s) everybody learned music.
=====

Want to emphasize that I went to public school in a 'poor' area. Music was not elitist, just another kind of reading.

Posted by: mustbequantum at March 11, 2018 02:00 PM (MIKMs)

463 "Mickey Spillage"

I hate it when that happens.

Posted by: Bill Cosby at March 11, 2018 02:00 PM (UdKB7)

464 OT but the wife and I finally solved the "mystery of the pile of feathers that magically appear once in a while" of our backyard.

At first, we thought cat but never saw a cat.

Today we found out there's a hawk that sees our trees, and the doves that nest within, as a smörgåsbord.

Posted by: Blake at March 11, 2018 02:00 PM (WEBkv)

465 "Mickey Spillage"

I hate it when that happens.
Posted by: Bill Cosby at March 11, 2018 02:00 PM (UdKB7)

Noice!

And also NOOD.

Posted by: Pug Mahon, Feeling kinda Irish at March 11, 2018 02:01 PM (Mkuv2)

466 *looks at the side-bar item about Homo Sapiens/Pan-Trog chimera and ponders*

Without going back to the Greek classics, was there a book earlier than The Island of Dr. Moreau in the past few centuries that centered on such a concept. I guess I should disqualify that reference in Pepy's diary and make it specifically another work of fiction.


I'm always astounded by folks that claim that since humans are only slightly more sophisticated meat robots than are animals, with no clear defining line, we should then treat animals the same way we treat humans, instead of taking the far more logical conclusion that we can treat humans the same way we treat animals.

To claim that creating chimeras, something he admits is a cruel endeavor, in the belief that it will inspire greater kindness to animals, is profoundly foolish on all kinds of levels.

Posted by: Grey Fox at March 11, 2018 02:01 PM (bZ7mE)

467 I joke with my kids that if I can be any race or
gender I want to be, then I should be able to declare that I'm a gay
black japanese eskimo.
------------

Years ago, in the twilight of my listening to NPR, Terry Gross interviewed a ghey Filipino banjo player. I checked to see if it was April 1st, just to be sure, but, nope. It was a 'serious' interview about the 'challenges' that he/she faced.

Actually, that may have been the last time that I ever tuned in.

Posted by: Mike Hammer, etc., etc. at March 11, 2018 02:02 PM (9tO1t)

468 454 ... Charlotte,

Mrs. JTB asked me to reply. We got the latest Pendergast book from the library. We aren't likely to re-read the series so we go the library route. And we both agree that Preston and Child do their best work together.

Posted by: JTB at March 11, 2018 02:04 PM (V+03K)

469 And we both agree that Preston and Child do their best work together.
=====

Niven and Pournelle. Simon and Garfunkle. All are exceptional, but together they are greater than the sum of their parts.

Posted by: mustbequantum at March 11, 2018 02:06 PM (MIKMs)

470 I recall one guy listing all the pathologies of reservation life and wondering why anyone would actually want to be an Indian).

Posted by: Grey Fox at March 11, 2018 01:52 PM (bZ7mE)

I saw Warren on a different show this morning, I think Face the Nation. She said her parents fell in love as teens, and her father's family disapproved of her mom because she was part Native American. Whatever

Anyway, she went on to say that Native American women have the highest rate of being victims of sexual abuse, and something needs to be done about this. She also said that over half the abusers aren't Indians. Ok, but this culture apparently isn't taking very good of its women.

Posted by: stace at March 11, 2018 02:06 PM (6HFDU)

471 Niven and Pournelle. Simon and Garfunkle. All are exceptional, but together they are greater than the sum of their parts.
Posted by: mustbequantum at March 11, 2018 02:06 PM (MIKMs)
---
Like Monty Python.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, Gamestress of Triskelion at March 11, 2018 02:07 PM (qJtVm)

472 That is a fascinating book on a truly whacked out fellow. Little Marcus Aurelius was a troublemaker. Neil only mentions him being a twin, I am betting his brother got the accolades while Marcus was the shadow.

Of course you must follow it up with the fictional The Trouble With Heroes by Martin Dibner set during Viet Nam about a troubled Navy captain.

Posted by: Anna Puma (HQCaR) at March 11, 2018 02:08 PM (1xAqM)

473 Thanks Anna, I will put that on my (neverending) list.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, Gamestress of Triskelion at March 11, 2018 02:10 PM (qJtVm)

474 Like Marx and Engels, Gilbert and Sullivan, Captain and Tenille.

Posted by: Kindltot at March 11, 2018 02:11 PM (2K6fY)

475 468
454 ... Charlotte,



Mrs. JTB asked me to reply. We got the latest Pendergast book from
the library. We aren't likely to re-read the series so we go the library
route. And we both agree that Preston and Child do their best work
together.

Well I have an Amazon gift card trying to talk me into using it, so I may on this one. Cabinet of Curiosities is still my favorite of the bunch.

Posted by: Charlotte at March 11, 2018 02:11 PM (sfBtM)

476 You're conflating leadership/membership in a tribe with heritage.

I'd think if a DNA test were done they'd select someone with unmixed ancestry as the baseline and they'd be able to do this by looking at physical characteristics.

Just because we think there should be no identity politics such as Warren wants to promote, it's a fallacy to say "because some of the tribes contain people of various mixed ancestries, there are no physical differences between the indians and the colonists". That's clearly false.


I'm saying that heritage and membership in the tribe ARE Indian-ness, and that genetic makeup is incidental. That is the way the Indians have run things for centuries, as a matter of fact. I think this may have only changed in the last couple generations.

Also, finding someone you KNOW is unmixed is going to be a challenge. That is particularly true with the Cherokee, of which 25% were white or partly white by 1800 or so.

Posted by: Grey Fox at March 11, 2018 02:12 PM (bZ7mE)

477 The Trouble With Heroes is the bookend for Dibner's other work The Deep Six which is a fictionalized account of the only gun duel of the Pacific War in which Japanese and American float-planes acted as spotters.

Posted by: Anna Puma (HQCaR) at March 11, 2018 02:15 PM (1xAqM)

478 Also, finding someone you KNOW is unmixed is going to be a challenge.
------------
It's easy, just check the cheekbones, then just checkmark the cheekbone checkbox. Voila!

Posted by: Lizzy at March 11, 2018 02:15 PM (y3sT9)

479 Anyway, she went on to say that Native American women have the highest rate of being victims of sexual abuse, and something needs to be done about this. She also said that over half the abusers aren't Indians. Ok, but this culture apparently isn't taking very good of its women.

Well, the first part is true, I think. The rates of abuse of all kinds on the reservations is among the highest of any population sub-group in the US, IIRC.

Posted by: Grey Fox at March 11, 2018 02:17 PM (bZ7mE)

480 Anna, neither of my library systems has ANY Dibner!

Posted by: All Hail Eris, Gamestress of Triskelion at March 11, 2018 02:17 PM (qJtVm)

481
Without going back to the Greek classics, was there a book earlier than The Island of Dr. Moreau
in the past few centuries that centered on such a concept. I guess I
should disqualify that reference in Pepy's diary and make it
specifically another work of fiction.
=====

Gulliver's Travels?

Posted by: mustbequantum at March 11, 2018 02:19 PM (MIKMs)

482 423 **** Yes; I don't think as a rule churches shame woman who have abortions.

I gotta ask - how does the writer imagine a church finds out who has had an abortion? Planned Parenthood probably doesn't make a list available. Its not like looking up property tax records. So - how exactly does the shaming process start?
Posted by: 2009Refugee at March 11, 2018 01:38 PM (JyFLk)

Well, at least in the Catholic Church, the woman would tell the priest in the confessional, which is sealed, i.e. nobody else would know, ever. The priest used to be bound to send a request to the Vatican for absolution for that particular sin, but those requests were sent without naming names, so again, nobody would know. Now the sin is forgivable in the confessional, by the priest, so the circle remains tiny.

I think the issue for shame is wrongheaded, anyway. If you don't want to feel shame, then don't act shamefully. And, nobody can "shame" you--shame is what you feel for your behavior. It is there for a reason, and allowing the sinner to wriggle out of feeling it is not a particular act of mercy. You won't avoid hell just because you have avoided feeling rotten over your sins. Doesn't work that way.

The loving thing is to point to Jesus, and His Commandments, and walk with the sinner back to Him.

Posted by: tcn in AK at March 11, 2018 02:20 PM (NXsWM)

483 Years ago, in the twilight of my listening to NPR, Terry Gross interviewed a ghey Filipino banjo player. I checked to see if it was April 1st, just to be sure, but, nope. It was a 'serious' interview about the 'challenges' that he/she faced.

Actually, that may have been the last time that I ever tuned in.

Posted by: Mike Hammer, etc., etc. at March 11, 2018 02:02 PM (9tO1t)


Hopefully, you didn't miss Terry Gross' interview of Gene Simmons of Kiss, who claims to have slept with 4600 women. Simmons goes all pick up artist on her. Comedy gold!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xXMpo6rrUcI

Posted by: cool breeze at March 11, 2018 02:23 PM (UGKMd)

484 Also, finding someone you KNOW is unmixed is going to be a challenge. That is particularly true with the Cherokee, of which 25% were white or partly white by 1800 or so.
Posted by: Grey Fox at March 11, 2018 02:12 PM (bZ7mE)

It is not so difficult up here. Even the Athabaskans, who have intermarried near the cities, have populations like the G'witchin' who have not. And, since all the Natives came through the land bridge, it would be pretty simple to determine genetics thereby.

My son, for instance, in 98.8% Mayan. Oddly, he is about 02% Ashkenazi Jewish. Somewhere, back a few centuries, there was a Spaniard in the mix. But that's fairly pure so far as genetics go.

Posted by: tcn in AK at March 11, 2018 02:24 PM (NXsWM)

485 Want to correct a mistake.

The book is The Raft by Robert Trumbull.

The pilot, Chief Dixon, from Kansas, was awarded the Navy Cross by ADM Nimitz for his leadership and perseverance. That was when we had flying Chief Petty Officers.

Posted by: NaCly Dog at March 11, 2018 02:25 PM (hyuyC)

486 That was when we had flying Chief Petty Officers.
Posted by: NaCly Dog at March 11, 2018 02:25 PM (hyuyC)
---
My chief said they all just walk on water now.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, Gamestress of Triskelion at March 11, 2018 02:28 PM (qJtVm)

487 Don't fret too much, the real battle that The Deep Six is built around was called the Battle of Komandorski Islands. Happened up in the Aleutians of course.

US forces - Salt Lake City, Richmond, and four cans.

Japanese forces - Nachi, Maya, Tama, and Abukuma plus five cans and three transports.

Posted by: Anna Puma (HQCaR) at March 11, 2018 02:33 PM (1xAqM)

488 Dixon? Raft?

Oh yeah. TBD-1 Bu No 0335. VT-6 as 6-T-14. Went down on 1/16/42. 34 days at sea. Harold F. Dixon, Anthony J. Pastula, and Gene D. Aldrich.

IIRC the Naval Aviation Museum at Pensacola has that raft on display.

Posted by: Anna Puma (HQCaR) at March 11, 2018 02:39 PM (1xAqM)

489 File Under: The Da Vinci Code.
Terrible book.
Posted by: JoeF. at March 11, 2018 01:18 PM

Confession: I buy this book at charity book sales, take it home, tear it apart, and recycle it.

I never even read it when my anti-Christian co-worker spouted some nonsense about the pope putting someone to death in Rome and I said, "That was when the popes were in Avignon, France." Then an Episcopalian friend got into Dan Brown books and started spouting Gnosticism.

So I read it and decided it really appeals to people who identify with the smart, suave protagonist and don't read history. The clincher was when I finally went to the Louvre and the docents assumed we wanted to see all the Leonardo works; they were surprised when we called him Leonardo.

Also, Dan Brown thought a firewall was a physical thing in a technology-based thriller.

Posted by: NaughtyPine at March 11, 2018 02:45 PM (G8B7r)

490 Can't remember a time when I couldn't read, but I sure do remember when I couldn't read a clock. Took until second grade to understand how the little hand related to the big hand.

Same with directions. For years, I would have to go into the yard and turn toward the neighbor's farm, half a mile away, to fix north in my mind.

Even after I could read, around age 4, Dad would still sit in his chair in the evening and say, "Let's read the funnies." He would use different voices, making practical use of a skill he developed in high school for speech competitions.

Fast-forward a few decades -- when our oldest (and then only) son was young, I would read Spider-Man comics to him. I often wore out; Stan Lee had no idea about brevity.

Posted by: Weak Geek at March 11, 2018 02:46 PM (NJuZv)

491 Wjr123, I want to live in your library. Haven't read those titles and the chair looks so comfy.

Posted by: NaughtyPine at March 11, 2018 02:47 PM (G8B7r)

492 That TL;DR version of the Bible gave a very unwarranted short shrift to the Minor Prophets. With two-faced monsters, masses of people fleeing hither and yon, armies rampaging like locusts, continents being slashed to shreds by rivers, mountains melting before your eyes - these guys deserved a few more sentences than "not Jonah - feel free to skip".

Posted by: LCMS Rulz! at March 11, 2018 02:58 PM (o7l6R)

493 I requested the rabbi's book from the state library system. I spent two hours on the phone with a friend who was widowed this past summer. She's keeping busy but the suggestions that people make, like sell the house or travel don't make sense for her.

I suggested she write a book on Small Gardening. I finished the fifth Small Gardening book this past week and determined that mostly it's aimed at English urbanites, Californians with small yards, and places with mild climates like BC. Colder climes like NYC get the hardscaping, trickling fountain, and potted plant treatment.

There needs to be a book for Midwesterners who have no use for water features (hello, mosquitoes and mold!), can't keep dwarf palm or bamboo alive, and crave interesting features when covered in snow.

Posted by: NaughtyPine at March 11, 2018 02:59 PM (G8B7r)

494 I'm re-reading Spark Joy by Marie Kondo, mostly because I got into a discussion with a friend about how religious philosophy changes perception of life. Kondo's approach to organizing and tidying is directly related to her Shinto beliefs. Quite a few reviewers on Amazon like her method but wanted her not to talk about her beliefs. Too damned bad. If you think objects gain a type of soul, it affects your care and handling of them.

Posted by: NaughtyPine at March 11, 2018 03:07 PM (G8B7r)

495 I'm reading 'How the West Won: The Neglected Sorry of the Triumph of Modernity' by Rodney Stark.

Like it. Recommend it.

Posted by: fretless at March 11, 2018 03:12 PM (uDTP4)

496 I don't remember not being able to read. I do remember my uncle calling me a liar and that I must have the books memorized. I read the newspaper to him.

I finished "Artemis" by Andy Weir and am giving Jordan Peterson another try. (Kindle won't hold a charge for long, so it no longer travels.)

Posted by: roamingfirehydrant at March 11, 2018 03:20 PM (THS4q)

497 LOL. Finally! Arnheiter has given his farewell address and is being forcibly escorted off the ship by the new commander of the Vance.

"You will never forget me," the captain called out to the crew, "for I took you into harm's way. I led you where the shells were falling."

What a nutjob!

Posted by: All Hail Eris, Gamestress of Triskelion at March 11, 2018 03:32 PM (qJtVm)

498 Arnheiter, never before had there ever been a man more deserving of being attached to a K-gun and the lanyard being pulled.

Posted by: Anna Puma (HQCaR) at March 11, 2018 03:43 PM (1xAqM)

499 Oh wait until you get to Appendix B where the Chaplain, Lt Dando USNR, drops this gem: "The kindest thing I can say about him is he needs help."

Posted by: Anna Puma (HQCaR) at March 11, 2018 03:50 PM (1xAqM)

500 Dennis properly attributes the quote to Rabbi Milton Steinberg, who wrote: "The believer in God has to account for the existence of unjust suffering; the atheist has to account for everything else."

Posted by: ShainS at March 11, 2018 11:10 AM (BiLU+)

Thanks for the correction. I was going from memory. I loaned my copy out. LOL

Posted by: SandyCheeks at March 11, 2018 04:14 PM (ihzOe)

501 I remember a discussion of SRA reading a few months back.

And I know my school used old material, but did NO ONE else have "Jack and Janet" readers instead of "Dick and Jane"? To help jog memories, J&J's pets were Tip (dog) and Mitten (cat).

Posted by: Weak Geek at March 11, 2018 04:16 PM (zT4Y1)

502 207 In case anyone is wondering, the reference to tea and tobacco should have gone out under my nic. Mrs. JTB doesn't smoke a pipe.

Multiple nics on the same machine can lead to complications.
Posted by: JTB at March 11, 2018 11:33 AM (V+03K)

I wondered about that, but to quote anti-pope Frankie, "Who am I to judge?"

Posted by: SandyCheeks at March 11, 2018 04:23 PM (ihzOe)

503 Elisabeth G. Wolfe, if you're still around. This is off the top of my head, so no guarantees, but you might look at Lewis's _The Discarded Image_ on Sidney. I wrote a paper/article years ago that referenced The Redcross Knight in relation to the Ransom of _Out of the Silent Planet_ and seem to recall using that reference.

Posted by: Miss Sippi at March 11, 2018 04:27 PM (4IhZE)

504 490 Can't remember a time when I couldn't read, but I sure do remember when I couldn't read a clock. Took until second grade to understand how the little hand related to the big hand.

when jr chronda was learning to read clocks, i looked around the house and realized all the clocks were either of the digital or humorous counterclockwise variety.

Posted by: Anachronda at March 11, 2018 04:42 PM (OVRJp)

505 I don't think I really could read a clock properly until high school.

Posted by: votermom certified russian matryoshka bot at March 11, 2018 04:45 PM (hMwEB)

506 Re remembering when you learned to read:

I didn't learn to read until first grade, which was the norm back in my day. I had an older brother and sister, and before learning to read I was very jealous of them, but I didn't attempt to teach myself to read. I remember one time paging through a book and pretending to read. My mother was excited and asked me if I was really reading and I had to admit I was just remembering the book and making it up.

As first grade approached, I remember being very anxious that I wouldn't be able to learn to read. That was probably the only time as a kid that I got stressed out at the beginning of school. I was just so afraid that I wouldn't be able to figure it out and reading would remain a mystery to me.

My fears were for nought. I learned to read very quickly and was soon moved into the most advanced reading group. I don't remember learning to read basic words. I think once I learned the alphabet sounds, I just recognized the basic "See Dick run" words and didn't need to read them. But I have a clear memory of coming across the words 'surprise' and sounding it out and finally figuring out what it was. That was a real a-ha moment for me.

Posted by: biancaneve at March 11, 2018 04:55 PM (A/iod)

507 Currently reading fantasy short story compilation - Ill Met in Lankhmar 1995 paperback. I don't think I need to pump Fritz Leiber. He wrote and then tinkered with his little fantasy works throughout the course of his life. Wonderfully imaginative phrasing best describes his prose.

Posted by: 13times at March 11, 2018 05:06 PM (K3B2k)

508 The typeface, paper, and smell of a book make a lasting impression. I am instantly transported back to when I first read a particular book, and to how I felt reading it. It's a time machine!
Posted by: All Hail Eris, Gamestress of Triskelion at March 11, 2018 09:34 AM (qJtVm)

Me, too. I have my original paperback box set of The Hobbit and LotR, pages are disintegrating, as well my original paperback copies of The Earthsea Trilogy. If I had money I would love to do a movie series of those books. The crap miniseries on Sci-fi should be burned and removed from the world's collective memory.

Posted by: Gem at March 11, 2018 06:08 PM (XoAz8)

509 I was burrowing around in one of my bookcases and found Maureen Birnbaum: Barbarian Swordsperson, Yay!

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maureen_Birnbaum,_Barbarian_Swordsperson

Posted by: All Hail Eris, Gamestress of Triskelion at March 11, 2018 06:27 PM (qJtVm)

510 *goes pillaging a bookcase*

So picture this.
I'm like sitting on the edge of the upstairs bathtub, which in Mums and Daddy's house is half-sunken so my knees are jammed up under my chin, and I'm watching my dear, dear friend, Maureen Birnbaum the Interplanetary Adventuress, apply eye shadow. Maureen is, you know, very finicky about makeup when she uses it, which isn't often these days because she's mostly a barbarian swordsperson who only rarely bothers with normal stuff.


"Maureen Birnbaum in the Mud." pg 311. Chicks in Chainmail

Posted by: Anna Puma (HQCaR) at March 11, 2018 06:52 PM (1xAqM)

511 File Under: The Da Vinci Code.
Terrible book.
Posted by: JoeF. at March 11, 2018 01:18 PM (7uYFy)

I threw mine in the trash. That was in my pre-AoSHQ days, or I might have done something more creative.

Posted by: Miss Sippi at March 11, 2018 06:58 PM (4IhZE)

512 Arnheiter, never before had there ever been a man more deserving of being attached to a K-gun and the lanyard being pulled.
Posted by: Anna Puma
---------

Ah. The naval cousin of the old 'Rent Asunder' technique.

Posted by: Mike Hammer, etc., etc. at March 11, 2018 07:30 PM (c/EDo)

513 Heh. Curse this place! Have now ordered two books today. Amusingly, the used copy of 'The Raft' that I found was listed as:
'The Raft: The Courageous Struggle of Three Naval Airmen Against the Ex Library'

Posted by: Mike Hammer, etc., etc. at March 11, 2018 07:42 PM (QxXRY)

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