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Sunday Morning Book Thread: 11/12/2017

Bodlian Library.jpg

Bodleian Library, Oxford University, England

One of my first book quests was for the second and third installments of a very exciting and interesting (for a 13-year-old) Science Fiction novel called The Persimmion Sequence, by an unknown author called Don J. Fretland. I had a buddy who also liked Sci-Fi, and he found the book as fun as I did, so off we went into the wilds of 1970s NYC to find another copy, and hopefully to get the rest of the series, which was touted in the first, but was mysteriously absent from the simple pre-internet searches we could conduct.

Persimmion sequence.jpg

We even had the smarts to contact the publisher, who didn't respond to two nagging teenagers. But we never found the book, which was frustrating, but the hunt sure was fun.

Many years later I decided to find the complete work, and managed to get all three! I reread the first installment, and found that it was an awkwardly written but well-planned and interesting story. The second and third? Wow...a hot mess.

But...what a blast to revisit that search! I wonder if my buddy did the same thing.

******

As more and more of us become comfortable with Kindle-style readers, what is the future of printed books? I like them both, but there a few categories in my that will remain printed and bound forever. Dictionaries are so wonderful as big, heavy, ponderous tomes that go thud when you put them down on the desk. Looking up one word is a flash on an electronic systems, but there is something so satisfying about a dictionary that gives you a glimpse of strange and wonderful words just a few entries away from your original search. That's the kind of experience that is difficult to replicate with digital books.
******

Moron A.M. Sterling has published his novel, but I will let him describe it....
mountainthrone.jpg

It is a fantasy novel at the point where the genre Venn diagrams of 'Dark,' 'Low,' and 'Epic' overlap. All three labels are partially accurate, but the industry types who have commented have put it into 'Epic.'

It is a well-developed setting with a complex plot that manages not to be a Gordian Knot, but it is really a character story. No unchanging archetypes here. Even the secondary characters got high marks from my early readers. Theme is wrapped up with the characters. There are three protagonists and, while they share a common plot, their individual portions carry different themes: mystery and discovery, political intrigue and warring loyalties, and espionage and escape. The characters change quite a bit over the course of the story.

For those who like to be moved by art, you will be pleased to hear that real tears were shed by several of my alpha readers. There is a humorous blurb on the back cover to that effect.


The Mountain Throne: Book I of the Sindathi Twilight Trilogy (Volume 1)
Plus it has a map. A really cool map. And I am a sucker for maps!
mountainthronemap.PNG

******

And a note from Moron and author Hans G. Schantz, who gives us a heads-up about a couple of books.....
Wanted to make sure the Moron Horde knows that Daniel Humphreys' excellent A Place Outside the Wild now has a sequel. A Place Called Hope is the kind of smart, action-packed zombie thriller we've come to expect from Humphreys - and it's just $0.99 for a limited time.

Also, my own The Hidden Truth will be on sale this week for $0.99. My most recent reviewer learned about The Hidden Truth thanks to you...


Support your local Moron!

[Wasn't that a movie?]

Posted by: CBD at 09:00 AM




Comments

(Jump to bottom of page)

1 Good Morning folks

Posted by: rhennigantx at November 12, 2017 08:58 AM (bmkS9)

2 2

Posted by: Steve and Cold Bear at November 12, 2017 08:58 AM (/qEW2)

3
I haven't read a book in a long time.

Posted by: Soothsayer -- That's class! at November 12, 2017 09:00 AM (ENxvy)

4 I don't know if I can actually stand a thread that doesn't keep my rage and blood pressure bouncing on the peg. I'll give it a go though.

Posted by: goon at November 12, 2017 09:01 AM (EaQ6/)

5 Good morning fellow Book Threadists. I hope everyone had a wonderful week of reading. And thanks to CBD for the thread.

Posted by: JTB at November 12, 2017 09:04 AM (V+03K)

6 The second and third? Wow...a hot mess.

========

Well, duh! You should have been able to figure that out by the change in the cover art.

http://tinyurl.com/lkyvz7q

Posted by: Steve and Cold Bear at November 12, 2017 09:04 AM (/qEW2)

7
Speaking of books, if you get the COMET tv channel, Men Into Space is on right now. After that, Johnny Sokko and his Flying Robit is on.

Posted by: Soothsayer -- That's class! at November 12, 2017 09:04 AM (ENxvy)

8 That thing about how a dictionary leads you to a new adventure in learning is potentially very important, not to mention valuable. Nice catch of something that all of us have experienced, but not monetized. Yet.

Posted by: goon at November 12, 2017 09:05 AM (EaQ6/)

9
About Oregon Muse - I just mentioned to wife his story and she said, "Was he tested for Lyme Disease?".

Because a friend of hers - the husband - had a seizure and they discovered it was due to Lyme. I've had Lyme twice. It's real sneaky. Sometimes there's definite symptoms, sometimes the only clue is elevated temperature.

Posted by: Ace Tractor Seat Supply at November 12, 2017 09:06 AM (ajiE5)

10 Top twenty

Posted by: Traveling Man at November 12, 2017 09:06 AM (R5lpX)

11 Tolle lege
Finished Thomas Carlyle' book 19 on the History of Frederick the Great, only this book ( 20) and 1 more to go. This is covering 1761,2 of the Seven Year War. But am going to finish Master and Commander the first of Patrick O'Brian's series of naval warfare in the Napoleonic era.

Posted by: Skip at November 12, 2017 09:07 AM (aC6Sd)

12 Ah 'De Book Thread'


Started on a reread of the Mistborn Trilogy and downloaded a continuation with the Allow of Law. These are by Brian Sanderson who finished up the Wheel of Time series after Jordan died. However I stopped and moved over to a re-read of the Honor Harrington series as I started getting burned out on the Mistborn stuff.

Posted by: Vic We Have No Party at November 12, 2017 09:07 AM (mpXpK)

13 Wow, that's a library?

Posted by: Vic We Have No Party at November 12, 2017 09:08 AM (mpXpK)

14  I haven't read a book in a long time.
Posted by: Soothsayer -- That's class! at November 12, 2017 09:00 AM 

Then no time like the present to pick up War and Peace by Leon Tolstoy

Posted by: Skip at November 12, 2017 09:10 AM (aC6Sd)

15 As more and more of us become comfortable with Kindle-style readers,
what is the future of printed books? I like them both, but there a few
categories in my that will remain printed and bound forever.



I was against e-books in the beginning but my deteriorating eye sight made me give them a try. I will never go back.

Posted by: Vic We Have No Party at November 12, 2017 09:10 AM (mpXpK)

16 Listening to Lord of the Flies on the commute to school with my 12 year old. Interestingly, William Golding is reading it to us. I think it was recorded in the 1970s.

In the introduction, Golding explains why he didn't have both boys and girls on the island, or simply all girls on the island. His answer is non-PC, basically saying that a group of young boys boiled down into the constituent parts of a civilization, whereas a group of girls didn't. He knew the feminists wouldn't like that, but that is how he saw it.

Coincidentally, I was checking wikipedia to see more about Golding, and I noticed that an all female movie production of Lord of the Flies is currently in the works.

Good thing they waited til Golding had passed. He would have had a bird. I equate it to what Walt Disney would think of the development of his company in the past decade or so. Neither would be happy, I think.

Posted by: squeakywheel at November 12, 2017 09:10 AM (S2w5P)

17 The maps at the beginning of The Hobbit and LOTR may be part of their success. Is there a D&D player who doesn't like maps?

Posted by: BourbonChicken at November 12, 2017 09:11 AM (rnAwa)

18 What the heck my last comment disappeared.

Posted by: freaked at November 12, 2017 09:12 AM (UdKB7)

19 They must have taken that beautiful picture on one of the days when the BBC bribed the weather gods to give them sunshine so that they could film a crime drama without all of the lighting and umbrellas.

Posted by: goon at November 12, 2017 09:12 AM (EaQ6/)

20 Well...if it really is Support Your Local Moron Sunday, I do have a new novel called REPUTATION. (Link below.) It's a story about a young civil engineer who loses his footing in the world, with terrible consequences. I think of it as a civic novel, very much in the tradition of Aeschylus.

goo.gl/eppGQ7

Posted by: Caliban at November 12, 2017 09:13 AM (QE8X6)

21 I've been reading "New Lands" by Charles Fort. Turns out that scientist's predicitions in the 1800s were mostly wrong too.

Posted by: freaked at November 12, 2017 09:14 AM (UdKB7)

22 Read a book on the trip to China and back about the history and politics surrounding the battle and retreat at Dunkirk. It had perspectives from the English, the French and the German views. The circumstances and political views that were described that led to the rise of socialism and the Nazis taking power were pretty much in line with what's happening today.

Posted by: CrotchetyOldJarhead at November 12, 2017 09:14 AM (oLTNb)

23 Girls would have civilized Lott, it would have lead to open warfare in the fight for the girls, more than 1 fat kid would have died.

Posted by: Skip at November 12, 2017 09:15 AM (aC6Sd)

24 'After that, Johnny Sokko and his Flying Robit is on. '

Johnny's robot is awesome. Hard to believe he built that using only an Erector Set and sone surplus Soviet military stuff.

Posted by: freaked at November 12, 2017 09:15 AM (UdKB7)

25 Jamie McFarlane just came out with "On a Pale Ship." I decent scifi book in a future of his creation. I really enjoy his stuff as there is some pretty good themes and it can be light hearted at times.

Posted by: TheGarbone at November 12, 2017 09:16 AM (9dH/8)

26 It's Lord of the Flys, the new update is changing my typing. And the dictionary seems to be starting from scratch.

Posted by: Skip at November 12, 2017 09:16 AM (aC6Sd)

27 I would buy the LOTR trilogy again. If they would sync the soundtrack so that when I turned to the appropriate pages that the beautiful music would play. Can't tell that I'm hooked on the movies, right?

Posted by: goon at November 12, 2017 09:17 AM (EaQ6/)

28 I read 'Harm's Way' by James Bassett. A fairly good WW2 Navy read. The movie 'In Harm's Way' is based on this book. I prefer the book, but the movie does have John Wayne and two absolutely gorgeous actresses, Patricia Neal and Paula Prentiss.

Currently reading, or more correctly slogging through 'Lord Jim' by Joseph Conrad.

For your listening pleasure.

B-Tribe-The Sun
https://youtu.be/meNU0pYTUrY

Hank Williams, Jr-Country Boys Can Survive
https://youtu.be/3cQNkIrg-Tk

The Black Angels-You On The Run
https://youtu.be/jvnLlwBWhg4

Posted by: Jake Holenhead at November 12, 2017 09:18 AM (Kfmqy)

29 Coincidentally, I was checking wikipedia to see more about Golding, and I noticed that an all female movie production of Lord of the Flies is currently in the works.

Good thing they waited til Golding had passed. He would have had a bird. I equate it to what Walt Disney would think of the development of his company in the past decade or so. Neither would be happy, I think.
Posted by: squeakywheel at November 12, 2017 09:10 AM (S2w5P)


How insulting to Golding while ignoring that he was much more intelligent and creative than those spiteful hormonal nightmares. There's no way it won't be unwatchable man hating trash like the horrible The Piano.

Posted by: Captain Hate at November 12, 2017 09:19 AM (y7DUB)

30 Yay book thread!!!
thanks CBD!

Abd hu to OM in case he is lurking

(ps CBD good job on formatting the amazon links)

Posted by: votermom pimping great books! at November 12, 2017 09:19 AM (hMwEB)

31 Abd hu = And hi

Posted by: votermom pimping great books! at November 12, 2017 09:20 AM (hMwEB)

32 I'm starting to like this guy...

"Charles Fort (1874-1932) fancied himself a true skeptic, one who opposes all forms of dogmatism, believes nothing, and does not take a position on anything"

Posted by: freaked at November 12, 2017 09:21 AM (UdKB7)

33 I'm a moron with a new book out, if anyone's interested. It's called FALL FROM GRACE, was released by Bancroft Press in September, and stirred up a little controversy with some Christian readers who bought it thinking it fell into the no-sex, no-profanity Christian fiction genre (they gave it one-star reviews). I did get a great review from Midwest Book Reviews and Booklist. So hop on over and take a peek at it on Amazon to see if it's your kind of thing. FALL FROM GRACE by Libby Sternberg

Posted by: Libby at November 12, 2017 09:21 AM (Ipnbk)

34 I found my missing comment on the EMT. I blame Venusians.

Posted by: freaked at November 12, 2017 09:22 AM (UdKB7)

35 I am also a convert to e-readers. It just makes more sense for me to be able to read the words the first time through. I admit to loving the smell of books ... damn! Another million dollar idea! Woot!

Posted by: goon at November 12, 2017 09:22 AM (EaQ6/)

36 Hi, all - I've been away from the intetubules over the last couple of weeks, trying to finish up two more books for the end of year shopping season -- and doing market events with my daughter and her origami art... so...
A Fifth of Luna City in the eBook edition is released as of the 15th and is available for pre-order, Print version will be out by the end of the month. And - finished the last touches on the follow-up to Lone Star Sons (a historically accurate version of the Lone Ranger, without the mask, silver bullets, etc) - that new book is Lone Star Glory, and will be available very soon as an eBook, and in print by Christmas.
Next Friday, I'll be in the Author Hall at the New Braunfels Weihnachtsmatkt, which is held in the Convention Center on Coll and San Antonio streets in New Braunfels. I posted the link for A Fifth of Luna City on last week's book-thread - but just go to my Amazon author page: Celia D. Hayes - and look out for the other writer Celia Hayes, who is a Brit and does rom-com.

Posted by: Sgt. Mom at November 12, 2017 09:23 AM (xnmPy)

37 Condolences Traveling Man.

CBD did you ever hit up the Federation Trading Post while you were searching in 1970s Manhattan?

Posted by: San Franpsycho at November 12, 2017 09:23 AM (Q5xjQ)

38 Okay, Libby. I've been looking for a good dirty book for a couple of days! (just kidding, doing a little Bloody Mary talkin', no offense intended!)

Posted by: goon at November 12, 2017 09:24 AM (EaQ6/)

39 Been reading the survivalist series by An American. I'm up to book eight.

It's fairly well written and is fast paced and doesn't get bogged down in the details. The first seven books were mainly about the Remnant, patriotic Americans living on the fringes as Rogues in Homeland Security tried to take over the country. All of the action in this series so far has centered around Central Florida. It's got all the elements, "FEMA Camps", criminal gangs who go around stealing, raping and killing the weak outliers.

It also shows people coming together for common cause and protection from the marauders and HS.

Book eight gets into foreign powers trying to sneak in for their own nefarious purposes.

We have the dead tree versions, but I'm sure they are available on Kindle, ect.




Posted by: Traveling Man at November 12, 2017 09:24 AM (R5lpX)

40 Greetings from (almost) Utopia! I gave a talk this weekend to an association of Vachel Lindsay enthusiasts comparing his poetic/mystical/downright weird novel "The Golden Book of Springfield" to other utopian/dystopian works published in his lifetime. The biggest difference is that Lindsay's vision of Springfield IL, his hometown, in 2018 (100 years after the book was written) is not about whiz-bang tech/scientific advances, or big ideas for solving the world's problems, but about capturing/reviving the spirit of a community. The talk was well received and I'm hoping to do it again during the coming year.

Posted by: Secret Square at November 12, 2017 09:25 AM (9WuX0)

41 Morning book people. I'm drinking coffee and watching my mother rake leaves. Hey, no pants. Don't judge.

Currently in Frank Herbert's futuristic Cold War SF story "Under Pressure", about a Psych/Electronics genius aboard a sub-tug that is going deep into enemy territory to tap an oil field for precious resources. Minds will of course start to crack under pressure. This novel was written in the 50's before the whole Peak Oil thing.

My first non-Dune Herbert novel, and I am impressed with his deft characterizations and dialog. Whoever recommended this in the august book thread, thank you.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at November 12, 2017 09:25 AM (VTMWE)

42 While recovering from surgery I have been rereading the Archy McNally series by Lawrence Sanders. Basically a lighthearted mystery series. Archy is the main character and narrator and lives in Palm Beach, FL with his parents. Father is an attorney, he is not (got kicked out of Yale Law) but he is a partner in the firm and runs the Discreet Inquiries department. The series is a bit like Nero Wolfe with well-developed details about the home where they live, the meals, Archy's girlfriend, life in Palm Beach, etc. Very frothy but just what is needed if you want a light read.

Posted by: Dr Alice at November 12, 2017 09:25 AM (LaT54)

43 Thanks CBD!
It was nice to see OM's update post yesterday.

Posted by: SouthEast PA Lurker at November 12, 2017 09:26 AM (vFHFh)

44
Downstairs in bed I read e-books. Upstairs in my study I read dead tree books. It's a combination of 1) the most comfortable position and 2) the focal length of my eyes.

Posted by: Hadrian the Seventh at November 12, 2017 09:27 AM (EqqJ1)

45 CrotchetyOldJarhead, you went to China?

so cool that there are so many new Horde books!

Posted by: votermom pimping great books! at November 12, 2017 09:28 AM (hMwEB)

46 This week I read "Under the Skin," recommended by naturalfake in a Halloween book thread. While I'm not into sci-fi, and I don't quite get the full comparison to Animal Farm, it was a different, but eye-opening experience. It was yet another creepy read that will stick with me a long time. If you're into horror and like a sci-fi angle, highly recommended. Thanks, naturalfake!

Posted by: SandyCheeks at November 12, 2017 09:29 AM (zSRRl)

47 Posted by: Soothsayer -- That's class! at November 12, 2017 09:04 AM (ENxvy)

I am addicted to Comet. You never know what you'll get. Mexican Godzilla knock-off? Why not!

Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at November 12, 2017 09:29 AM (VTMWE)

48 Also, this week the WSJ had an interview with Lee Childs which I found interesting. I haven't yet read any of his books (or seen the movies) but I'm planning to give him a try.

Posted by: Dr Alice at November 12, 2017 09:30 AM (LaT54)

49 Watched a video at TFB TV on youboob about Col. Dillon's captured AK-47 turning up in a London museum and how they reunited him with at least where it was and his story behind the capture.

He carved his name into the stock in big letter "G.P Dillon 1/7". He won it on an op in a different area than the Ia Drang though.

Great video and his story is quite funny as to how he came to get the weapon and how he lost it to Army BS.

Of course, I had to break out "We were Soldiers Once, and Young" to refresh my memory.

Posted by: Hairyback Guy at November 12, 2017 09:30 AM (nUkMr)

50 How did the show go yesterday, Hadrian?

Posted by: no good deed at November 12, 2017 09:31 AM (eIQHF)

51 That's a beautiful library, but one can get a lot more storage for a lot less money in a big square building with metal siding, metal roof. And maintenance is easier ... imagine painting that ornate library.

ha ... we have a beautiful library here, now a museum. The new library has some nice architectural features around it, but is more of the box variety. A lot of nice projects were done here by the CCC and other work projects of the 1930's. Maybe we can "train" (program) robots to build more ornate and awesome structures in the future.

Suburbs build houses with lots of different angles and dormers which I guess hides the big box aspect, but they seem overly complicated (for building and repairing especially) and not that interesting.

Paul Joseph Watson has pushed that theme a few times, about the ugly communist architecture.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GapUEKYLE1o

Posted by: illiniwek at November 12, 2017 09:31 AM (/aIFg)

52 I have a bunch of time travel books from the library to read, thanks to last Sunday's book thread.

Posted by: votermom pimping great books! at November 12, 2017 09:32 AM (hMwEB)

53 All Hail Eris,

Last weeks book thread you asked about suggestions for books on the Army Corps of Engineers in Asia. This isn't a book, but a website which you might already know about. It has a lot of neat stuff about the CBI Theater.

cbi-theater dot com
https://tinyurl.com/yb3eqzjc

It seems that those who served in the China-Burma-India Theater called it Confusion Beyond Imagination.

Posted by: Jake Holenhead at November 12, 2017 09:34 AM (Kfmqy)

54 My son is making a greater foray into fantasy with Mistborn. I am so pleased to see his love of reading develop.

Posted by: no good deed at November 12, 2017 09:35 AM (eIQHF)

55 Secret Square, I once, more than 40 years ago, chose to read The Congo in a mixed race speech class as my presentation for that day. I had always found it rhythmic and almost an adventure yarn. I suddenly realized, mid-way through, how hurtful and awful my choice was. I was on a basketball scholarship, and had black friends, so I didn't have to pretend not to be a racist, but I still regret that day. I don't believe that I have read Lindsay since. I'll maybe break my fast.

Posted by: goon at November 12, 2017 09:35 AM (EaQ6/)

56 E-readers are a convenience and sometimes a money saver. I have hundreds of books on mine. But there are certain books that need to be completely under my control. Reference books like dictionaries and thesauri, home repair, tool use and cookbooks, the great works of literature such as Shakespeare and many others, books of sentimental value like LOTR that I re-read frequently, history books especially about fundamental matters all qualify. Basically, any books I don't want to leave to the vagaries of some electronic gremlins, technical or commercial. As long as I have a candle or lantern, there is nothing between me and entertainment and learning.

I am lucky that my glasses allow me to read normally without having to rely on expandable text sizing. When it comes to maps and illustrations, I would rather use a good magnifying glass if needed.

In a culture where more and more matters are being taken out of our hands, literally, or worse are being given away through laziness and ignorance (Carry cash? What for? I have a smart phone! What could go wrong?) I take comfort in some things that remain in my grasp.

Mini-rant off.

PS: Mrs. JTB and I LOOOOVE maps. Besides the various atlases, we have been known to haunt the local AAA office to scarf up all the paper maps they carry.

Posted by: JTB at November 12, 2017 09:37 AM (V+03K)

57 Good morning, fellow readers!

I don't remember who recommended them, but I'm working on
"Execution by Hunger" "Harvest of Sorrow."

The books are an interesting contrast, because "Execution by Hunger" is a personal account whereas "Harvest of Sorrow" delves more into the broad Stalinist policies that brought about the Ukrainian famine and subsequent death by starvation of millions.

Posted by: Blake at November 12, 2017 09:37 AM (WEBkv)

58 A Place Called Hope... zombies...

That's the one about the Clintons, right, and their rancid, undying craving for power?

Posted by: an indifferent penguin at November 12, 2017 09:37 AM (rqHtf)

59 Tom Wolfe's "From Bauhaus to Our House" just destroys the featureless boxes of the New Architecture.

There was one essay on "Corbu" and his Worker's Paradise-style housing project for which he had strict rules on use of sun shades - either fully drawn, halfway down, or fully drawn to maintain aesthetic appeal.

Of course the trogs ended up hanging laundry out and stinking up the joint with their cabbage and sausages. The People are so crude!

Need it be said that Corbousier himself lived in stylish, classic comfort?

Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at November 12, 2017 09:37 AM (VTMWE)

60 Posted by: JTB at November 12, 2017 09:37 AM (V+03K)

I'm one who understands the appeal of electronic devices for reading but much prefer the feel and heft of a book.

Posted by: Blake at November 12, 2017 09:39 AM (WEBkv)

61 Thanks Jake! I predict hours down the history rabbit hole.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at November 12, 2017 09:39 AM (VTMWE)

62 "or fully drawn"

I meant fully down, of course.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at November 12, 2017 09:40 AM (VTMWE)

63 >>> I have a bunch of time travel books from the library to read, thanks to last Sunday's book thread.

Posted by: votermom pimping great books! at November 12, 2017 09:32 AM (hMwEB<<<



Is there one about the Ewok's time machine, the TARDAce?

Posted by: an indifferent penguin at November 12, 2017 09:41 AM (rqHtf)

64 Thanks for the plug, CBD, and for kind words about the maps. There are four in the book.

Showering now, but I should be back in this thread later to try to harass everyone into giving a rookie fantasy author a shot.

Posted by: Apostate at November 12, 2017 09:42 AM (7d/38)

65 @58 - nope, but there's suitable awe and praise for Mattie and some snarky disdain for Paul Ryan. "That Eddie Munster-lookin' twerp", one of the characters describes him.

Posted by: Emile Antoon Khadaji at November 12, 2017 09:44 AM (4h0ts)

66 Mattis. Darn autocucumber.

Posted by: Emile Antoon Khadaji at November 12, 2017 09:44 AM (4h0ts)

67 Abd hu = And hi

Posted by: votermom pimping great books! at November 12, 2017 09:20 AM (hMwEB)


========

At least b/n and u/i are adjacent on the keyboard. Some of the typos I see here I think "How did they even do that?"

Posted by: Steve and Cold Bear at November 12, 2017 09:45 AM (/qEW2)

68 It seems that those who served in the China-Burma-India Theater called it Confusion Beyond Imagination.

Posted by: Jake Holenhead at November 12, 2017 09:34 AM (Kfmqy)


I used to collect a lot of WWII stuff. Being interested in the Flying Tigers brought me to the CBI, and after reading a lot about the CBI region I started calling it the ghetto area of WWII.

Posted by: Berserker- Dragonheads Division at November 12, 2017 09:45 AM (aMlLZ)

69 Partly book related: The Great Courses is having a sale on all their courses. Naturally, that includes a lot about books. The sale ends at midnight tonight. Just FYI.

Posted by: JTB at November 12, 2017 09:47 AM (V+03K)

70 PS: Mrs. JTB and I LOOOOVE maps. Besides the various
atlases, we have been known to haunt the local AAA office to scarf up
all the paper maps they carry.

Posted by: JTB at November 12, 2017 09:37 AM (V+03K)

Along those lines, I have and use a good GPS in my travels. But that being said, I always carry an Atlas with me. The GPS normally will take you on interstates and US routes. A lot of times, I'll take a peek at the map book and see if I can find short cuts on less traveled roads.

Posted by: Traveling Man at November 12, 2017 09:47 AM (R5lpX)

71 Currently re-reading the Ellis Peter's 'Brother Cadfell' series. Relatively simple murder mystery plots are background for interesting characters and life in 12th century England amidst the horror of the succession war between Made and Stephen.

They are a counter point to Penman's "When Christ and All His Saints Slept".

When I finish these I plan on tackling the Lindsey Davis Didius Falco series.

Posted by: Lurking Cynic at November 12, 2017 09:47 AM (pP7Dg)

72 At least b/n and u/i are adjacent on the keyboard. Some of the typos I see here I think "How did they even do that?"


Posted by: Steve and Cold Bear at November 12, 2017 09:45 AM (/qEW2)

I have about 8 or 9 keys that have worn letters, you should see some of those typos before I correct them. lol

Posted by: Berserker- Dragonheads Division at November 12, 2017 09:47 AM (aMlLZ)

73 I used to have a neighbor who was a vet of the CBI campaign. Next door neighbor. He was a hoot. I miss him.
I would see him outside and he would complain about "all those g.d. filipinos moving in to the neighborhood".

He was Filipino.

You should have seen all the collectibles he had from the war.

Posted by: navybrat at November 12, 2017 09:51 AM (w7KSn)

74 Last night on the ONT there were discussions on alternative Germany, Russia and Japan actions in WWII.

Every wargame is the start of an alternate history.

Here are two good stories on that.

The Last Article by Harry Turtledove
Thor Meets Captain America by David Brin

Posted by: NaCly Dog at November 12, 2017 09:52 AM (hyuyC)

75 " I have a bunch of time travel books from the library to read, thanks to last Sunday's book thread.

Posted by: votermom pimping great books! at November 12, 2017 09:32 AM (hMwEB"

I hope you picked up my favorite time travel novel, "Doomsday Book" by Connie Willis. I've read it multiple times.

Posted by: Tuna at November 12, 2017 09:52 AM (jm1YL)

76 "They are a counter point to Penman's "When Christ and All His Saints Slept". "

Love that book.

Posted by: Tuna at November 12, 2017 09:54 AM (jm1YL)

77 I'm already sucked into the section on the Ledo Road. I have photos of Dad standing before the sign to "Ledo Road/Liduo Lu" in English and Chinese.

He had stories of trying to build under monsoon conditions, but jeebus, the photos show how hard it must have been.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at November 12, 2017 09:55 AM (VTMWE)

78 Abd hu to OM ... ICHL.

Posted by: Off the reservation at November 12, 2017 09:56 AM (vWMNq)

79 Dr Alice,

I've read all of Lee Childs' Jack Reacher books. There're pretty good. But, like a lot of authors who write a series his latest ones are getting a bit stale.

As for the two movies with that midget Cruz, the first one was ok, and I haven't seen his second one and don't plan to. It apparently butchers the book.

Posted by: Jake Holenhead at November 12, 2017 09:56 AM (Kfmqy)

80 As for the two movies with that midget Cruz, the first one was ok, and I haven't seen his second one and don't plan to. It apparently butchers the book.
Posted by: Jake Holenhead at November 12, 2017 09:56 AM (Kfmqy)
---
I've heard that Cruise is good, but he is simply not right for the role. Jack Reacher is really tall, rangy and big-boned and his mere presence sets teeth on edge.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at November 12, 2017 09:59 AM (VTMWE)

81 De nada, SandyCheeks!


Seeking of ancient SF paperbacks-

I was rummaging through an old box of crap the other day and found a novel I'd read in my last year of high school or first year of college.

"The Carefully Considered Rape of the World"

weirdly enough written by Shepherd Mead, the author of "How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying"

It's a black comedy about every woman in the world becoming pregnant at the same time and plays out a bit like a DEVO 60's sitcom version of "The Village of the Damned".

I honestly don't remember that much about it, but I liked it well enough to read "A Big Ball of Wax" which was Mead's second SF novel.

Mead came out of the 50s-60s ad man world so that influences his take on things.


Aaannnnnyyyyyway, to my surprise, most of Mead's books are available for cheap on kindle.

So check out TCCRotW if that sounds like your kind of thing.

Posted by: naturalfake at November 12, 2017 10:00 AM (9q7Dl)

82 Posted by: votermom pimping great books! at November 12, 2017 09:19 AM (hMwEB)

I saw the comment last week but was too late to thank you....

Much appreciated!

Posted by: CharlieBrown'sDildo at November 12, 2017 10:02 AM (wYseH)

83 70 ... "Along those lines, I have and use a good GPS in my travels. But that being said, I always carry an Atlas with me."

We have a GPS as well but I find it doesn't match my opinions, the uppity POS. A few times it tried to get us to go back over a hundred miles to take the route it suggested. After that distance, it ought to take the hint. Also, now that we don't have to worry about the fastest possible drive, I try to stay off the big interstates and look for smaller roads that get us there eventually. (Helps to be retired.) That is why we always have good paper maps in the car. Must be the latent "Travels With Charley" syndrome I contracted years ago and couldn't indulge. :-)

Posted by: JTB at November 12, 2017 10:02 AM (V+03K)

84 I read 'Harm's Way' by James Bassett. A fairly good WW2 Navy read. The movie 'In Harm's Way' is based on this book. I prefer the book, but the movie does have John Wayne and two absolutely gorgeous actresses, Patricia Neal and Paula Prentiss.

Posted by: Jake Holenhead at November 12, 2017 09:18 AM (Kfmqy)


That is a pretty good WWII novel about US Navy operations in the Pacific. Bassett served as a staff officer during the war and I have no doubt that he based his characters on officers he served with. It's not all glory and some of the stuff going on is rather sordid, but the novel is worth reading since it seems like an authentic recounting of events.

Posted by: Retired Buckeye Cop is now an engineer at November 12, 2017 10:03 AM (5Yee7)

85 The books are an interesting contrast, because "Execution by Hunger" is a personal account whereas "Harvest of Sorrow" delves more into the broad Stalinist policies that brought about the Ukrainian famine and subsequent death by starvation of millions.
Posted by: Blake at November 12, 2017 09:37 AM (WEBkv)


Those were an integral part of the early narrative of Timothy Snyder's Bloodlands. I don't think there's an adequate appreciation for what the people of that area endured, being reduced to cannibalism by the Soviets and then occupied by the Nazis and forced to do whatever the fuck they ordered them to do. It's easy to think you'd refuse to knuckle under. Really? Do you really think so? Being a hero isn't for everybody otherwise they wouldn't stand out.

Posted by: Captain Hate at November 12, 2017 10:03 AM (y7DUB)

86 32 I'm starting to like this guy...

"Charles Fort (1874-1932) fancied himself a true skeptic, one who opposes all forms of dogmatism, believes nothing, and does not take a position on anything"
Posted by: freaked at November 12, 2017 09:21 AM (UdKB7)

Fort was a very interesting writer, kind of like Mencken, but with a taste for the weird & supernatural. He'd be worth a deeper look on a future book thread.

Posted by: josephistan at November 12, 2017 10:05 AM (ANIFC)

87 Bought a couple of books by Conn Iggulden in an attempt to find an author that was similar to Steven Pressfield for historical fiction. So far not successful.

Anyone who has read Pressfield have any suggestions?

Posted by: Alabaster Jones at November 12, 2017 10:06 AM (2DOZq)

88 Captain @85 --- The heroes died early. Standing up to Stalin or the Nazis diminished your life expectancy to mere minutes.

Posted by: Lurking Cynic at November 12, 2017 10:06 AM (pP7Dg)

89 I've heard that Cruise is good, but he is simply not right for the role. Jack Reacher is really tall, rangy and big-boned and his mere presence sets teeth on edge.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at November 12, 2017 09:59 AM (VTMWE)

Cruz? Dang, I must have been thinking of Penelope. You are right though, but he does a pretty good job in it.

Posted by: Jake Holenhead at November 12, 2017 10:10 AM (Kfmqy)

90 Alabaster @ 87 - If you haven't read Mary Renault you should check them out. Start with 'The King Must Die' then go on with 'Fire from Heaven' and 'The Mask off Apollo'. Unforgettable reads.

Posted by: Lurking Cynic at November 12, 2017 10:11 AM (pP7Dg)

91 I continue with my sloooow re-reading of LOTR, savoring the words and rhythms of Tolkien's writing. It is worth the extra time and, besides, I'm in no hurry. After 51 previous readings, I know how it will end.

I do love the notion of the movie soundtrack playing as I turn to that part of the book. Especially the theme for Rohan.

Posted by: JTB at November 12, 2017 10:15 AM (V+03K)

92 Lady of the Flies sounds more like a hygiene issue than a gender-focused rewrite of screenplay adapted from a novel.

Posted by: Fritz at November 12, 2017 10:17 AM (e4OJ/)

93 Oh hey, this is fun.

A few days after last week's BT discussion of Hemingway.

My youngest comes in and asks, "What do you think of Hemingway?"

So, I told him that there's no denying Hemingway's a great writer, simple clean style, etc, etc.

So, he wanted a recommendation and I told him to try "The Old Man and the Sea" cause it's short enough that it has a lot of the pleasures of Hemingway's short stories but long enough to carry the weight of a novel.

To my surprise he plowed through it in a couple of days then wanted to talk about it.

I let him talk mostly cuz I wanted to hear what he has to say. Then he says(I'm paraphrasing a bit)-

"You know, what really makes that story is the ending.

"The story is this old guy fishing and how he fishes.

But then, comes the ending and it forces you to look back and see everything a different way."


Yes! Exactly!

It's so much fun to see your kids mature and hear their thoughts.

I love that kind of novel where the ending/climax brings about a realization/re-evaluation of what has come before (I do that in my own writing).

And he enjoyed OMatS so much that he got another of Hemingway's novels to read.

Posted by: naturalfake at November 12, 2017 10:18 AM (9q7Dl)

94 Captain @85 --- The heroes died early. Standing up to Stalin or the Nazis diminished your life expectancy to mere minutes.
Posted by: Lurking Cynic at November 12, 2017 10:06 AM (pP7Dg)


Absolutely. Mass graves were full of anonymous heroes.

Posted by: Captain Hate at November 12, 2017 10:18 AM (y7DUB)

95 We have a GPS as well but I find it doesn't match my
opinions, the uppity POS. A few times it tried to get us to go back
over a hundred miles to take the route it suggested. After that
distance, it ought to take the hint. Also, now that we don't have to
worry about the fastest possible drive, I try to stay off the big
interstates and look for smaller roads that get us there eventually.
(Helps to be retired.) That is why we always have good paper maps in the
car. Must be the latent "Travels With Charley" syndrome I contracted
years ago and couldn't indulge. :-)

Posted by: JTB at November 12, 2017 10:02 AM (V+03K)

I've found that pulling over and Xing out the GPS route and re-inputting the destination will usually cure that.
When We were snowed in last spring in Northern Colorado, ( 40" inches of snow on the 18th of May.), I started reading "Travels With Charley." I've always liked Steinbeck.

Posted by: Traveling Man at November 12, 2017 10:19 AM (R5lpX)

96 The talk was well received and I'm hoping to do it again during the coming year. Posted by: Secret Square at November 12, 2017 09:25 AM (9WuX0)
=====

Daniel in the Lion's Den by Lindsay is one of my all-time favorites. He used his stage directions almost as part of the text itself. Good luck.

Congo gets a bad rap, but one black guy did a black power reading (in the 70s) and it was powerfully beautiful; but could only have been performed by an intelligent and tough black guy.

Posted by: mustbequantum at November 12, 2017 10:20 AM (MIKMs)

97 Posted by: naturalfake at November 12, 2017 10:18 AM (9q7Dl)

Nicely done!

Posted by: CrotchetyOldJarhead at November 12, 2017 10:20 AM (oLTNb)

98 Reading Escape Clause by John Sanford. Its one of his Vigil Flowers series. Fun readable murder mysteries set in Minnesota. Flowers, an investigator, arrives to one murder towing his bass boat.

Posted by: Phildirt at November 12, 2017 10:25 AM (i2iPH)

99 Back to plug my book.

Since it was introduced with a map and a few comments about maps, I'll put in the Amazon page description of the world-building.

The World of Urrael: It is a world where sorcerers obtain their powers by stealing it from the divine realm and channeling it through their own souls. They pay for this by suffering persecution by priestly powers for their blasphemous theft and by hearing strange disembodied voices in their minds, spoken by demons of the other world through their tainted souls.

The continent upon which the story focuses, Terryth, is dominated by a great empire that arose by conquest, but is now weakened by decadence, mismanagement, and corruption. Barbarians, rebels, and enemy nations test its defenses, waiting for the Imperial dynasty to stumble. Its defenders must decide what crimes they are willing to commit to save it, or abandon it to the chaos of revolution or civil war.

The uncertainty in the Empire feeds intrigues as powerbrokers and political rivals fight for the greatest shares of power. Falsehoods, betrayals, and poisonous plots abound and even maidens of the court cannot escape.

Posted by: Apostate at November 12, 2017 10:26 AM (7d/38)

100 93 ... naturalfake,

I'm not much of a Hemingway fan but Old Man and the Sea was a great suggestion. Out of curiosity, how old is the budding Hemingway fan? Seeing a sign of intellectual maturity like that must have been wonderful.

Posted by: JTB at November 12, 2017 10:29 AM (V+03K)

101 The Tower of The Five Orders:

The Bodleian Library pre-dated every attempt to catalogue large collections, and so had a shelving identification system all its own. And Shelving is kind of a big deal around here.

Each big (they are really big) set of shelves had a classical bust atop its visible end, and a book's first geo-ID was the name of that ancient worthy. Roman numerals followed to show what shelf the book dwelt-upon. Some important books came to be known only by their Bodleian code.

It was the work of a full college course to understand how to use the old system, but you needed it if you were going to have an account at Blackwell's of Oxford, and you needed that to be a grad student in philosophy in an active program. It's about as "abstruse" as any knowledge can be.

No doubt someone who calls in here has used the old Bodleian system to actually get a book out. I'd be interested in hearing about that.

Posted by: Stringer Davis at November 12, 2017 10:30 AM (H5rtT)

102 Actually, after a period of decline, book sales are tipping up slightly. I think people who read love books most of all, but like kindle's convenience and portability. My Kindle Fire has hundreds of books on it (mostly free ones from Gutenberg) but I still prefer to read an actual book.

Posted by: Christopher R Taylor at November 12, 2017 10:32 AM (39g3+)

103 Finished reading "Trophies" by J. Gunnar Grey, a well-written murder mystery with some family dynamics (both by blood and by military service) thrown in.

Now reading "Out of the Soylent Planet" by Robert Kroese. I wanted something amusing, and Kroese has delivered so far.

Posted by: roamingfirehydrant at November 12, 2017 10:33 AM (THS4q)

104 Lindsey Davis Didius Falco series.

Blech.

Try John Maddox Roberts' SPQR books instead.

I know of three Roman detective novel series, and, strangely, out of the entire expanse of Roman history, they all take place in the exact same timeframe.

(The SPQR books are the only series of the three worth reading).

Posted by: Decius Caecilius Metellus at November 12, 2017 10:33 AM (wpC7C)

105 I would buy the LOTR trilogy again. If they would sync the soundtrack so that when I turned to the appropriate pages that the beautiful music would play. Can't tell that I'm hooked on the movies, right?
Posted by: goon
..............
And I, on the other hand, feel those crappy movies ruined a lifelong love of the books.

Over several decades, I probably read the trilogy 10-15 times.. It was my go to "book" when I was feeling low or had nothing else to read.

I haven't been able to pick up the books since seeing the movies.. Peter Jackson's hack job is what I see in my mind's eye.. *sigh*

Posted by: Chi-Town Jerry at November 12, 2017 10:34 AM (5tSKk)

106 I started reading "Travels With Charley." I've always liked Steinbeck.

Posted by: Traveling Man at November 12, 2017 10:19 AM (R5lpX)

What a fun book!

Have you gotten to the scene where he gets the tires replaced? One of my favorites....

Posted by: CharlieBrown'sDildo at November 12, 2017 10:34 AM (wYseH)

107 If you like maps, here's the basic national boundary map of my fantasy world

http://tinyurl.com/ya5vpkln

Two of my novels are set in this land (mostly Morien) and I have several game supplements out for Fantasy Hero in this world.

Posted by: Christopher R Taylor at November 12, 2017 10:36 AM (39g3+)

108 Well this week's reading was revisiting an old friend plus reading an 'old' one never read before.

Heinlein's Friday is still a good fascinating read. Wonder what his take on all the 'genders' we now have would be though we get a hint at it with his description of future Vicksburg's low town.

Pournelle's Janissaries was another good read once I got past something fairly noticeable. The bones and sinews of the story are very much David Drake's Roman Legion books and H. Beam Piper's Lord Kalvan of Otherwhen and the short story "When in the Course -."

Used bookstore where I found both books uses a web-site to check the value of books.

https://bookscouter.com/

For amusement at home I ran a few books' ISBN numbers through it and found an oddity or maybe an irregularity might be more appropriate. One of my books, the publisher had reused the ISBN on because a different book came up in the search.

Posted by: Anna Puma (HQCaR) at November 12, 2017 10:37 AM (eBz9f)

109 John "Derf" Backderf, My Friend Dahmer. Graphic novel. Terrifying look at our generation's Jack The Ripper (as Derf points out) when he was just a child.

When he was a teenager Dahmer wasn't a killer yet. He did however have empathy issues and was haunted by Future Dahmer, basically. Derf meanwhile was already a talented cartoonist and, if not exactly Dahmer's buddy, though Dahmer's antics were funny. Other kids did too and formed a "fan club" around Dahmer, although they still didn't connect as friends because, you know, protoDahmer.

Except the one time. That's the time Dahmer bullshitted his and his Fan Club's way into an impromptu visit with... Vice President Walter Mondale.

Most of the time though Dahmer was drinking himself blotto so he wasn't thinking about doinking dead guys in the butt all the time.

I guess the moral is, be glad you're not Dahmer.

Posted by: boulder terlit hobo at November 12, 2017 10:37 AM (6FqZa)

110 Sorry the $0.99 sale is no longer running on The Hidden Truth or Daniel Humphreys' A Place Outside the Wild. Both my books and his remain free through Kindle Unlimited, however. Many thanks to Oregon Muse and the Moron Horde for supporting independent authors. Here's hoping Oregon Muse is back in the saddle again soon.

Posted by: Hans G. Schantz at November 12, 2017 10:38 AM (0h1Dx)

111 I haven't been able to pick up the books since
seeing the movies.. Peter Jackson's hack job is what I see in my mind's
eye.. *sigh*

Posted by: Chi-Town Jerry at November 12, 2017 10:34 AM (5tSKk)


Do you have one of the illustrated editions (the original illustrations)? If so, try rereading again, but look at the illustrations often, and especially whenever a new character is introduced...it might change your perspective back to what you remember before the movies....

Posted by: CharlieBrown'sDildo at November 12, 2017 10:38 AM (wYseH)

112 Second John Maddox Roberts' SPQR books but I do really like Conn Iggulden's books.

I've heard that Cruise is good, but he is simply not right for the role. Jack Reacher is really tall, rangy and big-boned and his mere presence sets teeth on edge.p

Cruise does a good job with the smart and observant part of Reacher, but he's half the man.

Posted by: Christopher R Taylor at November 12, 2017 10:39 AM (39g3+)

113 I reread the first installment, and found that it was an awkwardly written but well-planned and interesting story. The second and third? Wow...a hot mess.

Sounds like Pullman's "Dark Materials" trilogy. Oh, and Pullman seems to have run out of cash because he's published a fourth book.

Posted by: boulder terlit hobo at November 12, 2017 10:39 AM (6FqZa)

114 "I haven't been able to pick up the books since seeing the movies.. Peter Jackson's hack job is what I see in my mind's eye."

That's why I've never seen them. I saw the first one, was disgusted, and refused to watch any more.

Posted by: Apostate at November 12, 2017 10:40 AM (7d/38)

115 Didius Falco? Why that good for nothing informer!

I have a bunch of them. I don't worry about solving the mysteries. I just enjoy the messes he and Helena get into and out of. A badly gelded ox nicknamed Nero is still one of those things that makes me giggle.

Posted by: Anna Puma (HQCaR) at November 12, 2017 10:42 AM (eBz9f)

116 Peter Jackson's hack job is what I see in my mind's
eye.. *sigh*


While Jackson brutally violated the storyline, I did think his visuals were brilliant and beautiful. He relied on several classic, beloved Lord of the Rings illustrators and Tolkien's own sketches for the visuals. That's how I think the land and people should look, at least.

Posted by: Christopher R Taylor at November 12, 2017 10:42 AM (39g3+)

117 Oh.. speaking of LOTR and the Bodleian Library, I have a framed poster of one of Tolkien's illustrations from The Hobbit (Bilbo riding barrels fulls of dwarves down the river) hanging in my office. It references a Tolkien art exhibit in the Bodleian Library.

Posted by: Chi-Town Jerry at November 12, 2017 10:42 AM (5tSKk)

118 112 Second John Maddox Roberts' SPQR books but I do really like Conn Iggulden's books.

I've heard that Cruise is good, but he is simply not right for the role. Jack Reacher is really tall, rangy and big-boned and his mere presence sets teeth on edge.p

Cruise does a good job with the smart and observant part of Reacher, but he's half the man.
Posted by: Christopher R Taylor at November 12, 2017 10:39 AM (39g3+)

But more believable as an on-screen character. Besides, who would you cast to represent the character as described in the books who can actually act?

Posted by: Insomniac at November 12, 2017 10:42 AM (NWiLs)

119 Hans Schantz books are really fun anti SJW adventures.
Highly recommended.

Posted by: votermom pimping great books! at November 12, 2017 10:43 AM (hMwEB)

120 Now for the Plot and Character descriptions...

The Plot: Aged Emperor Thelden III Arrigar's last days are approaching and the Empire's leaders are taking sides in a struggle for power between rival heirs. Blood runs in the streets and the nights are thick with intrigue.

Drake Arrigar, bastard prince and half-blooded sorcerer. Darius of Lorradon, foreign-born Initiate of a holy order of warriors sworn to the Empire. Leasha, senior maiden and chief spy for the Emperor's daughter. These three unlikely friends must navigate the coming storms as plots, violence, and unholy barbarians tear their lives apart. Their trials, failures, and triumphs will have far-reaching consequences, for their people and for their own futures.

Characters and Theme: As rich as the world is, the story is ultimately about its characters and their choices. The book follows three protagonists, each with distinct themes.

Drake's story is one of self-mastery and discovery, of unlocking the arcane secrets that only one of his kind can understand and struggling to come to terms with an unrealizable birthright.

Darius's is one of internal conflict, investigation, and corruption. As a Champion of Ryack, patron deity of the Empire and defender of the weak, what sacrifices is he willing to make to support and protect his Emperor? What deaths are acceptable? What crimes? And at what cost to his own immortal soul?

Leasha's is a tale of treachery: secrets, lies, and espionage. A young woman trapped as a pawn of courtly intrigues, she must use her wits, beauty, and ruthless political mind to extract herself and wreak vengeance upon those who wrong her.

Posted by: Apostate at November 12, 2017 10:43 AM (7d/38)

121 My Kindle Fire has hundreds of books on it (mostly free ones from Gutenberg) but I still prefer to read an actual book.
Posted by: Christopher R Taylor at November 12, 2017 10:32 AM (39g3+

me too
I guess we are old fuddy duddies

Posted by: votermom pimping great books! at November 12, 2017 10:44 AM (hMwEB)

122 I continue with my sloooow re-reading of LOTR, savoring the words and rhythms of Tolkien's writing. It is worth the extra time and, besides, I'm in no hurry. After 51 previous readings, I know how it will end.

Posted by: JTB at November 12, 2017 10:15 AM (V+03K)


Jesus, do you relax by hanging from a ceiling by chains and hooks in your flesh? lol

1 read thru for me and I was ready to dig that bastard up and piss in his dead skull.

Holy shit man. We need to read about the sun on the little rock, and how the little rock broke loose and rolled over a leaf, and how the leaf felt about being crushed by the little rock, and what about the dirt who now has a little rock path imprinted on it, and how some fly looked down and saw it all, and then 10 pages on the fly's upbringing, and the pile of cow shit it landed on, and the farmer who owns the cow who made the cow shit, and on and on and on and on.


I seriously, seriously considered sending a bullet through that book when I was done. I wanted it dead.

Excellent story, but damn that mofo knows how to waste time.

Posted by: Berserker- Dragonheads Division at November 12, 2017 10:44 AM (aMlLZ)

123 So the Brazilian national anthem sounds like a bad '60s pop song.

The babe singing it is hot as anything, of course.

Posted by: watching F1 instead of reading at November 12, 2017 10:45 AM (wpC7C)

124 So the Oxford Bodleian library is the inspiration for the Citadel in Game of Thrones,

Posted by: Ignoramus at November 12, 2017 10:45 AM (pV/54)

125 Besides, who would you cast to represent the character as described in the books who can actually act?

Yeah, that's the problem. And I did enjoy the first movie, even if it took... liberties with the book.

Posted by: Christopher R Taylor at November 12, 2017 10:47 AM (39g3+)

126 This is the AoSHQ Prayer List for this Sunday Morning:

Redc1c4- Employment

Fox2!- Bloodwork and colonoscopy

Abby- SJW children won't communicate (w) her Father in a coma.

Carol- Her Brother's eventual passing.

kbdabear- Mother's dementia.

Brother Cavil- Kidney problems, urinating blood insomnia. Legal issues after Father's passing.

Ladylibertarian- Father in hospice. Fell and broke nose.

CaliGirl- Mom's boyfriend Arthur has cancer.

Grump928(c)- Mother, Sally Jo, fell and broke her hip.

Hrothgar- Son killed in accident.

Ritabootoo- Someone who may have colon cancer.

Fenelon Spoke- Supervisor, "D's", Brother had a stroke and is in hospice. Husband's job search. Son acting out in a disturbing manner.

Dr. Strangepork- Friend may have had a stroke.

Bebe's boobs destroy- In a fight over the house with her Sister.

Stringer Davis- One partial kidney left after removal.

Neil- Back

Jo Anne- Left leg.

Mindful webworker- Premature Grandchild.

Patty- Alcoholic husband.

ibguy- Sister's brain cancer, (gioblastoma).

pookysgirl- Husband's suicide attempt and mental health.

Jade Sea- Husband's cancer

tcn- husband's possible lung tumor and swollen lymph nodes.

Anna Puma- Job advancement for Management position.

Moron Pundit- Father-in-law's heart surgery.

junior- Employment

Duke Lowell- Son in need of healing.

Miley- Future employment, big move, Friend Melonie's cracked ribs. Mother's cellulitis of leg.

Captain Whitebread- Future employment. Mother needs stent; may not be well enough for it.

Jinx- Mother's passing.

Emmie- Relationship with Daughter.

Vic- Return of cancer.

ReneeTX, Terminal brain cancer.

Booknlass- Relationship with Daughter.

Just wondering- Sister, Lisa, has a brain tumor.

Christopher Taylor- Health and depression.

Lin-duh fell- Father-in-law has a gioblastoma.

Blacksheep- Stage 2 prostate cancer.

Weirddave and Gingy- Gingy's father passing away.

Alexthechick- Father's dementia.

Molly K- Neice killed by elderly driver.

Donna V- Bills to be paid and alcoholic Brother.

Gushka- Infection after being bitten by her horse. Her friends' mental health after returning from battle.

TonyPete- Friends' terminal diagnosis, Wife's, (Renee), terminal illness.

bergerbuilder- Multiple strokes, out of hospital at end of September.

Chi- Friend's passing, (Lewis), after battle with cancer.

huerfano- Father with DNR was revived by fellow bridge players and EMTs; Angry about it.

Posted by: Slapweasel, (Cold1), (T) at November 12, 2017 10:47 AM (Ckg4U)

127 "Besides, who would you cast to represent the character as described in the books who can actually act?"


Spitballing. Sounds like Liam Neeson

Posted by: Ignoramus at November 12, 2017 10:47 AM (pV/54)

128 What a fun book!

Have you gotten to the scene where he gets the tires replaced? One of my favorites....


Posted by: CharlieBrown'sDildo at November 12, 2017 10:34 AM (wYseH)

I didn't get that far in the book. It was one of many books on the shelf in the little cabin we stayed in for three weeks.
I'm old and have CRS so my memory isn't what it used to be. Plus 70's and 80's, destroyed brain cells...you get the gist.

Posted by: Traveling Man at November 12, 2017 10:48 AM (R5lpX)

129 There was a series I read in the past called The War Against the Chtorr by David Gerrold. The 4th was completed in 1993 and the 5th and 6th have been teased ever since, with a chapter released and everything. But alas, there is no more. I have written to him and the publisher, no dice.

There were a few times the books rambled on, but I liked how the aliens in it had a purpose, they weren't just scary monsters made up for a book, and that for the most part the plot kept me guessing.

Posted by: Juddgement at November 12, 2017 10:48 AM (LOJDs)

130 127 "Besides, who would you cast to represent the character as described in the books who can actually act?"


Spitballing. Sounds like Liam Neeson
Posted by: Ignoramus at November 12, 2017 10:47 AM (pV/54)

Not a big enough guy.

Posted by: Insomniac at November 12, 2017 10:49 AM (NWiLs)

131 And if any of you have 99 cents left over after buying Hans' stories, can you please toss them my way for Yuriko or Pinch of Larceny or a couple dollars more Golden Isis? Thanks.

I have verified that Yuriko is indeed entered in the Amazon Pen and Publish contest. So who knows might get at least Honorable mention.

Yuriko - https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07769T9FZ

PS Don't forget to leave reviews.

PPS Go buy some Jack July Amy Lynn stories while at it. He is busily at work on book five.

Posted by: Anna Puma (HQCaR) at November 12, 2017 10:50 AM (eBz9f)

132 You'd need someone the size of Hafthor Bjornsson.

Posted by: Insomniac at November 12, 2017 10:50 AM (NWiLs)

133 "I guess we are old fuddy duddies"

I know a number of people in their 20s and 30s like that, myself included. I think a lot of it is psychological.

For instance, I work with electronic documents every day. If it's not legal writing or research it's datasheets, electronics reference manuals, videos, technical writing. Work. Scroll read analyze scroll read analyze, double click, scroll read analyze. With buried links and irregular pages, it's hard to keep track of your progress or how far you have to go.

When I pick up a dead tree book, I'm not at work and I know exactly how far I've gone and how far I have to go. No backlight or battery power necessary, and, I think most importantly, there is no psychological hint that I could be 'at work.'

Posted by: Apostate at November 12, 2017 10:50 AM (7d/38)

134 Karl Urban as Jack Reacher!!!
that's my pick

Posted by: votermom pimping great books! at November 12, 2017 10:51 AM (hMwEB)

135 If corrections to the Prayer List are needed, retractions to be made or people added?

My email is in my nic.

Please copy and paste this to your Notepad for others' benefit.

Posted by: Slapweasel, (Cold1), (T) at November 12, 2017 10:51 AM (Ckg4U)

136 You can go ahead and take me off the list, other people need a lot more concern and prayer than I do.

Spitballing. Sounds like Liam Neeson

Yeah he's basically a bodybuilder the size of Lurch, according to the books.

Posted by: Christopher R Taylor at November 12, 2017 10:51 AM (39g3+)

137 134 Karl Urban as Jack Reacher!!!
that's my pick
Posted by: votermom pimping great books! at November 12, 2017 10:51 AM (hMwEB)

He'd have to hit the dbol and HGH pretty hard.

Posted by: Insomniac at November 12, 2017 10:51 AM (NWiLs)

138 I've met Neeson. He's a broad 6' 4"

How big is Reacher supposed to be. People over 6'4" are uncommon

Posted by: Ignoramus at November 12, 2017 10:52 AM (pV/54)

139 While Jackson brutally violated the storyline, I did think his visuals were brilliant and beautiful. He relied on several classic, beloved Lord of the Rings illustrators and Tolkien's own sketches for the visuals. That's how I think the land and people should look, at least.
............
I had no problem with the landscapes.. Hobbiton was perfect.. as was Rivendell and the mountains and plains (Edoras comes to mind) were stunning visuals..

So.. yeah.. maybe I should pick them up again..

Posted by: Chi-Town Jerry at November 12, 2017 10:52 AM (5tSKk)

140 I appreciate the thought there Slap dude but save the spiritual horsepower for those in real need like Gushka.

Posted by: Anna Puma (HQCaR) at November 12, 2017 10:53 AM (eBz9f)

141 I appreciate the thought there Slap dude but save the spiritual horsepower for those in real need like Gushka.


Posted by: Anna Puma (HQCaR) at November 12, 2017 10:53 AM (eBz9f)



What happened to Gushka??

Posted by: Berserker- Dragonheads Division at November 12, 2017 10:54 AM (aMlLZ)

142 Thank you Slapweasel for the prayer list. It's a great service and much appreciated.

Posted by: Northernlurker, the lurkingest lurker of the north. Still proudly lurking. at November 12, 2017 10:54 AM (nBr1j)

143 "I appreciate the thought there Slap dude but save the spiritual horsepower for those in real need like Gushka."
-Posted by: Anna Puma (HQCaR) at November 12, 2017 10:53 AM (eBz9f)

Understood.

Posted by: Slapweasel, (Cold1), (T) at November 12, 2017 10:55 AM (Ckg4U)

144 6'5", 250, bodybuilder physique, chiseled features.

Posted by: Insomniac at November 12, 2017 10:56 AM (NWiLs)

145 If Leeson is too small, then Cruise is obviously miscast. He's playing a role, but he's missing a key element, obviously.

Posted by: Ignoramus at November 12, 2017 10:56 AM (pV/54)

146 You hire the 6'4" guy and then don't cast anyone else over 5'8".

Posted by: the guy that moves pianos for a living at November 12, 2017 10:56 AM (3DZIZ)

147 I always have three books on the go. I go dead tree book during my morning reading routine. I have a very disciplined morning routine, which includes reading.
I also have an Audible book, which I listen to in the car.
And I have a Kindle book which I read in spare moments away from home.

Posted by: Northernlurker, the lurkingest lurker of the north. Still proudly lurking. at November 12, 2017 10:57 AM (nBr1j)

148 But more believable as an on-screen character. Besides, who would you cast to represent the character as described in the books who can actually act?

Posted by: Insomniac at November 12, 2017 10:42 AM (NWiLs)


Wallace Shawn, with Brian Dennehy as his stunt double for the action sequences.

Posted by: HTL at November 12, 2017 10:57 AM (J50A0)

149 "What happened to Gushka??"
-Posted by: Berserker- Dragonheads Division at November 12, 2017 10:54 AM (aMlLZ)

She was bitten by her horse and had to spend weeks in the hospital, enduring a bunch of tests and treatments for the ensuing infection.

Posted by: Slapweasel, (Cold1), (T) at November 12, 2017 10:58 AM (Ckg4U)

150 Mucking with her beloved horses got an edema that then became infected. As in a grossly huge swelling, you really don't want to see the pictures of it, that sent her to the hospital. But she is getting better.

Posted by: Anna Puma (HQCaR) at November 12, 2017 10:58 AM (eBz9f)

151 Excellent story, but damn that mofo knows how to waste time. Posted by: Berserker- Dragonheads Division at November 12, 2017 10:44 AM (aMlLZ
=====

As much as I admire and respect JTB, he also likes Dickens.

Posted by: mustbequantum at November 12, 2017 10:58 AM (MIKMs)

152 I didn't have much of a problem separating the Jackson movies of LOTR from my enjoyment of the books. His Hobbit trilogy is another matter entirely. I took the movies on their own merits. And I thought Jackson did an excellent job with the visuals and especially the battle scenes.

There are a couple of books out with Tolkien's own drawings and maps he did while writing the Hobbit and LOTR. IIRC, the title is "JRR Tolkien: Artist and Illustrator. The man had a real talent for that.

Posted by: JTB at November 12, 2017 10:59 AM (V+03K)

153 Charles Fort Never Mentioned Wombats was a kind of fun read from the days when I read more science fiction than I do now. It is a novel about SF fandom from the 1970s.
Another "science fiction" book I really enjoyed a lot was Passing for Human by Jody Scott. Have not read rest of series including I,Vampire. She died in2007. There is a short bio of her at amazon. "Pioneering cult novelist."

Posted by: Glenn John at November 12, 2017 10:59 AM (9ASZc)

154 Liev Schreiber is 6'3" and has (or at least had) an impressive physique.

Also, c'mon. Dwayne Johnson.

Posted by: Apostate at November 12, 2017 11:00 AM (7d/38)

155 Cast for Reacher? How about Robert Taylor (I think that's his name) now that Longmire has been cancelled.

I've read all the SPQR books - Didius Falco stuff is an after thought and follow-up. Besides my on-line library lets me read them for free - price is right even for bad books.

Posted by: Lurking Cynic at November 12, 2017 11:00 AM (pP7Dg)

156 @126 Why thank you Slapweasel, but my name can be removed from the "Prayer List" (except for the consequences to my soul, and that would require a lot of prayer indeed, and a longer list). I done been "cured"!


Posted by: Stringer Davis at November 12, 2017 11:00 AM (H5rtT)

157 I started reading "Travels With Charley." I've always liked Steinbeck.

Posted by: Traveling Man at November 12, 2017 10:19 AM (R5lpX)

My mom loved that book and had me read it when I was a little kid. I loved it too.

Later, the movie "Charly" came out, which was based on the story "Flowers for "Algernon". My mom, who is otherwise a very intelligent woman, somehow got it in her head that this was an adaptation of Travels with Charley. I was just a kid but even I got the sense from the ad that this had nothing to do with the Steinbeck book we loved.
I tried to tell her but she was NOT having it. She took me and my little brother, and I still remember the Mom-arms being flung across our faces when the Charly character tried to sexually assault his beautiful doctor.

Anyway, Flowers for Algernon and Travels with Charley are both good reads.

Posted by: stace at November 12, 2017 11:00 AM (6HFDU)

158 Also, c'mon. Dwayne Johnson.
Posted by: Apostate at November 12, 2017 11:00 AM (7d/3

Too charismatic.

Posted by: Insomniac at November 12, 2017 11:01 AM (NWiLs)

159
6'5", 250, bodybuilder physique, chiseled features.
=====

Baldwin (also played Jayne).

Posted by: mustbequantum at November 12, 2017 11:02 AM (MIKMs)

160
How did the show go yesterday, Hadrian?

Posted by: no good deed at November 12, 2017 09:31 AM (eIQHF)


Val was Best of Winners for his first point.

Posted by: Hadrian the Seventh at November 12, 2017 11:02 AM (EqqJ1)

161 Thank you for the update, Stringer.

Posted by: Slapweasel, (Cold1), (T) at November 12, 2017 11:03 AM (Ckg4U)

162 One Prayer to preside over them all,
One Prayer to find them,
One Prayer to bring them all,
and in the darkness bind them

Posted by: Fritz at November 12, 2017 11:03 AM (e4OJ/)

163 I'm a third through something I picked up on Amazon for the Kindle, a novel called "Afterlife."

A weird take on where you go if your life gets cut short and you had some potential for something. An alternate reality in which there's no power, and nothing works, and you are in the world you left, with these other people that also got whacked or wrecked or whatever.

It is set in Chicago. Imagine the city in which in one instantaneous act, all the people simply disappeared. Gone. Cars on the freeways all stopped. Restaurants open and chairs back from tables where people were sitting.

This is the alternate world in which the FBI agent, killed by a bomb in a trap set by a serial killer he's pursuing, is out and about, trying to figure out what's happening. He and a few thousand others.

Posted by: Les Kinetic at November 12, 2017 11:03 AM (U6f54)

164 Posted by: Slapweasel, (Cold1), (T) at November 12, 2017 11:03 AM (Ckg4U)
=====

There is also rickl, lung cancer. Hope the support network is activated.

Posted by: mustbequantum at November 12, 2017 11:04 AM (MIKMs)

165 Schrieber could play Reacher, if he hit the roids and HGH hard, but he doesn't like playing good guys, apparently. Has he ever been a good guy?

Reacher is 6'5 and built like a linebacker. So like I said, Cruise is half the man, even standing on a box. But he plays the personality and mind of Reacher well enough that I don't really mind. Jack Reacher is a big fat mary stu for Lee Child (who is really big himself). Super smart, sexy, huge, tough, better fighter than everybody, smarter than everybody, etc... But the books are entertaining enough.

Posted by: Christopher R Taylor at November 12, 2017 11:04 AM (39g3+)

166 Safety car lap 1 due to the 1st lap scrum in Brazil
Had a few chuckles watching various Sunday talk show hosts trying to defend the conviction of them on Moore's sexual allegations and defence of their Leftist friend Fatty Kim.

Posted by: Skip at November 12, 2017 11:04 AM (aC6Sd)

167 I just finished a Temperance Brennan novel by Kathie Reichs. I do enjoy her and find the books much better than Bones, the television series.
The books, however, are formulaic. At some point the evidence comes together in Brennan's mind and she goes out to in some fashion to confront the evil doer and finds herself in great danger. And, of course, she gets rescued by the cop she's working with.
Formulaic, yes, but I do enjoy the series as a light read.
I wonder if series tend toward a formula. I also enjoy the Inspector Rebus series by Ian Rankin. They also have a formula.

Maybe all series have a formula. It would make the writing easier. Disrupting the formula would be a good way to end a series.

Posted by: Northernlurker, the lurkingest lurker of the north. Still proudly lurking. at November 12, 2017 11:05 AM (nBr1j)

168 "There is also rickl, lung cancer. Hope the support network is activated."
-Posted by: mustbequantum at November 12, 2017 11:04 AM (MIKMs)

Thank you. That was a recent addition that I had neglected. The Support Network has sprung into action, indeed.

Posted by: Slapweasel, (Cold1), (T) at November 12, 2017 11:07 AM (Ckg4U)

169 We're throwing out 1,000 years of wisdom of common law over how to do deal with felonious accusations. MSM wants to be judge and jury in the court of public opinion.

WaPo conflated Moore dating young women 40 years ago with the salacious story of one lone accuser, who probably wouldn't survive the spotlight if she actually came forward.

Most likely outcome is that Moore gets elected by the voters of AL. There's a SCOTUS case that says McConnell can't stop the duly elected sheriff from taking his seat.

This is a potentially dangerous precedent folks.

Posted by: Ignoramus at November 12, 2017 11:07 AM (pV/54)

170 Slap, you may want to add Mary Poppin's Perfect Piercing to the list over job issues and a few other quirks.

Posted by: Anna Puma (HQCaR) at November 12, 2017 11:08 AM (eBz9f)

171 WaPo conflated Moore dating young women 40 years ago with the salacious story of one lone accuser, who probably wouldn't survive the spotlight if she actually came forward.

What I thought was amusing was how ABC I think it was sent a reporter to Alabama to find people upset by the story and could not find one, not a single person who was reversing their vote over it. Just nobody trusts the Washington Post any more. Cry wolf enough and people stop listening, even if you're telling the truth.

Posted by: Christopher R Taylor at November 12, 2017 11:09 AM (39g3+)

172 Berserker, Thanks for the laughs. I can see how Tolkien's descriptions could be a 'bit' more detailed than some care for. I happen to enjoy them since Tolkien was creating his own world.

mustbequantum: Dickens drove me crazy when I was younger and his socialist philosophy still bugs me. Now I can appreciate the description he used without bothering with the story. And since most of his stories were published as serials, I'm impressed how well he could pad his word count. :-)

Posted by: JTB at November 12, 2017 11:10 AM (V+03K)

173 171 WaPo conflated Moore dating young women 40 years ago with the salacious story of one lone accuser, who probably wouldn't survive the spotlight if she actually came forward.

What I thought was amusing was how ABC I think it was sent a reporter to Alabama to find people upset by the story and could not find one, not a single person who was reversing their vote over it. Just nobody trusts the Washington Post any more. Cry wolf enough and people stop listening, even if you're telling the truth.
Posted by: Christopher R Taylor at November 12, 2017 11:09 AM (39g3+)

As a former small town reporter it bothers me that I don't believe a word I read or hear in the MSM. (Small town newspapers tend to be different, the reporters don't live in the same impenetrable bubble.)

Posted by: Northernlurker, the lurkingest lurker of the north. Still proudly lurking. at November 12, 2017 11:12 AM (nBr1j)

174 It also bugs me that the tru-cons and neverTrumpers actually trust what they read in the Wa-Po.
Really, truly-cons and neverTrumpers what does the Wa-Po need to do to earn your contempt?

Posted by: Northernlurker, the lurkingest lurker of the north. Still proudly lurking. at November 12, 2017 11:16 AM (nBr1j)

175 Martha Rat-ditz has Moore convicted and wanted every Republican from President Trump to condemn him to hell

Posted by: Skip at November 12, 2017 11:17 AM (aC6Sd)

176 I see this is becoming a Moore thread. At least it ain't about Michael Moore.

Posted by: Anna Puma (HQCaR) at November 12, 2017 11:18 AM (eBz9f)

177 167 ... "Maybe all series have a formula. It would make the writing easier. Disrupting the formula would be a good way to end a series."

A formula can be used to advantage if done right. Sherlock Holmes and Nero Wolfe stories might fall into that category: familiar setting and interaction among the characters. It's the variety of the action in the stories that makes them work.

Posted by: JTB at November 12, 2017 11:18 AM (V+03K)

178 Anybody know what this book is?

Dystopian future where aliens have invaded and enslaved humans. Aliens live in domed cities with their own atmosphere. Hero of the book, at one point, escapes a city through a canal.

Anyone? Please?

Posted by: Clique me at November 12, 2017 11:18 AM (1vsiQ)

179 And a white ottoman.

Posted by: Anna Puma (HQCaR) at November 12, 2017 11:19 AM (eBz9f)

180 Skip @175 -

And she would aquit Wine-stain and Spacey.

Posted by: Lurking Cynic at November 12, 2017 11:19 AM (pP7Dg)

181 I'm surprised they haven't accused Moore of abducting his wife since he is 14 years older than she is.

Posted by: Alabaster Jones at November 12, 2017 11:20 AM (2DOZq)

182 Dickens drove me crazy when I was younger and his socialist philosophy
still bugs me. Now I can appreciate the description he used without
bothering with the story.
=====

GB Shaw with poisonous sociopolitical views, but a deft and witty writer. Shaw hits that sweet spot of acknowledging all views and highlighting the ambiguity. My mom and I debated Pope vs Swift for years. Beatings will continue until morale improves or the lighter stiletto touch.

Posted by: mustbequantum at November 12, 2017 11:20 AM (MIKMs)

183 70 PS: Mrs. JTB and I LOOOOVE maps. Besides the various
Along those lines, I have and use a good GPS in my travels. But that being said, I always carry an Atlas with me. The GPS normally will take you on interstates and US routes. A lot of times, I'll take a peek at the map book and see if I can find short cuts on less traveled roads.
Posted by: Traveling Man at November 12, 2017 09:47 AM (R5lpX)

I just read a study showing that if you use GPS to drive from here to there, you do get there, but using a map (or at least looking at the trip on a map beforehand) you know where you are when you get there.
The study made a lot more sense than my recap does.

Posted by: Just John at November 12, 2017 11:21 AM (khtqU)

184 "Has he ever been a good guy?"

Zus Bielski in Defiance was a good guy, but that was in contrast to Nazis and Soviets.

Posted by: Apostate at November 12, 2017 11:22 AM (7d/38)

185 We're throwing out 1,000 years of wisdom of common law over how to do deal with felonious accusations.

If only. 1,000 years ago we had a much more limited budget for justice.

"You are banished. You must leave Iceland for three years. Take what you want, whom you need, just get out.

If you're alive and can find your way back in three years we'll talk".

Posted by: Bandersnatch at November 12, 2017 11:23 AM (gIRsn)

186 I'm old and have CRS so my memory isn't what it used to be. Plus 70's and 80's, destroyed brain cells...you get the gist.
Posted by: Traveling Man

https://www.smithsonianmag.com/science-nature/
being-a-lifelong-bookworm-may-keep-you-sharp-in-
old-age-6786112/

Posted by: n at November 12, 2017 11:23 AM (KOc2K)

187 Maps give you context, GPS doesn't.

GPS may get you there, but you're lost in a sense.

Posted by: Ignoramus at November 12, 2017 11:24 AM (pV/54)

188 A formula can be used to advantage if done right. Sherlock Holmes and Nero Wolfe stories might fall into that category

I agree, a formula if done well can be an excellent structure to build a series around. It can go terribly wrong and become dull if too rigid and forced, but it can give you something to grab hold of as an author and get started with.

Posted by: Christopher R Taylor at November 12, 2017 11:24 AM (39g3+)

189 I've never been in Bodleian, but I used to bicycle right past it every night for awhile.

Posted by: Walter Freeman at November 12, 2017 11:24 AM (I/iGu)

190 Posted by: Clique me at November 12, 2017 11:18 AM (1vsiQ)

Are you being sarcastic? That's basically the description of Battlefield Earth.

Posted by: Alabaster Jones at November 12, 2017 11:24 AM (2DOZq)

191 Reading "Louis L'Amour's Lost Treasures" has rekindled my enjoyment of his writing. I picked out half a dozen of his books to read over the winter. Some are new to me like "Bendigo Shafter" others are re-reads like "The Sackett Brand" and "Ride The River", two of my favorites.

Posted by: JTB at November 12, 2017 11:25 AM (V+03K)

192 "Slap, you may want to add Mary Poppin's Perfect Piercing to the list over job issues and a few other quirks."
-Posted by: Anna Puma (HQCaR) at November 12, 2017 11:08 AM (eBz9f)

Written and saved.

Posted by: Slapweasel, (Cold1), (T) at November 12, 2017 11:25 AM (Ckg4U)

193 .
I do have a request for Horde Help. Is there an online source for quick lookups with at least some accuracy? With a lot of people here, I prefer the big old Atlas, but trying to find geopolitical maps online was waaay more difficult than I even imagined.

Posted by: mustbequantum at November 12, 2017 11:26 AM (MIKMs)

194 Wait, Roy Moore wrote a dating book?

Posted by: Meremortal, no prosecutions, no peace! at November 12, 2017 11:26 AM (3myMJ)

195 @190: "Battlefield Earth."

Also popular with the Columbia House like book clubs back in the day.

Posted by: Walter Freeman at November 12, 2017 11:26 AM (I/iGu)

196 HA HA told you so! It is a Christmas movie!
http://tinyurl.com/y97ecv7n

Posted by: rhennigantx at November 12, 2017 11:27 AM (bmkS9)

197 Speaking of maps do wish I had the hard copy of this History of Frederick the Great, it has no maps on the FB Reader so I go to Google to follow along. But being much of Prussia is now Poland names are changed making it a bit more difficult.

Posted by: Skip at November 12, 2017 11:28 AM (aC6Sd)

198 So it's a Christmas movie, is it a floor wax and desert topping also?

Posted by: Anna Puma (HQCaR) at November 12, 2017 11:28 AM (eBz9f)

199 Seeing the pic of the Bodleian up there, my immediate thought is the Inspector Morse series. I never read the books, and someday might, but the tv series is wonderful.

I've probably said before, and it may be sacrilege to say so, but the two subsequent series, Lewis and Endeavor, are better than the original.

There's a new season of Endeavor out now, and I haven't yet seen it. Love the way they capture the feel and look of the 60s. Such a complex series of stories they weave. I like the British concept of longer, movie length episodes, with just a handful created each season, rather than the U.S. process of tossing off 20 or more episodes a season. It creates fatigue, especially if you watch shows the way I do: after their run, in binge style, as many do, rather than week to week.

Posted by: BurtTC at November 12, 2017 11:29 AM (Pz4pT)

200 Recent additions to The Prayer List:

Rickl- Lung cancer.

Mary Poppins' Practically perfect Piercing- Job Issues.

The Oort Cloud- Thalassemia, genetic blood disorder, complicated my hemolytic anemia. "Given" two years by doctor.

Posted by: Slapweasel, (Cold1), (T) at November 12, 2017 11:29 AM (Ckg4U)

201 The Left are vile .

https://pjmedia.com/instapundit/280663/

Posted by: steevy at November 12, 2017 11:29 AM (LiyEm)

202 193 ... mustbequantum,

For current maps and geopolitical matters, look up the CIA World Fact Book online. I think it will suit your interests. We have used it many times in the past.

Posted by: JTB at November 12, 2017 11:31 AM (V+03K)

203 @199: "I like the British concept of longer, movie length episodes, with just a handful created each season, rather than the U.S. process of tossing off 20 or more episodes a season."

British do the short season thing with standard length episodes series too. It used to bother me since there was less to consume, but yeah, it does reduce the amount of stuffing and filler that you see in American series.

Posted by: Walter Freeman at November 12, 2017 11:31 AM (I/iGu)

204 For the record I liked both the LOTR movie and the books. And although they had to cut significant parts out of the book like the Tom Bombadiel character they had to. It was already too long and that part didn't really advance the plot anyway.

Posted by: Vic We Have No Party at November 12, 2017 11:32 AM (mpXpK)

205 The search for a good but out-of-print book is a great quest with a treasure at the successful end. I have done it many times.

Posted by: exdem13 at November 12, 2017 11:32 AM (wZznc)

206 "I just read a study showing that if you use GPS to
drive from here to there, you do get there, but using a map (or at least
looking at the trip on a map beforehand) you know where you are when
you get there.

The study made a lot more sense than my recap does.

Posted by: Just John"

And then you also read about people that have followed their GPS to death. Literally.

There's a street here in town that on the GPS it shows it connecting to another street, but it doesn't. There's a right of way and a footpath that goes through the trees. The property owner actually had to put up a gate to keep people from driving down it.

Posted by: AshevilleRobert at November 12, 2017 11:32 AM (w+Jhj)

207 Hamilton is up to 5th place starting from the pit lane, he doesn't need the points and could park it without a worry

Posted by: Skip at November 12, 2017 11:32 AM (aC6Sd)

208 I'm old and have CRS so my memory isn't what it used to be. Plus 70's and 80's, destroyed brain cells...you get the gist.

Posted by: Traveling Man



https://www.smithsonianmag.com/science-nature/

being-a-lifelong-bookworm-may-keep-you-sharp-in-

old-age-6786112/

Posted by: n at November 12, 2017 11:23 AM (KOc2K)

I've got the life long bookworm part right, but I think it also depends on what you're reading and how important memorizing what you read is to your everyday life. Fiction is what one reads for entertainment and memorizing or remembering it isn't as important in the grand scheme of things as say, memorizing all the ADA regulations for restroom fixtures and accessories, parking lot slope minimums and maximums, ect.

Posted by: Traveling Man at November 12, 2017 11:32 AM (R5lpX)

209 Hey all. Thanks CBD for the search for oldies.

I think I'll find and reread I Am Legend (1954) by Richard Matheson. Mesmerized me as a kid and adapted to film 4 times. The first time with Charlton Heston. Found he wrote 17 episodes for Twilight Zone and several other books and short stories I'll check out. Six of is novels became movies and his Bid Time Return became Somewhere in Time. I had no idea. Blast from the past.

Posted by: Cannibal Bob at November 12, 2017 11:33 AM (VezBU)

210 My Android is full of Louis L'Amour's books.

Posted by: Vic We Have No Party at November 12, 2017 11:33 AM (mpXpK)

211 201 The Left are vile .

https://pjmedia.com/instapundit/280663/
Posted by: steevy at November 12, 2017 11:29 AM (LiyEm)

And in other shocking news, water is wet, deserts are dry and the sky is blue. Details at noon.

Posted by: Insomniac at November 12, 2017 11:33 AM (NWiLs)

212 It also bugs me that the tru-cons and neverTrumpers actually trust what they read in the Wa-Po.
Really, truly-cons and neverTrumpers what does the Wa-Po need to do to earn your contempt?

Posted by: Northernlurker, the lurkingest lurker of the north. Still proudly lurking. at November 12, 2017 11:16 AM (nBr1j)


========

I don't think they "trust" WaPo. I think they trust that is influential with others. They think most people regard it as trustworthy.

That's why they think it is an effective vehicle for taking down PDT, Moore and anyone else who doesn't go along with them. It's also part of why they are completely impotent: they don't want to be castigated in the press because they fear it.

Posted by: Steve and Cold Bear at November 12, 2017 11:34 AM (/qEW2)

213 Ach! That's a wee bit embarrassing there laddie

https://i0.wp.com/www.powerlineblog.com/ed-assets/2017/11/Zuchinni-Bomb-hed.jpeg

Posted by: Anna Puma (HQCaR) at November 12, 2017 11:35 AM (eBz9f)

214 But they make big movies about the Washington Post!

Surely, Hollywood would never lie to us!

Posted by: Walter Freeman at November 12, 2017 11:35 AM (I/iGu)

215 209 I think I'll find and reread I Am Legend (1954) by
Richard Matheson. Mesmerized me as a kid and adapted to film 4 times.
The first time with Charlton Heston. Found he wrote 17 episodes for
Twilight Zone and several other books and short stories I'll check out.
Six of is novels became movies and his Bid Time Return became Somewhere
in Time. I had no idea. Blast from the past.

Posted by: Cannibal Bob at November 12, 2017 11:33 AM (VezBU)

I think that is on Gutenberg for free. But the bok is not as good as the Will Smith movie. Just one of those rare times.

Posted by: Vic We Have No Party at November 12, 2017 11:35 AM (mpXpK)

216 *big heroic movies

Posted by: Walter Freeman at November 12, 2017 11:35 AM (I/iGu)

217 Reading latest Michael Connelly: 'Two Kinds of Truth.' Very good so far but then I'm a Bosch fan so I'm biased.

Posted by: Bookworm Bob at November 12, 2017 11:36 AM (bc2Lc)

218 177 167 ... "Maybe all series have a formula. It would make the writing easier. Disrupting the formula would be a good way to end a series."

A formula can be used to advantage if done right. Sherlock Holmes and Nero Wolfe stories might fall into that category: familiar setting and interaction among the characters. It's the variety of the action in the stories that makes them work.

------------------------------------------------
This is what made reading Dick Francis's mysteries so interesting. 40 or so books and almost all had different "casts". only thing tying them together was horses.

Posted by: Just John at November 12, 2017 11:36 AM (khtqU)

219 L'Amour is, for me, one of those guilty pleasures. Literature it ain't - plots are predictable and bad guy characters are repitious. That said, however, there are hidden and subtle gems throughout.

They are morality plays against a landscape and background that is familiar and nostalgic. His dialogue is crisp, clean, and character driven. The fact that he had personally ridden the country he describes is evidence of his own commitment to the stories.

It's too easy to read him casually. Close reading reveals a sharper intellect and insightful understanding of humanity and our contretemps.

Posted by: Lurking Cynic at November 12, 2017 11:36 AM (pP7Dg)

220 My Android is full of Louis L'Amour's books.
=====

L'amour is fine, even rises to great narrative and descriptions. Whatever happened to Zane Gray?

Posted by: mustbequantum at November 12, 2017 11:37 AM (MIKMs)

221 Added to Prayer List: Hopped up on Something...

Hopped up on Something- Immediate Family member with cancer. Bone pain without opioids, Hospital Policy.

Posted by: Slapweasel, (Cold1), (T) at November 12, 2017 11:37 AM (Ckg4U)

222 I cut myself with a ceramic knife making breakfast this morning. I think it's a minor cut but it's bleeding more than I thought it would.
Those things are so sharp you can cut yourself to the bone and not feel a thing for a minute or two.
Maybe I should have put this in the food thread.

Posted by: Northernlurker, the lurkingest lurker of the north. Still proudly lurking. at November 12, 2017 11:37 AM (nBr1j)

223 Your android is full of L'Amour?

The toaster better run.

Posted by: Anna Puma (HQCaR) at November 12, 2017 11:38 AM (eBz9f)

224 210 ... "My Android is full of Louis L'Amour's books."

Vic, Except for the Sackett series I would be happy enough to have his books on an e-reader. But I can buy the paperbacks much cheaper at the local used book store than I can get the e-versions which rarely, if ever, go on sale.

Posted by: JTB at November 12, 2017 11:38 AM (V+03K)

225
I think that is on Gutenberg for free. But the bok is not as good as the Will Smith movie. Just one of those rare times.

Posted by: Vic We Have No Party at November 12, 2017 11:35 AM (mpXpK)

Thanks much Vic. I haven't seen the Will Smith version but will now after i rewatch he Heston one. Sound Ike fun to compare.

Posted by: Cannibal Bob at November 12, 2017 11:38 AM (VezBU)

226 71
Currently re-reading the Ellis Peter's 'Brother Cadfel' series.
Relatively simple murder mystery plots are background for interesting
characters and life in 12th century England amidst the horror of the
succession war between Made and Stephen.



They are a counter point to Penman's "When Christ and All His Saints Slept".



When I finish these I plan on tackling the Lindsey Davis Didius Falco series.
======
I am a big fan of both the medieval mysteries of Brother Cadfael and Sharon Ky Pnman's well-researched living chronicles. When my parents toured England about 20 years ago they visited Shrewbury and the ruins of the once-great abbey. The ancient edifice has been turned into a Brother Cadfael tourist trap, but it was an educational trap that described the life of a large monastic community of the time.

I have heard good things about SPQR sleuth Didius Falco, and may have to read one of them some day.

Posted by: exdem13 at November 12, 2017 11:39 AM (wZznc)

227 Whatever happened to Zane Gray?


Whatever happened to Fay Wray
That delicate satin draped frame
As it clung to her thigh
How I started to cry
Cause I wanted to be dressed just the same

Posted by: Bandersnatch at November 12, 2017 11:39 AM (gIRsn)

228 Consider praying for the people who are always supportive, always concerned, and always there for you. They have down times and bad days and awful things they struggle with too, and often are all alone in it because there's nobody for them like they are for everyone else.

Posted by: Christopher R Taylor at November 12, 2017 11:39 AM (39g3+)

229 220 L'amour is fine, even rises to great narrative and descriptions. Whatever happened to Zane Gray?


Posted by: mustbequantum at November 12, 2017 11:37 AM (MIKMs)

I have a lot of his stuff too and a lot of it is available for free from from Gutenberg. But it is dated and you have to put up with a LOT of his racist shit. He was even worse than ERB.

Posted by: Vic We Have No Party at November 12, 2017 11:40 AM (mpXpK)

230
Anybody know what this book is?

Dystopian future where aliens have invaded and enslaved humans. Aliens live in domed cities with their own atmosphere. Hero of the book, at one point, escapes a city through a canal.

Anyone? Please?
Posted by: Clique me at November 12, 2017 11:18 AM


Sounds like the Tripods trilogy by John Christopher.
They made the first two books into a TV series and then ran out of money.

http://tinyurl.com/y8jle54x

Posted by: Bertram Cabot, Jr. at November 12, 2017 11:40 AM (IqV8l)

231 Ron Chernow's new bio is of US Grant.

I read his Hamilton, and recommend it.

Posted by: Ignoramus at November 12, 2017 11:40 AM (pV/54)

232
Reading "Louis L'Amour's Lost Treasures" has rekindled my enjoyment of
his writing. I picked out half a dozen of his books to read over the
winter. Some are new to me like "Bendigo Shafter" others are re-reads
like "The Sackett Brand" and "Ride The River", two of my favorites.

Posted by: JTB at November 12, 2017 11:25 AM (V+03K)

You might also like "Last Of The Breed" by L'Amour. It's about a Native American pilot who's plane is sabotaged and he gets shot down over Siberia. It details his adventures trying to escape and the people he meets and helps.
Also good reads are his stories set in the South Pacific around/during WW2.

Posted by: Traveling Man at November 12, 2017 11:41 AM (R5lpX)

233 New Addition to Prayer List:

Publius- Rheumatoid arthritis, severe pain during flare-ups.

Posted by: Slapweasel, (Cold1), (T) at November 12, 2017 11:41 AM (Ckg4U)

234 During high school went through most of the Louis L'Amour series

Posted by: Skip at November 12, 2017 11:41 AM (aC6Sd)

235 224
210 ... "My Android is full of Louis L'Amour's books."



Vic, Except for the Sackett series I would be happy enough to have
his books on an e-reader. But I can buy the paperbacks much cheaper at
the local used book store than I can get the e-versions which rarely, if
ever, go on sale.

Posted by: JTB at November 12, 2017 11:38 AM (V+03K)

I have everyone of his books in print, most of them in paperback. but I can no longer read the print versions with resulting to magnifying glasses which hurt my eyes and give me a headache.

Posted by: Vic We Have No Party at November 12, 2017 11:42 AM (mpXpK)

236 The thing I like about Louis L'Amour is that he's a super fast fun read, but if you slow down and take your time, you are rewarded by surprisingly rich descriptions and locations and deep historical information you may have otherwise missed.

L'Amour personally traveled all the places he wrote about, and what's more when he was young, he met and talked to those old cowboys about the old days, the details, the history, the language, and the behavior. I particularly liked that in his later books he just abandoned the jargon and the "aw shucks ma'am" stuff. Many of those old ranchers and cowboys were better educated than we are today.

Posted by: Christopher R Taylor at November 12, 2017 11:42 AM (39g3+)

237 I think I unwittingly provoked my first gout attack. My older, bigger brother used to have gout troubles, but I never have, and I don't fit the profile in terms of diet, weight, general disposition, etc.

Some dry aged steaks with an anchovy heavy bottled sauce cooked in a recently soaked, scrubbed, and not entirely re-seasoned cast iron skillet.

I guess there's some connection between uric acid and iron overload. Who knew? Not me!

Still laughing about the whole thing though. Soooo strange waking up with a suddenly angry big toe.

Posted by: Walter Freeman at November 12, 2017 11:43 AM (I/iGu)

238 Speaking of actors, I saw an old Alfred Hitchcock show starring Robert Duvall back when he was very young. In one scene, he was in a beatnik joint cool dancing to a solo bongo piece.

Posted by: Anonosaurus Wrecks, I'm Dreaming of a White Privilege at November 12, 2017 11:43 AM (Nwg0u)

239 225 Thanks much Vic. I haven't seen the Will Smith version but will now after i rewatch he Heston one. Sound Ike fun to compare.

Posted by: Cannibal Bob at November 12, 2017 11:38 AM (VezBU)

I have not seen all of the Charlton Heston one, and that was a long time ago. So I didn't try to compare them.

Posted by: Vic We Have No Party at November 12, 2017 11:44 AM (mpXpK)

240 Yeah I'm not as fond of Zane Gray. He's more a romance writer than L'Amour and his writing is really dated, its more set in his time period than historical frontier. He's got some classic plots and some of his books are pretty good but he's not nearly as good as L'Amour. A more modern western writer is Loren Estleman, but his books are less hopeful and clearly good vs evil.

Posted by: Christopher R Taylor at November 12, 2017 11:44 AM (39g3+)

241 In about '73, I was given three paperback books written by Tenzin Gyatso, also known as the Dalai Lama. In one he told the story of his 1949 exile trip. There were many adventures, some very hard to believe.

Anyway, I've searched for those books under his name(s) but haven't found them.

Posted by: Meremortal, no prosecutions, no peace! at November 12, 2017 11:45 AM (3myMJ)

242 The Left are vile .


Fisk hasn't had his ass kicked in awhile. He might be due.

Posted by: tu3031 at November 12, 2017 11:46 AM (O5Q3r)

243 When I am not here, (often), please send others' Prayer requests to the address in my sig.

I would appreciate it.

You may also request removal from the Prayer List at the same address.

Posted by: Slapweasel, (Cold1), (T) at November 12, 2017 11:46 AM (Ckg4U)

244 I Am Legend is a book I have long wanted to read, but have not because I know its pretty awful and depressing. There is a reason nobody has ever made the real version of the story.

Posted by: Christopher R Taylor at November 12, 2017 11:46 AM (39g3+)

245 17
The maps at the beginning of The Hobbit and LOTR may be part of their success. Is there a DD player who doesn't like maps?
=====
The honor of the first map for a fantasy world belongs to Robert E. Howard, for his stories of Conan the Barbarian. However, Tolkien had a real working map in antique fashion for The Hobbit, and for LOTR there were those nicely labeled maps of The Shire, Middle-earth at large, and Gondor-Mordor which really provide hope and help for readers. After that, the map was a necessary heroic fantasy element, and the wargame-cum-treasure hunt Dungeons and Dragons made maps portals to adventure.

Posted by: exdem13 at November 12, 2017 11:46 AM (wZznc)

246 Zane Gray was a cross dresser?!!!

Posted by: Anonosaurus Wrecks, I'm Dreaming of a White Privilege at November 12, 2017 11:46 AM (Nwg0u)

247 Gees Slapweasel I miss my dear departed mother in laws 'prayer chain' with her northern MN ladies. Thank you for prayers.

Two brother in laws.

1. Brain tumor hospice soon.
2. Just diagnosed cancer around heart and in aorta. Biopsy taken. Stage 3.
3. Cousin just completed 5 rounds of chemo for cancer in abdomen. Reocurance firm many years ago.

Thank you and prayers to you to assist yours. Bless you.

Posted by: Cannibal Bob at November 12, 2017 11:46 AM (VezBU)

248
Zane Gray was a cross dresser?!!!

He became a rapper known as Zane E

Posted by: Bertram Cabot, Jr. at November 12, 2017 11:47 AM (IqV8l)

249 Reading some Tarzan by Egar Rice Burroughs. Got the first three in a single volume, and have worked my way through the first and second.

There's some undeniably silly stuff in there, like Tarzan teaching himself to read. And then some unexpected stuff. All the French characters...and the whole second book! Parts of book II seem more at home in an Indiana Jones adventure than a Tarzan adventure!

Posted by: Castle Guy at November 12, 2017 11:48 AM (Lhaco)

250 The Lama also described his beatings at the hands of the Chinese, how they broke his legs and hands, etc.

Posted by: Meremortal, no prosecutions, no peace! at November 12, 2017 11:48 AM (3myMJ)

251 But they make big movies about the Washington Post!

Hey, don't forget us! "Spotlight", the Academy Award winning movie that no one ever saw!

Posted by: The Boston Fucking Globe at November 12, 2017 11:49 AM (O5Q3r)

252 Reading some Tarzan by Egar Rice Burroughs. Got the first three in a single volume, and have worked my way through the first and second.

I have a first edition of Tarzan of the Apes, found it in a closet at grandma's house. 1914.

Posted by: Meremortal, no prosecutions, no peace! at November 12, 2017 11:50 AM (3myMJ)

253 Reading some Tarzan by Egar Rice Burroughs.


I'm trying to remember if I've ever read ERB. I did read a bunch of Robert Howard's "Conan" books, which I think were pretty much contemporaneous with Tarzan.

Always love me some Conan.

Posted by: Bandersnatch at November 12, 2017 11:52 AM (gIRsn)

254 "After that, the map was a necessary heroic fantasy element, and the wargame-cum-treasure hunt Dungeons and Dragons made maps portals to adventure."

Exactly what I thought when I made those maps.

Aside, if anyone is curious, I used Campaign Cartographer to make them. https://www.profantasy.com/products/cc3.asp

I went big and created the entire continent, and filled in smaller regions as I went. Doing like I did will require a lot of computing power, or a lot of time as your dinky machine tries to process whatever you told it to do.

There are variant programs in that same suite for designing cities and dungeons, as well.

Posted by: Apostate at November 12, 2017 11:52 AM (7d/38)

255 The Left are vile .

https://pjmedia.com/instapundit/280663/

Posted by: steevy at November 12, 2017 11:29 AM (LiyEm)


========

He's probably suffering from Confedrate Flag envy and wants to nominate the poppy in order to compensate for his inadequacy.

Looking through his bio on wikipedia, I think this guy may be a John Brennan type.

Posted by: Steve and Cold Bear at November 12, 2017 11:52 AM (/qEW2)

256 British lefties are even more crazy in the own special ways.

Posted by: Walter Freeman at November 12, 2017 11:53 AM (I/iGu)

257 If I may add to the prayer list for my own selfish needs:

1) That my autoimmune disorder will stay under control. 2) That the work situation I have will continue to come together and grow.

Posted by: Insomniac at November 12, 2017 11:54 AM (NWiLs)

258 About 2 years ago I got ALL the Tarzan books in a single e-book volume really cheap. I got about half way through it before I got tired of them.

Posted by: Vic We Have No Party at November 12, 2017 11:54 AM (mpXpK)

259 For the record I liked both the LOTR movie and the books. And although they had to cut significant parts out of the book like the Tom Bombadiel character they had to. It was already too long and that part didn't really advance the plot anyway.
Posted by: Vic We Have No Party at November 12, 2017 11:32 AM (mpXpK)


He could have left Tom in, but then he'd have less time for close-up shots of Orlando Bloom and other f**king elves.

Posted by: BurtTC at November 12, 2017 11:54 AM (Pz4pT)

260 There's a street here in town that on the GPS it shows it connecting to another street, but it doesn't. There's a right of way and a footpath that goes through the trees. The property owner actually had to put up a gate to keep people from driving down it.

-
GPS companies put imaginary streets into their systems as a form of copyright protection. If a competitor's system has a Yellow Brick Road leading to the Emerald City, they know and can prove it was stolen from them.

Posted by: Anonosaurus Wrecks, I'm Dreaming of a White Privilege at November 12, 2017 11:55 AM (Nwg0u)

261 On the Brother Cadfel series- one criticism a friend once had of this series was that everyone in the novels speaks the same way. No matter how educated or un-educated the character. No one speaks in the vernacular. Every peasant sounds as if they were as educated as Cadfel. Still we both enjoyed the novels bigly. Read several. Sorry for the redundancy.

Posted by: Glenn John at November 12, 2017 11:55 AM (9ASZc)

262 Tarzan addicted me to reading. 9 yrs. old, quarantined from school with chicken pox. My Mom went to library and asked for recommendations. Brought home three Tarzan books. 65 yrs. later and I'll read matchbook covers if there's nothing else around.

Posted by: Lurking Cynic at November 12, 2017 11:55 AM (pP7Dg)

263 I woke up this morning thinking or Roger Zelazny's Doorways in the Sand.

It is a McGuffin story involving aliens, a missing artifact, isomers, and a professional college student taking advantage of a mis-worded inheritance trust.

Posted by: KIndltot at November 12, 2017 11:56 AM (2K6fY)

264 exdem13,

Do you know if Robert E. Howard drew the map for his Conan world or if it was done for him? I've read most of his writing and seen the map but never heard who drew it.

Posted by: JTB at November 12, 2017 11:56 AM (V+03K)

265 -Posted by: Cannibal Bob at November 12, 2017 11:46 AM (VezBU)

Added, Good Sir.

Posted by: Slapweasel, (Cold1), (T) at November 12, 2017 11:56 AM (Ckg4U)

266 Before there was Star Wars, the biggest adventure movie series were the Tarzan flicks, the best of which is the second, Tarzan and His Mate. Every 13-year old boy's fantasy. Playing house with Maureen O'Sullivan in the jungle. Tarzan and Jane didn't have Make-up Sex. They had adrenaline-fueled Rescue Sex.

Posted by: Ignoramus at November 12, 2017 11:57 AM (pV/54)

267 On a recommendation from another blog, I picked up Anno Dracula: One Thousand Monsters and then went back and reread Anno Dracula. I pretty much have the same issue with the new one that I had with the original: while the stories are fun reads, the plots are a bit thin.

Posted by: Aetius451AD at November 12, 2017 11:58 AM (ycWCI)

268 266
Before there was Star Wars, the biggest adventure movie series were the
Tarzan flicks, the best of which is the second, Tarzan and His Mate.
Every 13-year old boy's fantasy. Playing house with Maureen O'Sullivan
in the jungle. Tarzan and Jane didn't have Make-up Sex. They had
adrenaline-fueled Rescue Sex.

Posted by: Ignoramus at November 12, 2017 11:57 AM (pV/54)

And the first movie showed both of them naked. (with intent)

Posted by: Vic We Have No Party at November 12, 2017 11:59 AM (mpXpK)

269 Still laughing about the whole thing though. Soooo strange waking up with a suddenly angry big toe.

Posted by: Walter Freeman

Cherries.
Tart cherry juice.

Posted by: old f at November 12, 2017 11:59 AM (KOc2K)

270 Before there was Star Wars, the biggest adventure movie series were the Tarzan flicks,

Johnny Weismmuller was a badass.

Posted by: Meremortal, no prosecutions, no peace! at November 12, 2017 11:59 AM (3myMJ)

271 Zane Gray was a cross dresser?!!!



He became a rapper known as Zane E


He needed the money after his cabin burned down.

Posted by: Blanco Basura at November 12, 2017 12:00 PM (IcT7t)

272 257 If I may add to the prayer list for my own selfish needs:

1) That my autoimmune disorder will stay under control. 2) That the work situation I have will continue to come together and grow.
Posted by: Insomniac at November 12, 2017 11:54 AM (NWiLs)

I did not know about the autoimmune, man. Glad to hear the work situation is improving and hope it continues to do so.

Posted by: Aetius451AD at November 12, 2017 12:00 PM (ycWCI)

273 -Posted by: Insomniac at November 12, 2017 11:54 AM (NWiLs)

It is my honor to add you to The Prayer List, Sir.

You are NOT "selfish". When you need comfort and relief, please ask for it.

That goes for everyone.

Posted by: Slapweasel, (Cold1), (T) at November 12, 2017 12:00 PM (Ckg4U)

274 @199: "I like the British concept of longer, movie length episodes, with just a handful created each season, rather than the U.S. process of tossing off 20 or more episodes a season."
----------------------------
British do the short season thing with standard length episodes series too. It used to bother me since there was less to consume, but yeah, it does reduce the amount of stuffing and filler that you see in American series.
Posted by: Walter Freeman at November 12, 2017 11:31 AM (I/iGu)


I'm sure that's true. The longer series show, but there's much of the British tv world I am not interested in.

There seem to be a never ending supply of British crime dramas, but I think I've reached the end of line, regarding "quality" work.

The other one I like a lot is George Gently, as it's also set in the 60s. Some anachronistic p.c. themes come up in it, but I can mostly let that go. They're selling it to a modern British audience, after all.

Posted by: BurtTC at November 12, 2017 12:01 PM (Pz4pT)

275 "Do you know if Robert E. Howard drew the map for his Conan world or if it was done for him?"

Wikipedia says he hand-drew the map in 1932. An apparent scan here: http://swordsofreh.proboards.com/thread/291/robert-howards-hyborian-age-maps

Posted by: Apostate at November 12, 2017 12:01 PM (7d/38)

276 262 Tarzan addicted me to reading. 9 yrs. old, quarantined from school with chicken pox. My Mom went to library and asked for recommendations. Brought home three Tarzan books. 65 yrs. later and I'll read matchbook covers if there's nothing else around.
Posted by: Lurking Cynic at November 12, 2017 11:55 AM (pP7Dg)

I was the same way, but with the John Carter of Mars books. Good stuff for a boy.

And Robert Howard was Robert Jordan (of the Wheel of Time.) Much more modern author than Burroughs. Damn fine writer though.

Posted by: Aetius451AD at November 12, 2017 12:02 PM (ycWCI)

277 Glen John @261 ---

Absolutely agree. In her defense Pargeter (Ellis Peter's was a peudonym) was an academic and most of her writing was academic-history. Cadfel was a kinda' hobby.

Posted by: Lurking Cynic at November 12, 2017 12:02 PM (pP7Dg)

278 Nood, by the way.

Posted by: Slapweasel, (Cold1), (T) at November 12, 2017 12:02 PM (Ckg4U)

279 275, Apostate, Thanks for that info and link.

Posted by: JTB at November 12, 2017 12:03 PM (V+03K)

280 BTW, the Jody Scott novel is not a typical vampire story. It is definitely science fiction. (I,Vampire). First in series is Passing for Human.
Unique.

Posted by: Glenn John at November 12, 2017 12:03 PM (9ASZc)

281 @269: "Tart cherry juice."

Even in my rather pedestrian (not fancy) grocery store, they've been selling ridiculously expensive tart cherry juice concentrate in the freezer section for years, and I've always wondered who would buy such a thing.

Now I know why.

Posted by: Walter Freeman at November 12, 2017 12:04 PM (I/iGu)

282
Herr des Dschungels

that's German for "Tarzan"

Posted by: Soothsayer -- That's class! at November 12, 2017 12:04 PM (ENxvy)

283 Conan holds up really well still, terrific, exciting, and well told adventures. Pre-Tolkien, too. Proto-fantasy really.

I have not read the Tarzan books at all but have wanted to forever.

I like the John Carter books okay but they are a bit silly at times if very inventive.

Posted by: Christopher R Taylor at November 12, 2017 12:05 PM (39g3+)

284 And Robert Howard was Robert Jordan (of the Wheel of Time.) Much more modern author than Burroughs. Damn fine writer though.
Posted by: Aetius451AD at November 12, 2017 12:02 PM (ycWCI)

Dammit, I am an idiot and slow thinking this morning. Howard was the original author of the Conan books. Jordan wrote stories in the universe.

Posted by: Aetius451AD at November 12, 2017 12:05 PM (ycWCI)

285 nood

Posted by: Vic We Have No Party at November 12, 2017 12:06 PM (mpXpK)

286 I got Chernow's book about Grant this week. Will wait to review it until I've read a bit more.

The Kindle sample is the first four chapters of the book.

Posted by: Notsothoreau at November 12, 2017 12:06 PM (Lqy/e)

287 This is a book related rant. I am watching CSPAN book stuff and Brian Kilmeade is on hawking one or more of his books. The blurb said it was going to be about Andrew Jackson and the Battle of New Orleans.

He's been talking about Brian Kilmeade, mostly. Brian Kilmeade is an idiot.

Posted by: Bandersnatch at November 12, 2017 12:06 PM (gIRsn)

288 Prayers sent Insomniac and for other ailing or stressed horde members.

Posted by: PaleRider, simply irredeemable at November 12, 2017 12:07 PM (84F5k)

289 Posted by: Slapweasel, (Cold1), (T) at November 12, 2017 10:47 AM (Ckg4U)

Dang, Slap. That's one heckuva compilation. It brings to mind some of the excellent books on the power of prayer that Fen has listed over the years. All of the titles she has recommended are truly memorable and make quite an impact -- if you think prayer "ain't all that."

I'll be praying today for all Morons in need.

Posted by: SandyCheeks at November 12, 2017 12:07 PM (ihzOe)

290 Since there is a New Thread, I feel good to re-paste the New, Updated AoSHQ Prayer List:

Rickl- Lung cancer.

Redc1c4- Employment

Fox2!- Bloodwork and colonoscopy

Abby- SJW children won't communicate (w) her Father in a coma.

Carol- Her Brother's eventual passing.

kbdabear- Mother's dementia.

Brother Cavil- Kidney problems, urinating blood insomnia. Legal issues after Father's passing.

Ladylibertarian- Father in hospice. Fell and broke nose.

CaliGirl- Mom's boyfriend Arthur has cancer.

Grump928(c)- Mother, Sally Jo, fell and broke her hip.

Hrothgar- Son killed in accident.

Ritabootoo- Someone who may have colon cancer.

Fenelon Spoke- Supervisor, "D's", Brother had a stroke and is in hospice. Husband's job search. Son acting out in a disturbing manner.

Dr. Strangepork- Friend may have had a stroke.

Bebe's boobs destroy- In a fight over the house with her Sister.

Neil- Back

Jo Anne- Left leg.

Mindful webworker- Premature Grandchild.

Patty- Alcoholic husband.

ibguy- Sister's brain cancer, (gioblastoma).

pookysgirl- Husband's suicide attempt and mental health.

Jade Sea- Husband's cancer

tcn- husband's possible lung tumor and swollen lymph nodes.

Moron Pundit- Father-in-law's heart surgery.

junior- Employment

Duke Lowell- Son in need of healing.

Miley- Future employment, big move, Friend Melonie's cracked ribs. Mother's cellulitis of leg.

Captain Whitebread- Future employment. Mother needs stent; may not be well enough for it.

Jinx- Mother's passing.

Emmie- Relationship with Daughter.

Vic- Return of cancer.

ReneeTX, Terminal brain cancer.

Booknlass- Relationship with Daughter.

Just wondering- Sister, Lisa, has a brain tumor.

Christopher Taylor- Health and depression.

Lin-duh fell- Father-in-law has a gioblastoma.

Blacksheep- Stage 2 prostate cancer.

Weirddave and Gingy- Gingy's father passing away.

Alexthechick- Father's dementia.

Molly K- Neice killed by elderly driver.

Donna V- Bills to be paid and alcoholic Brother.

Gushka- Infection after being bitten by her horse. Her friends' mental health after returning from battle.

TonyPete- Friends' terminal diagnosis, Wife's, (Renee), terminal illness.

bergerbuilder- Multiple strokes, out of hospital at end of September.

Chi- Friend's passing, (Lewis), after battle with cancer.

huerfano- Father with DNR was revived by fellow bridge players and EMTs; Angry about it.

The Oort Cloud- Thalassemia, genetic blood disorder, complicated my hemolytic anemia. "Given" two years by doctor.

Mary Poppins' Practically Perfect Piercing- Job issues.

Hopped up on Something- Immediate Family member with cancer. Bone pain without opioids, Hospital Policy.

Publius- Rheumatoid arthritis, severe pain during flare-ups.

Cannibal Bob- Two brothers in law. 1. Brain tumor hospice soon.
2. Just diagnosed cancer around heart and in aorta. Biopsy taken. Stage 3.
3. Cousin just completed 5 rounds of chemo for cancer in abdomen. Reocurance firm many years ago.

Insomniac- 1) That my autoimmune disorder will stay under control. 2) That the work situation I have will continue to come together and grow.

Posted by: Slapweasel, (Cold1), (T) at November 12, 2017 12:09 PM (Ckg4U)

291 As I mentioned, please update me for those I have missed at the email in my nic.

Posted by: Slapweasel, (Cold1), (T) at November 12, 2017 12:11 PM (Ckg4U)

292 >>>There's some undeniably silly stuff in there, like Tarzan teaching himself to read.

Me no like boast, but me are autodidact.

Posted by: Tarzan at November 12, 2017 12:13 PM (/qEW2)

293 Please, also let me know if you want the names published, or just pronouns, like "Mother".

Anonymity is important to me. I do not want to publish names if they are not necessary.

Posted by: Slapweasel, (Cold1), (T) at November 12, 2017 12:14 PM (Ckg4U)

294 No matter how educated or un-educated the character. No one speaks in the vernacular. Every peasant sounds as if they were as educated as Cadfel.

This is... something that has concerned me a long time about writing historical books. The only ones that really handle it well are around 1800 and beyond, because we have so many examples of spoken language and know how people of various social strata actually spoke.

But in 1400 how did people speak? We know some of it, but not very much. We don't have many examples of actual dialog, rather the language of educated people and latin. There's no real "common man" information. For that matter we're not sure how people really spoke even in academic circles, because the writing is more poetic or stylized than trying to copy the world around them.

Further, if someone actually did try to write accurately, it would read like the original 1600s King James Bible which makes your head ache to read even very familiar passages. The language is so dense, and different, and filled with unfamiliar or barely-familiar words that nobody could enjoy it at all.

Here's the Christmas story from Luke 2, from the 1611 King James original:

And it came to passe in those dayes, that there went out a decree from Cesar Augustus, that all the world should be taxed. (And this taxing was first made when Cyrenius was gouernor of Syria) And all went to bee taxed, euery one into his owne citie.
And Ioseph also went vp from Galilee, out of the citie of Nazareth, into Iudea, vnto the citie of Dauid, which is called Bethlehem, (because he was of the house and linage of Dauid,) to be taxed with Mary his espoused wife, being great with child.

[note: I had to edit this to remove characters and symbols not hampster-friendly, it was even more illegible]

Now that's cool and authentic and all but... barely legible by modern readers.

So you don't get thees and thous, or differences between the pig farmer and the nobleman.

This is something I try to work with in my fantasy writing, to some degree: some slang, some differences in class and background, some variation in speech and patterns of language. Old Habits actually I delved into that quite a bit, creating a slang and a sort of pidgin street cant. But I'd like to do more of it because language fascinates me.

Posted by: Christopher R Taylor at November 12, 2017 12:16 PM (39g3+)

295 on Chernow's new bio is of US Grant.

I read his Hamilton, and recommend it.
Posted by: Ignoramus at November 12, 2017 11:40 AM (pV/54)

I've also read his Washington and John D. Rockefeller (Titan) bios and they are all well-structured, comprehensive without getting bogged down with minutia and well-paced. And did I say he was never boring?
He usually starts with a set-piece of the subject aged, near death ( or in the case of Hamilton, already dead) and then goes to the beginning.
He churns them out every four years or so and I hope he has a few more in him.....

Posted by: Bluto at November 12, 2017 12:17 PM (7uYFy)

296 John D. Rockefeller (Titan) bios and they are all well-structured,
comprehensive without getting bogged down with minutia and well-paced.
And did I say he was never boring?
=====

Thank you for reminding me of that John D bio. Excellent. Trying to sort through 'stuff' and I can't find the bio of JP Morgan (even paid $15 on remainder stacks) -- also excellent.

Posted by: mustbequantum at November 12, 2017 12:27 PM (MIKMs)

297 Gee Whiz, just opened the thread and already 300 comments? I can't keep up. Oh well. I'm reading "Left of Bang" by Horne & Riley, about the USMC Combat Hunter program, and "How the West Won" by Stark. Now to skim your comments.

Posted by: The Inexplicable Dr. Julius Strangepork at November 12, 2017 12:29 PM (wuzxW)

298 Me no like boast, but me are autodidact.
=====

Like the Monster in 'Frankenstein' --

Posted by: mustbequantum at November 12, 2017 12:29 PM (MIKMs)

299 As far as the slang or vernacular or whatever that people used to speak to each other 600 or 800 years ago, wth?

I guess I kind of understand why someone might want to read/hear the differences but come on. By that logic a sci fi book written about life on another planet or LOTR for that matter should be written in total gibberish to an us.

The story is supposed to be the thing. The character development. The theme(s).

Not if the town drunk said ain't or aren't or isn't.

Posted by: weirdflunky at November 12, 2017 12:29 PM (aWzLP)

300 91
I continue with my sloooow re-reading of LOTR, savoring the words and
rhythms of Tolkien's writing. It is worth the extra time and, besides,
I'm in no hurry. After 51 previous readings, I know how it will end.



I do love the notion of the movie soundtrack playing as I turn to that part of the book. Especially the theme for Rohan.
====
To my mind there can be no slow re-reading of LOTR ever.

Posted by: exdem13 at November 12, 2017 12:35 PM (wZznc)

301 I am doomed to reading on my Kindle. At first, when I needed to go to the next page, I would reach up to the upper right hand corner to try to literally turn the page! It was a hard habit to break for one who was a voracious reader for 50 years. Poor eyesight makes ebooks imperitive for me.

Posted by: Susanamantha at November 12, 2017 12:37 PM (aeqTc)

302 Slap's list - I only knew some of the problems not exactly what they were.

Posted by: Skip at November 12, 2017 12:38 PM (aC6Sd)

303 About 2 years ago I got ALL the Tarzan books in a
single e-book volume really cheap. I got about half way through it
before I got tired of them.
Posted by: Vic We Have No Party at November 12, 2017 11:54 AM (mpXpK)


I tried binge reading O'Brian's Master and Commander series, and got bogged down. I don't think it is the writing, though it is all of a (excellent) style, I think it is that there is just so much of it.

It may be best to read only a couple in sequence, and then go to another writer to let it settle a bit.

Posted by: KIndltot at November 12, 2017 12:39 PM (2K6fY)

304 Yeah lush, full books you can get overfull of, kind of like a full meal. You gotta give yourself time to digest and think.

Posted by: Christopher R Taylor at November 12, 2017 12:46 PM (39g3+)

305 Slap, MP4 has type 2 diabetes (just diagnosed)

Posted by: Votermom's phone at November 12, 2017 12:47 PM (8rVl6)

306 I have the Rockefeller book and need to pick it up again. The story of his childhood is fascinating. I try to remind myself, when reading biographies, that the subject had no idea how things would turn out.

Posted by: Notsothoreau at November 12, 2017 12:58 PM (Lqy/e)

307 Watching World at War

Where they burn books, they will too in the end burn people.
Heinrich Heine 1797- 1856

Posted by: Skip at November 12, 2017 01:08 PM (aC6Sd)

308 Miklos Molnar asked a couple of nights ago what I suggested as reading in economic theory since I was discussing the intersection of economic theory and freedom, but he asked after I had crashed.

So, since I figure no-one wants to be pushed into the nearly mind-numbing detail and analysis of Mises and Hayek, a good starting point would be Ralph Raico on the history of liberalism - and really everything he wrote is on this subject if only tangentially - Jesus Huerta de Soto who runs with the Austrian theory, and my all over favorite, the first third or so of Thomas Malthus' On Population (the last part are refutations of Candorcet and Godwin which are interesting, but need more background).

Malthus is more of the Classical school since he was a contemporary of Smith and Ricardo, but he does make the arguments clearly (and has not gotten mired in the argument over what sets pricing)

For a historical view of economics and development, I dearly love the one European history by Carlo Cipolla that I have read, Guns, Sail and Empire.

Posted by: KIndltot at November 12, 2017 02:00 PM (2K6fY)

309 Heartfelt prayers and comfort for all on the prayer list. (Good God - what kind of "hospital policy" says "no opioids" for bone cancer???? That is truly messed up.)
On the book front, I've been reading the letters of Nancy Mitford/Evelyn Waugh. Such brittle, unlikeable people, but I can't stop. Also reading "Decca: The Letters of Jessica Mitford", the communist element of her very dysfunctional family (Nancy was a socialist, Diana was a fascist, Unity was a Nazi and Deborah was a monarchist, which, since she was also the Duchess of Devonshire, makes a kind of sense).
To Dr. Alice re: Lawrence Sanders - I loved his books back in the day. The Archy McNally books are light and fun, but I liked his Sin series with Edward X. Delaney, NYPD best. The First Deadly Sin is especially good.

Posted by: Bookaday at November 12, 2017 02:01 PM (2qDS0)

310 That's not the Bodleian. It's the Radcliffe Camera.

Bodleian is some modern monstrosity now.

Posted by: Jeanne del norte at November 12, 2017 02:20 PM (B9dAp)

311 I read faster and more thoroughly with a real book. The Kindle is okay for a romance or thriller I read on the train, but if I want to really enjoy or absorb something, I want hard copy.

Posted by: Gem at November 12, 2017 02:29 PM (XoAz8)

312 Did you try abebooks.com ? First search yeirlded 9 copies
as inexpensive as $5.50 shiipping included. I had to break the link up because your softwae wouldn't permit the long string because it is "annoying+.
https://www.abebooks.com/servlet/ SearchResults?sts=t&an=Fretland&tn= The+Persimmion+Sequence&kn=&isbn=

Posted by: Richard Rabatin at November 12, 2017 03:10 PM (zlsmD)

313 Reading Taleb's _Fooled by Randomness_.

Bought Dan Jones' _The Templars_ after hearing a radio interview about the book. I want to give it to my brother who liked playing the video game Assasin's Creed, but maybe to give a more historically accurate portrayal.

Posted by: goodluckduck at November 12, 2017 03:34 PM (V8zw+)

314 Coming in late to the book thread today, but I was late since someone in the thread weeks ago had recommended a series of books by Mick Herron. I was not able to get my hands on a free copy of any of the series, but did get my hands on a free copy of a standalone called Nobody Walks. The plot is ex-spy goes to investigate death of estranged son, so nothing new under the sun there. The characters are well written and there is not much fluff, so I will be checking out actually paying for one of the books in the series. Thanks to whomever rec'd it and "made" me spend my Sunday morning reading it.

Posted by: Charlotte at November 12, 2017 03:56 PM (Uz88Z)

315 Fretland wrote the a second book in the series: Winds of the Heliopolis in 1972. Apparently he did not finish the series. Those appear to be the only two books he wrote. He seems to have given up writing after that.

Posted by: Sea Writer at November 12, 2017 04:04 PM (Fa2K3)

316 *taps chin*

Novel from 1892 Mirrikh, or, A Woman from Mars: A Tale of Occult Adventure

https://en.wikisource.org/wiki/Mirrikh,_or,_A_Woman_from_Mars

Pondering reading it.

Posted by: Anna Puma (HQCaR) at November 12, 2017 04:23 PM (eBz9f)

317 There were several mentions of the CBI theater in WWII in comments above (#s 53, 68, 73 and 77). For anyone interested I would recommend a couple of first hand accounts from that theater of the war:

The first is the memoir "Quartered Safe Out Here" by George MacDonald Fraser (yes, the author of the Flashman novels). He was a private in the Border Regiment, part of the 17th Division of the Indian Army. Toward the end of the campaign he rose to the dizzying heights of a lance-corporal. Both funny and grim by turns and sometimes both at once.

Second, "The Road Past Mandalay" by John Masters. This the middle volume of his autobiography and covers his service in WWII (first and third are "Bugles and a Tiger" and "Pilgrim Son"). Masters was an officer in a Gurkha regiment (4th Gurkha Rifles). He saw combat in Iraq, Syria and Iran. He was then sent to staff college in India and finished the war commanding a Chindit brigade in Burma. A vivid first person view of war and the hard lessons it teaches.

Posted by: John F. MacMichael at November 12, 2017 04:28 PM (Hb4+2)

318 Posted by: Caliban at November 12, 2017 09:13 AM (QE8X6)

Planning on a Kindle release?

Posted by: waelse1 at November 12, 2017 08:13 PM (cd2Ve)

319 CBI books: Add "Beyond the Chindwin" and "The Wild Green Earth" by Bernard Fergusson, and "Prisoners of Hope" by Michael Calvert.

Say, isn't that the Radcliffe Camera, not the Bodleian Library? I mean, they aren't the same thing. Part of the Bodleian collection is in the R.C. and a lot of it is elsewhere.

Posted by: Bill Befort at November 13, 2017 06:50 PM (hJFOo)

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