Sunday Morning Book Thread: 12/10/2017

home library3.jpg

I get the idea, but without the base of the ladder on a circular track, or even better a single bearing, it must be difficult to move around the circle!

But that is a nice segue to the question of the best design for a library. Not the huge public and university versions, but a home library. I love the idea of a small room whose walls are completely lined with shelves, with comfortable chairs, with ottomans of course, in the middle. Maybe a small table for your beer or Scotch, and not much else. Good lighting, which means no fluorescent or CFLs. Ideally incandescent, although the better LEDs work nicely too.

I like the idea of being completely surrounded by books, without the distraction of anything else.

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Some Recommendations From The Horde

Here's one for a kids' book from (lurker?) "Tail Gunner Sam."

Your comment on non P.C. books for kids made me think of this great author Walter Buehr who was a prolific writer and illustrator of children's history books. Most have been pulled from public libraries as on(sic) old or non P.C. They are worth checking out.

Disclaimer as I am related to Buehr thru my mother.


The Crusaders has a couple of good reviews on "Goodreads," but nothing on Amazon, which means exactly nothing, since they are a decidedly leftist organization and I don't trust their reviewing system, especially for non-PC books.

Besides, a review from a Moron is worth a lot more than some random lunatic spewing blather on Amazon.

Just finished reading the Heretics of St. Possenti. ($4.99 on Kindle) I ended up wishing that there was a bishop out there willing to take this on and make it a reality. Sadly, reality bites.

Best,
Brendan


It does indeed Brendan, but that's what books are sometimes good for...to avoid that realization...if only for a few hours.
******

Moron author Celia Hayes has dropped a note to The Book Thread:
the follow-up to my reworking of the Lone Ranger is available now as an ebook - Lone Star Glory.

Meanwhile, for the month of December, the first book, Lone Star Sons is available as an ebook for .99 cents! As the drug dealer says - the first hit is free ... erm, or nearly so.

There is a considerable difference in the cover concept - the feedback to me was that some kids loved the Sons' pulpish cover, but most adults hated it. So - test-driving a new concept, based on the title still-life of objects in the TV Sharpe series.


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I was never much of a detective novel fan until I discovered Robert Parker and his most famous character, Spenser. I would buy second-hand paperbacks from Moe's Books on Telegraph Avenue in Berkeley, and when I was done reading them I would resell them for exactly what I paid and then buy a couple more. It was a great system, and a great bookstore. Yes, it was political, as all bookstores in Berkeley were, and I have to assume are, but they carried everything, not just leftist drivel. Moe himself stalked the store, and he looked like nothing so much as a clone of Danny Devito, if Danny Devito wore a ratty sports coat and smoked a large cigar.

Parker's earliest Spenser novels were his best. He became formulaic toward the end, and Spenser was a caricature of his former self. But even the worst ones were fun to read, and Parker even branched out into two more characters; a woman detective and an alcoholic chief of police.

I may have mentioned Jo Nesbo and his Harry Hole series, but aside from him I don't know much about the genre. Anyone have strong opinions about detective novels? Who's good, who's bad, who's worth a read, and who's worth a pass?

******

[Addendum] New commenter "Hokiemom" recommends children's book author Peter Catalanotto, for the quality of his writing and because he seems like a genuuinely good person.

Posted by: CBD at 09:00 AM




Comments

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1 Book thread initiated.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at December 10, 2017 08:56 AM (qJtVm)

2 Today's read is "Sex and Rockets: The Occult World of Jack Parsons" by John Carter and Robert Anton Wilson.


Parsons was one of the original founders of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and Aerojet and is considered a pioneer in solid-fuel rocketry. He showed an interest in rocketry early on and was primarily self-taught. It was said he "lacked the discipline of formal training, but had an uninhibited imagination". Boy, did he.


Parsons invoked Pan, the wild horned god of fertility, before each rocket test.


Parsons and his wife were followers of occultist Aleister Crowley, whose Gnostic Mass was performed at the Church of Thelema in Hollywood. Parsons felt magick could be explained through quantum physics (Crowley also had a disciple in armored warfare theorist J.F.C. Fuller, so he has cut quite a swathe in the science and technical world, with I find delightfully freaky). Jack set up his own bohemian anarchist grove and he befriended non other than L. Ron Hubbard, who later ran off with his wife. But oh, did I mention Parsons also had a scarlet-haired woman living in his house with whom he performed sex magic? Polyamory baby!


Parsons died in an explosion at 37. Which if you think about it is a kind of astral projection.


I first heard of Parsons in Metzger's "Book of Lies" and I was all SQUEEEEE when I saw that RAW had contributed to a biography of the man who founded JPL. I was disappointed that Wilson's introduction was his usual rant against the fascist theocracy that it modern America -- it is forever the Nixon/Reagan Terror, and yet he has never fled the Fatherland in all these years.


The book is interesting -- how could it not be with this subject? -- but it is rather workmanike in execution. If anybody knows a more lurid take I am all ears.


Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at December 10, 2017 08:58 AM (qJtVm)

3 What was the Twilight Zone episode w/the guy who liked to read so much the world was destroyed while he was in a closet or something reading and didn't notice?

Posted by: BignJames at December 10, 2017 09:00 AM (1Oy/Q)

4 Tolle lege
About 1/3 of way through Col John Elting's Swords Around a Throne. Enjoying it very much.

Posted by: Skip at December 10, 2017 09:01 AM (aC6Sd)

5 Need to read something good. I tend to find a book on Amazon and then read the entire series. Reading Lindsey Cole's Hannah Holiday books, they are kind of silly.

Posted by: rhennigantx at December 10, 2017 09:02 AM (BtQd4)

6 Can't wait to actually review the cookbook.

Posted by: Village Idiot's Apprentice at December 10, 2017 09:02 AM (EyPfd)

7 I get claustrophobic just looking at that pic

Posted by: runner at December 10, 2017 09:02 AM (QC/4S)

8 Of Mice Men and Henry Beeber ( not sure of last spelling)

Posted by: Skip at December 10, 2017 09:02 AM (aC6Sd)

9 Sounds like California was already pretty weird back in the 50s.

I first read it as "Church of Thelma".

Posted by: rickl at December 10, 2017 09:03 AM (sdi6R)

10 "What was the Twilight Zone episode w/the guy who liked to read so much the world was destroyed while he was in a closet or something reading and didn't notice?"

Burgess Meredith, I believe.

And then he broke his glasses, and was unable to see well enough to read all the books he was surrounded by.

Posted by: Village Idiot's Apprentice at December 10, 2017 09:03 AM (EyPfd)

11 The episode might be Time enough at last, or thats what Burgess says.

Posted by: Skip at December 10, 2017 09:03 AM (aC6Sd)

12 Growing up I would drop whatever I was doing to read one of Parker's Spencer novels.

Posted by: Cosda at December 10, 2017 09:04 AM (w4rj3)

13 I think this belongs here from EMT :
(my response to Mr. Weasel)

179 @174 I am still dumbfounded that it actually came together and at how well it looks - very professional! Bluebell and you really did an AWESOME JOB. APPLAUSE !
Posted by: runner at December 10, 2017 09:01 AM (QC/4S)

Posted by: runner at December 10, 2017 09:04 AM (QC/4S)

14 My copy of the cookbook is supposed to be here today. I'm gonna wrap it as a Christmas present for the Grumpy Grandma. After I read it while she's at work the next couple of nights.

Posted by: CrotchetyOldJarhead at December 10, 2017 09:04 AM (XGGts)

15 Not going to review the book until I get to see it. Amazon usually sends me a form to review books I get.

Posted by: Skip at December 10, 2017 09:05 AM (aC6Sd)

16 That library looks like it should be on a spaceship, but with null-g they shouldn't need a ladder.

Posted by: Laura Montgomery at December 10, 2017 09:05 AM (IbzI6)

17 I'll be reviewing it, for sure...

Posted by: runner at December 10, 2017 09:05 AM (QC/4S)

18 This was linked in yesterday's Weird News Thread, and it certainly belongs here as well.

https://preview.tinyurl.com/y8qxeo8n

I thought the Twitter comment was hilarious.

Posted by: rickl at December 10, 2017 09:06 AM (sdi6R)

19 Reading The Deplorable Gourmet. Just great. It really is a cookbook to use. People have given me some crazy haute books over the years, and most are in the basement. This rivals Vincent Price's amazing time for breadth and the anecdotes are great!

Posted by: CN at December 10, 2017 09:07 AM (5gaNQ)

20 It is Time Enough at Last, characters name is Henry Bemis

Posted by: Skip at December 10, 2017 09:07 AM (aC6Sd)

21 Yor recommend Burgess Thornton for young readers. But Yor a sucker for personification and anthropomorphism.

Posted by: Yor, the Hunter from the Future at December 10, 2017 09:07 AM (Jj+59)

22 13 I think this belongs here from EMT :
(my response to Mr. Weasel)

179 @174 I am still dumbfounded that it actually came together and at how well it looks - very professional! Bluebell and you really did an AWESOME JOB. APPLAUSE !
Posted by: runner at December 10, 2017 09:01 AM (QC
--------
Thanks runner!!! I will tell you the truth, we're both very happy with the way it turned out and are very happy it's DONE. But you all made it what it is with your recipes!

Posted by: Weasel at December 10, 2017 09:08 AM (Sfs6o)

23 My favorite detective novels are the Lord Peter Wimsey ones by Dorothy Sayers, the Albert Campion series by Margery Allingham, and the Adam Dalgleish ones from P. D. James.

The Sayers novels are slower reads for me because her writing is so intricate. But then, I'm a bear of very little brain plus a Red Sox fan, so what do you expect.

Posted by: bluebell ~ get cooking, Horde! at December 10, 2017 09:08 AM (kNasr)

24 My ideal library is one of those english manor ones. Warm woods, a fireplace, overstuffed chairs, shelves of first edition hardbacks, and a suit of armor. Something that feels welcoming, quiet, and comfortable, but respectful and grown up.

Posted by: Christopher R Taylor at December 10, 2017 09:09 AM (39g3+)

25 I read 'Behind The Burma Road' by William R. Peers and Dean Brelis. The authors, who were in the unit, tell the story of the U.S. Army/OSS Detachment 101, a unit that would wage guerilla warfare in Burma against the Japanese. They also write about Burma's history, her people, the logistical difficulties of getting supplies to the China-Burma-India Theater, the efforts to get a land route to China instead of just 'flying the hump', some of the horrors of living and fighting in the jungle.

I have a much better understanding of the problems that faced Gen. Joseph Stilwell as the CBI Theater commander, as well as those who served there, and not all of them were from the Japanese.

The facility where the OSS trained some of the men in 1942 was in the Maryland mountains at a site called B Camp. It would later get re-named to Camp David.

Posted by: Jake Holenhead at December 10, 2017 09:09 AM (6jF2I)

26 Can't wait to actually review the cookbook.


I am looking forward to the reveal of R.W. Bell. (One of the cookbook reviewers). S/he's also reviewed Lizzy Warren, a bunch of tech, and some Civil War stuff. So that narrows it down.

But it's my favorite review.

Posted by: Bandersnatch, in touch with his toxic masculinity in his desire to oppress someone at December 10, 2017 09:09 AM (fuK7c)

27 That ladder is one of those collapsible ones that telescope down so you could fit it into any car. So doubt its connected at top in any way.

Posted by: Skip at December 10, 2017 09:09 AM (aC6Sd)

28
Currently on Book 3 of the Crystal Singer trilogy. When I finish this
one I guess I will go back to the Thomas Covenant series and try it
again.

Posted by: Vic We Have No Party at December 10, 2017 09:09 AM (mpXpK)

29 Posted by: Skip at December 10, 2017 09:05 AM (aC6Sd)
------
Hope you like it Skip!

Posted by: Weasel at December 10, 2017 09:09 AM (Sfs6o)

30 Please consider horde authors when you think of Christmas gifts. Lots of novels out there written by us, here's my link for my three books.

http://alphawolf10.wixsite.com/kestrelarts2/books

Posted by: Christopher R Taylor at December 10, 2017 09:10 AM (39g3+)

31 Oh, I forgot to mention the Roderick Alleyn series by Ngaio Marsh. I like those a lot, too.

Posted by: bluebell ~ get cooking, Horde! at December 10, 2017 09:10 AM (kNasr)

32 Started the last Aubrey/Maturin volume, Blue at the Mizzen, and will savor every page as I reach the end of this magnificent voyage through the world's seas during the Napoleanic wars told through the lenses of a very unlikely friendship. As an aficionado of improvised music that most people would consider sheer noise, O'Brian's insight into the expressive power of the creative impulse exceeds most of the expert scribblers.

Posted by: Captain Hate at December 10, 2017 09:10 AM (y7DUB)

33 Thanks guys!

Posted by: BignJames at December 10, 2017 09:10 AM (1Oy/Q)

34 the ottoman is a must have

Posted by: Fat Naked Guy at December 10, 2017 09:11 AM (KCxzN)

35 Good morning fellow Book Threadists. I hope everyone had an enjoyable week of reading. With the bit of snow and a forecast of much colder temps, this is my time to cook and read. I have the ingredients needed for the first and plenty of booze and good tea for the second.

Posted by: JTB at December 10, 2017 09:11 AM (V+03K)

36 Posted by: Bandersnatch, in touch with his toxic masculinity in his desire to oppress someone at December 10, 2017 09:09 AM (fuK7c)

I like the illustrations - so appropriate and FUN!

Posted by: runner at December 10, 2017 09:11 AM (QC/4S)

37 I am looking forward to the reveal of R.W. Bell. (One of the cookbook reviewers). S/he's also reviewed Lizzy Warren, a bunch of tech, and some Civil War stuff. So that narrows it down.

But it's my favorite review.
Posted by: Bandersnatch, in touch with his toxic masculinity in his desire to oppress someone at December 10, 2017 09:09 AM (fuK7c)
-----------

I have a suspicion of who it is based solely on the writing style, but I won't say who I think it is unless he reveals himself.

Posted by: bluebell ~ get cooking, Horde! at December 10, 2017 09:11 AM (kNasr)

38 And here is the Goodreads list of horde-written books to browse through. I'm sure you can find at least one book in here that someone would love to have

http://tinyurl.com/jfnx9jo

Posted by: Christopher R Taylor at December 10, 2017 09:11 AM (39g3+)

39 Speaking of kids' books, a good one for an older kid, especially a boy, is MiG Pilot: the Final Escape of Lt. Belenko. I found that in my public school library in 6th grade, and credit it in part with proofing me against communism, despite school's waffling on the issue.

Posted by: drive-by at December 10, 2017 09:12 AM (KfchC)

40 22: You and Bluebell made it happen. It is truly fabulous. The blog formatting works, the recipes are vast and varied, and publishing the stories that went with them makes it a cover to cover read.

Posted by: CN at December 10, 2017 09:12 AM (5gaNQ)

41 20 It is Time Enough at Last, characters name is Henry Bemis
Posted by: Skip at December 10, 2017 09:07 AM (aC6Sd)


He worked in a bank, and used to go down into the vault during his lunch hour, where he could read undisturbed.

The vault turned out to be a good bomb shelter.


It's probably in the top five most famous Twilight Zone episodes ever.

Posted by: rickl at December 10, 2017 09:12 AM (sdi6R)

42 The ladder in that pic...Sharper Image??

Posted by: Corona at December 10, 2017 09:12 AM (88+VL)

43 I love the pic of this library. The mind boggles at what the rest of the house must look like.

Posted by: Anonymous-9 at December 10, 2017 09:12 AM (omz2g)

44 I read The Talbot Odyssey by Nelson DeMille. Last week several mentioned DeMille positively, and I am enjoying working my way through his books for the first time. They may not be great literature, but they are great thrillers. I had to stay up late one night to finish this one. Couldn't put it down.

I also read The Final Spark by Richard Paul Evans. This is the seventh and final book in the Michael Vey series for YA's. The series promotes all the right values such as friendship, acceptance, honor, etc. and also teaches readers about various countries and cultures around the world in an engrossing action-packed story. Great series.

Posted by: Zoltan at December 10, 2017 09:13 AM (T8WeQ)

45 offs

Posted by: Cheribebe at December 10, 2017 09:14 AM (DAdSz)

46 Read a couple of outstanding books this week: Winner Takes All, from Vigilante Author Robert Bidinotto, and Peter Grant's epic fantasy, King's Champion. I highly recommend both.

Posted by: Hans G. Schantz at December 10, 2017 09:14 AM (NhF/Q)

47 I'll be getting a hardcopy for the kitchen

Posted by: CN at December 10, 2017 09:14 AM (5gaNQ)

48 You and Bluebell made it happen. It is truly fabulous. The blog formatting works, the recipes are vast and varied, and publishing the stories that went with them makes it a cover to cover read.
Posted by: CN at December 10, 2017 09:12 AM (5gaNQ)
----------

Thank you, CN! The stories are far and away my favorite part. Not everyone had a story to go with their recipe, which of course is fine, but I have to say I enjoyed getting to know some of the Morons through their stories, very much. I was also pleasantly surprised by all the ethnic recipes we received - there are many things in there I want to try that are very different from what I usually cook.

Posted by: bluebell ~ get cooking, Horde! at December 10, 2017 09:15 AM (kNasr)

49 "I love the pic of this library. The mind boggles at what the rest of the house must look like."

I wonder if one of those 3D sidewalk artists could paint that on a flat ceiling?

Posted by: Village Idiot's Apprentice at December 10, 2017 09:15 AM (EyPfd)

50 9 Sounds like California was already pretty weird back in the 50s.

I first read it as "Church of Thelma".
Posted by: rickl at December 10, 2017 09:03 AM (sdi6R)
---
Oh man, was it ever. This would be in the 40's, although the church itself was I think established in the 'teens.

The Wiki article on Parsons says his influence on contemporaries like Hubbard and Heinlein played a significant role in shaping the Californian counterculture. Parsons' Witchcraft group is cited as precipitating the neopagan revival of the 1950s.

So one man can make a difference!

Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at December 10, 2017 09:16 AM (qJtVm)

51 The Deplorable Gourmet is amaziballs!
bluebell and Weasel should get the Noble prize for Gastronitivity! Who do we call to make this happen?

Posted by: Cheribebe at December 10, 2017 09:16 AM (DAdSz)

52 " I'll be getting a hardcopy for the kitchen"

Take the time to do it up right.

Contact Ace, to see if he can install a reading shelf in the kitchen for you.

Posted by: Village Idiot's Apprentice at December 10, 2017 09:16 AM (EyPfd)

53 CBD, I love your ideal reading room. The concept reminds me of Thomas Jefferson's Monticello. He had such a space (matching the rest of the architecture of course) a short way from the main house. Clearly for reading, writing and contemplation. It was about my favorite part of the estate.

Posted by: JTB at December 10, 2017 09:17 AM (V+03K)

54 Looking at that pic makes me dizzy and want to puke. The wood in that room is beautiful. Must have cost a small fortune.

Posted by: ripley at December 10, 2017 09:17 AM (k/7yp)

55 Hiya, Horde, and thanks again to CBD for pinch hitting for Mr. Muse. Indeed, that is a kewel liberry, but I agree with the problems of access. Makes me think the owner just wants to show off rather than get to his stash...

Meanwhile, back at the ranch, my pile of TBR books continues its ominous climb to the ceiling. I've laid aside "Miracles" by Eric Metaxis and "The Stupidest Angel," (which is going back to the 'brary posthaste) in favor of lighter fare, "Seven Days of Us," about a British family who agrees to quarantine themselves if it means they can spend Christmas with their M.D. daughter/sister, who volunteers for medical missions in the disease-ravaged Third World. So far, so good.

Posted by: SandyCheeks at December 10, 2017 09:17 AM (ihzOe)

56 Currently I'm reading The Affair by Lee Child. He kind of lost his way with the Jack Reacher character and I was considering just not reading any more but this one is better than the last few. Its also a flashback to when he quit the military, about his last case as an MP.

Also reading Cochrane: The Real Master and Commander. This is a non fiction look at one of the greatest men and naval captains of all time, the guy that fictional captains such as Ramage, Hornblower, and particularly Aubrey are based on. The first Aubrey/Maturin book is almost directly taken from Cochrane's first independent sailing as a lieutenant, and much of his life was lifted for various captains of books. Some of what he accomplished and did is difficult to believe, and at the same time he was such an idiot.

Posted by: Christopher R Taylor at December 10, 2017 09:17 AM (39g3+)

57 As for other reading, I have been hunting for good story reading material for the grandsons. Settled on a multi volume set from the 40s. It actually admires American history, so it's great

Posted by: CN at December 10, 2017 09:17 AM (5gaNQ)

58 Posted by: CN at December 10, 2017 09:12 AM (5gaNQ)
-----
Thanks CN! So glad you like it! It's a little like painting a room - I keep seeing all of the little mistakes I made!

Posted by: Weasel at December 10, 2017 09:18 AM (Sfs6o)

59 Last week several people mentioned they were burnt out on reading or just not in the mood, especially for entire books. It happens to all of us. When that happens, these are the books I find my hand reaching for. In no particular order:

The Liturgical Mystery series by Mark Schweizer

The Skylark and Lensman series by EE 'Doc' Smith

Matt Helm series by Donald Hamilton

Martha's Vineyard mysteries by Philip Craig

any outdoor writing by William G.Tapply

almost anything by Loius L'Amour

"She" and "King Solomon's Mines"

poetry by Tennyson

PG Wodehouse golf stories

Conan stories but only the originals by Robert E. Howard

Posted by: JTB at December 10, 2017 09:19 AM (V+03K)

60 Thanks for the link!
I've been busy with market events the last few weekends; I took along a book to read, while sitting all day in my daughter's booth at Art Squared in San Marcos - the book yesterday was a cookbook (like I need another cookbook, right?) - the Little House Cookbook, by Barbara Walker, and illustrated with art done by Garth Williams for Laura Ingalls Wilder's Little House series. Ms Walker went back and researched, and recreated as many of the dishes and meals described in the series. It's a fascinating exercise, although I think the book is aimed at teen readers more than adults.

As for dream libraries - mine is on the modest English country house ideal - carved paneling, floor to ceiling dark wood bookcases, filled with books, some nice art over an open fireplace, comfy overstuffed chairs, nice reading lamps, a center table with a Tiffany lamp on it, a slightly worn Oriental rug on the floor, and one single tall window offering a view of rolling hills, dotted with oak trees. I can dream, can't I?

Posted by: Sgt. Mom at December 10, 2017 09:19 AM (xnmPy)

61 In the Wodehouse compilation I'm on The Great White Hope (yes really) which seems to be his attempt at The Great American Novel. He seems to have generally liked Americans, which I appreciate, but I think I may skip to the end as an observation on all the ways a relationship can fall apart is not why I read Wodehouse.

Posted by: Polliwog the 'Ette at December 10, 2017 09:20 AM (rp9xB)

62 Robert Parker's books are fun and easy reads. Yeah his last few Spenser books weren't great but the first 20 or so are pretty fun and even though not particularly great detective fiction are quite enjoyable. His best other work was Apaloosa, a very interesting western that was made into a solid movie.

Posted by: Christopher R Taylor at December 10, 2017 09:21 AM (39g3+)

63 I by rebooting my Kindle app just before ordering book may have helped to get free 2 day postage and have a certificate for money off a ebook, I should get my next Aubrey/ Maturin book Fortunes of War

Posted by: Skip at December 10, 2017 09:21 AM (aC6Sd)

64 For anyone interested in a book series about a time and place we'll never see again, I can not recommend "The Hangman's Daughter" series enough. Finished the second in the series yesterday.

Posted by: weirdflunky at December 10, 2017 09:21 AM (HI47V)

65 Jack set up his own bohemian anarchist grove and he befriended non other than L. Ron Hubbard, who later ran off with his wife.

Every new thing I hear about Hubbard makes me more sure he was fundamentally evil.

Posted by: Mr. Peebles at December 10, 2017 09:22 AM (oVJmc)

66 23 My favorite detective novels are the Lord Peter Wimsey ones by Dorothy Sayers, the Albert Campion series by Margery Allingham, and the Adam Dalgleish ones from P. D. James.

The Sayers novels are slower reads for me because her writing is so intricate. But then, I'm a bear of very little brain plus a Red Sox fan, so what do you expect.

Posted by: bluebell ~ get cooking, Horde! at December 10, 2017 09:08 AM (kNasr)
__________________

Moi aussi, bluebell! In fact I'm reading (re-reading after many years) Sayers' Have His Carcase right now. Amazon has been offering the Lord Peter books for kindle, at a reduced price, every now and then, and I try to grab them. Not as familiar with Allingham, but P.D. James is my "other favorite" mystery writer. Like Sayers, she is as interested in the characters as people as in the mechanics of the story.

Posted by: Miss Sippi at December 10, 2017 09:22 AM (3HZIY)

67 In non-fiction I'm still on The Discarded Image. Lewis is now citing sources that I've at least heard of so I'm not sure if I'm following his argument better or just have the illusion of doing so.

Posted by: Polliwog the 'Ette at December 10, 2017 09:22 AM (rp9xB)

68 For those of you with the paperback copy of the cookbook, look at p. 70-71 to see whose recipe formatting I screwed up!!

Posted by: Weasel at December 10, 2017 09:23 AM (Sfs6o)

69 Thomas Cochran gets caught later in life in some kind of investment or monetary scam if I remember right.

Posted by: Skip at December 10, 2017 09:23 AM (aC6Sd)

70 I've linked to the book on his library before, but here is a video tour of Guillermo del Toro's charming house:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r0WXqEl846k

Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at December 10, 2017 09:23 AM (qJtVm)

71 Good morning fellow Book Threadists. I hope everyone had an enjoyable week of reading. With the bit of snow and a forecast of much colder temps, this is my time to cook and read. I have the ingredients needed for the first and plenty of booze and good tea for the second.
Posted by: JTB at December 10, 2017 09:11 AM (V+03K)


Now that kollidge football season is over, unless there's something pressing to get me out of the house, my Saturday evenings consist of reading in the attic in front of the stereo and sipping on a strong dark craft beer. The summer is just too fucking hot up there for that and a/c just ain't the same.

Posted by: Captain Hate at December 10, 2017 09:24 AM (y7DUB)

72 "Also reading Cochrane: The Real Master and Commander. This is a non fiction look at one of the greatest men and naval captains of all time, the guy that fictional captains such as Ramage, Hornblower, and particularly Aubrey are based on. The first Aubrey/Maturin book is almost directly taken from Cochrane's first independent sailing as a lieutenant, and much of his life was lifted for various captains of books. Some of what he accomplished and did is difficult to believe, and at the same time he was such an idiot."

Dude puts carrots in his chili.
'Nuff said.

Posted by: Village Idiot's Apprentice at December 10, 2017 09:24 AM (EyPfd)

73 Our copies of the cookbook are supposed to arrive today but we got the Kindle version just after midnight this morning. It is wonderful. (I mentioned to Weasel that the formatting was fine on the Kindle Fires.)

Humor, non-PC, and fantastic recipes. Add in Bandersnatch's illustrations (yes, I am artistically envious) and Muldoon's limmericks and you have a very usable classic. No kidding. The recipes are excellent and the entire book is entertaining.

Diabetes be damned. The pie section alone is worth the price of the book. I may have to learn to eat them by a spoonful now and then instead of by the LARGE slice. SIGH!

Posted by: JTB at December 10, 2017 09:26 AM (V+03K)

74 Cochrane was a bit ahead of his time, eventually England caught up with him but he was too rash and dogmatic in everything for his own good. The guy was incredibly brilliant and capable, bolder than you'd think possible, but he took that boldness place he shouldn't and ended up making enemies of people who would have readily been his friends.

Yeah he got busted in a stock market scandal which may have been a setup, to ruin him. He made a lot of very powerful enemies trying to fight corruption, and just being generally an ass to people.

Posted by: Christopher R Taylor at December 10, 2017 09:27 AM (39g3+)

75 Good use of that space for a lieberry.

I figure whoever bought that house wanted to use up that space.

I was perusing my local used book stores recently but all they had beside W E B Griffin crap was lots of used women's love and "roomance" novels but scant few history books.

Maybe I check back in a few weeks.

Posted by: Hairyback Guy at December 10, 2017 09:28 AM (EoRCO)

76 Not as familiar with Allingham, but P.D. James is my "other favorite" mystery writer. Like Sayers, she is as interested in the characters as people as in the mechanics of the story.
Posted by: Miss Sippi at December 10, 2017 09:22 AM (3HZIY)
-----------

You should definitely check out Allingham's books. And if you can find it, BBC did a short series of her novels, called "Campion," starring Peter Davison as the detective Albert Campion. It is an excellent series. At one time, years ago, it was streaming on Netflix and that's how I watched it. But due to contract negotiation issues with BBC, it's been off Netflix for years. They don't even have the DVDs, and it's hard to find them for the US zone.

Posted by: bluebell ~ get cooking, Horde! at December 10, 2017 09:28 AM (kNasr)

77 31 Oh, I forgot to mention the Roderick Alleyn series by Ngaio Marsh. I like those a lot, too.
Posted by: bluebell ~ get cooking, Horde! at December 10, 2017 09:10 AM (kNasr)


Isn't she an incredible author? From the Golden Age of detective stories, so the stories are very "outdated," but Ngaio Marsh surely has the gift of words... I love her irony. Sometimes I get a little sick of Troy. She's just too good to be true.

Posted by: Ladyl at December 10, 2017 09:28 AM (TdMsT)

78 My favorite detective novels are the Lord Peter Wimsey ones by Dorothy Sayers, the Albert Campion series by Margery Allingham, and the Adam Dalgleish ones from P. D. James.

I like Allingham's short stories with Campion but not the longer books. Its like Poirot stories, the short stories are fine but the long form novels get bogged down in irrelevant details for me.

Posted by: Christopher R Taylor at December 10, 2017 09:29 AM (39g3+)

79 Does anyone else here enjoy buying used books? It is often the only way to get old out-of-print titles and text books I want at an affordable price. I'm not entirely sure why, besides the economics, but buying used gives me a great sense of satisfaction.

Weird, I know, but I'm generally not dangerous.

Posted by: Weasel at December 10, 2017 09:30 AM (Sfs6o)

80 Isn't she an incredible author? From the Golden Age of detective stories, so the stories are very "outdated," but Ngaio Marsh surely has the gift of words... I love her irony. Sometimes I get a little sick of Troy. She's just too good to be true.
Posted by: Ladyl at December 10, 2017 09:28 AM (TdMsT)
----------

Ha! Yes, Troy is, but so is Alleyn. I love the old-fashioned vibe of her novels. I just can't get into the newer ones with f-bombs on every page. That's just jarring to me. Give me the oldies but goodies.

Posted by: bluebell ~ get cooking, Horde! at December 10, 2017 09:30 AM (kNasr)

81 Does anyone else here enjoy buying used books?

They're pretty much all I can afford, so yeah. I would love to have a wall of hard bound books, but I get what I can in paperback, used. I have a lot of kindle books I found for free or very cheap on the internet as well. Its astonishing what is out there for free. Guttenberg project's books are usually awful formatting but they have mountains of free books.

Posted by: Christopher R Taylor at December 10, 2017 09:32 AM (39g3+)

82 76: loved Peter Davison as Campion. It was the first time I saw him in a not a Tristan Farnon role. I still him the theme

Posted by: CN at December 10, 2017 09:32 AM (5gaNQ)

83 Thomas Cochran gets caught later in life in some kind of investment or monetary scam if I remember right.
Posted by: Skip at December 10, 2017 09:23 AM (aC6Sd)


Aubrey got snared by some shysters midway through the series. Stephen, who was oddly detached about money, probably because he usually had a lot, at times risked being destitute because of political turmoil around where it was housed.

Posted by: Captain Hate at December 10, 2017 09:32 AM (y7DUB)

84 Jake, I am a lying sack of shit. My position in government gives me a free pass to lie my ass off without consequence. And being a smug bastard is my privilege as a government official.

Posted by: Congressman Adam Schifty at December 10, 2017 09:33 AM (2X7pN)

85 Posted by: JTB at December 10, 2017 09:26 AM (V+03K)
-------
Thank you so much, JTB. You don't know how much that means to us! And thank you to you and Mrs. JTB for your thorough proofreading!!! It was a big help!

Posted by: Weasel at December 10, 2017 09:33 AM (Sfs6o)

86 Detective novels.. I have read all of the Lincoln Rhyme novels..

He's the retired NYC detective who was crippled in the line of work and, even as a quadriplegic, directs his minions in solving crimes..

They made him into a black guy (Denzel Washington) in the movie The Bone Collector..

The earlier ones are better, IMHO..

These novels preceded the CSI type TV shows, and I would speculate they possibly inspired that whole genre...

"The Stone Monkey" is my favorite.

Posted by: Chi-Town Jerry at December 10, 2017 09:34 AM (5tSKk)

87 loved Peter Davison as Campion. It was the first time I saw him in a not a Tristan Farnon role. I still him the theme
Posted by: CN at December 10, 2017 09:32 AM (5gaNQ)
------------

I love the theme! He was a Doctor Who long ago too, the youngest one until Matt whats-his-can came along. Interesting trivia: Davison's daughter is married to another former Dr. Who, David Tennant.

If you like Davison as much as I do, see if you can find the BBC series The Last Detective with him. It's set in today's England. It was never broadcast here in the states, but I got the DVDs through Netflix.

Posted by: bluebell ~ get cooking, Horde! at December 10, 2017 09:34 AM (kNasr)

88 oops.. Lincoln Rhyme novels by Jeffery Deaver

Posted by: Chi-Town Jerry at December 10, 2017 09:35 AM (5tSKk)

89 i visited the home of a professor in college. she and her husband were near emeritus, of that great, storied european tradition, deeply read in literature and culture, now long gone. their "library" was bookcase after bookcase of 10,000 books. purely functional, it was where they put the books after they were read.

whose library is that in the picture? the problem is not the ladder going up, it's coming down with an armful of books.

Posted by: musical jolly chimp at December 10, 2017 09:35 AM (Pg+x7)

90 Weasel, you may in fact be nuttier than a fruit cake, but it's not because you like buying used books.

The older the better, I say, and not just pulp sci-fi with moldy covers showing leering orchid-men carrying off green women.

It's the connectivity with times past. I like to think it's an unbroken chain of comeradery with some unknown person who also liked to read what I like.

I dunno.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at December 10, 2017 09:35 AM (qJtVm)

91 O'Brian so closely mimics Cochrane's career with his Aubrey novels that it would almost be ridiculous, except he takes them amazing places with such richness of character and detail, so many wonderful events and such genius writing that it doesn't matter.

Posted by: Christopher R Taylor at December 10, 2017 09:36 AM (39g3+)

92 It's the connectivity with times past. I like to think it's an unbroken chain of comeradery with some unknown person who also liked to read what I like.

I dunno.
Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at December 10, 2017 09:35 AM (qJtVm)
--------

I love old books too. I love the way they feel, and the way they smell.

Posted by: bluebell ~ get cooking, Horde! at December 10, 2017 09:37 AM (kNasr)

93 I want to add my congrats to Weasel an Bluebell!

Wonderful cookbook!

Are the limericks by Muldoon? And did Bander do the little drawings too?

Posted by: votermom pimping great books! at December 10, 2017 09:37 AM (hMwEB)

94 Posted by: bluebell ~ get cooking, Horde! at December 10, 2017 09:37 AM (kNasr)

Book sniffing is not a crime!

Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at December 10, 2017 09:38 AM (qJtVm)

95 Every time I start trying to catch up on the comments the phone rings.

Posted by: Vic We Have No Party at December 10, 2017 09:38 AM (mpXpK)

96 I love old books, and used book sales.

Posted by: votermom pimping great books! at December 10, 2017 09:38 AM (hMwEB)

97 Are the limericks by Muldoon? And did Bander do the little drawings too?
Posted by: votermom pimping great books! at December 10, 2017 09:37 AM (hMwEB)
-------

Thanks, votermom! And yes, and yes. Read the preface!!!!!! Content, people, content!

Posted by: bluebell ~ get cooking, Horde! at December 10, 2017 09:39 AM (kNasr)

98 The new version of the Kindle App does not give page numbers so I could not check pp 70-71.

Posted by: Vic We Have No Party at December 10, 2017 09:39 AM (mpXpK)

99 Posted by: votermom pimping great books! at December 10, 2017 09:37 AM (hMwEB)
-----
Thanks votermom! bluebell did all of the hard work, I made all of the mistakes, and Muldoon and Bander both nailed the limericks and art.

Posted by: Weasel at December 10, 2017 09:39 AM (Sfs6o)

100 95 Every time I start trying to catch up on the comments the phone rings.
==

is it the neighbor asking for valu-rite delivery?

Posted by: votermom pimping great books! at December 10, 2017 09:39 AM (hMwEB)

101 Weasel - wrong, wrong, and right.

Posted by: bluebell ~ get cooking, Horde! at December 10, 2017 09:40 AM (kNasr)

102 His best other work was Apaloosa, a very interesting western that was made into a solid movie.

Posted by: Christopher R Taylor at December 10, 2017 09:21 AM (39g3+)

Oh hell, I completely forgot about that one! Thanks for the reminder.

Posted by: CharlieBrown'sDildo at December 10, 2017 09:40 AM (wYseH)

103 I envision vic's phone as one of those old candlestick jobs with the separate piece for your ear and the dial at the bottom.

Posted by: Christopher R Taylor at December 10, 2017 09:40 AM (39g3+)

104 98 The new version of the Kindle App does not give page numbers so I could not check pp 70-71.
Posted by: Vic We Have No Party at December 10, 2017 09:39 AM (mpXpK)
--------
Reference recipe # 115

Posted by: Weasel at December 10, 2017 09:41 AM (Sfs6o)

105 Does anyone else here enjoy buying used books?

Posted by: Weasel at December 10, 2017 09:30 AM (Sfs6o)

When we lived in the DFW area, I went to half price books every weekend. It was conveniently located
a couple of miles from the house, and the cigar shop was on the way back. Alas, no such place here in Denver.

Posted by: CrotchetyOldJarhead at December 10, 2017 09:41 AM (XGGts)

106 Does anyone else here enjoy buying used books?
Weasel at December 10, 2017 09:30 AM

Yes! There's an old used book store near where I live that I go to about monthly. They have mostly paperbacks, but also hardbacks. The smell in there is intoxicating.

Posted by: Jake Holenhead at December 10, 2017 09:41 AM (6jF2I)

107 64 ... I think I mentioned last week that The Hangman's Daughter series is on sale on Kindle for 1.99 each. Apparently, they still are. I haven't started them yet but Mrs. JTB is enjoying the first one.

Posted by: JTB at December 10, 2017 09:41 AM (V+03K)

108 Overwhelmed by skimming the cookbook. Awesome job Weasel and Bluebell. Now to narrow down to one thing to try this week. Single, living alone but don't mind too many leftovers.

As for personal reading, finished the third book in the Forging the Crucible. Some violence, a lot of sex and not too much tension other than political commentary. Going to look into the Earthbound series of the story.

Posted by: auscolpyr at December 10, 2017 09:41 AM (pzA2L)

109 103 I envision vic's phone as one of those old candlestick jobs with the separate piece for your ear and the dial at the bottom.

Posted by: Christopher R Taylor at December 10, 2017 09:40 AM (39g3+)

It would be great to read a story where all the characters are Morons as we imagine them.

Maybe a murder mystery. Probably the culprit is Fenelon with a typewriter.

Posted by: votermom pimping great books! at December 10, 2017 09:42 AM (hMwEB)

110 The Library ,IMHO, antique maps and nautical(sailing ships in storms) and military( uniforms from napoleonic era) prints. And a largish window for ambient light.The chairs ought to enable a position that allows the reader to mark up a text: active reading . IMHO ,and as my own is configured.

Posted by: jay hoenemeyer at December 10, 2017 09:43 AM (YrDFq)

111 Such a pleasure anymore to read non-PC books! I have recently begun reading F. Paul Wilson's Repairman Jack series, from start to finish. I'd read some in the past and now I am going to catch up on them all. They are really enjoyable and SO not-PC.....reading them now, I have honestly wondered if they are written by a lurking Moron, they are that spot-on with their observations about today's political correctness/totalitarianism.

Posted by: RigelDog at December 10, 2017 09:43 AM (Uyu4L)

112 Maybe a murder mystery. Probably the culprit is Fenelon with a typewriter.

Clearly, the victim is Buzzion.

Posted by: Christopher R Taylor at December 10, 2017 09:43 AM (39g3+)

113 Probably the culprit is Fenelon with a typewriter.
Posted by: votermom pimping great books! at December 10, 2017 09:42 AM (hMwEB)
--------

Have you seen the back cover of the cookbook?

Posted by: bluebell ~ get cooking, Horde! at December 10, 2017 09:43 AM (kNasr)

114 79 Does anyone else here enjoy buying used books? It is often the only way to get old out-of-print titles and text books I want at an affordable price. I'm not entirely sure why, besides the economics, but buying used gives me a great sense of satisfaction.

Weird, I know, but I'm generally not dangerous.
Posted by: Weasel at December 10, 2017 09:30 AM (Sfs6o)


Oh hell yeah. In recent years I've bought scores of used hardcovers at Alibris and AbeBooks.

I seem to have a knack for reading the descriptions, because almost all I've bought have been in excellent condition, with some being pristine. I don't buy the cheapest or most expensive copies, but I keep managing to hit the "sweet spot" somewhere in the middle.

For example, I bought H. J. R. Murray's "A History of Chess". It was originally published in 1913, but the one I bought is a reprint from Oxford University Press. Strangely, there is no date on it other than the original publication date. I think it's from the 1980s or later.

I paid $37 for it, and it was an absolute steal for its condition. I don't think you will find the reprints for that price now.

Murray also published another book in 1951, "A History of Board-Games Other Than Chess" which was much smaller than his earlier masterpiece. That one was also reprinted by Oxford. I paid $170 for it. I bought it just because I could. It's cool to have the matched set.

Posted by: rickl at December 10, 2017 09:44 AM (sdi6R)

115 It would be great to read a story where all the characters are Morons as we imagine them.

Maybe a murder mystery. Probably the culprit is Fenelon with a typewriter.
Posted by: votermom pimping great books! at December 10, 2017 09:42 AM (hMwEB)
-------
Funny you mention that. We decided last night to make a movie based on the cookbook.

Posted by: Weasel at December 10, 2017 09:44 AM (Sfs6o)

116 I see Muldoon as an old timey newspaper man type, with the press pass in his hat and a loosened tie. Cigarette dangling, sleeves rolled up, but in a vest.

Posted by: Christopher R Taylor at December 10, 2017 09:44 AM (39g3+)

117 Guillermo del Toro's house looks like something from an Hieronymus Bosch, Fabulous Furry Freak Brothers, with a bit of Monty Python kind of dream.

Posted by: Jake Holenhead at December 10, 2017 09:44 AM (6jF2I)

118 I love old books, and used book sales.
Posted by: votermom pimping great books! at December 10, 2017 09:38 AM (hMwEB)


Mrs. Hate used to publicize Case Western Reserve's annual used book sale which I guess was made up of donations from faculty, staff and alumni including from their estates. I've found some real diamonds in the rough there, particularly history books.

Posted by: Captain Hate at December 10, 2017 09:45 AM (y7DUB)

119 I just checked the tracking for delivery of the copies of The Deplorable Gourmet that I ordered. They've been handed off to USPS to deliver, which means it's unlikely I'll get them before I go out of town today. USPS delivery sucks here. So they'll sit on my front porch until I get back. Aaaarggghhh!

Posted by: Ladyl at December 10, 2017 09:46 AM (TdMsT)

120 Here's another video of del Toro's house, this time with Andy Richter touring it. It gives a nice look at the library, with its statues of Poe and Lovecraft:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IjvuUUlfrCE

Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at December 10, 2017 09:47 AM (qJtVm)

121 Funny you mention that. We decided last night to make a movie based on the cookbook.
Posted by: Weasel at December 10, 2017 09:44 AM (Sfs6o)
-----------

Did we? I suppose Kate Upton will be portraying me?

Posted by: bluebell ~ get cooking, Horde! at December 10, 2017 09:47 AM (kNasr)

122 That B Hussein guy was a real weasel. My guess this is just part of the story on Not Net Neutrality.
https://tinyurl.com/ycbkp4zd

Posted by: rhennigantx at December 10, 2017 09:47 AM (BtQd4)

123 I'm looking for some Christmas coloring book recommendations. Asking for a friend.

Posted by: Slow Uncle Joe Biden at December 10, 2017 09:47 AM (Tyii7)

124 My favorite Marsh mysteries are the theater books--Killer Dolphin, Light Thickens, etc. She spent a lot of time in the theater and she knew the people.

Posted by: the guy that moves pianos for a living at December 10, 2017 09:47 AM (3DZIZ)

125 100 is it the neighbor asking for valu-rite delivery?

Posted by: votermom pimping great books! at December 10, 2017 09:39 AM (hMwEB)

Actually she did call to ask to borrow my car while her's is in the shop.

Posted by: Vic We Have No Party at December 10, 2017 09:48 AM (mpXpK)

126 Over the years about half the Chilean navy has been named after Thomas Cochrane.

Posted by: the guy that moves pianos for a living at December 10, 2017 09:49 AM (3DZIZ)

127 There's a problem with books. Between us, my wife and I have "too many" for our house (but not for us, of course). About 2/3 are inaccessible at any time. Of course, I'm not DIY handy.

Even 29 years ago, that was true. 2 days before the wedding, she had all four of our parents there to meet at her apartment. By then, I'd moved mine in, my brother had brought more from NY, and her brothers had hauled hers there, as well. The two mothers were looking around, and got to the spare bedroom. It was, literally, nothing but stacks of books. Each said "Poor George" and "Poor Beth". Our fathers thought it was neat, though.

Posted by: George LeS at December 10, 2017 09:49 AM (+TcCF)

128 Earlier this week I read a mystery set during Elizabethan England, specifically about the players at the Globe theater. Shakespeare is alive and has just written Hamlet, and the murder is suspiciously like the play.

It was engaging enough but the mystery was really easy to figure out and it was lighter on historical details than I would have liked. Some interesting insights into very old theater, though.

Posted by: Christopher R Taylor at December 10, 2017 09:49 AM (39g3+)

129 103
I envision vic's phone as one of those old candlestick jobs with the separate piece for your ear and the dial at the bottom.

Posted by: Christopher R Taylor at December 10, 2017 09:40 AM (39g3+)

I actually used to have one like that but it was a modern version and I had yo pay extra for it. I took it back to the phone company but they would not give me my money back. It looked neat but it was a PITA to use.

Posted by: Vic We Have No Party at December 10, 2017 09:50 AM (mpXpK)

130 There's a great used book store not too far from my work.. it makes for a long lunch when I go, though, because they really have a lot to browse.. vinyl too!

https://frugalmusebooks.com

Had lunch with my two daughters yesterday.. I knew my younger daughter was in a book club for years, but just learned yesterday they have a name for the club.. "The Litwits"! I thought that was amusing..

Posted by: Chi-Town Jerry at December 10, 2017 09:50 AM (5tSKk)

131 The local library just had a book sale. I usually go but I have way too many books for the amount of space I have available.

Posted by: Concerned Peoples Front, Splitter Chapter at December 10, 2017 09:50 AM (2X7pN)

132 Did we? I suppose Kate Upton will be portraying me?

Posted by: bluebell ~ get cooking, Horde! at December 10, 2017 09:47 AM (kNasr)

------------------------------------

I don't think the future Mrs. Verlander can pull off the "naughty librarian" look.

Posted by: blake at December 10, 2017 09:50 AM (WEBkv)

133 Posted by: JTB at December 10, 2017 09:41 AM (V+03K)

I got the first one "free" from Amazon and really enjoyed it. Thanks for the discount mention last week. I bought the series during last weeks books.

If and when you and I ever meet the first round is on Vic.



Posted by: weirdflunky at December 10, 2017 09:50 AM (HI47V)

134
Did we? I suppose Kate Upton will be portraying me?

Posted by: bluebell ~ get cooking, Horde! at December 10, 2017 09:47 AM (kNasr)
--------
Precisely!

Posted by: Weasel at December 10, 2017 09:50 AM (Sfs6o)

135 Davison was a good Doctor, but I have always maintained that if you were going to make a Farnon the Doctor it should have been Siegfried.

Posted by: the guy that moves pianos for a living at December 10, 2017 09:50 AM (3DZIZ)

136 Re: the ladder. A circular track at the base of the ladder would be an unnecessary obstacle/installation. The upper end of the lightweight aluminum ladder is mounted on a wheeled bracket that is spring-loaded, giving mechanical advantage to the user. To rotate the ladder, the user merely lifts the lower end slightly, allowing the springs to load the weight while keeping the upper bracket seated in its circular track. While lifted a few inches, the user merely rotates the entirety, then seats the bases in the carpet.

Zod has designed such escalations before.

Posted by: Zod at December 10, 2017 09:52 AM (hgpSN)

137 That's not OM's library, is it? That ladder looks suspicious.

Posted by: Mike Hammer,etc., etc. at December 10, 2017 09:52 AM (AI/Vm)

138 My favorite Marsh mysteries are the theater books--Killer Dolphin, Light Thickens, etc. She spent a lot of time in the theater and she knew the people.
Posted by: the guy that moves pianos for a living at December 10, 2017 09:47 AM (3DZIZ)



My two favorites are "Overture to Death" and "Death in a White Tie."

Posted by: Ladyl at December 10, 2017 09:52 AM (TdMsT)

139 Peter Davison had the tough job of taking over Dr. Who after the long run of Tom Baker, who will always be my favorite Doctor. He did a pretty creditable job of it, I recall enjoying his time there even though I haven't seen them in years.

Posted by: Tom Servo at December 10, 2017 09:52 AM (V2Yro)

140 I forgot. One time a friend, also book-crazy, came by. We went to a newly opened used book store. As we were checking out, he said to the girl behind the desk, "You've passed a very elementary test. If you can't sell books to the three of us, you will starve."

Posted by: George LeS at December 10, 2017 09:52 AM (+TcCF)

141 rhennigantx,

If you're looking for a good series try CJ Box's about a Wyoming game warden named Joe Picket. He's honest which gets him into a lot of trouble and his wife and daughters always feature prominently in his books. I think he has about a dozen so far.

Posted by: Jake Holenhead at December 10, 2017 09:52 AM (6jF2I)

142 I don't think the future Mrs. Verlander can pull off the "naughty librarian" look.
Posted by: blake at December 10, 2017 09:50 AM (WEBkv)
-----------

I think she's the current Mrs. Verlander. You're probably right anyway; she most likely doesn't have the versatility to be able to play someone of my age (29 and one week).

Posted by: bluebell ~ get cooking, Horde! at December 10, 2017 09:52 AM (kNasr)

143 Reference recipe # 115

Posted by: Weasel at December 10, 2017 09:41 AM (Sfs6o)

Format looks fine on the Kindle

Posted by: Vic We Have No Party at December 10, 2017 09:52 AM (mpXpK)

144 Yeah I see Bluebell with dark hair pulled up in a bun, horn rim glasses, a prim dress with a lace collar, and a pencil behind the ear... but you know she takes those glasses off, shakes her hair down, and unbuttons to reveal a lacy bra when the hubby comes home.

Posted by: Christopher R Taylor at December 10, 2017 09:52 AM (39g3+)

145 Have you seen the back cover of the cookbook?
Posted by: bluebell ~ get cooking, Horde! at December 10, 2017 09:43 AM (kNasr)

I don't think the kindle version has a back cover, does it?

Posted by: votermom pimping great books! at December 10, 2017 09:53 AM (hMwEB)

146 Mrs. D and I were in Portland (OR) about a week ago, so we made the pilgrimage to Powells Books on Burnside. One of my purchases was a book titled Sextant, by David Barrie. He summarizes the history of navigation before we could all push a button on a GPS unit.

I guess I'm in a phase of nautical interest, because my amazon gift list is full of books about the sea. Of course, I also requested a copy of the aoshq cookbook. Looking forward to the hobo-meat recipes.

Posted by: PabloD at December 10, 2017 09:53 AM (fps1q)

147 79 ... "Does anyone else here enjoy buying used books?"

Weasel, Oh absolutely! Given my eclectic (read weird and varied) taste in reading, there are times when only a used book store has what I want. And there is always the chance for a huge bargain. I found almost all the O'Brian Aubrey books one time and paid less than 20 bucks for all of them. Years of good reading for that price makes them even better.

Posted by: JTB at December 10, 2017 09:53 AM (V+03K)

148 I don't think the kindle version has a back cover, does it?
Posted by: votermom pimping great books! at December 10, 2017 09:53 AM (hMwEB)
-------
You're right. It doesn't.
Crap.

Posted by: Weasel at December 10, 2017 09:54 AM (Sfs6o)

149 The library design is spectacular, but I'd never put any of the books back. For me it would be a fail.

Posted by: Dr Alice at December 10, 2017 09:55 AM (LaT54)

150 Its hard to find Patrick O'Brian used. For a while I was getting them but now people seem to be keeping them and not selling or trading to used book stores any longer.

Posted by: Christopher R Taylor at December 10, 2017 09:55 AM (39g3+)

151 144 Yeah I see Bluebell with dark hair pulled up in a bun, horn rim glasses, a prim dress with a lace collar, and a pencil behind the ear... but you know she takes those glasses off, shakes her hair down, and unbuttons to reveal a lacy bra when the hubby comes home.
Posted by: Christopher R Taylor at December 10, 2017 09:52 AM (39g3+)
------
So you've met her already?

Posted by: Weasel at December 10, 2017 09:56 AM (Sfs6o)

152 I am in the habit of taking a photograph of whatever book I'm reading and putting it on Instagram.
I did that recently with one of the Temperance Brennan novels by Kathy Reichs.
She responded, which I thought was cool.

Posted by: Northernlurker, glad to be only lurking at December 10, 2017 09:56 AM (nBr1j)

153 Christopher, it may be time to start breaking into people's houses.

That's why I love the photos of Horde libraries.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at December 10, 2017 09:56 AM (qJtVm)

154 A warning: don't trust Cochrane's version of anything. Yes, he was brilliant in fact, but also one of those guys who is inherently mendacious and self-aggrandizing. This carries over to biographers, if they take him at his word. This, of course, leads others to paint him as all-black. (Can't remember the name or author of the one which is regarded as actually balanced, though.)

Note that O'Brian acknowledges, in the preface to Reverse of the Medal, that the case against Cochrane was much stronger, and the trial much fairer, than those against Jack Aubrey.

Posted by: George LeS at December 10, 2017 09:57 AM (+TcCF)

155 >>Its hard to find Patrick O'Brian used. For a while I was getting them but now people seem to be keeping them and not selling or trading to used book stores any longer.

I lent my complete set to my best friends son when he showed an interest. I've been jonesing to get the back ever since.

I've read them a number of times, doesn't matter, I want them back just because.

Posted by: JackStraw at December 10, 2017 09:58 AM (/tuJf)

156 Can someone with skills take a pic of the back cover and post a link? We won't shoot you for copyright infringement.

Posted by: Weasel at December 10, 2017 09:58 AM (Sfs6o)

157 I wrote a letter to Loren Estleman, and he wrote me back hand written quite a nice letter. He still hammers out books on a manual typerwriter. That's the only author I've written although I would have written CS Lewis and Louis L'Amour.

Authors like getting letters, usually. If they have time, they often respond.

Posted by: Christopher R Taylor at December 10, 2017 09:58 AM (39g3+)

158 With all due respect to Zod.

That library looks posed, more than anything else. Like a magazine ad, or a real estate glamour shot. Laying your hand on a particular book should require no more effort than recalling which bookcase/bookshelf it is on.

That's another difference between cleaning the gutters and picking a book.

Eloquent as a design, perhaps, but impractical. But, that's just me.

Posted by: Mike Hammer,etc., etc. at December 10, 2017 09:58 AM (AI/Vm)

159 But that is a nice segue to the question of the best design for a
library. Not the huge public and university versions, but a home
library. I love the idea of a small room whose walls are completely
lined with shelves, with comfortable chairs, with ottomans of course, in
the middle. Maybe a small table for your beer or Scotch, and not much
else. Good lighting, which means no fluorescent or CFLs. Ideally
incandescent, although the better LEDs work nicely too.



I prefer a window that allows the Sun in during the day. My problem is the windows in my living room are not situated good for a chair. The couch is in a good spot but then in the afternoon it gets direct sun on it and it is uncomfortable. But with the Samsung it provides its own back light unlike the original Kindle.

Posted by: Vic We Have No Party at December 10, 2017 09:59 AM (mpXpK)

160 156 post it on a review!

Posted by: votermom pimping great books! at December 10, 2017 10:00 AM (hMwEB)

161 I woke up this morning thinking about a question in the movie thread last night, "why zombies? Why do zombies seem so popular now?"

Every age has its own monsters, which reflect the subconscious terrors of that generation. The 50's had the Red Scare, and hence all kinds of Invasion Themes, whether from giant bugs or body snatchers. The late Victorians had Vampires, with all of the fear and desire of repressed sexuality those stories entail. A fear of change and inability to understand technology leads to Frankenstein, mad scientists, and Robots Gone Wild.

So why did we end up with Zombies? I believe it reflects are awareness that we now don't think we can trust anyone - that tomorrow, you may wake up and your good friends may turn to be brainless monsters who cannot be reasoned with, and who only want to destroy you, for no reason you can even understand - in other words, progressive democrats.

You may like someone, you may have had a relationship for years, you may have thought you could trust them - and then they can say "you know what, Hillary should really be President" and you know that they have no brain and that they want to kill you, and even worse they have a whole lot of other zombies backing them up.

Zombies everywhere, it's our world now.

Posted by: Tom Servo at December 10, 2017 10:00 AM (V2Yro)

162 Death in a White Tie is really good. The BBC production is well done and follows the book very closely.

I know I've read Overture but I am drawing a blank on it.

Singing in the Shrouds--the one where Alleyn is undercover on the passenger ship is good, too.

Posted by: the guy that moves pianos for a living at December 10, 2017 10:01 AM (3DZIZ)

163
That's a cute library in the pic, but what are you gonna do when you get Old?

Can't climb that forever, you know.

Posted by: Soothie at December 10, 2017 10:01 AM (olqTN)

164 Today's read is "Sex and Rockets: The Occult World of Jack Parsons" by John Carter and Robert Anton Wilson.

The original name for JPL was GALCIT (Guggenheim Aeronautical Laboratory at California Institute of Technology). If anyone could be said to have founded JPL, it would be Theodore von Karman, and the Guggenheim family.

What really got the rocket research started was when some of von Karman's students, who were into rockets in a major way, won von Karman's and GALCIT's support. The leader of the pack was a guy named Frank Malina, along with some associates of his, one of which was John W. Parsons, who was a chemist.

The name was changed to Jet Propulsion Laboratory in 1943. Even though their work involved rocket propulsion they used "jet" instead, because the term "rocket" was seen as too Buck Rogersish in the scientific establishment. The company this crew formed to make and sell JATO units to the government, Aerojet, also left the word rocket out of it's name, even though they were a major player in rocket development.

Parsons left JPL and in 1944 and Aerojet the following year. He blew himself up in his home lab in 1952. To be sure, Parsons was a player in the formation of JPL, but he was certainly only one among many who created that establishment.

(Source: "To A Distant Day, The Rocket Pioneers" by Chris Gainor)

Posted by: The Oort Cloud - Source of all SMODs at December 10, 2017 10:01 AM (PNxM1)

165 Oh, and Vintage Murder, I like that one.

Posted by: the guy that moves pianos for a living at December 10, 2017 10:01 AM (3DZIZ)

166 This carries over to biographers, if they take him at his word.

Yeah this guy seems to be very scrupulous about using multiple sources, not guessing about things, and just presenting what he can prove and show from history. Still pretty astounding.

But he also tells the bad side, like when Cochrane has the Arab brig and ran into two different ships over the course of a month, damaging them badly. Cochrane blamed the ship as a crappy sailer, but the author can find no evidence it was particularly bad.

O'Brian made it more clear in his novel by giving Aubrey a bizarre experimental ship that sailed like a brick.

Posted by: Christopher R Taylor at December 10, 2017 10:02 AM (39g3+)

167 Good morning!

Let's smile and be happy and strike fear in the heart of killjoy leftists everywhere.

Posted by: NaCly Dog at December 10, 2017 10:03 AM (hyuyC)

168
btw, how old is that pic?

The "laptop" there looks like circa 1998.

Posted by: Soothie at December 10, 2017 10:04 AM (olqTN)

169 All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes

All I am authorized to say is my [OPSEC] naughty librarian.

Posted by: NaCly Dog at December 10, 2017 10:04 AM (hyuyC)

170 A good mystery series, not as well known as those mentioned above, is the Sloan/Crosby series by Catherine Aird. They are classic British cozies set in and around a small market town. A few of the author's asides indicate that she has no patience for the PC crowd - a plus.

Posted by: Dr Alice at December 10, 2017 10:04 AM (LaT54)

171 @103: I envision vic's phone as one of those old candlestick jobs with the separate piece for your ear and the dial at the bottom.

What is this dial nonsense? you turn the crank and ask the operator to connect you.

And always muffle the mike when listening in on the party line.

Posted by: Forget exfil at December 10, 2017 10:04 AM (lnK2O)

172 that's a great explanation, Tom Servo

what do you think the next monster fad will be?

Posted by: votermom pimping great books! at December 10, 2017 10:04 AM (hMwEB)

173 I like the look of the library, but it can't be very practical. It reminds me of a private library that I had worked in a few years ago, with a second floor of shelves that looked down on to the main floor, but you had to climb stairs to get to the second floor rather than move a ladder around.

Posted by: josephistan at December 10, 2017 10:05 AM (ANIFC)

174 Wait, Overture is the old ladies, the piano, the erector set, and the squirt gun. Yeah, that one is a hoot.

Posted by: the guy that moves pianos for a living at December 10, 2017 10:07 AM (3DZIZ)

175 "Does anyone else here enjoy buying used books?"
----------

I have bought whole auction lots, just because there were one or two that I was interested in out of 20-30 books in the lot. I'm speaking here of an expenditure of $20-$30. The books in which I have no interest go to Goodwill, or Ebay.

If you have an eye for older books, you might find a gem or two worth $.

Anyhow, I haunt the used bookstores and thrift shops. I haven't bought a new book (other than Hordeling authored) in probably 30 years.

Posted by: Mike Hammer,etc., etc. at December 10, 2017 10:07 AM (AI/Vm)

176 >>O'Brian made it more clear in his novel by giving Aubrey a bizarre experimental ship that sailed like a brick.

The Surprise was a captured and renamed French frigate. She wasn't so much an experiment as a foreign made vessel.

Posted by: JackStraw at December 10, 2017 10:07 AM (/tuJf)

177 Oh and the cookbook is fantastic! I love reading the contributor details about the background of the recipes. And tons of in-jokes. The last recipe in particular is classic. I will post a review today.

Posted by: Dr Alice at December 10, 2017 10:07 AM (LaT54)

178 On the lower end of the price spectrum, I bought "Birth of the Chess Queen" from AbeBooks for $4 plus shipping.

It was a first edition hardcover, and it was so pristine that I found the sales slip from the original purchaser. It was bought at a Barnes & Noble in Baltimore on 5/26/04.

Posted by: rickl at December 10, 2017 10:08 AM (sdi6R)

179 There's a used bookstore near by that recently opened up, and is having a 30% off sale until Christmas, I might check it out today.

Posted by: josephistan at December 10, 2017 10:08 AM (ANIFC)

180 Thank you, Dr. Alice!

And rickl, I'm so old that when I saw the date of 5/26/04 my first thought was "Barnes and Noble was around in 1904?" Sheesh.

Posted by: bluebell ~ get cooking, Horde! at December 10, 2017 10:09 AM (kNasr)

181 That library pic just bothers me.. no comfy chair, for one..

All that lovely wall space above the counters that could hold a good portion of the books above wasted on displaying a collection of rugs (shawls? throws? who knows!)

Posted by: Chi-Town Jerry at December 10, 2017 10:10 AM (5tSKk)

182 179
There's a used bookstore near by that recently opened up, and is having a
30% off sale until Christmas, I might check it out today.

Posted by: josephistan at December 10, 2017 10:08 AM (ANIFC)

I wish we had a used bookstore here.

Posted by: Vic We Have No Party at December 10, 2017 10:10 AM (mpXpK)

183 I am still plowing through The Histories by Herodotus. The Landmark edition is a tome of good stuff. Lots of wonderful vignettes throughout.

I'm up to Chapter 8 and the Battle of Salamis. Gripping stuff here, as Athens is burned to the ground, the allied Greeks fleet remaining squabble and try to flee, and Themistocles excels at cunning to bring about battle.

Posted by: NaCly Dog at December 10, 2017 10:10 AM (hyuyC)

184 Thanks Dr. Alice! Adding AoS memes was a big part of the fun.

Posted by: Weasel at December 10, 2017 10:11 AM (Sfs6o)

185 The company this crew formed to make and sell JATO units to the government, Aerojet, also left the word rocket out of it's name, even though they were a major player in rocket development.
The Oort Cloud - Source of all SMODs at December 10, 2017 10:01 AM

Whenever I hear or read, JATO, I always think of the idiot that got hold of a JATO rocket and mounted it on the roof of his car and lit it off. He did not survive. At least that's the urban legend.

Posted by: Jake Holenhead at December 10, 2017 10:12 AM (6jF2I)

186 There are a few basic splits among mysteries, and their readers.

1. It makes a big difference whether it's a whodunnit (or the related, Colomboesque, how was he caught) variety), or more of the action/suspense sort. The former is heavy on clues and fair play, the latter, well, who cares? It is sometimes said the former is Brit, the latter American, but that's false. Stout and Gardner are in the former group; while Edgar Wallace and much Michael Gilbert in the latter.

2. There is a split between polished and hard-boiled. This is a bit more clearly a national split; most h-b is American, and mostly derives from Hammett.

3. One not enough discussed is the division created between those where the detective is the narrator, and those where he is not. It's not a case of first-or-third person, but who, if it's first, is telling the story. The trouble, to me, is that when it's the detective telling us what happened, I almost always think he comes off as an asshole. A sidekick narrator avoids this. Dupin, Holmes, Wolfe, for instance. Well, Wolfe is a bit of a jerk, but only in the way he's supposed to be. The only case that really beats this, for me, is the Continental Op, who pulls it off by telling us very little about himself.

I will note that it's easier to manage in short stories than in novels and novelettes.

4. For those who want a pure fair play puzzle-style mystery (written in the English tradition but by an American) I can't recommend John Dickson Carr too highly (aka Carter Dickson). I know of none who really give you all the clues, and remain baffling. Some are quite funny, too.

5. Another I've very fond of is the Judge Dee series. A Tang dynasty magistrate who was famous for dazzling deductions. Part of it is the characters, and part is the very foreign setting (which is really apparently more like Ming than Tang.)

Posted by: George LeS at December 10, 2017 10:13 AM (+TcCF)

187 The book is interesting -- how could it not be with this subject? -- but it is rather workmanike in execution. If anybody knows a more lurid take I am all ears.


Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at December 10, 2017 08:58 AM (qJtVm)

Have you ever heard of the book "Final Events" by Nick Redfern, a contributor to the paranormal site Mysterious Universe? I haven't read more than the free kindle sample, but the premise is that during the DOD's remote viewing experiments, contact was made with - something. It connects UFOs, demonology, the military, and all manner of weirdness.

Posted by: josephistan at December 10, 2017 10:14 AM (ANIFC)

188 What will be the greatest fears of our children and grandchildren? Impossible to know, but I hope it isn't the fear of a selfish and older population seeking to suck the life out of them just to make their own lives easier.

Posted by: Tom Servo at December 10, 2017 10:15 AM (V2Yro)

189 what do you think the next monster fad will be?

Posted by: votermom pimping great books! at December 10, 2017 10:04 AM (hMwEB)

Short, fat Norks w/bad hair-cuts?

Posted by: BignJames at December 10, 2017 10:15 AM (1Oy/Q)

190 My mom and I are going to the birthday party of a 2 year old girl in about a week. My mom suggested a couple of books, one of which was "My First Book of Patterns." so I'm on Amazon typing in the title and what's the first thing to come up?

"My First Book of Girl Power"...

Deleted with extreme prejudice.

Posted by: Dr Alice at December 10, 2017 10:15 AM (LaT54)

191 Note that O'Brian acknowledges, in the preface to Reverse of the Medal, that the case against Cochrane was much stronger, and the trial much fairer, than those against Jack Aubrey.
Posted by: George LeS at December 10, 2017 09:57 AM (+TcCF)


The case against Aubrey was like something the DoJ fuckheads would come up with by using spurious evidence from slimy sources.

Posted by: Captain Hate at December 10, 2017 10:16 AM (y7DUB)

192 Whenever I hear or read, JATO, I always think of the idiot that got hold of a JATO rocket and mounted it on the roof of his car and lit it off. He did not survive. At least that's the urban legend.

Posted by: Jake Holenhead at December 10, 2017 10:12 AM (6jF2I)

The version of that story I heard was that the numbskull somehow got hold of the rocket engine out of a Sidewinder air to air missile, and used that, with the same bad result. But as you say, that is the urban legend.

Posted by: The Oort Cloud - Source of all SMODs at December 10, 2017 10:16 AM (PNxM1)

193 The Surprise was a captured and renamed French frigate. She wasn't so much an experiment as a foreign made vessel.

No, I'm referring to the one he got just after the war started again, the Polychrest.

Posted by: Christopher R Taylor at December 10, 2017 10:17 AM (39g3+)

194 Laying your hand on a particular book should require no more effort than recalling which bookcase/bookshelf it is on.

That's another difference between cleaning the gutters and picking a book.

Eloquent as a design, perhaps, but impractical. But, that's just me.
Posted by: Mike Hammer,etc., etc. at December 10, 2017 09:58 AM (AI/Vm)
---
Maybe he has a very intelligent monkey butler to fetch books for him.

"No, no, the 1949 Oxford translation Catullus, not the Nisbett!"

Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at December 10, 2017 10:18 AM (qJtVm)

195
olde books -

Some time ago, at some book sale, I bough the complete works of Charles Dickens, printed in 1908. The illustrations seemed to be hand colored and protected by a film of acid-free paper, pages in some volumes still uncut. Time warp.

Posted by: runner at December 10, 2017 10:18 AM (QC/4S)

196 Whenever I hear or read, JATO, I always think of the idiot that got hold of a JATO rocket and mounted it on the roof of his car and lit it off. He did not survive. At least that's the urban legend.

Posted by: Jake Holenhead at December 10, 2017 10:12 AM (6jF2I)

The version of that story I heard was that the numbskull somehow got hold of the rocket engine out of a Sidewinder air to air missile, and used that, with the same bad result. But as you say, that is the urban legend.

Posted by: The Oort Cloud - Source of all SMODs at December 10, 2017 10:16 AM (PNxM1)

Didn't "Mythbusters" try the car/jato?

Posted by: BignJames at December 10, 2017 10:19 AM (1Oy/Q)

197 O'Brian made it more clear in his novel by giving Aubrey a bizarre experimental ship that sailed like a brick.

The Surprise was a captured and renamed French frigate. She wasn't so much an experiment as a foreign made vessel.
Posted by: JackStraw at December 10, 2017 10:07 AM (/tuJf)


I think he's referring to an unwieldy tub that he sailed only briefly before being rid of it midway through the series. Jack loved the Surprise.

Posted by: Captain Hate at December 10, 2017 10:20 AM (y7DUB)

198 'what do you think the next monster fad will be? '

Men. Creepy gropey men.

Seems to me it would get hot up there in that library thing. It's like an attic for books you never read.

Posted by: freaked at December 10, 2017 10:21 AM (UdKB7)

199 it must be difficult to move around the circle!

Maybe it's a special fisheye lens. You're looking at one flat wall.

Posted by: t-bird at December 10, 2017 10:21 AM (TUE05)

200 >>No, I'm referring to the one he got just after the war started again, the Polychrest.

Gotcha. Yea, that was an interesting point in the whole series. Bad ship and bad times between Aubrey and Maturin.

Posted by: JackStraw at December 10, 2017 10:22 AM (/tuJf)

201 176 >>O'Brian made it more clear in his novel by giving Aubrey a bizarre experimental ship that sailed like a brick.

The Surprise was a captured and renamed French frigate. She wasn't so much an experiment as a foreign made vessel.
Posted by: JackStraw at December 10, 2017 10:07 AM (/tuJf)

Different books getting conflated here. The "bizarre ship" is the Polychrest, in Post Captain, not the almost ubiquitous HMS Surprise. Polychrest was clearly inspired by Arrow and Dart, two experimental sloops, which so far as I can find out, never did anything like the cutting-out of the Fanciula. (Other than the fighting, I think the battle with the bailiffs is the high point of Post Captain, ending with "Mr Pullings, impress those men.")

OTOH, the Sophie of M&C is almost exactly Cochrane's Speedy, except that Speedy was built for the RN.

I've found the originals of MOST of the actions in the Aubreyad. One exception is very dramatic sinking of the Waachzamheid. I don't think that ever happened. Also, of course, those that don't involve the navy, but private ships. Like the way they escape the American privateers in Surgeon's Mate.

One trouble with O'Brian is that I don't think I can ever read Forrester again, the writing being so much better in the former. Yet CSF was a staple of my teens.

Posted by: George LeS at December 10, 2017 10:22 AM (+TcCF)

202 I am currently reading "The Sky Below" by Scott Parazynski. I dig astronaut memoirs, and this one is no exception - some really interesting stories so far. Parazynski is by far the nicest astronaut I've ever met, so for the most part, this is a pleasant read. One nitpick I have is that it's mostly written in present tense, which strikes me as odd for an autobiography. "We move to Tehran..." "I interview for the job..." It draws attention to the writing style, especially when it changes to past tense, and I don't like that.

Posted by: roamingfirehydrant at December 10, 2017 10:24 AM (THS4q)

203 Didn't "Mythbusters" try the car/jato?

Posted by: BignJames at December 10, 2017 10:19 AM (1Oy/Q)

I'd heard that too. The version I heard was that it was a Sidewinder engine they tested, but who the hell knows. Not me, since I never watched that show.

Posted by: The Oort Cloud - Source of all SMODs at December 10, 2017 10:24 AM (PNxM1)

204 One of the problems with old school monsters is people have a hard time wrapping their heads around evil. That is why the current incarnations of vampires and werewolves are basically just x men. The kids think it is just a f'ed up super power. Modern zombies aren't evil for the most part, they are presented like a natural disaster or a pack of predator animals.

Posted by: the guy that moves pianos for a living at December 10, 2017 10:24 AM (3DZIZ)

205 The Blue Angels have a C-130 that takes off with the assistance of eight JATO rockets.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VHOvoO-6nWQ

I saw it in person a couple of times, and it was pretty impressive.

I'm veering off-topic for the book thread, but someone mentioned JATOs and I figured you should see them in action.

Posted by: rickl at December 10, 2017 10:24 AM (sdi6R)

206 Posted by: Northernlurker, glad to be only lurking at December 10, 2017 09:56 AM (nBr1j)

It would be hard to have two more different characters than the Brennan of the novels and that of the tv series. It was clever of Reichs to have her name be Brennan's pen-name in the series, which is how I found the novels. They are decent reads, but it's difficult for me to get past the character difference.

Posted by: Polliwog the 'Ette at December 10, 2017 10:25 AM (rp9xB)

207 I saw a jet-powered semi truck at an air show this year. It's operator jokingly said it earned him his doctorate in Redneck Arts and Sciences.

Posted by: josephistan at December 10, 2017 10:26 AM (ANIFC)

208 Best line in Herodotus;

"Here, everyone paints himself red and eats monkeys."

Posted by: the guy that moves pianos for a living at December 10, 2017 10:27 AM (3DZIZ)

209 I saw it in person a couple of times, and it was pretty impressive.

I'm veering off-topic for the book thread, but someone mentioned JATOs and I figured you should see them in action.

Posted by: rickl at December 10, 2017 10:24 AM (sdi6R)

So have I. Very impressive, although the smell those JATOs give off is pretty nasty.

Posted by: The Oort Cloud - Source of all SMODs at December 10, 2017 10:28 AM (PNxM1)

210

I hate fucking monkeys, no matter how delicious they might be.

Posted by: Soothsayer SLX Pro Series II Platinum Turbo at December 10, 2017 10:28 AM (5M5cz)

211 Jake Holenhead
thanks I tend to read the prime books (unlimited) but will spend a few bucks usually for plane rides. ugh, 4 this week.
If you like this try the Blanco County Mysteries by Ben Rehder

Posted by: rhennigantx at December 10, 2017 10:30 AM (BtQd4)

212 174 Wait, Overture is the old ladies, the piano, the erector set, and the squirt gun. Yeah, that one is a hoot.
Posted by: the guy that moves pianos for a living at December 10, 2017 10:07 AM (3DZIZ)

Yep!

Posted by: Ladyl at December 10, 2017 10:30 AM (TdMsT)

213 >>Different books getting conflated here. The "bizarre ship" is the Polychrest, in Post Captain, not the almost ubiquitous HMS Surprise. Polychrest was clearly inspired by Arrow and Dart, two experimental sloops, which so far as I can find out, never did anything like the cutting-out of the Fanciula. (Other than the fighting, I think the battle with the bailiffs is the high point of Post Captain, ending with "Mr Pullings, impress those men.")

I always thought the name Polychrest was a key, an attempt to meld medicine or science in the design of a ship instead of creating a ship for its intended role as a ship of war. It seemed to highlight the conflict between Aubrey and Maturin which was mirrored in the deterioration of their relationship during that time.

That was one of the central themes throughout the series, the dynamic tension between the role of the two main characters, war and science.

But maybe I was reading too much into it.

Posted by: JackStraw at December 10, 2017 10:30 AM (/tuJf)

214 Looked up Walter Buehr on Amazon and immediately recognized some of the covers . Pretty sure my grandparents used to have a bunch of those but they are long gone so not sure what would have happened to the books.

Spencer is always an enjoyable read. Agree about early vs late, but the Jesse Stone books are worth it. There are even some good books written since his death but it depends on who wrote them. One or two good authors, one or two marginal.

Dick Francis. Well researched, enjoyable. Avoid anything his son Felix wrote like the plague.

Alan Bradley, the first four or five Flavia de Luce novels. The last one veers off into some weirdness and wasn't particularly enjoyable.

Agatha Christie is still readable although the language is getting a bit dated.

The first few Hamish Macbeth novels. After that they get formulaic and not in a good way.

Longmire books are good. Craig Johnson I think is the author. Made into decent TV series but books are almost always better.

Tony Hillerman/Alice Hillerman. Chee/Leaphorn novels are all excellent and his daughter has now started to write. The first one was good. I picked up the second but haven't started reading it yet.

Posted by: Heresolong at December 10, 2017 10:31 AM (K+rrH)

215 Posted by: The Oort Cloud - Source of all SMODs at December 10, 2017 10:01 AM (PNxM1)
----
I did say "a" founder. Von Karman listed him third after himself and Malina, and Von Braun too thought Parsons deserved more credit. And we need look no further than JPL's Halloween Nativity to see his importance:

https://www.pinterest.com/pin/244320348509925463

Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at December 10, 2017 10:31 AM (qJtVm)

216 Actually the Hornblower novels hold up really well still, largely because of Forester's talent and the characterization of Horatio.

Posted by: Christopher R Taylor at December 10, 2017 10:33 AM (39g3+)

217 what do you think the next monster fad will be?

Posted by: votermom pimping great books! at December 10, 2017 10:04 AM (hMwEB)

Werewolves. All the previous-humaness of zombies but the change is more sudden and the effect more aggressive.

Actually I have no idea, I hate monster stuff but can understand Lewis's view that fighting fictional monsters lets kids no that real monsters can and should be fought.

Posted by: Polliwog the 'Ette at December 10, 2017 10:34 AM (rp9xB)

218 They even tried reverse JATOs on a 130 but it didn't work out too well. Look up Operation Credible Sport.

They had one of those Credible Sport modified C-130s at the Robins Air Museum sitting out back for years. Last time I looked for it though it was gone, maybe moved somewhere else for storage.

Posted by: freaked at December 10, 2017 10:34 AM (UdKB7)

219 That pic from the Byron York link on the side make VJ look like some kind of scary troll. Imagine finding that in your bed one morning.

Posted by: rhennigantx at December 10, 2017 10:36 AM (BtQd4)

220 206 Posted by: Northernlurker, glad to be only lurking at December 10, 2017 09:56 AM (nBr1j)

It would be hard to have two more different characters than the Brennan of the novels and that of the tv series. It was clever of Reichs to have her name be Brennan's pen-name in the series, which is how I found the novels. They are decent reads, but it's difficult for me to get past the character difference.
Posted by: Polliwog the 'Ette at December 10, 2017 10:25 AM (rp9xB)

I found the books much better than the series. They are somewhat formulaic, but that often happens in series.

Posted by: Northernlurker, glad to be only lurking at December 10, 2017 10:37 AM (nBr1j)

221 rhennigantx,

Thanks. I'll check out Rehder.

Posted by: Jake Holenhead at December 10, 2017 10:38 AM (6jF2I)

222 218 They even tried reverse JATOs on a 130 but it didn't work out too well. Look up Operation Credible Sport.

They had one of those Credible Sport modified C-130s at the Robins Air Museum sitting out back for years. Last time I looked for it though it was gone, maybe moved somewhere else for storage.
Posted by: freaked at December 10, 2017 10:34 AM (UdKB7)


Oh yeah, I've seen that. I think they were going to land a C-130 inside a soccer stadium to rescue the Iranian hostages or something.

Posted by: rickl at December 10, 2017 10:38 AM (sdi6R)

223 My copy dead tree copy of the cookbook should arrive today, so hurray!


Hey, how about everyone listing your favorite book evah, fiction or nonfiction?

Or, if that's too much of a limit, your top three.



I need some ideas for Christmas gifts of a secondary nature as I've already gotten the big gift for all family members.

I often give books but as always "More is more better." on the ideas and info front.

Posted by: naturalfake at December 10, 2017 10:38 AM (9q7Dl)

224 Patricia Wentworth wrote a mystery series with a detective Miss Silver, somewhat similar to Miss Marple. Difference is that Miss Silver became a professional.

Posted by: Lirio100 at December 10, 2017 10:39 AM (JK7Jw)

225 Since I referenced it earlier, "To A Distant Day", by Chris Gainor was a pretty good history of early rocket development around the world, and of all the major players involved. As can be seen in most technological developments of whatever sort, it took a very long time and a lot of work by a variety of people to reach the point where we are today in terms of rocket flight. (And even today they still blow up on occasion.)

Overall I liked Gainor's book, although I got a real strong vibe that it really galled him that he could not show that Werner von Braun was a Nazi (he wasn't). Fact was, von Braun was already working for the German Army on rocket development before Hitler ever came to power, for the simple reason that he and his crew had learned what every other early rocketeer (Goddard, Korolev, etc) had learned. "No bucks, no Buck Rogers". If you wanted to build and fly rocket, you go where the money is, and in the 20th century, that was mainly the military.

Outside of that, it was a pretty good book, especially if you have an interest in the history of spaceflight.

Posted by: The Oort Cloud - Source of all SMODs at December 10, 2017 10:40 AM (PNxM1)

226 HA!


Just had my copy of The Deplorable Gourmet hand-delivered by friendly Postal guy.


Boy, are we gonna get fat doing these dessert recipes.

Posted by: Steck at December 10, 2017 10:40 AM (LlRQB)

227 C-130s are as cool as A-10s, in their own way.

Posted by: rickl at December 10, 2017 10:41 AM (sdi6R)

228 Another book about Jack Parsons, arguably better than _Sex and Rockets_, is _Strange Angel_ by George Pendle. Pendle isn't quite as fascinated by the Magickal Worckings and spends more time on the history of JPL. He's also a bit more hard-nosed about Parsons's flagrantly self-destructive habits (literally, at the end).

Posted by: Trimegistus at December 10, 2017 10:41 AM (ErN1Q)

229 Modern zombies aren't evil for the most part, they are presented like a natural disaster or a pack of predator animals. Posted by: the guy that moves pianos for a living at December 10, 2017 10:24 AM (3DZIZ)
=====

Saw a cute cop show about a zombie girl, I think it was I Zombie, that handled the brain-eating in a funny way. Her pal at the morgue was a supplier and she kept brains in tupperware. Don't remember what channel, just that it was 'cute' which seemed odd for a zombie premise and I watched an entire episode, which with my ADD is unusual.

Posted by: mustbequantum at December 10, 2017 10:42 AM (MIKMs)

230 I love the idea of a small room whose walls are completely lined with shelves, with comfortable chairs, with ottomans of course, in the middle. -- CBD

^^^^ This.

And, of course, some fine art on the walls, as an aid to contemplation.

Posted by: The Man on the Ottoman at December 10, 2017 10:43 AM (H+TFm)

231 what do you think the next monster fad will be?

AI is the new hot fad of scary things. EEevil robots. Basically zombies, but without the rotting stench or need to justify how they show up.

Posted by: Christopher R Taylor at December 10, 2017 10:43 AM (39g3+)

232 Cardboard boxes full of books stacked against a below-grade wall - that's how you get ants.

Posted by: DaveA at December 10, 2017 10:45 AM (FhXTo)

233 Tom Servo, I just showed Mrs. JTB, who grew up in Waukesha, your stollen recipe from the cookbook. She thinks she might have that power company recipe book or a very similar one inherited from her grandmother.

Posted by: JTB at December 10, 2017 10:46 AM (V+03K)

234 Posted by: Lirio100 at December 10, 2017 10:39 AM (JK7Jw)

I've been listening to those now that the prices have come down. How is it that the Golden Age of mysteries is best known for its female authors?

Posted by: Polliwog the 'Ette at December 10, 2017 10:47 AM (rp9xB)

235 I did say "a" founder. Von Karman listed him third after himself and Malina, and Von Braun too thought Parsons deserved more credit. And we need look no further than JPL's Halloween Nativity to see his importance:

https://www.pinterest.com/pin/244320348509925463

Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at December 10, 2017 10:31 AM (qJtVm)

Meh. Depends on who is writing the history, I suppose. Gainor mentions him as part of the founding group, (he also mentioned in passing his interest in a "black magic cult"), a player as it were, but the others, such as von Karman and Malina (who was quite the Commie apparently) had a bigger impact on the early development of GALCIT/JPL.

Posted by: The Oort Cloud - Source of all SMODs at December 10, 2017 10:48 AM (PNxM1)

236 'Oh yeah, I've seen that. I think they were going to land a C-130 inside a soccer stadium to rescue the Iranian hostages or something.'

After the first failure in Iran the Pentagon setup a program for a second try to rescue the hostages called "Honey Badger". The short takeoff and landing C-130 was part of that.

Posted by: freaked at December 10, 2017 10:49 AM (UdKB7)

237 Speaking of detective novels, does anyone have an opinion of The Yiddish Policemen's Union? It keeps getting the occasional recommendation, but never from someone first-hand.

Posted by: hogmartin at December 10, 2017 10:50 AM (y87Qq)

238 mustbequantum, iZombie on the CW
I watched the first season

The nice thing about the CW is you can watch their shows for free online or on their app
No cable sign in needed

Posted by: votermom pimping great books! at December 10, 2017 10:51 AM (hMwEB)

239 236
After the first failure in Iran the Pentagon setup a program for a second try to rescue the hostages called "Honey Badger". The short takeoff and landing C-130 was part of that.
Posted by: freaked at December 10, 2017 10:49 AM (UdKB7)


What a perfect name for a mission like that. They had no idea that "Honey Badger" would become an internet meme decades later.

Posted by: rickl at December 10, 2017 10:52 AM (sdi6R)

240 I've been listening to those now that the prices have come down. How is it that the Golden Age of mysteries is best known for its female authors?

All the guys writing great mysteries were in the USA: Dashiell Hammett, Raymond Chandler, Earle Stanley Gardner, etc

Posted by: Christopher R Taylor at December 10, 2017 10:52 AM (39g3+)

241 Was recently exchanging email with a fellow hobbyist (a truck driver , by the way) when I realized the info I had was sufficient for a book and that I was likely the only hobbyist with the knowledge of this particular methodology at the moment. So now book writing is jammed into my schedule on a regular basis. I am so stupid.

Posted by: Igotnothing at December 10, 2017 10:52 AM (yk8Fu)

242 For those of you with the paperback copy of the cookbook, look at p. 70-71 to see whose recipe formatting I screwed up!!

Ha, Weasel! You'd better sleep with one eye open. Someone may be feeling shank-y.

Posted by: no good deed at December 10, 2017 10:53 AM (eIQHF)

243 Yeah, from the pic, I get the phrases "form over function," and "style over substance" in my head.

The ideal libarry has ease of access as a paramount concern. If I could... and someday soon I might, dedicate one room mostly for books, I would want everything within arms reach. Which means, I don't want to be down on the floor when I'm taking stuff off the shelves any more than I want to be climbing on things.

Posted by: BurtTC at December 10, 2017 10:54 AM (Pz4pT)

244 OT , but West Point needs to get their crap together. Besides the Communist graduate, they have a cheating Muslim QB and apparently a system where cadets bang each others brains out.

Posted by: Alabaster Jones at December 10, 2017 10:54 AM (2DOZq)

245 Love C-130s and A-10s equally. Another one to add to the list, OV-10 Broncos., which sadly, are no longer active, I don't believe.

Put me in the Hornblower > Aubrey camp, although i have nothing against Aubrey, per se.

At first I thought a Reader's Companion for AoS would be an excellent 2nd book... but then i realized that the secretive nature of Horde Lore is much better preserved if shrouded in mystery and history. No shortcuts.

Posted by: goatexchange at December 10, 2017 10:54 AM (YFnq5)

246 I think I might be the only one that didn't care for the O'Brian/Aubrey series. At least it seems that way from the many positive comments from this and previous book threads. I got about half way through his first book and gave up. His writing style didn't flow. Plus, I got tired of looking up word after word of his navy lingo in the dictionary on almost every page, and I'm former navy, but maybe not navy enough.

Posted by: Jake Holenhead at December 10, 2017 10:54 AM (6jF2I)

247 My favorite detective novels are written by Anna Salter. She and her heroine are forensic psychiatrists so the stories tend to involve child abuse although that may not be the actual whodunnit part.

I had to dig out "Hallow Mass" so I could tell a choir friend about it. We are singing a song for Christmas where the chorus involves "Eya" which is pronounced "a-as-in-bake"-ya but my first thought was the "Ia" cry used in summoning otherwhere creatures in Lovecraftian stories. I mentioned this to the girl sitting next to me and she laughed and said she thought the same thing, and became that much cooler in my eyes, although giggling over Lovecraft in a Catholic church - well, pretty sure that's not supposed to happen.

And I'm reading Jen Lancaster's latest and it's not as bad as some of the reviews made it sound, but neither is it her best. It's purely chick-lit, for those who don't know her stuff, but she's very cynical which I enjoy.

Posted by: Tonestaple at December 10, 2017 10:55 AM (V15Jb)

248 >>OT , but West Point needs to get their crap together. Besides the Communist graduate, they have a cheating Muslim QB and apparently a system where cadets bang each others brains out.

Did you notice Navy trolling the crap out of Army yesterday about the communist thing?

Posted by: JackStraw at December 10, 2017 10:55 AM (/tuJf)

249 But then, I'm a bear of very little brain plus a Red Sox fan, so what do you expect.
Posted by: bluebell ~ get cooking, Horde! at December 10, 2017 09:08 AM


The "very little brain" is most definitely not true.

And the Red Sox predilection is a touch of asperity in an otherwise genial nature.

:-)

Posted by: Duncanthrax at December 10, 2017 10:55 AM (H+TFm)

250 Posted by: no good deed at December 10, 2017 10:53 AM (eIQHF)
-----
Yeah - I'm scairt!

Posted by: Weasel at December 10, 2017 10:56 AM (Sfs6o)

251 The short takeoff and landing C-130 was part of that.

Combat landing practice on a C-130. Not. Fun.

Posted by: no good deed at December 10, 2017 10:56 AM (eIQHF)

252 Posted by: JackStraw at December 10, 2017 10:55 AM (/tuJf)

Just a bit. Wish it would have helped.

Posted by: Alabaster Jones at December 10, 2017 10:57 AM (2DOZq)

253
I suppose my perfect home library would resemble the Korova Milk Bar with something more...reubenesque than the tables as a Lazy Boy for seating.

Posted by: naturalfake at December 10, 2017 10:57 AM (9q7Dl)

254 OT,
Everyone please pray for anyone in Monticeto/Carpinteria. I don't know how the fire skipped Summerland.

It's burning the forest behind these coastal towns.

There are mandatory evacuation in E Monticeto.

Posted by: CaliGirl at December 10, 2017 11:00 AM (Ri/rl)

255 My dream home library has cushioned window seats.

And some kind of electronic tag on each book so it doesn't matter where you shelve it, an app will find it for you.

Posted by: votermom pimping great books! at December 10, 2017 11:01 AM (hMwEB)

256 'Combat landing practice on a C-130. Not. Fun'

They were going to land in a stadium and then turn around and take off with 150 people aboard. I'm not sure that would have gone any better that the first time around. Fortunately we got Reagan.

Posted by: freaked at December 10, 2017 11:01 AM (UdKB7)

257 Polliwog, I don't know why. It's irritating in a way because writers now seem to think they're doing something new with female authors/detectives. Same thing with female science fiction authors of earlier years, for example Jirel of Joiry, by C L Moore.

Posted by: Lirio100 at December 10, 2017 11:02 AM (JK7Jw)

258 Lawrence Block has 3 terrific series -- the Matt Scudder ones are about an alcoholic former cop, the Bernie Rhodenbarr ones concern a burglar who keeps getting accused of murder and the ones about Keller the killer.

I agree about the Walt Longmire novels, they are just fantastic.

If you're into classic detective stuff you can't go wrong with Dashiell Hammet.

If you're into fantasy s/f you might want to check out Steven Brust. His main character, Vlad Taltos, is an assassin so his stories are kind of like a detective novel in reverse because they're from the bad guy's POV. And he has some interesting friends to help out when he needs it.

Posted by: Scars at December 10, 2017 11:03 AM (NVyjJ)

259 ***NOT ABOUT BOOKS*****
I've tried to get into Netflix Original Series. I've watched the first full season of "Ozark," and have attempted "The Punisher" and "Godless." I've come to the conclusion Netflix writers all work from the same template.
Episode 1: sudden violence, nothing, nothing, nothing, ominous foreshadowing, nothing.
Episode 2: nothing, nothing, nothing.
Episode 3: nothing, nothing, nothing, unexpected sudden violence.
Episode 4: nothing, nothing, ominous foreshadowing, nothing, nothing.
Episode 5: nothing.
Episode 6: nothing.
Episode 7: nothing, ominous foreshadowing.
Episode 8: nothing, nothing, unexpected, sudden violence, season conclusion.

It's pretty frustrating, and like watching paint dry. "Ozark" had some promise, but they killed off the most interesting character after season 1. I will watch season 2 if it gets made. Maybe.

Posted by: Brave Sir Robin at December 10, 2017 11:03 AM (ty7RM)

260 I feel inspired to visit my closest used book store due to comments above. Good place for copies of children's books that can be used by preschoolers without too much agony, as they tend to be scrawled on already.

After that will buy the art supply component of my grandsons' gifts. I bought various building supplies (tinker-toys, gears, connectagons, magnatiles), matchbox car equipment) construction toys and an array of paw patrol vehicles. Art supplies are always a good fit as they like to pretend they are making blueprints and construction sketches.

Posted by: CN at December 10, 2017 11:04 AM (5gaNQ)

261 You don't want to be in that library during an earthquake.

Posted by: mark1971 at December 10, 2017 11:04 AM (xPl2J)

262 It draws attention to the writing style, especially when it changes to past tense, and I don't like that.

Posted by: roamingfirehydrant at December 10, 2017 10:24 AM (THS4q)


========

I've heard of the use of present tense as a narrative technique that's used to draw you in, as if you were there while it was happening. Even colloquially, when we're recounting some event in conversation, people will say things like, "So I'm there with my friend, and he says to me ... and then I say to him ...", etc. I think there are even a few books in the bible that do that.

Posted by: Steve and Cold Bear at December 10, 2017 11:04 AM (/qEW2)

263 I think I might be the only one that didn't care for the O'Brian/Aubrey series. At least it seems that way from the many positive comments from this and previous book threads. I got about half way through his first book and gave up. His writing style didn't flow. Plus, I got tired of looking up word after word of his navy lingo in the dictionary on almost every page, and I'm former navy, but maybe not navy enough.
Posted by: Jake Holenhead at December 10, 2017 10:54 AM (6jF2I)


I got midway through M&C and put it down as unreadable. Then two things happened: I watched the DVD with Russell Crowe and then made my book group read it. Hard to say which of the two turned my head around more because one other group member has continued with the series and I can't read anything about Jack without a mental image of Crowe.

Posted by: Captain Hate at December 10, 2017 11:04 AM (y7DUB)

264 They were going to land in a stadium and then turn around and take off with 150 people aboard.

Right, with Jet Assisted Take-Off.

Posted by: no good deed at December 10, 2017 11:05 AM (eIQHF)

265 244 OT , but West Point needs to get their crap together. Besides the Communist graduate, they have a cheating Muslim QB and apparently a system where cadets bang each others brains out.
Posted by: Alabaster Jones at December 10, 2017 10:54 AM (2DOZq)

Obama ruined another venerable institution.

Posted by: CN at December 10, 2017 11:05 AM (5gaNQ)

266 Watched American Assassin last night. Haven't read Flynn's books but makes me want to.

Posted by: blaster at December 10, 2017 11:05 AM (jHrzU)

267 That famous Burgess Meredith Twilight Zone episode ("Time Enough At Last") always seemed stupid to me, on several levels.

He's not going to survive long on canned food without safe water, or a fire, or preparation for winter.

Is he really the only survivor in the world? How is that possible?

Anyway, even if his city was directly targeted, why aren't the people who live 20 miles away mounting a rescue operation to search for survivors?

I learned too much about nuclear weapons at a young age. Most "postapocalyptic" stories were obviously wrong.

Posted by: Trimegistus at December 10, 2017 11:06 AM (ErN1Q)

268 My dream home library has cushioned window seats.

That's like my oldest daughter. She would be happy forever w/a sun-bathed window seat, a cup of really good cocoa, and a stack of books.

Posted by: Brave Sir Robin at December 10, 2017 11:06 AM (ty7RM)

269 Just got back from paste waxing a floor, so someone may have asked this, but...



Insty frequently does a "Received in the mail" short review and link.
And he is no stranger to Ace's writings here.

Anybody send him a copy, and ask for his thoughts?

Posted by: Village Idiot's Apprentice at December 10, 2017 11:06 AM (EyPfd)

270 y copy dead tree copy of the cookbook should arrive today, so hurray!


Hey, how about everyone listing your favorite book evah, fiction or nonfiction?

Or, if that's too much of a limit, your top three.


I need some ideas for Christmas gifts of a secondary nature as I've already gotten the big gift for all family members.

I often give books but as always "More is more better." on the ideas and info front.
Posted by: naturalfake at December 10, 2017 10:38 AM (9q7Dl)


Fiction: Don Quixote... the Edith Grossman translation. Every page was a joy to read.

Non-fiction: Can't go wrong with the Shelby Foote Civil War series, for those so inclined. Or Paul Johnson's Birth of the Modern, which is such a monumental work, in both its ability to teach us much about the world in which we live today, by showing the story of that era, with clear, crisp, enjoyable language. Throw in Jay Winik's The Great Upheaval as an honorable mention.

Posted by: BurtTC at December 10, 2017 11:07 AM (Pz4pT)

271 Loren Estleman has a great detective series with Amos Walker, quite a few books in that series. Also there are great books by Joe Gores, particularly his Dan Kearney Associates books.

And, the first few books by Walter Mosely are good, although his later books lost my interest.

Posted by: Christopher R Taylor at December 10, 2017 11:07 AM (39g3+)

272 266 Watched American Assassin last night. Haven't read Flynn's books but makes me want to.
Posted by: blaster at December 10, 2017 11:05 AM (jHrzU)

The book of course is 100 times better but it did not have to be that different. The people who cast the movie could not have read a word of the book. If they did , then they intentionally tried to ruin the movie.

Posted by: Alabaster Jones at December 10, 2017 11:10 AM (2DOZq)

273 ***NOT ABOUT BOOKS*****
I've tried to get into Netflix Original Series. I've watched the first full season of "Ozark," and have attempted "The Punisher" and "Godless." I've come to the conclusion Netflix writers all work from the same template.
Episode 1: sudden violence, nothing, nothing, nothing, ominous foreshadowing, nothing.
Episode 2: nothing, nothing, nothing.
Episode 3: nothing, nothing, nothing, unexpected sudden violence.
Episode 4: nothing, nothing, ominous foreshadowing, nothing, nothing.
Episode 5: nothing.
Episode 6: nothing.
Episode 7: nothing, ominous foreshadowing.
Episode 8: nothing, nothing, unexpected, sudden violence, season conclusion.

It's pretty frustrating, and like watching paint dry. "Ozark" had some promise, but they killed off the most interesting character after season 1. I will watch season 2 if it gets made. Maybe.
Posted by: Brave Sir Robin at December 10, 2017 11:03 AM (ty7RM)


I think the problem is less the writers, who can only do so much with the template (which I do believe exists). No, the problem is, if you've watched enough tv/movies, you do realize there's not much they can do that you haven't already seen.

I tend to start something, and then after a few minutes of a movie, or a few episodes of a show, have that sudden realization: they didn't make this for me. I'm not their target audience. They're trying to attract folks for whom this IS fresh and new.

Posted by: BurtTC at December 10, 2017 11:11 AM (Pz4pT)

274 _Yiddish Policemen's Union_ is weird. It's an alternate history, in which the post-WWII Jewish homeland isn't Israel but a chunk of Alaska, and the official language is Yiddish rather than Hebrew. There's trouble because the lease on the territory is set to expire, and there's a murder . . .

And then it all kind of goes stupid at the end. Chabon decided to go full liberal retard about the Bush Administration, even though it's an alternate universe.

Posted by: Trimegistus at December 10, 2017 11:13 AM (ErN1Q)

275 >>> 115 ... Funny you mention that. We decided last night to make a movie based on the cookbook.
Posted by: Weasel at December 10, 2017 09:44 AM (Sfs6o)

Any movie involving Morons needs to include lots of explosions.... also, bacon.

My copies of the cookbook will be here tomorrow, yay!

Posted by: Helena Handbasket at December 10, 2017 11:13 AM (0ReGO)

276 I just picked up book #7 in The Expanse series Persopolis Rising. I don't know what it is about this series, but I really enjoy it. I never read sci-fi, but this grabbed me. I ran through the first six nooks, watched the tv series and have been patiently waiting for this book. I'm anxious to read it, but I also want to savor it because I don't thimk there will be any more.

Posted by: Abby at December 10, 2017 11:14 AM (uEn5N)

277 Insty frequently does a "Received in the mail" short review and link.
And he is no stranger to Ace's writings here.

Anybody send him a copy, and ask for his thoughts?
Posted by: Village Idiot's Apprentice at December 10, 2017 11:06 AM (EyPfd)


The book is ranked 1861 overall on Amazon, and 210 in cookbooks! Yesterday I noted it was 217 in cookbooks, not sure of its overall number. It will be fun watching those numbers go down.

Posted by: BurtTC at December 10, 2017 11:14 AM (Pz4pT)

278 Posted by: Trimegistus at December 10, 2017 11:06 AM (ErN1Q)

You're no fun.

Posted by: rickl at December 10, 2017 11:15 AM (sdi6R)

279 HaHa! Kaepernick got offered a starting QB job.







For The Richmond Roughriders, of indoor football "fame".

Posted by: Brave Sir Robin at December 10, 2017 11:15 AM (ty7RM)

280 Hey buddy, can I borrow a Cupola of Book?

Posted by: garrett at December 10, 2017 11:15 AM (q3Awe)

281 The nice thing about the CW is you can watch their shows for free online or on their app
No cable sign in needed
=====

Thanks, vm. I was trying to remember that show because my 13yo granddaughter will not read, but she will watch stuff, and I want to be supplied with semi-appropriate offerings and I don't have cable and don't watch movies. Currently, I hate Disney with the heat of a thousand suns so something that I saw that was 'edgy' enough for her but still appropriate was tickling my misfiring memory banks.

Posted by: mustbequantum at December 10, 2017 11:16 AM (MIKMs)

282 >>Funny you mention that. We decided last night to make a movie based on the cookbook.


Can we get Cake Girl for the female lead?

Posted by: garrett at December 10, 2017 11:17 AM (q3Awe)

283 I've come to the conclusion Netflix writers all work from the same template.

Yeah I get the same sense. Almost every series seems to have an awful lot of filler. Its not universal, Mind hunters was pretty consistent, but still: filler. Its like they don't quite have enough story to fill out a full episode.

Posted by: Christopher R Taylor at December 10, 2017 11:17 AM (39g3+)

284 Parsons' Witchcraft group is cited as precipitating the neopagan revival of the 1950s.

So one man can make a difference!

Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at December 10, 2017 09:16 AM (qJtVm)


========

According to wikipedia, he rejected communism - too bad he didn't make a difference there, especially in CA. Also odd that a man whose profession involved getting precise, measured results would believe so strongly in the occult, which never seems to get verified.

Posted by: Steve and Cold Bear at December 10, 2017 11:18 AM (/qEW2)

285 ...There's trouble because the lease on the territory is set to expire, and there's a murder . . .

And then it all kind of goes stupid at the end. Chabon decided to go full liberal retard about the Bush Administration, even though it's an alternate universe.
Posted by: Trimegistus at December 10, 2017 11:13 AM (ErN1Q)


Your description here, sorta reminds of the plot of the show, Fortitude!

Posted by: BurtTC at December 10, 2017 11:18 AM (Pz4pT)

286 And then it all kind of goes stupid at the end. Chabon decided to go full liberal retard about the Bush Administration, even though it's an alternate universe.
Posted by: Trimegistus at December 10, 2017 11:13 AM (ErN1Q)
---
I'm a big fan of Chabon's works but this one never compelled me to read past a few chapters. Glad I didn't push past that.

Doesn't BDS seem like a world away, now that we have TDS? They keep ramping up their hysteria.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at December 10, 2017 11:18 AM (qJtVm)

287 Can we get Cake Girl for the female lead?
Posted by: garrett at December 10, 2017 11:17 AM (q3Awe)
--------

So you've seen my picture? How?

Posted by: bluebell at December 10, 2017 11:18 AM (kNasr)

288 Thanks, vm. I was trying to remember that show because my 13yo granddaughter will not read, but she will watch stuff, and I want to be supplied with semi-appropriate offerings and I don't have cable and don't watch movies.

The American Girl historical movies are pretty good for that audience, and devoid of SJW history re-writes. And, they are all based on books. Might get her interested in reading.

Posted by: Brave Sir Robin at December 10, 2017 11:19 AM (ty7RM)

289 Can we get Cake Girl for the female lead?
Posted by: garrett at December 10, 2017 11:17 AM (q3Awe)


Then everyone not named Ryan lines up to audition for the male lead.

Guess I better update my head shots.

Posted by: BurtTC at December 10, 2017 11:20 AM (Pz4pT)

290 Mark Helprin has a new novel, "Paris in Real Time," which I CANNOT WAIT TO READ. It's a Christmas break book for me.

Currently, I'm wending my way through "Huon of Bordeaux," done into English by Sir John Bourchier. I wish I could read it in the original French, but alas, I'm tragically miseducated.

https://archive.org/stream/huonofbordeauxdo00bernuoft#page/63/mode

Posted by: Smallish Bees at December 10, 2017 11:20 AM (YPgXi)

291 >>what do you think the next monster fad will be?


*Looks down*

Are you saying that the Romper Fad is over?

Posted by: garrett at December 10, 2017 11:20 AM (q3Awe)

292 Godless had promise but it looks like yet another dreary show about miserable people with no hope or real heroism and women in improbable situations because grrl power. Its not as bad as the previews suggest, but its still not for me.

Posted by: Christopher R Taylor at December 10, 2017 11:21 AM (39g3+)

293 Can we get Cake Girl for the female lead?
=====

Humble suggestion for butter-churning girls, as well. Cookbook, sine qua non.

Posted by: mustbequantum at December 10, 2017 11:22 AM (MIKMs)

294 Posted by: BurtTC at December 10, 2017 11:07 AM (Pz4pT)


Thanks.

I haven't thought of "Don Quixote" for a long time.

And I love me some picaresque novels.

I may reread it as well as give it!

Posted by: naturalfake at December 10, 2017 11:22 AM (9q7Dl)

295 Semi-book post. I saw Murder on the Oriental Express last night and liked it. It's beautifully shot, I particularly liked the !ightning striking the mountain causing the avalanche that traps the train, with lots of period detail. It's Christie-esque without being Christie. That is, although the story arc and solution are generally the same, there are many changes. I could have done without the racial virtue signaling but whatevs. I've seen two prior movie versions which I thought were good but I'd say this is the best.

Posted by: Anonosaurus Wrecks, I'm Dreaming of a White Privilege at December 10, 2017 11:22 AM (+y/Ru)

296 >>> Anyone have strong opinions about detective novels? Who's good, who's bad, who's worth a read, and who's worth a pass?

That settles it. I'm going to delve into Chesterton, starting with the Father Brown series.

Posted by: fluffy at December 10, 2017 11:23 AM (cHbmY)

297 An interesting read that just popped into my head: "Arundel", by Kenneth Roberts. It's historical fiction about the ultimately failed attempt by Colonial forces to take Quebec City. It paints Benedict Arnold in a new light. It would make a good movie if it isn't already.

Posted by: Brave Sir Robin at December 10, 2017 11:24 AM (ty7RM)

298 My wife and I watched episode 1 of the Marvelous Mrs. Maisel on Amazon prime tv last night. It may turn into something pretty funny. Mrs. Maisel's father (I think played by the guy who was Monk) has an office/den in his apartment (pre-war NYC building) Not only does he have books on the walls, they are piled everywhere. I think there may be piles of books on top of piles of books. My kind of library.

Posted by: Still John at December 10, 2017 11:24 AM (HI63o)

299 I do highly recommend the Father Brown short stories. They definitely will make you think. Chesterton was several quantum leaps of intelligence above mine.

Posted by: Christopher R Taylor at December 10, 2017 11:25 AM (39g3+)

300 I've tried to get into Netflix Original Series."

*glad not the only one like that*

Quality work is difficult - and these shows are interested in volume, not quality. Bad sets, costumes, action, and *surprise* story...

Posted by: Anon a mouse at December 10, 2017 11:25 AM (MINbv)

301 292 Godless had promise but it looks like yet another dreary show about miserable people with no hope or real heroism and women in improbable situations because grrl power. Its not as bad as the previews suggest, but its still not for me.
Posted by: Christopher R Taylor at December 10, 2017 11:21 AM (39g3+)


In other words, Mad Men.

Posted by: Ladyl at December 10, 2017 11:25 AM (TdMsT)

302 I saw Murder on the Oriental Express last night and liked it.

I agree it was beautifully shot. Q: did Christie's book make the obvious reference to the Lindbergh kidnapping, or was that added?

Posted by: Brave Sir Robin at December 10, 2017 11:26 AM (ty7RM)

303 Chabon decided to go full liberal retard about the Bush Administration,

-
He must have not gotten the memo. The party line now is that W was a good president unlike the current Nazi in the White House.

Posted by: Anonosaurus Wrecks, I'm Dreaming of a White Privilege at December 10, 2017 11:26 AM (+y/Ru)

304 Over 300, so OT - for those interested, Plaza Las Americas is a large urban mall in San Juan, PR. They've updated their vid page w/Santa's arrival and such:
http://www.plazalasamericas.com/center-info/plaza-videos/

Pretty amazing recovery for a place we were assured would be without the basics for human life over at least 6 months, if not years...

Posted by: Anon a mouse at December 10, 2017 11:27 AM (MINbv)

305 So you've seen my picture? How? Posted by: bluebell at December 10, 2017 11:18 AM (kNasr)
=====

Just read a funny novel by Crusie and Meyer about a cookbook author going by the name of Cranky Agnes. Heaven help me, but I thought of you (aggravated assault by frying pan and murder by meatfork). 'Agnes and the Hitman' -- comic romantic/mystery novel. Pretty good.

Posted by: mustbequantum at December 10, 2017 11:28 AM (MIKMs)

306 Posted by: BurtTC at December 10, 2017 11:07 AM (Pz4pT)


Thanks.

I haven't thought of "Don Quixote" for a long time.

And I love me some picaresque novels.

I may reread it as well as give it!
Posted by: naturalfake at December 10, 2017 11:22 AM (9q7Dl)


I think there are some complaints about her translation, that it's too Americanized, or something. I have nothing against which to compare it, and certainly have no way of comparing it to the original text. However, she does provide some helpful footnotes regarding her choices.

Posted by: BurtTC at December 10, 2017 11:28 AM (Pz4pT)

307
I I
would like to recommend a good read.
The book is "The Sea Was in
Their Blood: The Disappearance of the "Miss Ally's" Five-man Crew" by
Quentin Casey and published by Nimbus Publishing of Halifax, Nova
Scotia.
For those involved in things maritime or naval,
involvement in a loss at sea can rear its head at almost any point as
the recent Argentine submarine loss proved. This little book covers the
experience in depth and lays out many of the pitfalls that can be
involved. Knowledge of the people involved, the various bureaucracies,
the e-mail dangers are delineated as lessons to be learned and
remembered. In fact, I would recommend the book for a seminar or book
club study in the hope that pouring over it would result in some long
tern retention.
The loss of the Russian sub, Kursk, and now the
Argentine one both seem to present failures on the part of the
designated leaderships. This book might prevent or mitigate future ones.
On
a personal note, when I went to sea back in the mid-70s on one of
Columbia University's research vessels, most of our deck crew was from
Nova Scotia or Newfoundland. They were happy to be aboard as opposed to
being on the [fishing] "boats". They were on every other page.

Posted by: 11B40 at December 10, 2017 11:28 AM (evgyj)

308 Obama ruined another venerable institution.

Normally, I wouldn't be caught dead in the book thread, but...

"It's who we are!"

Posted by: Barack Hussein Obama, from the Office of the Ex-Command-In-Chief at December 10, 2017 11:29 AM (fR+If)

309 Sill waiting for Amazon to ship my cookbook.

For decades now I have kept a notebook of architectural details I want to include in a home I actually get to build from scratch instead of inheriting someone else's bad decisions, and in those pages is:
The Tower of Books
round or octagonal, about 20' diameter, a spiral staircase up the center. Each level has 6 floor-to-ceiling bookshelves, a big window with window-seat, and a desk-carrel thing. Top floor is all windows, comfy chairs, and small tables. At least 4 levels so windows cover all directions; a middle level has only 5 shelves to accommodate a sink and WC.
Someday, maybe.

Posted by: sock_rat_eez at December 10, 2017 11:30 AM (HySvC)

310 Chabon decided to go full liberal retard about the Bush Administration,

-----------
He must have not gotten the memo. The party line now is that W was a good president unlike the current Nazi in the White House.
Posted by: Anonosaurus Wrecks, I'm Dreaming of a White Privilege at December 10, 2017 11:26 AM (+y/Ru)


That's the problem with this whole "principles over party" thing. Things can change so quickly.

Especially you have, you know, no actual principles.

Posted by: BurtTC at December 10, 2017 11:30 AM (Pz4pT)

311 Murder on the Orient Express was partially inspired (supposedly) by the Lindbergh kidnapping...

Posted by: Anon a mouse at December 10, 2017 11:30 AM (MINbv)

312 He must have not gotten the memo. The party line now is that W was a good president unlike the current Nazi in the White House.
Posted by: Anonosaurus Wrecks, I'm Dreaming of a White Privilege at December 10, 2017 11:26 AM (+y/Ru)
---
If the insanity continues on its upward trajectory, it will eventually lead to President Milo in a spiffy Hugo Boss suit flanked by his dusky Praetorian Guard.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at December 10, 2017 11:31 AM (qJtVm)

313 According to wikipedia, he rejected communism - too bad he didn't make a difference there, especially in CA. Also odd that a man whose profession involved getting precise, measured results would believe so strongly in the occult, which never seems to get verified.

Posted by: Steve and Cold Bear at December 10, 2017 11:18 AM (/qEW2)

Not so surprising, perhaps. I was very fortunate, back in my sordid youth, to get to know and spend time with quite a few very intelligent people (we are talking STEM types here).

There was one lesson I learned back then that is relevant here. We have all heard that old saying about there being a "thin line between genius and insanity". Truer words were never spoken. These people I knew back then were indeed shockingly intelligent, but many of them were also just downright...strange. And that is putting it mildly.

No doubt Parsons was very intelligent (I think he was the one who resolved some of the reliability and consistency problems they were having with their early solid rocket fuels). But that he could also have been mixed up with something like the occult. Maybe not so surprising. (It was said that Tsiolkovsky was also into some kind of quasi occult thing called "cosmism" back in the day, something that did not sit too well with the commisars.)

Posted by: The Oort Cloud - Source of all SMODs at December 10, 2017 11:31 AM (PNxM1)

314 Three thugs enter a store, try to steal bottles of wine, then punch and assault the owner when he tried to stop them.

What happened next?

Evil SJWs descend on the store and try to get it shut down for being "racist":

http://www.sfgate.com/news/crime/article/ Racial-dispute-at-beloved-bakery-roils-liberal-12419618.php

"Racial dispute at beloved bakery roils liberal college town."

God I hate these people sooooooo much.

Posted by: zombie at December 10, 2017 11:31 AM (42M22)

315 I agree it was beautifully shot. Q: did Christie's book make the obvious reference to the Lindbergh kidnapping, or was that added?

-
Christie based the book on the Lindbergh case. Incidentally, on of the characters is pissed because his DA father lost his reputatjon because of the botched trial. In real life, the DA was Stormin' Norman Schwartzkopf's father.

Posted by: Anonosaurus Wrecks, I'm Dreaming of a White Privilege at December 10, 2017 11:31 AM (+y/Ru)

316 This is my first time to post, have lurked for a couple of years. Sunday book thread is my favorite! I lost a shelf-full of children's books when Hurricane Harvey flooded our house, including Dylan's Day Out, signed by the author, which my oldest got when he was in the first grade. My children and I always loved this book, and I could only find used copies (with inscriptions to other children) that I could afford on Amazon, so I contacted the author- Peter Catalanotto- through his website to ask if I could buy a copy from him. He sent me a new copy, with signed message to my son, at no charge. Along with best wishes for recovery from the flood. If you're looking for a children's book to give as a Christmas gift, I recommend his books, although I think Dylan's Day Out may be out of print.

Posted by: Hokiemom at December 10, 2017 11:32 AM (WUYxS)

317 Mark Helprin has a new novel, "Paris in Real Time,"

Posted by: Smallish Bees at December 10, 2017 11:20 AM (YPgXi)

That man can write!

Posted by: CharlieBrown'sDildo at December 10, 2017 11:33 AM (wYseH)

318 Welcome Hokiemom!

Posted by: votermom pimping great books! at December 10, 2017 11:33 AM (hMwEB)

319
Who on earth designed that library? I presumed the idea was to make the literature accessible.

This setup is just a glorified computer station.

Posted by: irongrampa at December 10, 2017 11:33 AM (S/hVx)

320 The Crusaders has a couple of good reviews on "Goodreads," but nothing on Amazon, which means exactly nothing, since they are a decidedly leftist organization and I don't trust their reviewing system, especially for non-PC books.

++++

It sounds like you are unaware that Goodreads is owned by Amazon. Vox Day had a dustup with Goodreads and was removed from their platform.

Posted by: Anon Y. Mous at December 10, 2017 11:33 AM (pvjTE)

321 My favorite detective books were those Travis McGee novels by John D. McDonald. They have been released on Kindle now but they are wanting too much for these dated books.

Posted by: Vic We Have No Party at December 10, 2017 11:34 AM (mpXpK)

322
For The Richmond Roughriders, of indoor football "fame".

I'll bet my left nut he rejects the offer.

Posted by: Soothsayer SLX Pro Series II Platinum Turbo at December 10, 2017 11:34 AM (5M5cz)

323
The book is ranked 1861 overall on Amazon, and 210 in cookbooks! Yesterday I noted it was 217 in cookbooks, not sure of its overall number. It will be fun watching those numbers go down.
Posted by: BurtTC at December 10, 2017 11:14 AM (Pz4pT)
---------
The numerical rankings are actually going UP. We peaked at #521 in Amazon Books and #51 in Cookbooks on Friday.

Posted by: Weasel at December 10, 2017 11:34 AM (Sfs6o)

324 Three thugs enter a store, try to steal bottles of wine, then punch and assault the owner when he tried to stop them.

-
Picture of a similar incident. Note the ghetto grip.

http://bit.ly/2nMBbgc

Posted by: Anonosaurus Wrecks, I'm Dreaming of a White Privilege at December 10, 2017 11:34 AM (+y/Ru)

325 He sent me a new copy, with signed message to my
son, at no charge. Along with best wishes for recovery from the flood.

Posted by: Hokiemom at December 10, 2017 11:32 AM (WUYxS)

That is wonderful. I'll put a link in the post....

Posted by: CharlieBrown'sDildo at December 10, 2017 11:34 AM (wYseH)

326 Posted by: Hokiemom at December 10, 2017 11:32 AM (WUYxS)
---
I'm so sorry about your books. But what a nice thing for Catalanatto to do!

Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at December 10, 2017 11:35 AM (qJtVm)

327 A lot of the decor seems to be culturally appropriative. And the rest are the skulls of murdered animals. I rate this library 2 out of 10 for wokeness.

Posted by: Your friendly no-escapism facilitator at December 10, 2017 11:36 AM (/qEW2)

328 Evil SJWs descend on the store and try to get it shut down for being "racist"

That's like the Phillie councilwoman trying to get bulletproof glass declared racist and banned from city shops.

Posted by: Christopher R Taylor at December 10, 2017 11:36 AM (39g3+)

329 Just read a funny novel by Crusie and Meyer about a cookbook author going by the name of Cranky Agnes. Heaven help me, but I thought of you (aggravated assault by frying pan and murder by meatfork). 'Agnes and the Hitman' -- comic romantic/mystery novel. Pretty good.
Posted by: mustbequantum at December 10, 2017 11:28 AM (MIKMs)
----------

Oh, I like that - that's me all right! No frying pan for you.

Hi Hokiemom - I'm a Hokie mom too!

Posted by: Cranky bluebell at December 10, 2017 11:37 AM (kNasr)

330 Just re-read Murder on the Orient Express. It does not mention the Lindbergh kidnapping but I have to believe that was the inspiration for Christie.

Glad to see folks liked the newest movie. I will get the DVD when it comes out. (Hate going to the theater.) Branaugh's movies are usually visually rich and interesting.

Posted by: JTB at December 10, 2017 11:37 AM (V+03K)

331 >>Posted by: Hokiemom at December 10, 2017 11:32 AM (WUYxS)


Welcome, Lurker.

Make yourself at home and please remember to use a seat prtoector when using the White Ottoman.

Posted by: garrett at December 10, 2017 11:37 AM (q3Awe)

332 Posted by: Cranky bluebell at December 10, 2017 11:37 AM (kNasr)
-------
This is about recipe #115, isn't it?

Posted by: Weasel at December 10, 2017 11:38 AM (Sfs6o)

333 Hokiemom,

Welcome! That's a really cool thing Peter Catalanotto did for you.

Posted by: Jake Holenhead at December 10, 2017 11:38 AM (6jF2I)

334 A warning about Chesterton: his stories are very stylized and artificial. You have to simply shut off your plausibility detector before you start reading. They're marvelous intellectual puzzles, but they aren't about real people doing real things (the way a Hammett or Chandler mystery would be).

GKC also has a few quirks. Because atheists, Jews, evangelical Protestants, Communists, and occult nut-cultists are all Not Catholic, he has this weird idea that they're All In It Together somehow.

Posted by: Trimegistus at December 10, 2017 11:38 AM (ErN1Q)

335 That's the problem with this whole "principles over party" thing. Things can change so quickly.

Especially you have, you know, no actual principles.
Posted by: BurtTC at December 10, 2017 11:30 AM (Pz4pT)


But there's no better way to make sure your books will stay relevant long into the next year or so, maybe!

Posted by: hogmartin at December 10, 2017 11:39 AM (y87Qq)

336 Ha ha, Weasel - that wasn't your fault. No frying pan for you either. Not today, anyway.

Posted by: Cranky bluebell at December 10, 2017 11:39 AM (kNasr)

337 All networks have their templates-

AMC's pretty obvious as well- Mad Men, Breaking Bad,
and TWD all use it.

New Season!

Episode 1-3 Generally, strong story telling. Good action.

Episode 3-4 -Mid season Finale - meander, meander, meander, artificial or secondary character issues, meander - Cliff Hanger Action!

Mid-Season First new episode - Actiony, sort of resolution but not really.

Remaining Season until last two shows - meander, meander meander, meander

Last Two shows - Actiony, Resolution of season problem or cliff-hanger.


Most of these multi-season series would be much stronger as maybe 20 shows total.

Or, roughly 5 shows per season.

Posted by: naturalfake at December 10, 2017 11:39 AM (9q7Dl)

338 They have been released on Kindle now but they are wanting too much for these dated books.

The prices that big publishers put on ebooks is practically begging people to steal them and torrent them.

Posted by: Christopher R Taylor at December 10, 2017 11:40 AM (39g3+)

339 Good morning Horde. I haven't really read any books lately. I just want to make a couple comments.

After a year and a half without, because I lost both my kindle and the old android tablet with the kindle app, I ordered a Kindle Fire 6" model from woot. It came to 32.00 or so with shipping, and it's currently at my Mom's some 20 miles away, because I don't have reliable mail here.

Work was sparse this week so I'm going back to trying to do the EdX course I signed up for re: programming with Python. I probably should have done more when I was recovering from surgery but my brain wasn't quite operating on all cyinders then. Now I'm doing ok except for being low on Potassium, which just doesn't seem to interest the doctors doing the followup stuff.

I still have the kindle app on my phone, and cloud reader, but I dislike both of them for various reasons. I also dislike that I can't go off-grid with the cloud reader app for the laptop. I would like to be able to read on my little linux netbook without being connected to the net, but [del]Homey[/del] Bezos doesn't play that... I have a mac laptop I want to put back into decent shape (needs new keyboard, trackpad, and power supply) but I keep finding other uses for the money. Also, I don't like Apple any more. They believe in all that global warming junk but have all their stuff made in China, coal user extroardinaire.

It's all just cover for the fact that they don't like proletariat people, but they're good little religious leftists and can't admit that to themselves. SO: $ 2000.00 (or more) laptops made in some other countries... if Apple had been in this position when Steve Jobs came back, they wouldn't have been able to come back. They have a mountain of cash sitting in accounts in Ireland but no idea what to do with it to make more money, and they're shipping versions of OS X with blatant security holes. So they're fulfilling both sides of the "oppressive idiot" equation, they're too busy being oppressive to stop being idiots.

Posted by: Thing From Snowy Mountain at December 10, 2017 11:42 AM (3/HOt)

340 Yeah, cuppa cawfefe and reading more reviews on The Deplorable Gourmet. Laughed my arse off. You all are quite witty for a buncha retards...juts sayin'.

...and i mean that with affection.

Posted by: Cannibal Bob at December 10, 2017 11:43 AM (xFBfz)

341 I can't believe how expensive some e-books are. It's often cheaper to buy a used dead trees version, thus depriving the author of his or her cut.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at December 10, 2017 11:43 AM (qJtVm)

342 Anyone have strong opinions about detective novels? Who's good, who's bad, who's worth a read, and who's worth a pass?

++++

Sue Grafton's Kinsey Millhone series is pretty good. The detective is a woman, but she isn't a superhero or anything. Instead of bouncing the bad guys around, she, more often than not, gets bounced around herself. Solves her cases by smarts and perseverance and is happy to accept help from men.

Posted by: Anon Y. Mous at December 10, 2017 11:43 AM (pvjTE)

343 "That's the problem with this whole "principles over party" thing. Things can change so quickly.

Especially you have, you know, no actual principles.
Posted by: BurtTC at December 10, 2017 11:30 AM (Pz4pT) "


Well, one principle anyway: Western Civilization must be destroyed at any cost and by any means !
Baby with the bathwater is a feature, not a bug, in their universe.

Posted by: sock_rat_eez at December 10, 2017 11:43 AM (HySvC)

344 Argh, I don't know how to do strikethrough here anymore.

Posted by: Thing From Snowy Mountain at December 10, 2017 11:44 AM (3/HOt)

345 The book is ranked 1861 overall on Amazon, and 210 in cookbooks! Yesterday I noted it was 217 in cookbooks, not sure of its overall number. It will be fun watching those numbers go down.
Posted by: BurtTC at December 10, 2017 11:14 AM (Pz4pT)
---------
The numerical rankings are actually going UP. We peaked at #521 in Amazon Books and #51 in Cookbooks on Friday.
Posted by: Weasel at December 10, 2017 11:34 AM (Sfs6o)


Which only makes sense if it's not cumulative rankings, but some sort of "what's hot" algorithm.

Bah. Nevermind. I was all set to enjoy this. Now those darned kids went and ruined that too.

Posted by: BurtTC at December 10, 2017 11:44 AM (Pz4pT)

346 336 Ha ha, Weasel - that wasn't your fault. No frying pan for you either. Not today, anyway.

Posted by: Cranky bluebell at December 10, 2017 11:39 AM (kNasr)
-------
Have a pudding cup!

Posted by: Weasel at December 10, 2017 11:44 AM (Sfs6o)

347 >>The prices that big publishers put on ebooks is practically begging people to steal them and torrent them.


Psst.

Hey buddy - Wanna Buy a Cookbook?

Posted by: garrett at December 10, 2017 11:45 AM (q3Awe)

348 I'm re-reading All Creatures Great and Small. Trying to write in first person so theres that and its just an enjoyable read.

Posted by: Cannibal Bob at December 10, 2017 11:46 AM (xFBfz)

349 Posted by: BurtTC at December 10, 2017 11:44 AM (Pz4pT)
-------
If each and everyone of you bought, oh, say 25 books each RIGHT NOW, I bet we could get those rankings back down! C'mon people!!

Posted by: Weasel at December 10, 2017 11:46 AM (Sfs6o)

350 Hey, how about everyone listing your favorite book evah, fiction or nonfiction?

-
A top contencer for me would be Robert Penn Warren's All the King's Men. Part mystery, part history, all a man finding redemption through suffering.

P.S. Both movie versions sucked and entirely missed the point of the book.

Posted by: Anonosaurus Wrecks, I'm Dreaming of a White Privilege at December 10, 2017 11:46 AM (+y/Ru)

351 344 Argh, I don't know how to do strikethrough here anymore.

Posted by: Thing From Snowy Mountain at December 10, 2017 11:44 AM (3/HOt)

Just use a sharpie on the screen . Trust me.

Posted by: Cannibal Bob at December 10, 2017 11:47 AM (xFBfz)

352 Which only makes sense if it's not cumulative rankings, but some sort of "what's hot" algorithm.

I think its what they base their promotions on. If your book breaks x level, then it gets promoted and it shows up in the "you also might like" suggestions. Reviews affect that, to some degree, as well.

Posted by: Christopher R Taylor at December 10, 2017 11:47 AM (39g3+)

353 [ s ] starts
[ / s ] ends

(remove all the spaces)

also:
b = bold
i = italic
u = underline

Posted by: sock_rat_eez at December 10, 2017 11:48 AM (HySvC)

354 Reviews affect that, to some degree, as well.
Posted by: Christopher R Taylor at December 10, 2017 11:47 AM (39g3+
----------

Uh oh

Posted by: Cranky bluebell at December 10, 2017 11:48 AM (kNasr)

355 Most of these multi-season series would be much stronger as maybe 20 shows total.

Or, roughly 5 shows per season.
Posted by: naturalfake at December 10, 2017 11:39 AM (9q7Dl)


Yeah, which is why I'm preferring the British cop dramas at the moment. Long play episodes, 3-5 of them per season.

I gave up on several series this past year, some I sat through faithfully. Walking Dead, The Americans, American Horror Story, even George RRRRRRR Martin's Game of Throbs.

So much sameness.

Posted by: BurtTC at December 10, 2017 11:49 AM (Pz4pT)

356 Morning all you lovely bibliophiles. Been re-reading P.C. Hodgell, now mostly through To Ride a Rathorn and noting stuff missed the first few times I read it.

Was lent a copy of The Star of Africa by Colin D. Heaton and Anne-Marie Lewis since I like World War II history. This book is about Hans-Joachim Marseille. Got through the intro by Walter J. Boyne to Heaton's intro and stopped reading. The author mentions the WWII pilots he had met listing them by name. In the same paragraph, he mentions Robert Stanford Tuck twice. I have serious doubts if I want to read a book when such a simple error slipped through.

Posted by: Anna Puma (HQCaR) at December 10, 2017 11:49 AM (z/8Yh)

357 >>> A warning about Chesterton:

Thanks for the heads up. I'll go in eyes open.

Posted by: fluffy at December 10, 2017 11:49 AM (cHbmY)

358
344 Argh, I don't know how to do strikethrough here anymore.



Posted by: Thing From Snowy Mountain at December 10, 2017 11:44 AM (3/HOt)

same as italics except with an s instead of an i.


[ s ] AND [/s ]



Posted by: Vic We Have No Party at December 10, 2017 11:50 AM (mpXpK)

359 Thanks for the heads up. I'll go in eyes open.

What he says is mostly true only in the sense of "anyone who denies the truth is ultimately playing from the same sourcebook, whatever edition it might be." I didn't see any such hostility in my copies of the short stories. Just hostility to postmodernism.

Posted by: Christopher R Taylor at December 10, 2017 11:51 AM (39g3+)

360 Uh oh

Posted by: Cranky bluebell at December 10, 2017 11:48 AM (kNasr)

I'll let you look under my grass skirt if that will make you feel better...well t will at least give you some perspective. There are worse things.

Posted by: Cannibal Bob at December 10, 2017 11:52 AM (xFBfz)

361 Which only makes sense if it's not cumulative rankings, but some sort of "what's hot" algorithm.
-------------------------------
I think its what they base their promotions on. If your book breaks x level, then it gets promoted and it shows up in the "you also might like" suggestions. Reviews affect that, to some degree, as well.
Posted by: Christopher R Taylor at December 10, 2017 11:47 AM (39g3+)


Presumably searches can affect that as well, or what I'm getting now are other things with the word "Deplorable" in the title showing up here and there, more than I did just after purchasing. So my repeated clicks on the title might be factored in somehow, at least in what they're advertising, to ME.

Posted by: BurtTC at December 10, 2017 11:53 AM (Pz4pT)

362 It seems Cannibal Bob is still trying to smuggle that salami.

Posted by: Anna Puma (HQCaR) at December 10, 2017 11:53 AM (z/8Yh)

363 362 It seems Cannibal Bob is still trying to smuggle that salami.
Posted by: Anna Puma (HQCaR) at December 10, 2017 11:53 AM (z/8Yh)
---
He calls it his "long pig".

Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at December 10, 2017 11:54 AM (qJtVm)

364 Amazon's also a bunch of oppressive idiots that I can't really trust with stuff, and I get reminded of this every time I see a link to the latest atrocity at the Washington Post, BUT... at least they're cheap enough that I can afford to do business with them.

Posted by: Thing From Snowy Mountain at December 10, 2017 11:55 AM (3/HOt)

365 Thanks for the welcome, all! I'll probably go back to lurking now- I'm terrified of the barrel!
Bluebell- always great to meet another Hokie mom. I still consider myself one even though my Hokie graduated 6 years ago.

Posted by: Hokiemom at December 10, 2017 11:55 AM (WUYxS)

366 Lol.

Posted by: Cannibal Bob at December 10, 2017 11:55 AM (xFBfz)

367 So my repeated clicks on the title might be factored in somehow, at least in what they're advertising, to ME.

Right, individuals will get stuff pitched to them based on previous purchases and searches, but the ads that are sent out as well as promos to any section you go to are more based on what they think is hot and interesting to people. As far as I can tell.

Every author on earth is trying to crack Amazon's system. There are lots of myths out there like "get x number of reviews" but nobody really knows except the guys coding it.

Its like when someone figured out which frame Youtube chose for the image of a video, and made sure that was the most interesting image in the world. It made their videos more popular. They cracked the code.

Posted by: Christopher R Taylor at December 10, 2017 11:56 AM (39g3+)

368 Well now I'm watching "Godless" out of curiosity.

Wow is Sam Waterston old. I remember him when he played Oppenheimer in that series.

Wow am I old.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at December 10, 2017 11:57 AM (qJtVm)

369 Ah, thank you VIc and Soc Rat Tees....

Posted by: Thing From Snowy Mountain at December 10, 2017 11:57 AM (3/HOt)

370 I don't think Amazon has any politics beyond those of basic greed. Bezos is just using the Washington Post to provide him with leftist armor. If he can appeal to them enough they'll let him get away with anything, no oversight, no checking into his work practices, pay etc. Its just a business decision to him, I think. Playing the game.

Posted by: Christopher R Taylor at December 10, 2017 11:58 AM (39g3+)

371 Finished "The Devil's Diary", about Nazi ideologue Alfred Rosenberg's diary, it's disappearance and recovery, and the colorful Nuremberg prosecutor, Robert Kempner, who was involved.


It's an interesting approach to the topic. The book begins with the rather amazing story of the diary's disappearance and eventual recovery, decades later, and then alternates between Rosenberg's story and that of Kempner, a Jewish lawyer who got out Germany just in time, made it to the US, then returned as part of the Nuremberg prosecution.


Definitely a "popular" historical format - no footnotes or heavy documentation. Not really a full biography of either man, more of a "highlights" approach. Rosenberg's diary is not constantly or extensively quoted, and only intermittently contrasted with the accounts of others (especially Goebbels, Rosenberg's chief adversary and a very dedicated diarist whose diary is by far the Third Reich's best source of inside info/personal takes on big events). One gets only an overall picture of Rosenberg's wacko philosophy, as summed up in his magnum opus of insanity "Myth of the Twentieth Century".


A good easy read for anyone interested in the key figures in the Nazi leadership, though Rosenberg ended up marginalized as time went on.





Posted by: rhomboid at December 10, 2017 11:59 AM (QDnY+)

372 368 Well now I'm watching "Godless" out of curiosity.

Wow is Sam Waterston old. I remember him when he played Oppenheimer in that series.

Wow am I old.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at December 10, 2017 11:57 AM (qJtVm)

I enjoyed Justified. I thought it was quite a different version of cop-cowboy meme.

Posted by: Cannibal Bob at December 10, 2017 11:59 AM (xFBfz)

373 Posted by: BurtTC at December 10, 2017 11:44 AM (Pz4pT)
-------
If each and everyone of you bought, oh, say 25 books each RIGHT NOW, I bet we could get those rankings back down! C'mon people!!
Posted by: Weasel at December 10, 2017 11:46 AM (Sfs6o)


What I think we should do, strictly for experimental purposes, is all buy 30 copies, just to see how much hotter it is than ONLY buying 25 each.

Posted by: BurtTC at December 10, 2017 12:00 PM (Pz4pT)

374 Can we get Cake Girl for the female lead?

Can we get Book Girl to be the on-screen narrator?

Posted by: Chuck C at December 10, 2017 12:00 PM (0V2ki)

375 I reread Vonnegut's The Sirens of Titan this week. I loved it as a kid but the nihilism is a little much for me now. I have also begun Vindolanda by Adrian Goldsworthy about a Roman centurion trying to keep the lid on a rebellion of barbarian Scots twenty years before Hadrian's Wall. So far, it's quite good and seems historically accurate. Vondolanda was a real place whose ruins you can visit today.

Posted by: Anonosaurus Wrecks, I'm Dreaming of a White Privilege at December 10, 2017 12:00 PM (+y/Ru)

376 I used to watch 'New Tricks' about a bunch of almost retirement-age brit detectives made into a cold case squad. Very clever and funny, but, of course, has now been lost to PC nonsense. Brenda Blethyn (?) did a good no-nonsense detective with muddy boots in one series, but again, lost to PC nonsense.

Posted by: mustbequantum at December 10, 2017 12:01 PM (MIKMs)

377 On the left in that picture is what appears to be an original Mac PowerBook computer. From the late 1980s. So this library is more of a stage set than a working office area.

Posted by: Raoul Ortega at December 10, 2017 12:02 PM (HAA3B)

378 He must have not gotten the memo. The party line now is that W was a good president unlike the current Nazi in the White House.

Posted by: Anonosaurus Wrecks, I'm Dreaming of a White Privilege at December 10, 2017 11:26 AM (+y/Ru)


========

Now that HW voted for Hillary and W said Trump was ultra-nationalistic in that last speech of his, W can be used as a propaganda tool by the left. "Hey Mr. Conservative, you like Bush? We do too. We think he's awesome, and he hates Trump". Jesse Jackson was right. Stay out of the Bushes.

Posted by: Steve and Cold Bear at December 10, 2017 12:03 PM (/qEW2)

379 >>On the left in that picture is what appears to be an
original Mac PowerBook computer. From the late 1980s. So this library
is more of a stage set than a working office area.

Posted by: Raoul Ortega

Or it's an old picture.

Posted by: Aviator at December 10, 2017 12:05 PM (2cuLk)

380 Right, individuals will get stuff pitched to them based on previous purchases and searches, but the ads that are sent out as well as promos to any section you go to are more based on what they think is hot and interesting to people. As far as I can tell.

Every author on earth is trying to crack Amazon's system. There are lots of myths out there like "get x number of reviews" but nobody really knows except the guys coding it.

Its like when someone figured out which frame Youtube chose for the image of a video, and made sure that was the most interesting image in the world. It made their videos more popular. They cracked the code.
Posted by: Christopher R Taylor at December 10, 2017 11:56 AM (39g3+)


I still buy cds by the truckload, mostly on Amazon, but not always. When I started buying there, it was relatively easy for me to be pointed to artists I would find interesting.

Now however, they're trying to push new crap on me, and I have no idea how it works. Meanwhile, an artist I love, one whose music I may have purchased half a dozen or more discs ON AMAZON, and I won't even get a sniff that they released something new.

It bugs the heck out of me, and I know it's some of that same stuff you're talking about here. I find myself trying to "trick" their system, by re-rating stuff I bought years ago, just to see if they'll pop up something I might actually want to buy. Sometimes it works, sometimes it doesn't, and I cannot for the life of me figure out how.

Posted by: BurtTC at December 10, 2017 12:06 PM (Pz4pT)

381 *looks at IMDB*

Missed that Oppenheimer mini-series. In fact missed many of the shows he was in. And those eyebrows, dude use the clippers.

Posted by: Anna Puma (HQCaR) at December 10, 2017 12:06 PM (z/8Yh)

382 Oops, meant Vic with proper capitalization.

Anyways... so I can be marginally on topic: The original companion book to the original version of the course I'm taking is available on Kindle:

Introduction to Computation and Programming Using Python by John V. Guttag.

There are two or three versions of this version of the course available for free download from Open Courseware at MIT, plus a second "edition" of it with more emphasis on data science, with a matching second edition of the textbook, which I don't have.

Posted by: Thing From Snowy Mountain at December 10, 2017 12:07 PM (3/HOt)

383 Thanks for the welcome, all! I'll probably go back to lurking now- I'm terrified of the barrel!
Bluebell- always great to meet another Hokie mom. I still consider myself one even though my Hokie graduated 6 years ago.

Posted by: Hokiemom at December 10, 2017 11:55 AM (WUYxS)


========

I think most of us find formatting errors to be a welcome diversion - there's no shame in it. Even ace regularly grey-boxes the entire thread, or centers or bolds it.

Posted by: Steve and Cold Bear at December 10, 2017 12:08 PM (/qEW2)

384 From the late 1980s. So this libraryis more of a stage set than a working office area. Posted by: Raoul Ortega
=====

Pretty pikchure. Who the heck is going to reshelve those books?

Posted by: mustbequantum at December 10, 2017 12:08 PM (MIKMs)

385 Have you ever heard of the book "Final Events" by Nick Redfern?
---
Ten bucks for an e-version! Come on!

And neither of my library systems has it.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at December 10, 2017 12:08 PM (qJtVm)

386 I'm going back to trying to do the EdX course I signed up for re: programming with Python

Posted by: Thing From Snowy Mountain at December 10, 2017 11:42 AM (3/HOt)


Would that course be the one from MIT, with Eric Grimson? I've taken it. It's a good introduction not just to Python but to programming concepts. It's tough but not too tough. IIRC, I barely passed.

Posted by: H. Solo at December 10, 2017 12:09 PM (EzdLW)

387 Anne Cleeland will serialize a historical fiction novel on her website, annecleeland.com
(free). "The True Pretender"
Full book will be published in the summer.
Sample: https://tinyurl.com/yax52886

Posted by: artemis at December 10, 2017 12:09 PM (AwPyG)

388 And those eyebrows, dude use the clippers.
---
I'm a fan of big eyebrows (within reason).

Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at December 10, 2017 12:09 PM (qJtVm)

389 The EMT is getting old. This only encourages people to go off topic on the book thread. Are the COBs back from church yet?

Posted by: Vic We Have No Party at December 10, 2017 12:10 PM (mpXpK)

390 I've tried to get into Netflix Original Series. I've watched the first full season of "Ozark," and have attempted "The Punisher" and "Godless." I've come to the conclusion Netflix writers all work from the same template.
Episode 1: sudden violence, nothing, nothing, nothing, ominous foreshadowing, nothing.
Episode 2: nothing, nothing, nothing.
Episode 3: nothing, nothing, nothing, unexpected sudden violence.
Episode 4: nothing, nothing, ominous foreshadowing, nothing, nothing.
Episode 5: nothing.
Episode 6: nothing.
Episode 7: nothing, ominous foreshadowing.
Episode 8: nothing, nothing, unexpected, sudden violence, season conclusion.

Posted by: Brave Sir Robin at December 10, 2017 11:03 AM (ty7RM)


Call us. We're hiring.

Posted by: Netflix new series development dept at December 10, 2017 12:10 PM (EzdLW)

391 Thanks for the welcome, all! I'll probably go back to lurking now- I'm terrified of the barrel!
Bluebell- always great to meet another Hokie mom. I still consider myself one even though my Hokie graduated 6 years ago.
Posted by: Hokiemom at December 10, 2017 11:55 AM (WUYxS)
-------

Please don't go back to lurking! I'm afraid of the Barrel too, but so far I've been okay. I avoided doing things like italics, bold, etc. for well over a year and still do that rarely, because why tempt fate.

Posted by: bluebell ~ get cooking, Horde! at December 10, 2017 12:11 PM (kNasr)

392 Eris, he is getting into the David Lynch Mentat eyebrows arena.

Posted by: Anna Puma (HQCaR) at December 10, 2017 12:11 PM (z/8Yh)

393
I'm a fan of big eyebrows...

Posted by: All Hail Eris



Yeah, you're normal.

Posted by: Soothsayer SLX Pro Series II Platinum Turbo at December 10, 2017 12:12 PM (5M5cz)

394 I'm a fan of big eyebrows (within reason).
Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at December 10, 2017 12:09 PM (qJtVm)
--------

Did you see the thing on boredpanda about the eyebrows decorated for Christmas? It was on the bottom of the links you gave us last night on the ONT. I sent the link for the eyebrows to my daughters and said don't you dare show up for Christmas like this.

Posted by: bluebell ~ get cooking, Horde! at December 10, 2017 12:13 PM (kNasr)

395 390
I've tried to get into Netflix Original Series. I've watched the
first full season of "Ozark," and have attempted "The Punisher" and
"Godless." I've come to the conclusion Netflix writers all work from the
same template.

Episode 1: sudden violence, nothing, nothing, nothing, ominous foreshadowing, nothing.

Episode 2: nothing, nothing, nothing.

Episode 3: nothing, nothing, nothing, unexpected sudden violence.

Episode 4: nothing, nothing, ominous foreshadowing, nothing, nothing.

Episode 5: nothing.

Episode 6: nothing.

Episode 7: nothing, ominous foreshadowing.

Episode 8: nothing, nothing, unexpected, sudden violence, season conclusion.



Posted by: Brave Sir Robin at December 10, 2017 11:03 AM (ty7RM)


My wife signed up for Netflix. I think it blows chunks. Daughter came by one day and introduced me to Hulu it is much better. Trying to get wifey to shut down Netflix and go to Hulu.

Posted by: Vic We Have No Party at December 10, 2017 12:13 PM (mpXpK)

396 Wow. Here's an interesting story: a crime fiction writer had her books plagiarized and e-published. I found this link on Twitter.

https://preview.tinyurl.com/yc7whbvp

Posted by: Dr Alice at December 10, 2017 12:15 PM (LaT54)

397 Did you see the thing on boredpanda about the eyebrows decorated for Christmas? It was on the bottom of the links you gave us last night on the ONT. I sent the link for the eyebrows to my daughters and said don't you dare show up for Christmas like this.
Posted by: bluebell ~ get cooking, Horde! at December 10, 2017 12:13 PM (kNasr)
---
Yes I did, and if they show up sporting the Reindeer Boob you will wish they only did the Christmas Tree Brow.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at December 10, 2017 12:16 PM (qJtVm)

398 370 crtaylor - bezos bought the post for "leftist armor"...

brilliant.

Posted by: musical jolly chimp at December 10, 2017 12:16 PM (Pg+x7)

399 Thanks for the welcome, all! I'll probably go back to lurking now- I'm terrified of the barrel!
=====

I'm a Moron. There is absolutely no attempt to format anything because I will mess it up. Survived for a while now without fancy-schmancy formatting; because Moron.

Posted by: mustbequantum at December 10, 2017 12:16 PM (MIKMs)

400 Yes I did, and if they show up sporting the Reindeer Boob you will wish they only did the Christmas Tree Brow.
Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at December 10, 2017 12:16 PM (qJtVm
---------

Oh dear. I don't think I'm going to go looking for that.

Posted by: bluebell ~ get cooking, Horde! at December 10, 2017 12:17 PM (kNasr)

401 Totally agree with bluebell and others about Golden Age detective novels. Some lesser known authors from that period are Josephine Tey, Edmund Crispin, Michael Innes, and Sarah Caudwell. For a contemporary author, try Anne Cleeland's Doyle & Acton series -- it's best to read them in order, Murder in Thrall is the first.

Posted by: Sutton Hoo at December 10, 2017 12:18 PM (ftoNL)

402 Sutten Hoo, thanks for the recs - I've read the Edmund Crispin ones and they are good, and funny. Will check out the others!

Posted by: bluebell ~ get cooking, Horde! at December 10, 2017 12:19 PM (kNasr)

403 Another reason not to trust anything from The Atlantic, their names are being used in phishing scams against writers.

http://accrispin.blogspot.com/2017/10/scam-alert-fraudsters-targeting.html

Posted by: Anna Puma (HQCaR) at December 10, 2017 12:20 PM (z/8Yh)

404 Yes I did, and if they show up sporting the Reindeer Boob you will wish they only did the Christmas Tree Brow.


I think the Glitter Beard tops the Tree Brow. Both are pretty damn hideous.

Posted by: no good deed at December 10, 2017 12:20 PM (eIQHF)

405 All right, no good deed, now you're making me go look.

Posted by: bluebell ~ get cooking, Horde! at December 10, 2017 12:21 PM (kNasr)

406 Reindeer boobs?

Frisky and Perky?

Posted by: Anna Puma (HQCaR) at December 10, 2017 12:21 PM (z/8Yh)

407 297
An interesting read that just popped into my head: "Arundel", by Kenneth
Roberts. It's historical fiction about the ultimately failed attempt by
Colonial forces to take Quebec City. It paints Benedict Arnold in a new
light. It would make a good movie if it isn't already.

Posted by: Brave Sir Robin at December 10, 2017 11:24 AM (ty7RM

----------------------


Anything by Roberts is a good read.

Posted by: Javems at December 10, 2017 12:21 PM (yOqwj)

408 H. Solo: I think Grimson's involved too, so that's the one. I also want to eventually do something to get some sort of credentials and bring my ~ 20 year old unix skills up to date.

To make a long story short: after eight years of Obama expressing his hostility to the oilfield in general by screwing over the Oilfield in Louisiana in particular, I've been wiped out to the point where only couch surfing and sleeping in the break room at work has kept me from homelessness, and I have had a year of health problems that I'm still recovering from. I'm doing a lot better than this time last year, but I have a long way to go and want to really get back on my feet.

Posted by: Thing From Snowy Mountain at December 10, 2017 12:21 PM (3/HOt)

409 The cookbooks just arrived. OMG!! We were enjoying the Kindle version but the physical copy is fantastic!!! Glad we have both versions.

Thanks to Weasel and bluebell and everyone who contributed and helped. This is entertaining and damn delicious. I foresee a few more pounds if I'm not careful.

Posted by: JTB at December 10, 2017 12:22 PM (V+03K)

410 Nood finally

Posted by: Vic We Have No Party at December 10, 2017 12:23 PM (mpXpK)

411 Well, I couldn't find Reindeer Boobs on boredpanda, but I searched glitter beard and got an eyeful. Not just glitter beards, but beards with Christmas lights, and Christmas balls. Wowza.

Posted by: bluebell ~ get cooking, Horde! at December 10, 2017 12:25 PM (kNasr)

412 Try the Travis McGee series by John D. MacDonald. With 21 paperbacks you should be able to find one or two in the used stacks. If you enjoy the Joe Pickett series by C. J. Box that was mentioned earlier, you might enjoy the Virgil Flowers books by John Sandford.

Posted by: Peter at December 10, 2017 12:26 PM (9LtBS)

413 Wishing you the best of luck!

Posted by: H. Solo at December 10, 2017 12:26 PM (EzdLW)

414 Heh. I'm vaguely referenced on the back cover.

Posted by: buzzion at December 10, 2017 12:26 PM (cAnNx)

415 Godless. Too much rape. There were at least two shown and a third discussed in, what, six episodes. Who do they think I am, Weinstein?

Posted by: Bear with Assymetrical Balls at December 10, 2017 12:27 PM (H5knJ)

416 After my first ( actually the second) Aubrey/ Maturin book I got A Sea of Words explaining the linguistics of the book. That is one of a few I wish were not ebooks.

Posted by: Skip at December 10, 2017 12:27 PM (aC6Sd)

417 buzzion! Yes, yes you are!

Posted by: bluebell ~ get cooking, Horde! at December 10, 2017 12:27 PM (kNasr)

418 Eris, you may want to check your spam folder again since I sent you a snippet.

Posted by: Anna Puma (HQCaR) at December 10, 2017 12:28 PM (z/8Yh)

419 415 Godless. Too much rape. There were at least two shown and a third discussed in, what, six episodes. Who do they think I am, Weinstein?
Posted by: Bear with Assymetrical Balls at December 10, 2017 12:27 PM (H5knJ)
---
It's one saving grace is that it is severely underlit (I'm still in episode 1).

Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at December 10, 2017 12:28 PM (qJtVm)

420 Missed that Oppenheimer mini-series. In fact missed many of the shows he was in. And those eyebrows, dude use the clippers.

Posted by: Anna Puma (HQCaR) at December 10, 2017 12:06 PM (z/8Yh)


========

To resist the eyebrow shamers, I'm calling for a national dye your eyebrows day.

Posted by: Martin Scorcese at December 10, 2017 12:29 PM (/qEW2)

421 It paints Benedict Arnold in a new light. It would make a good movie if it isn't already. Posted by: Brave Sir Robin at December 10, 2017 11:24 AM (ty7RM
=====

'Burr' by Gore Vidal is a great read. No matter what you think of the guy, he could write. He was also raised steeped in the military traditions. Great read.

Posted by: mustbequantum at December 10, 2017 12:29 PM (MIKMs)

422 Found it Anna.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at December 10, 2017 12:30 PM (qJtVm)

423 I'm vaguely referenced on the back cover.

If there's hope for the deceased like you, there's got to be hope for me. Even with all of my problems, I'm still alive, which should give me a leg up...

Posted by: Thing From Snowy Mountain at December 10, 2017 12:30 PM (3/HOt)

424 I don't know if it has been mentioned but, those who like Jack and Maturin will probably like Dewy Lambdin and his Alan Lewrie series. Lewrie has a much more "moronic" outlook and is a complete poon hound. Starts off good, gets better, and puts him at the heart of a lot of the smaller and less known actions of the wars.

Posted by: Catman at December 10, 2017 12:34 PM (HxsWp)

425 Bluebell, a friend of mine with a glorious beard put decorations in it last year. It was hilarious. The glitter is a bridge too far.

Posted by: no good deed at December 10, 2017 12:37 PM (eIQHF)

426 Steven Saylor's books set in the last days of Republican Rome centering around Gordianus (the Finder) are first-rate books with a solid grounding in the realities of ancient Rome.

Posted by: Larry at December 10, 2017 12:39 PM (QlVtc)

427 Cool Eris, thanks.

Posted by: Anna Puma (HQCaR) at December 10, 2017 12:41 PM (z/8Yh)

428 The cookbook is fun. I think I'm going have to get the paperback, too!

Good job, Weasel & bluebell!

Posted by: Gem at December 10, 2017 12:42 PM (XoAz8)

429
I can't wait to try Jane D'oh's Charleston Pickled Shrimp.

It must be delicious, since it's published at least three times so far!

Posted by: Spun and Murky at December 10, 2017 12:43 PM (4DCSq)

430 Please, no lit candles in your Hanukkah beards.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at December 10, 2017 12:45 PM (qJtVm)

431 How about battery operated LED candles?

Posted by: Anna Puma (HQCaR) at December 10, 2017 12:48 PM (z/8Yh)

432 Ah, detective novels. There are so many good ones out there. I like Harry Bosch (by Michael Connelly); Richard Jury (by Martha Grimes); Adam Dalgleish (by P.D. James); Matt Scudder (by Lawrence Block); Kinsey Milhone (by Sue Grafton); Nero Wolfe (by Rex Stout); Edward X. Delaney (by Lawrence Sanders).

Posted by: Bookaday at December 10, 2017 12:54 PM (2qDS0)

433 And I still have no urge to buy this book when it comes out

http://www.baen.com/mission-to-methone-earc.html

Posted by: Anna Puma (HQCaR) at December 10, 2017 12:56 PM (z/8Yh)

434 Late to the party but wanted to mention if it hasn't been, Campion, the last detective and many BBC programs can be found on Acorn TV. It's a Brit (some Canadian and Aussie too) streaming channel. It can be accessed on Netflix or Amazon prime. I pay just over $4/month for it.

Posted by: Finn McCool at December 10, 2017 12:57 PM (Cehzz)

435 Mark Helprin has a new novel, "Paris in Real Time,"

Posted by: Smallish Bees at December 10, 2017 11:20 AM (YPgXi)

That man can write!
Posted by: CharlieBrown'sDildo
-------------

Helprin's books cross the line from 'novel', to 'literature'. An amazing writer. I have numerous pages in 'Winters Tale' dogeared at interestingly phrased passages.

Posted by: Mike Hammer,etc., etc. at December 10, 2017 12:57 PM (AI/Vm)

436 Jake--and others--the first book in the Aubrey Maturin series is in fact largely unreadable. Plow through it or better yet skip ahead--O'Brien got less cryptic and technical as he went on. It's worth it.

I got into the books because I read an excerpt from "Desolation Island" about the roaring forties chase and sinking of the Wakzamheid, which is one of the most gripping pieces of fiction I have ever read. Since then I've read all 20 books at least 3 times. There is nothing to compare to them.

There is a scene at the end of "The Reverse of The Medal" where Aubrey is sentenced to public humiliation by being placed in the stocks for the stock swindle scheme. He faces gangs of thugs and hooligans who are planning to throw garbage, rocks and all manner of crap at him. His former crew members materialize in the crowd to protect him. It is extremely well written and quite moving. When they do the 75-part TV series that will be a memorable scene.

Posted by: boatbuilder at December 10, 2017 01:09 PM (pKZ3W)

437 I guess I'll me-too while the thread's winding down: I think Mark Helprin is one of the great ones. I'll probably read his stuff again once I get ahold of my replacement Kindle.

Posted by: Thing From Snowy Mountain at December 10, 2017 01:20 PM (3/HOt)

438 And then it all kind of goes stupid at the end. Chabon decided to go full liberal retard about the Bush Administration, even though it's an alternate universe.
Posted by: Trimegistus at December 10, 2017 11:13 AM (ErN1Q)
---
I'm a big fan of Chabon's works but this one never compelled me to read past a few chapters. Glad I didn't push past that.

Doesn't BDS seem like a world away, now that we have TDS? They keep ramping up their hysteria.
Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at December 10, 2017 11:18 AM (qJtVm)


My wife dragged me to see Chabon speak at the main library downtown. "Annoying little worm" is my thumbnail description.

Posted by: Captain Hate at December 10, 2017 01:23 PM (y7DUB)

439 436 Interesting you say jump to second book, I started with second and went up to Desolation Isand then found the 1stt book in 2nd hand shop. I did like the 1st book. I am going to keep looking for that series in 2nd hand but only other was one I alrady had. Saw 1 of the Sharpe series of which I have 1 of. Those are actually more in my expertise.

Posted by: Skip at December 10, 2017 01:26 PM (aC6Sd)

440 Getting ready to read the horde's cookbook when it gets delivered this week,

Posted by: Charlotte at December 10, 2017 01:37 PM (Uz88Z)

441 I have to vote for Cake Girl. The others, lovely as they are, are prettied-up models. But she's the real thing. And it's hard to beat a cute brunette with nice elbows who bakes for you. I know, I've been married to one for 29 years.

I must admit that, even in my teens when I devoured them, I never like the character of Hornblower himself. The portrayal of him as rather neurotic was just the standard issue for the times (40s through early 70s), and I just put up with it because it seems the way current writers wrote. But I have to say older (and later) writers were a breath of fresh air.

On Chesteron: you're going to love him or hate him. No one else writes at all like that. And if you want the people he really hates, look at his portrayal of Germans and Muzzies. When he tries to be sympathetic, he makes them into Frenchmen with funny accents. (His real flaw was his worship of France, which got entirely out of hand.)

Posted by: George LeS at December 10, 2017 01:40 PM (+TcCF)

442 About used books, I just checked to see what I paid for the Houghton-Mifflen 1951 hardback of Churchill's 'The Grand Alliance'. $1.00

Posted by: Mike Hammer,etc., etc. at December 10, 2017 01:59 PM (AI/Vm)

443 * 'Mifflin'

Posted by: Mike Hammer,etc., etc. at December 10, 2017 02:00 PM (AI/Vm)

444 Received my Son's copy of "The Deplorable Gormet" today....because some idiot forgot to change the default mailing address to his son's address.

So, another copy will be purchased and sent off, hopefully, with the correct address selected.

Posted by: blake at December 10, 2017 02:21 PM (WEBkv)

445 Thanks much for the review and mention of my book, Heretics of St. Possenti. And thank YOU, book-horde, for taking a chance on a book in a genre that doesn't see many visitors from these parts, I'd bet.

Merry Christmas!

Posted by: Rolf at December 10, 2017 02:34 PM (uVq6n)

446 By way of joining the group at Goodreads, I was wondering if the Horde can recommend a nonfiction book about Civil War Southerners who fought for the Union and vice versa. Thanks in advance!

Posted by: Impudent Warwick at December 10, 2017 02:40 PM (jMqdZ)

447 I'm not even halfway through the comments, so someone may have already axed, but does Ace still get credit if we order the Depolorable Cookbook through the HQ portal? If so, could one of you fine 'rons or 'ettes provide that linky? I've never used it before.

Thanks!

Posted by: SandyCheeks at December 10, 2017 02:41 PM (ihzOe)

448 447
I'm not even halfway through the comments, so someone may have already
axed, but does Ace still get credit if we order the Depolorable Cookbook
through the HQ portal? If so, could one of you fine 'rons or 'ettes
provide that linky? I've never used it before.



Thanks!

Posted by: SandyCheeks at December 10, 2017 02:41 PM (ihzOe)


its up at the top right-hand corner of the home page.

Posted by: Vic We Have No Party at December 10, 2017 02:44 PM (mpXpK)

449 Swords Around a Throne new would easily be $30 but found it at used for $7, wasn't going to pass that up.

Posted by: Skip at December 10, 2017 03:03 PM (aC6Sd)

450 If anyone is interested in Jo Nesbo, consider starting with the beginning of the Scandinavian crime mystery wave with the Martin Beck mysteries. Written between 1965 and 1975 there are only 10, and they are excellent. Dark mysteries, the characters develop and it's easy to see why these continue to be popular both as crime novels and television in UK and Sweden.

Posted by: johnoh at December 10, 2017 03:38 PM (m2Xh0)

451 Finished the Perry Mason book "The Case of the Vagabond Virgin" and decided to take another whack at the TBR agglomeration. Picked out the first Hard Luck Hank novel, which I got as a 2016 Christmas present. I had requested it at the recommendation of the Horde. I first cracked it that Christmas afternoon but stalled out at Chapter 4. This time I'm up to Chapter 7 and will keep going.

I also need to check comic publishers' websites to see what trade collections are coming out. I've cut way back on my comics buying, but I'm not done with them yet.

Posted by: Weak Geek at December 10, 2017 03:48 PM (G+J43)

452 "whose library is that in the picture? the problem is not the ladder going up, it's coming down with an armful of books."

I noticed that immediately. It's pretty but not functional.

Posted by: pst314 at December 10, 2017 04:29 PM (16pX7)

453 Just could not get into Thomas Covenant. So I downloaded two old Zane Grey books I haven't read in a while. Unfortunately they were not available on Gutenberg for free. and they haven't been on Amazon for long because i had checked before.

Posted by: Vic We Have No Party at December 10, 2017 04:39 PM (mpXpK)

454 James Lee Burke's Robicheaux series - even when Burke is formulaic, he's better than Parkcer and Nesbo combined.

And also the Preston and Child Pendergast series -- I read them (considerably) more quickly than anything else, despite (perhaps because of) the outrageous plots.

Posted by: NCC at December 10, 2017 07:09 PM (MduyG)

455 That particular library has the stench of IKEA all over it.

Posted by: KentAllard at December 10, 2017 08:02 PM (TQw9b)

456 C'mon folks, let's admit to our guilty pleasures:

Robert Crais - the Elvis Cole/Joe Pike Series: PI series set in LA;

Dennis Lehane - the Patrick Kenzie/Angela Gennaro Series: PI series set in Boston;

John Sandford - the Prey Series (mostly Lucas Davenport, with later addition of related Virgil Flowers series, too) - Police Detective Series set in Minnesota;

Michael Connelly - Harry Bosch Series: Police Detective Series set in LA (and recently adapted for TV and pretty well done, but read the books first, or at least the first few);

Jussi Adler-Olsen - Department Q Series: Police Detective Series Set in Denmark (translated from original Danish).

John Connelly - Charlie Parker Series: PI Series set in Northeast but moves around (much "darker" than some of the other series and has a touch of evil mysticism);

James Lee Burke - Dave Robicheaux Series: Police Detective/PI Series set in Louisiana;

Jonathon Kellerman - Alex Delaware Series: Police/Shrink Detective Series (main character a private shrink who helps LA Police Detective friend).

ISome are faster reads than others, but fun (and great escapism). Some of these series have more than 20 books and are continuing.

By the way, many of these authors write stand-alone novels unrelated to their series and some of those are excellent. For example, don't overlook "Alphabet House' by Adler Olsen - stunning; or "Shutter Island" by Lehane (has been made into movie, too).

Posted by: Marty at December 10, 2017 09:00 PM (xqnfZ)

457 I don't care for Saylor's short stories, but his novels are first rate. So, "Roma" sucks, but "Roman Blood" is a great read.

Posted by: Larry at December 10, 2017 09:54 PM (QlVtc)

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