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Sunday Morning Book Thread 06-18-2017


Kirby Library Lafayette College PA.jpg

Kirby Library, Lafayette College, PA


Good morning to all you 'rons, 'ettes, lurkers, and lurkettes. Welcome once again to the stately, prestigious, internationally acclaimed and high-class Sunday Morning Book Thread, where men are men, all the 'ettes are gorgeous, safe spaces are underneath your house and are used as protection against actual dangers, like natural disasters, or Literally Hitler, and special snowflakes do not last. And unlike other AoSHQ comment threads, the Sunday Morning Book Thread is so hoity-toity, pants are required. Even if it's these pants, who will never be president.


Another Conservative Book List

Some interesting items on this Washington Free Beacon list of 7 Books Every Conservative Should Read. Subtitled 'Book recommendations for students of all ages', there are some unexpected ones, for example, The Curmudgeon's Guide to Getting Ahead: Dos and Don'ts of Right Behavior, Tough Thinking, Clear Writing, and Living a Good Life by Charles Murray.

Among the curmudgeon’s day-to-day tips for the workplace:
 
• Excise the word “like” from your spoken English
• Don’t suck up
• Stop “reaching out” and “sharing”
• Rid yourself of piercings, tattoos, and weird hair colors
• Make strong language count
 
His larger career advice includes:
 
• What to do if you have a bad boss
• Coming to grips with the difference between being nice and being good
• How to write when you don’t know what to say
• Being judgmental (it’s good, and you don’t have a choice anyway)

Every fresh, new college grad probably needs to read this book. Especially whiny millennials that have racked up $180,000 in student loan debts so they could pursue their study of intersectional Zoroastrian poetry.

Another book on the list is the all-time classic The Conservative Intellectual Movement in America Since 1945 by George H. Nash. This history is "indispensable for anyone interested in learning more about libertarians, traditionalists, anti-Communists, William F. Buckley Jr. and National Review, the debate between freedom and virtue, and the original neoconservatives. The big weakness of this 1976 book is that it was published in 1976. There's been a lot of water under the bridge since then. What it desperately needs is a sequel.


It Pays To Increase Your Word Power®

To GLOAR is to stare at something vacantly.

Usage: Before AoSHQ was AoSHQ, ace's blog was known as The Chronicles of Gloar.

To GOVE is to stare vacantly, or 'to look about like a simpleton'.

Usage: And before that, ace's blog was known as The Pompatus of Gove.

Library of Apostate.jpeg
Library of Apostate


Pic Note

Apostate tells me:

My youngest son is playing Star Wars on the computer. The upper shelves are mostly law books. The second shelf above the desk is full of almost all the Great Books of the Western World collection, 1985(?) version. All the crap in front of them and to their right are math, science, and engineering texts and notes. Down and left of the Great Books are old or antique books, including several historical and Masonic texts from the 19th century. Assorted references and fiction are on the right in several layers. The bright red book on the right middle shelf laying horizontal is a proof copy of my first novel I ordered from Lulu a few years ago. Left middle shelves and below are graphic novels and comics, most prominently including Conan and the Knights of the Dinner Table. The upper right has an old Time-Life series on different eras and civilizations; it's from the 60s (I think), before SJWs and the likes of Howard Zinn ruined history. Many more books on history, espionage, and foreign and military affairs are boxed up in the garage. I have some Judaica and mystical works squirreled away elsewhere.

One day, I dream of having a proper, dedicated wood and stone library with old world decor and a properly tamed fireplace.

The embiggened version shows pretty good detail.


Crossing the Streams

Perhaps this should be a topic for the food thread, but Appetite City: A Culinary History of New York looks interesting, and I've never lived there:

New York is the greatest restaurant city the world has ever seen.

In Appetite City, the former New York Times restaurant critic William Grimes leads us on a grand historical tour of New York's dining culture. Beginning with the era when simple chophouses and oyster bars dominated the culinary scene, he charts the city's transformation into the world restaurant capital it is today. Appetite City takes us on a unique and delectable journey, from the days when oysters and turtle were the most popular ingredients in New York cuisine, through the era of the fifty-cent French and Italian table d'hôtes beloved of American "Bohemians," to the birth of Times Square--where food and entertainment formed a partnership that has survived to this day.

The book has photographs, rare menus, menu cards, and other illustrations. It sounds like one of those books you just kind of flip through randomly looking for interesting stuff.

Thanks to MP4 for recommending this book on a morning thread earlier this week.


Moron Recommendations

Just finished reading a collection of Poul Anderson sci-fi that ended on the short story called "Industrial Revolution."

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00KO6DL42

The premise? An entrepreneurial asteroid mining facility, funded with borrowed capital from a bank but turning a handsome profit and poised for growth, is visited by an earth warship commanded by officers who are members of the Social Justice Party -- no kidding, they're called the SJs -- who have won elections back on Earth on a platform of bitter "you didn't build that" socialism. The warship attempts to sabotage the facility and drive out its owners so it can be seized by the government. The CEO, an engineer, and his team outwit the warship's officers but the story is told in flashback as the first incident of a war between Earth and the productive asteroid mining colonies.

The story was first published in 1963.

Posted by: undocumented SMOD at June 17, 2017 12:43 PM (e8kgV)

The Poul Anderson Megapack (Kindle) can be purchased for $0.99. Which means, I assume, that the material is all public domain stuff which you can probably find on the web for free if you look long enough.

Or pay $0.99 to these guys who did it all for you already.


Books By Morons

Moron author Vince Milam released his 4th novel, The Suriname Job: A Case Lee Novel, last month:

When a mysterious client asks former Delta Force operator Case Lee to investigate a rebellion in South America, he uncovers an incredible global conspiracy. Welcome to revolution, murder, and behind-the-curtains intrigue. As events unfold, the spies and mercenaries come to a hard realization. You may mess with a lot on this good earth, but you don't mess with Case Lee.

This novel will be available for 99 cents until mid-July.

Vince is also the author of the three spiritual thrillers that comprise the Challenged World series. Here's the first one, the second, and the third.


___________

Don't forget the AoSHQ reading group on Goodreads. It's meant to support horde writers and to talk about the great books that come up on the book thread. It's called AoSHQ Moron Horde and the link to it is here: https://www.goodreads.com/group/show/175335-aoshq-moron-horde.


___________

So that's all for this week. As always, book thread tips, suggestions, bribes, rumors, threats, and insults may be sent to OregonMuse, Proprietor, AoSHQ Book Thread, at the book thread e-mail address: aoshqbookthread, followed by the 'at' sign, and then 'G' mail, and then dot cee oh emm.

What have you all been reading this week? Hopefully something good, because, as you all know, life is too short to be reading lousy books.

Posted by: OregonMuse at 09:05 AM




Comments

(Jump to bottom of page)

1 Morning all!

Posted by: Tonypete at June 18, 2017 09:05 AM (tr2D7)

2 nd

Posted by: Grump928(C) at June 18, 2017 09:06 AM (LTHVh)

3 Yay, OM awoke from his stupor!

Hello book people!

And sincerely, thank you OregonMuse.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at June 18, 2017 09:06 AM (QGoUX)

4 Good morning, Book Horde!

Posted by: josephistan at June 18, 2017 09:11 AM (ANIFC)

5 The upper right has an old Time-Life series on different eras and civilizations

I have that set.

Posted by: rickl at June 18, 2017 09:12 AM (sdi6R)

6 Good morning, all! Haven't been reading much this week. Finished the last of a book project for a client, and turned to writing the next of my own: another collection of YA western adventures which are a very loose (that is, all the identifying serial numbers have been carefully filed off) interpretation of the Lone Ranger series. This one will be called Lone Star Glory, and I hope to have finished in time for the Christmas market season; say, November.
I've already posted some excerpts of one adventure at my Celia Hayes blog. This involves a missing US Army officer ... and camels.
And we got a review of Luna City IV - wherein the reviewer plaintively asked when the next installment of the Luna City series is out. Answer: by the end of the year if I can write like the wind on two projects at a time, by May 2018 if I can't.

Posted by: Sgt. Mom at June 18, 2017 09:13 AM (xnmPy)

7 Yay Book Thread!

gloar, gove?
Are you making these up, OM?

Posted by: votermom pimping great books at June 18, 2017 09:13 AM (hMwEB)

8 Nice library up top. I'd love to have some space like that. Also, I think I had a few of the same textbooks as Apostate. Ugh, bad flashbacks.

Posted by: Insomniac at June 18, 2017 09:14 AM (0mRoj)

9 That college library doesn't look like it has very many books???

Posted by: Vic We Have No Party at June 18, 2017 09:14 AM (mpXpK)

10 99c sale on an Amanda Green book, and scroll down for my Friday freebie (conservative SF)
link in nic

Posted by: votermom pimping great books at June 18, 2017 09:15 AM (hMwEB)

11 Ah. 'A Distant Mirror', Tuchman, lower right.

Posted by: Mike Hammer, etc., etc. at June 18, 2017 09:15 AM (ZO497)

12 That college library doesn't look like it has very many books???
Posted by: Vic We Have No Party at June 18, 2017 09:14 AM (mpXpK)


I suspect it's a reading room within the larger library.

Posted by: OregonMuse, AoSHQ Thought Leader at June 18, 2017 09:16 AM (Ybs+3)

13 My current kindle book is "Indian Country" and I am still waiting for it to develop a plot. It seems to consist entirely of episodes of "Kill! Kill! Kill!" and that's about it. I really do hope there's a plot in there somewhere.

And the other books I'm reading are about dog training. In particular I'm reading a very short one by Patricia McConnell called "Feisty Fido" which is about leash aggression. My Sophie is actually dog aggressive (or reactive, if you prefer) because she very resource-guardy when we're out and about. I'm not sure what the resource is - it could be me or it could be the cookies I carry or it could be the tennis balls that always linger in her mind - but she does not want the other doggies anywhere near her. Anyway, the ideas in Feisty Fido definitely won't hurt and they might help.

Posted by: Tonestaple at June 18, 2017 09:16 AM (STkEV)

14 Yay, Book Thread!

I haven't been doing a lot of productive reading lately, but I did pick up a copy of The Bastard, by John Jakes. It's about the beginning of the American Revolution, which is interesting, but it's also not sure whether it wants to be a trashy romance novel or not, which is hilarious. I'd be reading along, enjoying the philosophy and politics of 1770s Boston, and then- bloop!- random sex scene. And there's a surprising amount of cussing for a book that was written almost fifty years ago. But it cost me 25 cents, so I can forgive most of its faults.

My writing has been mostly confined to the weekends, which is disappointing. I WILL finish this book eventually. At least, I keep telling myself that.

Posted by: right wing yankee at June 18, 2017 09:17 AM (26lkV)

15 I like Charleston restaurants better than NYC. Food is just as good and you do not have to get a second mortgage on your house to eat.

Posted by: Vic We Have No Party at June 18, 2017 09:17 AM (mpXpK)

16 I give the Charles Murray Curmudgeon book to every summer intern that rolls through my office. It is full of excellent advice.

Posted by: Scanner Dan at June 18, 2017 09:17 AM (lGKoh)

17 Yup, I'm pretty sure I had the same tax books and the same wills, trusts and estates book.

Posted by: Insomniac at June 18, 2017 09:17 AM (0mRoj)

18 5 The upper right has an old Time-Life series on different eras and civilizations

I have that set.
Posted by: rickl at June 18, 2017 09:12 AM (sdi6R)

We had that set too (Mom still has it). Great books indeed. We had the Time-Life "nature" and "science" series as well. Alas, they were given away, but I still have a few.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at June 18, 2017 09:17 AM (QGoUX)

19 15 I like Charleston restaurants better than NYC. Food is just as good and you do not have to get a second mortgage on your house to eat.
Posted by: Vic We Have No Party at June 18, 2017 09:17 AM (mpXpK)

Good food in Charleston. Haven't been in ages though.

Posted by: Insomniac at June 18, 2017 09:19 AM (0mRoj)

20 Very nice library, Apostate.

Posted by: NaCly Dog at June 18, 2017 09:19 AM (u82oZ)

21 Reread Dune this past week. Been a while since I last read it and all the talk of the movies the past couple of saturday movie threads got me in the mood for it.

Posted by: Darth Randall at June 18, 2017 09:19 AM (6n332)

22 Stephen Furst, famous for portraying "Flounder" in Animal House, has passed away at the age of 63. Sad, that is way too young, and he was always entertaining. (also had a significant role in Babylon 5) A cousin of his happens to be a Rabbi here where I live, have met him a few times. They look almost identical!

Posted by: Tom Servo at June 18, 2017 09:19 AM (V2Yro)

23 A library fit for Mortimer and Randolph.

Happy Father's Day

Posted by: Mr Aspirin Factory at June 18, 2017 09:19 AM (80X3Z)

24 RE: Apostates library... Holy Snikees! I have the same Calculus and DiffEQ books. Are you a patron of Half Price Books too? I LOVE that place. Too bad theydon't have one here in Denver.

Posted by: CrotchetyOldJarhead at June 18, 2017 09:20 AM (OlNRF)

25 12 I suspect it's a reading room within the larger library.


Posted by: OregonMuse, AoSHQ Thought Leader at June 18, 2017 09:16 AM (Ybs+3)

That's what I was thinking too.

Posted by: Vic We Have No Party at June 18, 2017 09:20 AM (mpXpK)

26 15. Charleston is one of my favorite food cities. 82 Queen Street an Magnolia's were both excellent the last time I was there. Beats NYC by a long shot

Posted by: Scanner Dan at June 18, 2017 09:20 AM (lGKoh)

27 I've taken to memorizing poetry (and pieces of plays in verse) recently for my YouTube channel. I would highly recommend the practice. You simply do not appreciate a piece of literature the same way until you've memorized it. Without any further reading, it brings a new level of understanding of the work.

(Any who are curious can see the results so far here: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLW-4X-flRYwBhRHy01hK_oUqJsncivTF5 I am particularly proud of "Lepanto", although it is a bit long.)

Posted by: Zaklog the Deplorable at June 18, 2017 09:20 AM (0ATMz)

28 GET ME OUT OF THIS BOX. I'M SUFFOCATING, AND SO IS MY HORSE.

Posted by: Robert Reich at June 18, 2017 09:20 AM (xAvrH)

29 Um...sure you didn't mean the word "glower?"

intransitive verb
: to look or stare with sullen annoyance or anger glowered at the noisy children in the library

Posted by: True the Note at June 18, 2017 09:21 AM (SJ184)

30 I'm about half way through Mere Christianity... why are there not more books like this one? And if there are, how are they not more widely known?

Posted by: Chupacabra at June 18, 2017 09:22 AM (z+83z)

31 "I suspect it's a reading room within the larger library.


Posted by: OregonMuse, AoSHQ Thought Leader at June 18, 2017 09:16 AM (Ybs+3)

That's what I was thinking too. "

I'm thinking that many Universities are now downsizing their libraries.

Mostly due to their students not actually needing to be able to read, nor extract information from the written word.

Posted by: Village Idiot's Apprentice at June 18, 2017 09:23 AM (J+eG2)

32 I definitely need to check out that Charles Murray book. I'm in dire need of more conservative-leaning social intelligence. And while I haven't racked up massive student loans, I was sentenced to 13 years of public school and 4 years of undergrad, so I'm now in the process of revising all the bad habits I picked up there.

Posted by: right wing yankee at June 18, 2017 09:23 AM (26lkV)

33 Coming to grips with the difference between being nice and being good


That's a lesson most modern American men need to learn, myself included, especially with the systematic and ongoing program of feminizing men from the time they're in preschool.

Posted by: Insomniac at June 18, 2017 09:25 AM (0mRoj)

34 I been going through "The Standard Dictionary of Facts" editited by H W Ruoff - 1914 - recently. Covers History, Literature, Geography, Politics, Government, Industry, Science, Commerce, Travel, Art, and much more.

Amazing that someone thought most of the important information of earth could be contained in one volume.



Posted by: Tonypete at June 18, 2017 09:25 AM (tr2D7)

35 On the Kindle, I read Borderlands: Journey by Aderyn Wood. This is a coming of age story of Dale (Dalendra), a misfit high schooler who sees faries and auras. The story is fast-paced and centers on Dale sailing from home to eventulally land in The Borderlands where she learns her true identity and begins training in sorcery. The book is labeled as YA, but there is some crude language. The story can be enjoyed by adults as well. The sequel is The Borderlands: War.

I also read Defying Hitler: A Memoir by Sebastian Haffner, translated by Oliver Pretzel. Sebastian Haffner is the pseudonym for Raymond Pretzel. The translator is his son. Haffner wrote this is 1939, but it is not published until 2000, after his death. In this work Haffner tries to answer two questions: "How were the Nazis possible?" and "Why didn't you stop them?" We all want to think that during a time of crisis and chaos, we would come down on the right side of history, to be one of the righteous; but I think one never really knows until one is face to face with the moral dilemmas and the choices that must be made. This is a very interesting book.

Posted by: Zoltan at June 18, 2017 09:26 AM (eTc/M)

36 to the birth of Times Square--where food and entertainment formed a partnership that has survived to this day.

I paid 20 bucks for a hamburger in TGIFridays in Times Square. I did NOT consider it a monumental dining experience.

Posted by: tu3031 at June 18, 2017 09:26 AM (qJhUV)

37 I finished "Aye, Robot" by Robert Kroese. I had gotten this one free through the Wrongthink giveaway. It is fine by itself, but I found out it is Book 2 of the Starship Grifters series, so I'll need to get the first book. It is funny and worth it for the arms discussion in Chapter 12 alone. "Yanthus Prime", a novella, was also included in the giveaway, and I enjoyed that as well.

Just started "Amy Lynn" by Jack July (I think a Moron author). So far so good.

Posted by: roamingfirehydrant at June 18, 2017 09:26 AM (THS4q)

38 Oh I thought it said "gloaring" hole.

Posted by: "Friend" of the blog at June 18, 2017 09:26 AM (BO/km)

39 Books read or reread last two weeks:

Poul Anderson's Mirkheim, Bored of the Rings, Nevil Shute's Landfall, David Drake and Charles G. Waugh's Space Infantry, Frederick Forsyth's The Fourth Protocol.

On deck: The Invention That Changed the World: How a Small Group of Radar Pioneers Won the Second World War and Launched a Technical Revolution
by Robert Buderi

Posted by: NaCly Dog at June 18, 2017 09:27 AM (u82oZ)

40 The left is maniac/depressive. Sometimes they're very agitated and at others they're all a gloary.

Posted by: geoffb5 at June 18, 2017 09:27 AM (d3wbb)

41 A few days ago I ordered a copy of Ann Coulter's "Demonic", but I haven't received it yet. I've been meaning to read it for some time now.

I found a used hardcover for $3.99 + $3.99 shipping. I figure I can't go wrong buying a used hardcover for less than the price of a new paperback.

Posted by: rickl at June 18, 2017 09:29 AM (sdi6R)

42 Yay, Apostate for the Knights of the Dinner Table. The Head of Vecna still makes me chuckle.

Posted by: roamingfirehydrant at June 18, 2017 09:29 AM (THS4q)

43 The Poul Anderson Megapack
(Kindle) can be purchased for $0.99. Which means, I assume, that the
material is all public domain stuff which you can probably find on the
web for free if you look long enough.




The third mega pack is out now but it is not on Gutenberg for free.

Posted by: Vic We Have No Party at June 18, 2017 09:29 AM (mpXpK)

44 I don't pick up a real book that often now, but I know one book I have read 3 or 4 times. Night Dogs by Kent Anderson is a quirky police/Vietnam vet book. It is both funny and scary.

The title goes to annual dog hunts by the police. There are feral and often rabid dog packs that roam the city. The police try to get as many confirmed kills as possible to win.

The policeman does a welfare check and finds an old man dead, with his faithful and blind dog at his feet. The man's son shows up, says just get rid of that old dog, so the man takes him home. He has a scene of sitting on his porch, sharing a beer and a conversation with the dog, and telling him not to get too close to the highway.

An ex-policeman I know told me his sergeant told him you will meet three kinds of people on the job. One needs a stern lecture and warning, a second needs to be in jail, the third needs a good beat down. That is this mans philosophy in the book.

I highly recommend.

Posted by: The Real Bruce at June 18, 2017 09:30 AM (bgs79)

45 42 Yay, Apostate for the Knights of the Dinner Table. The Head of Vecna still makes me chuckle.
Posted by: roamingfirehydrant at June 18, 2017 09:29 AM (THS4q)

Missed it. Loved Knights of the Dinner Table.

Posted by: Insomniac at June 18, 2017 09:31 AM (0mRoj)

46 30 ... "I'm about half way through Mere Christianity... why are there not more books like this one? And if there are, how are they not more widely known?"

There are other books in that vein by Lewis, GK Chesterton, etc. Unfortunately, the people who most need those books are the least likely to read them.

Posted by: JTB at June 18, 2017 09:31 AM (V+03K)

47 An ex-policeman I know told me his sergeant told him you will meet three kinds of people on the job. One needs a stern lecture and warning, a second needs to be in jail, the third needs a good beat down.

And those are just the co-workers!

Posted by: Insomniac at June 18, 2017 09:31 AM (0mRoj)

48 Coming to grips with the difference between being nice and being good


That's a lesson most modern American men need to
learn, myself included, especially with the systematic and ongoing
program of feminizing men from the time they're in preschool.

Posted by: Insomniac at June 18, 2017 09:25 AM (0mRoj)
I'm pretty sure most American women need to learn this, too. Which may explain why we have an entire generation of wet blankets who can't stand up for themselves without looking like toddlers having a temper tantrum.

Posted by: right wing yankee at June 18, 2017 09:31 AM (26lkV)

49 Or pay $0.99 to these guys who did it all for you already.

http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/30971

So where's my 99¢?

Posted by: t-bird at June 18, 2017 09:33 AM (/wWB4)

50 How to write when you don't know what to say

But is it possible to write when you can't even form coherent thoughts? Asking for a friend.

Posted by: Joe Biden at June 18, 2017 09:33 AM (xAvrH)

51 Great farmer's market in Charleston, too.

Posted by: Mr Aspirin Factory at June 18, 2017 09:33 AM (80X3Z)

52

Does library paste taste better than regular paste?

Posted by: In Vino Veritits at June 18, 2017 09:33 AM (qul7b)

53 San Franpsycho's culinary history of NYC:
Wo Hop
Peter Luger's
Lutece
21
La Reserve
Windows on the World
Zum Zum
Dosanko
David K's
Chock Full o Nuts
Nathan's
Nick's on Fr. Demos Square
Famous Original Ray's
Katz's
Stage Deli

Posted by: San Franpsycho at June 18, 2017 09:34 AM (EZebt)

54 Good morning fellow Book Threadists and happy fathers day if it applies.

This has been an odd week for my reading; not just eclectic but interrupted by an unexpected turn. Details to follow.

Posted by: JTB at June 18, 2017 09:35 AM (V+03K)

55 Morning all this Happy Father's Day from Fort Drum way way way Upstate NY

Posted by: Nevergiveup at June 18, 2017 09:35 AM (fu//l)

56 Speaking of Time-Life Books-

I guess they decided that there's too much money being left on the table with some of those series.

So, they're making a kind of limited comeback.

I saw a single issue magazine version of the Time-Life Old West series on the magazine rack at a drug store yesterday.

I was in a rush so I didn't buy it or look at it.

so, I can't tell you if it's a nice middle of the road, popular history dealio like their old series.

or an SJW comic book for the near-illerate and historically ignorant..

Maybe I'll return today a grab it.

Posted by: naturalfake at June 18, 2017 09:36 AM (9q7Dl)

57 Good morning, beloved Bookthreadists!

I get to report that I am finally re-establishing my reading habit. I picked up some G. K. Chesterton for the first time in my life and a collection of C. S. Lewis addresses/essays.

It's amazing how much reading concentration I have lost by mostly reading the internet.

On the other hand, I know a lot of random "facts." (When you've read them on the internet, there's no telling how true they are.)

Posted by: Emmie at June 18, 2017 09:36 AM (ZapPq)

58 I like those mega pack books. A dollar is worthwhile for a complete-ish collection.

Posted by: Chupacabra at June 18, 2017 09:36 AM (z+83z)

59 Ah, the Kindle. I just got one about a month ago and have been loading it up with books which would be too heavy to carry around in their dead-tree versions. So far I have biographies of Eamon de Valera and Antonio Salazar (I wanted to know what made them tick), Churchill's 6-volume history of the Second World War, and the Liturgy of the Hours for 2017. Also three volumes of the SPQR series by John Maddox Roberts, because sometimes I have to break from the serious stuff.

Posted by: Annalucia at June 18, 2017 09:36 AM (a5bF3)

60 This past week, I picked up the Penguin Classics edition of Thomas Ligotti's first two collections of short horror stories. I've read a few so far, he's quite good.

But having enough of horror, I've started (and nearly finished) Frederick Myatt's "March to Magdala: The Abyssinian War of 1868." One of the oddest wars of the Victorian era - King Theodore of Abyssinia sends a letter to Queen Victoria, asking Britain's assistance in his planned Crusade to liberate Jerusalem from the Ottoman Empire. The British think he's nuts, and don't even respond to the request. He is so outraged at the slight that he kidnaps & tortures the British consul, then does the same to the envoy the British send to negotiate his release. That was a line too far, so the British send an army to rescue him & other Western hostages.

Posted by: josephistan at June 18, 2017 09:36 AM (ANIFC)

61 I only like fiction on the Kindle. Books feel less substantial and fleeting for some reason when read on a screen.

I wish I didn't feel that way, because I'm going to have to make some hard decisions in regards to bookshelf space soon.

Posted by: Chupacabra at June 18, 2017 09:39 AM (z+83z)

62 30 I'm about half way through Mere Christianity... why are there not more books like this one? And if there are, how are they not more widely known?
Posted by: Chupacabra at June 18, 2017 09:22 AM (z+83z)


That is quite the classic. I am so glad I read it before going to college.

Posted by: Emmie at June 18, 2017 09:39 AM (ZapPq)

63 I'm pretty sure most American women need to learn this, too. Which may explain why we have an entire generation of wet blankets who can't stand up for themselves without looking like toddlers having a temper tantrum.
Posted by: right wing yankee at June 18, 2017 09:31 AM (26lkV)

I think that's a somewhat different dynamic, but something definitely needs to change there as well.

Posted by: Insomniac at June 18, 2017 09:40 AM (0mRoj)

64 Tolle lege

My attention has turned to a hobby project of the Gettysburg battle so want to recommend two books. First William Frassanito's Gettysburg, A Journey in Time which shows picturestaken right after the battle in July of 1863 and takes modern ( in early 1970's)picture in same spots. Could usea update as the Park has expanded and cleaned up lots of areas. The second is practically the bible of the battle Edward Coddington's Gettysburg A Study in Command. This book might be considered my most read bookI own which I have constantly picked up and find a chapter or two anywhere to read.

Posted by: Skip at June 18, 2017 09:40 AM (Ot7+c)

65 55 Nevergiveup

Good morning to you.

You sure get around. Are you a SEAL Team's staff dentist?

This is no shit. We used to be assigned to ships for up to 3 & a half years, and we liked it. Not a lot of billet hopping. In the really old Navy you could be a plank-owner and be on one ship for 12 or more years.

The difference between sea stories and fairy tales is fairy tales start with "Once upon a time".

Posted by: NaCly Dog at June 18, 2017 09:43 AM (u82oZ)

66 Appetite City takes us on a unique and delectable journey, from the days when oysters and turtle were the most popular ingredients in New York cuisine

That sounds barbaric! Worse than the Julius Caeser play.

Posted by: Mitch McConnell at June 18, 2017 09:45 AM (xAvrH)

67 I've read some Chesterton (which I bought in a mega pack, interestingly enough, and other Lewis, but none that made the case for Christianity in the same way.

Maybe MC's particular set of arguments hits the right spot for me, I dunno.

Posted by: Chupacabra at June 18, 2017 09:45 AM (z+83z)

68 I've started (and nearly finished) Frederick Myatt's
"March to Magdala: The Abyssinian War of 1868." One of the oddest wars
of the Victorian era - King Theodore of Abyssinia sends a letter to
Queen Victoria, asking Britain's assistance in his planned Crusade to
liberate Jerusalem from the Ottoman Empire. The British think he's nuts,
and don't even respond to the request. He is so outraged at the slight
that he kidnaps tortures the British consul, then does the same to
the envoy the British send to negotiate his release. That was a line
too far, so the British send an army to rescue him other Western
hostages.

Posted by: josephistan at June 18, 2017 09:36 AM (ANIFC

I've never even heard of this incident, yet it sounds so wonderfully stereotypical of the Victorian Era. Talk about thinking big- I didn't realize there was a Christian kingdom in the area of Ethiopia at that time, yet they were still there and had the guts to start planning a Crusade. Awesome.

Posted by: right wing yankee at June 18, 2017 09:46 AM (26lkV)

69 Book Thread tie-in:

Some of the funniest sea stories were by Daniel V. Gallery.

Stand BY-Y-Y to Start Engines
Cap'n Fatso
Now, Hear This!
Clear the Decks!

Posted by: NaCly Dog at June 18, 2017 09:47 AM (u82oZ)

70 I still say Suriname, French Guiana and Guyana were purposely named in order to confuse Highschool students between African countries and South American countries.

Posted by: Jack Sock at June 18, 2017 09:48 AM (IDPbH)

71 Posted by: right wing yankee at June 18, 2017 09:46 AM (26lkV)

I think that's where the Holy Grail is supposed to have ended up or something like that. Very interesting Christian church there built into the earth.

Posted by: Jack Sock at June 18, 2017 09:51 AM (IDPbH)

72 I think you had to be a sailor to appreciate sea stories. The absurdity of being a fleet sailor just isn't relatable to people who haven't been there.

Posted by: Chupacabra at June 18, 2017 09:53 AM (z+83z)

73 68 right wing yankee

Queen Victoria's Little Wars by Byron Farwell includes that war and many others. An extremely interesting book, which goes well with his Mr. Kipling's Army: All the Queen's Men, which is a sociological examination of the British colonial era army. Fascinating.

His Armies of the Raj: From the Great Indian Mutiny to Independence, 1858-1947 is similar in approach, but not quite as good as Mr. Kipling's Army.

Posted by: NaCly Dog at June 18, 2017 09:53 AM (u82oZ)

74 Book 12 pretty much wrapped up the Worlds Apart storyline. (I'll send Muse a link next week) But I think I'm gonna explore that universe a little more.

I'm thinking one of the next stories will include a character named Commander Isabel Sanford of the starship Ascendant II. Think anybody will get the joke?

Posted by: V the K at June 18, 2017 09:54 AM (jn7FC)

75
"I still say Suriname, French Guiana and Guyana were purposely named in
order to confuse Highschool students between African countries and South
American countries."

When I was in school they were still Dutch Guyana, French Guyana and British Guyana, respectively.

Posted by: Annalucia at June 18, 2017 09:54 AM (a5bF3)

76 My "library" is being redone at the moment. I built an insane 16 foot wide ceiling to floor corbeled monolith with fluted molding and rope crown molding patterned after the old world. All the hardwood facial appointments I made from flame maple. There is around 180 miters alone just along the top because of the various moldings. 5 sections, center is for the TV and electronics flanked by 2 book cases on each side, with internal lighting. Took almost 2 months to build it.

Why is it getting rebuilt? The 5/8" shelves started to sag a little, now I get to remake all the shelves with 3/4", which I should have done in the first place seeing the sides are all 3/4. I used the 5/8, because my asshole friend who volunteered to pick up the shelf material can't read a fucking ruler. I figured well how bad can 5/8 be? Yeah, I found out, sagged in 2 years. I have some of the new shelves in place unstained as a test. Solid as a rock.

Anybody here going to build shit, don't use anything less than 3/4 for shelves, that 1/8" matters.

Posted by: Berserker- Dragonheads Division at June 18, 2017 09:56 AM (aMlLZ)

77 Finished "Far Side of the World" and am still working my way through the queue and still enjoying the series.

On a side note, I bought a copy of Sarah Hoyt's "Darkship Thieves" because it got good Book Thread reviews, she is an interesting poster here as well, and I had never read any of her work. I really thought that I'd glance at the book and put it aside to read "later". However,much to my surprise (and delight), I am enjoying the heck out of the book, so much so, that I bought "Darkship Renegades" to have as a follow-up.

I have heard the term "too many words on the page" as a comment on verbose authors. I think it is worth noting that I found Baen's paper-back "typesetting" to be second rate, with too many words on the page, and it distracted me from Hoyt's text. By this I mean that the page margin on the binding side of the book was very small so that the edge text ran almost into the binding, making the book a bit irritating to read as I continually had to force the book to lay flat. Not a fault with the author though!

Posted by: Hrothgar at June 18, 2017 09:57 AM (gwPgz)

78 We're renovating the upstairs bedrooms now. We put shelves into one of the rooms that mimic built--in bookcases and are lining them with small, light books a guest might flip through before turning in.

Here's one we found. "Men and Cats." Pictures of male models posing with kittehs. Maybe some of the moronettes would enjoy.

https://tinyurl.com/y7esm2pt

Posted by: V the K at June 18, 2017 09:58 AM (jn7FC)

79 I'm about half way through Mere Christianity... why are there not more books like this one? And if there are, how are they not more widely known?

Posted by: Chupacabra


All of his non fiction is worth a read. I think I own them all: Problem of Pain, Mere Christianity, Miracles, Grief Observed, Abolition of Man. It's all reasoned out rigorously, and he has a gift for analogies, which I think is how people do their clearest thinking. Even if (like me) you are not a believer, you will probably agree with about 60-70% of what he says.

Posted by: Steve and Cold Bear at June 18, 2017 09:58 AM (xAvrH)

80 I think that's where the Holy Grail is supposed to
have ended up or something like that. Very interesting Christian church
there built into the earth.

Posted by: Jack Sock at June 18, 2017 09:51 AM (IDPbH)
Finding it must have been a heck of quest for Sir Perceval, given that he started in Wales.
That church sounds like an interesting place to play tourist. Except for the risk of getting shot, of course.

Posted by: right wing yankee at June 18, 2017 09:59 AM (26lkV)

81 I like Charleston restaurants better than NYC. Food is just as good and you do not have to get a second mortgage on your house to eat.
Posted by: Vic We Have No Party at June 18, 2017 09:17 AM (mpXpK)


You haven't been to NYC since the 70s, no? There are plenty of inexpensive eateries but you have to know where to look and avoid the touristy places like Times Square. I don't doubt that Charleston is very good.

Am on book 3 in The Once and Future King dealing with Lancelot and his cooch fever regarding Guenever and her weird reactions to it and how Elaine is always tricking him into banging her thinking it was the Queen (at least twice so far). For being written pre WW2, White throws in a lot of authorial asides to the reader which are sometimes very funny, which is a good way to breathe life into the very familiar story of Arthur, who has oddly been shoved to the narrative curb after being the initial focus.

Posted by: Captain Hate at June 18, 2017 09:59 AM (y7DUB)

82 I'm almost through Norman Ohler's Blitzed: Drugs in the Third Reich, and it is a trippy read indeed.

Without the natural resources available to empires like those of Britain and France, including natural stimulants like tea and coffee, Germany had to produce synthetic pep. They developed a thriving pharmaceutical industry in the interwar years. They became a top morphine-producing state and a champion at exporting heroine, 98% of which went abroad. German companies controlled 80 % of the world cocaine market. Peru sold all of its raw cocaine to Germany where it was refined.

The Nazis railed against this pleasure-seeking culture and swapped it out for a performance-enhancing culture. Benzedrine and ephedrine were already around, but the Temmler factory found a way to synthesize something even better and longer-lasting, methamphetamine, with the OTC name Pervitin.

And it was everywhere. Students used it to pull all-nighter study sessions, factory workers boosted productivity with it, performers used it to conquer stage fright. It was put into chocolates for housewives -- perfectly safe, unlike caffeine!

Crystal meth! In your Whitman Sampler!

Pervitan was in the kits of every soldier and airman, and the big push through Belgium into France was basically one big coordinated trip on crystal meth.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at June 18, 2017 09:59 AM (QGoUX)

83 Have a great day everyone. Time to put on my anti-chigger armor and work outside.

Posted by: NaCly Dog at June 18, 2017 10:00 AM (u82oZ)

84 Read Michael Crichton's The Terminal Man, not about a man who is dying but a dangerous psychopath who doctors give experimental brain surgery to connect him to a computer. Not one of his best but an entertaining thriller.

Posted by: waelse1 at June 18, 2017 10:00 AM (Mpm2M)

85 We're talking about converting the formal dining room into a library. We only use it for eating maybe twice a year, and with the table, we could still use it like that. People like to eat around shelves of books, right?

Posted by: V the K at June 18, 2017 10:00 AM (jn7FC)

86 Posted by: NaCly Dog at June 18, 2017 09:53 AM (u82oZ)

*adds to the reading list*

Geez, this list is taller than me. I'd better get crackin'.

Posted by: right wing yankee at June 18, 2017 10:00 AM (26lkV)

87 I like Poul Anderson's book Brain Wave.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brain_Wave

Posted by: Bertram Cabot, Jr. at June 18, 2017 10:00 AM (IqV8l)

88 Ah yes, the Kirby Library, Lafayette College. Exquisite furnishings, subdued lighting, wonderfully classic atmosphere. I eagerly anticipate taking a dump on that rug.

Posted by: Homeless schizo allowed to meander freely around campus at June 18, 2017 10:01 AM (UW4Uc)

89 Insomniac, I wanted to tell you I saw you've got some work and I'm really happy for you!

Posted by: Donna&&&&&&V sez the Brewers are NO.1 in the NL Central for the next 15 minutes at June 18, 2017 10:02 AM (P8951)

90 Posted by: V the K at June 18, 2017 09:54 AM (jn7FC)

Can't speak for others, but I know I don't get the joke. Only Sanford I can think of (other than the tv show) ought to go back to the "Appalachian Trail" instead of stabbing Trump in the back in congress.

Posted by: Polliwog the 'Ette at June 18, 2017 10:02 AM (sEDyY)

91 The highlight of my reading week was receiving a copy of Roget's Thesaurus printed in 1931. This is the older style with words grouped by use or property instead of just A to Z. This has advantages (at least to me) as it exposes you to other possibilities tangential to the specific word; things you might not have considered. The sections sometimes include quotes from history and literature (foreign languages translated) to provide literary context. There is an alphabetical index in the back but it refers to places within the ten subsections, not page numbers. The whole process sounds like going around three sides of the barn (and it sort of is) but it leads to a richer experience.

The introductory sections are a delight. They have the feel of Victorian era academia with a rich vocabulary and proper use of punctuation. It is florid, by today's standards, and exact at the same time. I love that style.

Physically, the book is a delight. Although it's 86 years old the binding is still good, the paper has not yellowed, and it has the first hints of that 'old book' aroma. The pages are thin stock but not weak (reminds me of better Bible editions) and they have that soft, silky feel that comes only after decades of use. It is pleasant to just hold and feel the book as you use it.

And yes, for those of us who used to read dictionaries and encyclopedias (raise my hand) you can get lost in this volume.

Posted by: JTB at June 18, 2017 10:02 AM (V+03K)

92 I know I have "Mere Christianity" somewhere here in the boxes, and I need to find and read it. I read "Letters to Malcolm, chiefly on Prayer" and found it fascinating. I keep meaning to get back to reading Lewis, but life keeps getting in the way!

Posted by: Hrothgar at June 18, 2017 10:04 AM (gwPgz)

93 Any conservative reading list should have Harry Crews in the fiction section.

Posted by: Captain Hate at June 18, 2017 10:04 AM (y7DUB)

94 Pervitan was in the kits of every soldier and
airman, and the big push through Belgium into France was basically one
big coordinated trip on crystal meth.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at June 18, 2017 09:59 AM (QGoUX)
That explains a lot. The French were sitting in their cafes with a glass of wine, all mellow and happy, and the Germans were tweaking their way through the countryside on uppers.

Posted by: right wing yankee at June 18, 2017 10:04 AM (26lkV)

95 "The difference between sea stories and fairy tales is fairy tales start with "Once upon a time"."

Hey...this is a "no-shitter"

Posted by: Village Idiot's Apprentice at June 18, 2017 10:04 AM (J+eG2)

96 Happy Father's Day one and all!


Father's Day always reminds me of a book, which I read titled...

...wait for it...

"Father's Day"!!!


It's not a particularly good book or very memorable in and of itself,

but here's the reason that I remember it:


I was a big fan of the author John Calvin Batchelor after reading his books, "The Birth of the People's Republic of Antarctica" and "American Falls". Both of which were fairly ambitious literary novels.

So, when his new novel, "Father's Day" came out, I snapped it up.

FD got a big push as well in TIME and the like with big raving reviews. Plus, a big movie advance.

The thing which makes FD stick in my mind is in one of the interviews I read with John Calvin Batchelor and heard on NPR (I believe)-

JCB basically sez

"Welp. My literary novels made no money. And I got a kid getting ready to go to college. So, since thrillers are all the rage I wrote this steaming pile of crap to make money.

And it worked! With the big advance and movie money, I can pay her tuition."

He didn't phrase it like that exactly, but that was the gist of it.

And that attitude showed in FD.

The first part was pretty good. But, the last half is just a big hard to follow mess.

One of those books where you can sense the author is tired of his own book.

You know the type...where you wish the author had put in a big ellipsis with the words "And then stuff happened!" and finish things off with the final chapter.

I suppose JCB was embarrassed by his own book and wished to disown it...Publically.

That was so weird that I've always remembered that book, which as I said above is so unmemorable in itself.

Posted by: naturalfake at June 18, 2017 10:04 AM (9q7Dl)

97 Happily, Nash's history of conservatism was updated in 2006.

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00JBRUI5K/?tag=aoshq-20#reader_B00JBRUI5K

Posted by: TD at June 18, 2017 10:05 AM (bxe9a)

98 Oh hell, I wouldn't trust 3/4" shelves not to sag. Not the way you really end up using bookshelves, with sideways stacks up to the gun'l's of stuff you've pulled for a "research project" (usually Victorian porno, but I don't judge).

You can save a sagging shelf by putting a 1 x 2ish longitudinal brace beneath it, keeping in mind that it's the screws through the shelf that maintain tension and a straight line, not just the weight of the load. And you know, if the shelf sits on a cleat on its back edge, it should be screwed or pinned into that, too -- same reason.

After you do it, you realize that runner should have been in there in the first place. But even as you kick your own backside for that realization, it's less work than pulling the shelves down.

If you had the "foresight" (dumb luck) to recess the shelf fronts from the framing around them, you can even get away with putting the brace on the front of the shelf. Less color matching, lot more holes to fill.

Posted by: Stringer Davis at June 18, 2017 10:06 AM (H5rtT)

99 Hello everyone.

I just received my review copy yesterday of Map Drawn By a Spy by Guillermo Cabrera Infante. It's quite a story. In a nutshell, Infante is a Cuban who was the cultural attaché to the Cuban embassy in Brussels in the mid 1960s. When his mother dies he returns home to manage things. When he applies to return to Europe some days later, he is denied and restricted to Cuba. He spends four months seeing Cuba through new eyes based on his experiences in Belgium. He was able to leave Cuba and began his writing career afterward.

This particular book is from a manuscript he left unsubmitted and was found after his death. I've only just started it but so far it's shaping up to be a fascinating glimpse into post revolutionary Cuba and the tyranny of Castro as described by someone who lived it first hand.

Posted by: WitchDoktor, AKA VA GOP Sucks at June 18, 2017 10:06 AM (2VN2E)

100 Admiral Gallery was a writer who helped solidify my love of the sea, and a desire to en list in the Navy.


And funny as hell to boot.

Don't forget the capture of the U-505, as written in "Away Boarders"

Posted by: Village Idiot's Apprentice at June 18, 2017 10:06 AM (J+eG2)

101 For years I used to buy paperbacks because they were cheap. But in recent years I started buying hardcovers whenever possible. They're just nicer, and you can find lightly used ones online pretty cheap. I've gotten good at reading the booksellers' descriptions of the book's condition. When there are numerous copies available, I don't buy the cheapest or most expensive ones, but go for somewhere in the middle.

When I get one, I like to Brodart the dust jacket.

https://tinyurl.com/ydx8umca

I have these covers in three different sizes, and with a ruler and X-Acto knife for folding and trimming, they can be made to fit almost any dust jacket. The end result looks pretty sharp, if I do say so myself.

Posted by: rickl at June 18, 2017 10:06 AM (sdi6R)

102 Temmler factory found a way to synthesize something even better and longer-lasting, methamphetamine, with the OTC name Pervitin.

And it was everywhere. Students used it to pull all-nighter study sessions, factory workers boosted productivity with it, performers used it to conquer stage fright. It was put into chocolates for housewives -- perfectly safe, unlike caffeine!

-
SJWs use it to beat down fascists.

Posted by: Anonosaurus Wrecks, the Real Anonosaurus Wrecks at June 18, 2017 10:07 AM (Nwg0u)

103 Posted by: Jack Sock at June 18, 2017 09:51 AM (IDPbH)

Ark of the Covenant. The Grail was supposedly taken to Europe by Joseph of Arimathea.

Posted by: Polliwog the 'Ette at June 18, 2017 10:08 AM (sEDyY)

104 I am reading "The Watchful Mind" by a monk of St Athos. It is teaching on the Jesus prayer- "Lord Jesus Christ, son of God, have mercy on me" which has a long meditative practice in the Eastern Orthodox Church.

Posted by: FenelonSpoke at June 18, 2017 10:08 AM (qES5k)

105 We're talking about converting the formal dining
room into a library. We only use it for eating maybe twice a year, and
with the table, we could still use it like that. People like to eat
around shelves of books, right? Posted by: V the K at June 18, 2017 10:00 AM (jn7FC)
=====

Could make after-dinner discussions interesting with competing searches for authority -- if you ban cellphones. Actually, formal dining rooms are really handy for homeschoolers because enough room to spread out and not get in the way of kitchen messes. I never had one so my kids were limited in projects to what they could keep contained and out of the way.

Posted by: mustbequantum at June 18, 2017 10:08 AM (MIKMs)

106 Any conservative reading list should have Harry Crews in the fiction section.

Posted by: Captain Hate at June 18, 2017 10:04 AM (y7DUB)



Agreed.

Car
Karate is a Thing of the Spirit
Gypsy's Curse
A Feast of Snakes


Jet black humor and all great stuff.

Posted by: naturalfake at June 18, 2017 10:09 AM (9q7Dl)

107 So far I have biographies of Eamon de Valera and Antonio Salazar (I wanted to know what made them tick)

Posted by: Annalucia at June 18, 2017 09:36 AM (a5bF3)


Which one of de Valera? I've read Tim Pat Coogan's, which describes de Valera as a pious self-rightious cardsharper. I understand there is another biography not as negative.

I wish to God I could clear my IP address, which is banned. I've tried everything. I'd like to comment on my reading but I'll be damned if I'll try to do a long-form on my phone.

Posted by: Hadrian the Seventh at June 18, 2017 10:10 AM (S1iHi)

108 I've never even heard of this incident, yet it
sounds so wonderfully stereotypical of the Victorian Era. Talk about
thinking big- I didn't realize there was a Christian kingdom in the area
of Ethiopia at that time, yet they were still there and had the guts to
start planning a Crusade. Awesome.
Posted by: right wing yankee at June 18, 2017 09:46 AM (26lkV)


George MacDonald Fraser wrote a Flashman book on it, Flashman on the March.
It plots like a Sir Walter Scott novel, but apparently that was pretty much how it went.

Posted by: Kindltot at June 18, 2017 10:10 AM (mkDpn)

109 The cop in Night Dogs does not like to wear his hat so his sergeant is always giving him a hard time. One time he arrives at a crime scene and his sergeant and other police are already there. So he jams his hat on so hard it pushes his ears out and forward. He then marches up to his sergeant, and with his best Benny Hill salute, says "reporting for duty SIR".

Posted by: The Real Bruce at June 18, 2017 10:10 AM (bgs79)

110 I started "A Green and Ancient Light" which was recommended last week. I'm only a few chapters in but can say the writing is excellent and characters are nicely limned without mind deadening exposition. The story is about a young boy sent to live with his grandmother, a near stranger, in a small English village during WW II. Although there is enough detail to ground their world in reality (an enemy bomber crashing, victory gardens, and such) there are just a few hints of fantasy, or fairie as Tolkien might say, further along. It's an interesting and difficult balance to maintain. I'm eager to finish the book.

Posted by: JTB at June 18, 2017 10:11 AM (V+03K)

111 That explains a lot. The French were sitting in their cafes with a glass of wine, all mellow and happy, and the Germans were tweaking their way through the countryside on uppers.
Posted by: right wing yankee at June 18, 2017 10:04 AM (26lkV)
---
They really were! Guderian's forces literally plowed through and over whatever and whoever was in the way. Apparently, when one is on the stuff, there is the urge to do something, to go go GO.

Tweakers in the Book Thread can enlighten us.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at June 18, 2017 10:13 AM (QGoUX)

112 89 Insomniac, I wanted to tell you I saw you've got some work and I'm really happy for you!
Posted by: Donna&&&&&&V sez the Brewers are NO.1 in the NL Central for the next 15 minutes at June 18, 2017 10:02 AM (P8951)

Thank you!

Posted by: Insomniac at June 18, 2017 10:14 AM (0mRoj)

113 I know I have "Mere Christianity" somewhere here in the boxes, and I need to find and read it. I read "Letters to Malcolm, chiefly on Prayer" and found it fascinating. I keep meaning to get back to reading Lewis, but life keeps getting in the way!

Posted by: Hrothgar


Another gift of Lewis - he takes all these complicated topics, and he makes it into a page-turner. You want to see where he goes next. So consider it as infotainment (sorry), rather than a chore that you'd rather avoid. If you take the subway, etc. you can easily slip in these reads.

Four Loves is another good one.

Posted by: Steve and Cold Bear at June 18, 2017 10:14 AM (xAvrH)

114 85 We're talking about converting the formal dining room into a library. We only use it for eating maybe twice a year, and with the table, we could still use it like that. People like to eat around shelves of books, right?
Posted by: V the K at June 18, 2017 10:00 AM (jn7FC)
---
I think this is a nifty idea and will have great visual interest for the room. I did a quick google for "dining room/library" and there are all kinds of cool setups.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at June 18, 2017 10:15 AM (QGoUX)

115 Anyone know what's up w/Twatter? I guess they changed the site, but it looks essentially the same. Except, every post w/video is a black box w/a message saying: "This media could not be played." I have an old OS on my desktop, maybe it's not supported for video there?

Posted by: Brave Sir Robin at June 18, 2017 10:16 AM (ty7RM)

116 A lot of German brutal treatment of the conquered, and just general bad-assery, has been blamed on the widespread use of those drugs -- or what happened when you ran out of them.

We, on the other hand, had instant coffee, and they envied us for it.
You know what happens when you run out of coffee?

Posted by: Stringer Davis at June 18, 2017 10:18 AM (H5rtT)

117 Question for the group: I have 2012 Kindle paperwhite. It works well and I still use it regularly. Amazon is offering a promotion right now that would allow up me to get about $40 toward a new Kindle. I would probably go with the current version of the Kindle paperwhite, which I believe first came out in 2015. On the specs, it seems to be an upgrade from my 2012 paperwhite. In practice, I am not sure if there would be an appreciable difference between the two.

Would love to hear opinions from any paperwhite users. For what it's worth, it did not appear that the kindle voyager is meaningfully different from the pw, but feel free to disabuse me of any bad assumptions on that point.

Thanks in advance.

Posted by: nc at June 18, 2017 10:20 AM (iopMS)

118 Started reading "We are Legion (We are Bob)" which I was excited to start because the premise seemed so interesting. But turns out the guy is a hard core atheist nutter. USA taken over by an evangelical fanatic who imposes a theocracy in order to do evil Christian things that all Christians secretly wish to do.

As I said in my review on Amazon, I regret giving my money to someone who hates me. It wasn't even important to the story. Could have been good without it, but no, have to grind that ax.

Am now reading "Starship Grifters" which is a treat. If you like "Space Balls", then you will like this. Same sort of sophisticated, erudite humor. It's funny without being vulgar, which is rare these days.

Here is the most ribald passage so far ( I laughed out loud):

Pepper Melange reached down her cleavage, "Here, my business card"

Wick took the card, "Oh...its so warm!", pressing it against his cheek.

"Give me that, you idiot," Rex exclaimed. "He's right its still warm"

Posted by: countrydoc at June 18, 2017 10:24 AM (NNwmg)

119 Read Michael Crichton's The Terminal Man, not about a man who is dying but a dangerous psychopath who doctors give experimental brain surgery to connect him to a computer. Not one of his best but an entertaining thriller.

Posted by: waelse1 at June 18, 2017 10:00 AM (Mpm2M)



Fun book and surprisingly, the movie is pretty great as well.

George Segal made a great "terminal man".

And Joan Hackett was still hawt.

Posted by: naturalfake at June 18, 2017 10:28 AM (9q7Dl)

120 And it was everywhere. Students used it to pull all-nighter study sessions, factory workers boosted productivity with it, performers used it to conquer stage fright. It was put into chocolates for housewives -- perfectly safe, unlike caffeine!

Crystal meth! In your Whitman Sampler!

Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at June 18, 2017 09:59 AM (QGoUX)


I've heard that when they first learned how to make heroin, they used it as an ingredient in kids' cough syrups. As a cough-suppressant, I guess heroin couldn't be beat.

Posted by: OregonMuse, AoSHQ Thought Leader at June 18, 2017 10:29 AM (Ybs+3)

121 Car
Karate is a Thing of the Spirit
Gypsy's Curse
A Feast of Snakes


Jet black humor and all great stuff.

Posted by: naturalfake at June 18, 2017 10:09 AM (9q7Dl)


The first thing I read by him was "All We Need of Hell" and began with him grinding on his wife trying to delay the happy ending by thinking of baseball or anything else while she's saying "you 'bout done yet?" Needless to say I was hooked for binge reading unlike anything since early Raymond Carver. Some of the ones, like The Knockout Artist are pretty fucking weird (Oyster Boy FTW). Even my lib friends with taste dote on him but fuck them, he was one of us.

Posted by: Captain Hate at June 18, 2017 10:29 AM (y7DUB)

122 I see Apostate (or his son) is also a fan of the Black Library and Warhammer 40,000, judging by the books stacked on the right side of the shelves.

Posted by: Toastrider at June 18, 2017 10:30 AM (Ar/Wb)

123 111
Tweakers in the Book Thread can enlighten us.
Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at June 18, 2017 10:13 AM (QGoUX)


The movie "Starfighters" from the early 60s about a squadron of F-104 pilots, has them being issued "pep pills" before a long flight.

That was one of my all-time favorite MST3K episodes.

"Pep pills" and "diet pills" containing various kinds of amphetamines were perfectly legal until the mid-1960s. The Rolling Stones song "Mother's Little Helper" was about them.

And a generation earlier, there was this:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rZ5_SyvxDXE

Posted by: rickl at June 18, 2017 10:30 AM (sdi6R)

124 A few quotes from Heinz Nordoff, the man whom the British appointed to run the Volkswagen plant after World War II.

"If we kill the cow on who's milk we want to live later just because it has fattened up a little - as we are advised by those who want to make the people happy - then we shall have no future, we shall go to the dogs, the whole lot of us, and our grandchildren will curse us because we did not think of them."
pg 139, part of speech delivered in late 1948 as VW started to build up cash a reserve and some wanted an immediate pay raise.

"You cannot make the past go away by turning your back on it or refusing to look at it."
pg 160. After reading Eichmann in Jerusalem.

Small Wonder. Walter Henry Nelson. Little, Brown and Company. Boston. 1967.*

*Thought there was in the book a quote by Nordoff on why he refused to set-up company run hospitals and such. But having no luck finding it. Which was the whole raison d'etre for me pulling this book off shelf after reading about Google's plans about company housing.

Posted by: Anna Puma at June 18, 2017 10:31 AM (I6YUj)

125 103 Posted by: Jack Sock at June 18, 2017 09:51 AM (IDPbH)

Ark of the Covenant. The Grail was supposedly taken to Europe by Joseph of Arimathea.
Posted by: Polliwog the 'Ette at June 18, 2017 10:08 AM (sEDyY)

Yes you are correct . I just recalled it was some religious artifact. Thanks .

Posted by: Jack Sock at June 18, 2017 10:31 AM (IDPbH)

126 Started reading "We are Legion (We are Bob)" which I was excited to start because the premise seemed so interesting. But turns out the guy is a hard core atheist nutter. USA taken over by an evangelical fanatic who imposes a theocracy in order to do evil Christian things that all Christians secretly wish to do.

Posted by: countrydoc at June 18, 2017 10:24 AM (NNwmg)


( *furiously scribbles notes* )

Posted by: Margaret Atwood at June 18, 2017 10:35 AM (Ybs+3)

127 Oh hell, I wouldn't trust 3/4" shelves not to sag. Not the way you really end up using bookshelves, with sideways stacks up to the gun'l's of stuff you've pulled for a "research project" (usually Victorian porno, but I don't judge).

You can save a sagging shelf by putting a 1 x 2ish longitudinal brace beneath it, keeping in mind that it's the screws through the shelf that maintain tension and a straight line, not just the weight of the load. And you know, if the shelf sits on a cleat on its back edge, it should be screwed or pinned into that, too -- same reason.

After you do it, you realize that runner should have been in there in the first place. But even as you kick your own backside for that realization, it's less work than pulling the shelves down.

If you had the "foresight" (dumb luck) to recess the shelf fronts from the framing around them, you can even get away with putting the brace on the front of the shelf. Less color matching, lot more holes to fill.


Posted by: Stringer Davis at June 18, 2017 10:06 AM (H5rtT)

The shelves are adjustable, they aren't fixed. The shelves sit on these little gold looking pins drilled into the sides. They couldn't have any runners along the back, or sides. I just pulled them out and made new ones. The tops and bottom of each unit is 3/4 dadoed into the 3/4 sides. This shit is built like furniture, even the backs are dadoed into the sides. I did use 2 additional dadoed "fixed" shelves in the center unit, one above and below the TV.

You would have to see pictures, its waaay too epic to have afterthought repairs. It needed new shelves.

Posted by: Berserker- Dragonheads Division at June 18, 2017 10:36 AM (aMlLZ)

128 Posted by: naturalfake at June 18, 2017 10:28 AM (9q7Dl)

Thanks for the tip, will have to Netflix the movie. All Crichton novels seem to be designed to be converted to screenplays.

Posted by: waelse1 at June 18, 2017 10:37 AM (Mpm2M)

129 "The Pompatus of Gove."

This is why I come here.

Happy Father's Day to all you dads, uncles, and godfathers! You're a handsome and talented and wonderful group, the lot of you.

Posted by: bluebell ~ send us your recipes! at June 18, 2017 10:37 AM (sBOL1)

130 101 For years I used to buy paperbacks because they were cheap. But in recent years I started buying hardcovers whenever possible. They're just nicer, and you can find lightly used ones online pretty cheap. I've gotten good at reading the booksellers' descriptions of the book's condition. When there are numerous copies available, I don't buy the cheapest or most expensive ones, but go for somewhere in the middle.
Posted by: rickl at June 18, 2017 10:06 AM (sdi6R)

I've found that many times at Amazon, when I'm looking at non-fiction (usually history) the hardbacks are less expensive than paperback editions. Gotten many volumes for 1 cent plus the $3.99 shipping charge.

But most of those penny books seem to have gone away. When Amazon changed their system (earlier this year) to allow sellers to set shipping charges or no shipping charges, the penny (plus $3.99) books pretty much went to $4.99 or $5.99 with FREE shipping.

Still as inexpensive or less than a new paperback.

Posted by: Just John at June 18, 2017 10:37 AM (Zhmao)

131 As a cough-suppressant, I guess heroin couldn't be beat.

They still blend codeine into cough syrup. It's unbeatable. Impossible to get rx for these days, but unbeatable.

Posted by: Brave Sir Robin at June 18, 2017 10:39 AM (ty7RM)

132 Apparently, when one is on the stuff, there is the urge to do something, to go go GO.

-
When I was a prosecutor, I prosecuted charges against members of a violent drug gang. When they were captured (on the way to rob another pusher), one member had his automatic pistol in his waistband without benefit of any holster. He had cut the trigger guard off. His role in the gang was to collect drug debts and his modus operandi was pistol whipping the debtors. With the gun with no trigger guard. He eventually turned states evidence and I interviewed him to prepare his testimony. I asked him why he cut the trigger guard off. He told me you know how it is. You're high on meth. The Dremel tool is right there. Next thing you know, no trigger guard.

I know of several instances where tweakers take things apart, televisions, motorcycles, etc., then have no idea how to put them back together.

Posted by: Anonosaurus Wrecks, the Real Anonosaurus Wrecks at June 18, 2017 10:39 AM (Nwg0u)

133 I read he first two Bob books, countrydoc, and yes, he has a very oligarchical/fascistic streak in his writing. When he's talking about exploration and things, the books are fine but any interaction with humans or other sentiments and it takes a garbage turn.

Posted by: Chupacabra at June 18, 2017 10:39 AM (z+83z)

134 Country Doc, should have read Dean Ing's Systemic Shock instead.

http://astore.amazon.com/aoshq-20/detail/0812500385

Posted by: Anna Puma at June 18, 2017 10:39 AM (I6YUj)

135 @29 glower

I think it's a variant of to GOML: to wave a stick from the porch, while shouting at yoots.

Posted by: Unsure if deplorable, covfefe moron at June 18, 2017 10:40 AM (Eynls)

136 Four Loves is another good one.
Posted by: Steve and Cold Bear at June 18, 2017 10:14 AM (xAvrH)
---------

That's a great one. My husband was the best man in a wedding and based his toast off what he read in that book. No joke, people were coming up to him afterwards and asking him for a copy of his toast.

I have my kids read The Great Divorce when we do British Lit in high school. Two of them have said it is their favorite book ever.

Posted by: bluebell ~ send us your recipes! at June 18, 2017 10:40 AM (sBOL1)

137 Still slugging away on Wilderness Empire by Allan Eckart.

Among other things, the fighting right BEFORE the French & Indian War first brought young George Washington to public attention.

GW's greatest ambition was a commission as a regular officer in the British Army. Ditto John Paul Jones for the Royal Navy,

Posted by: mnw at June 18, 2017 10:41 AM (9lTjk)

138 I've heard that when they first learned how to make heroin, they used it as an ingredient in kids' cough syrups. As a cough-suppressant, I guess heroin couldn't be beat.
Posted by: OregonMuse, AoSHQ Thought Leader at June 18, 2017 10:29 AM (Ybs+3


Interesting. Did they ultimately tone it down by substituting codeine, which I found out the hard way I'm allergic to and it wires me the fuck up? All of this overly long path to medical discovery led to my miserable barking winter coughs being caused by allergies which OTC Zyrtec generics have put in the past.

Posted by: Captain Hate at June 18, 2017 10:41 AM (y7DUB)

139 Dammit! I feel asleep on the train ride home last night & must have left my book on the train!

Posted by: josephistan at June 18, 2017 10:42 AM (ANIFC)

140 Jay Asher, Thirteen Reasons Why. I've been hinting at this one for a week or more, so...

This is a young adult story about a guy, Clay, who has a crush on a girl, Hannah Baker, who has a reputation as being "easy". She actually isn't, but due to certain mutual classmates, she's attained that rep. And then Baker commits suicide, reports differ on how, and sends out a collection of cassette-tapes explaining why.

It does well with character. World-building, less well; the town does not feel real to me.

Also the organisation needs work, or at least the explanation thereof. I do not know if all the events occurred during some school term or during several. Sometimes I think it's just one, but then there's flashbacks to the previous summer, so maybe some of the Reasons Why happened the term before that.

I got a distinct whiff of Very Special Episode from some of the events. It starts with the "Teen Suicide - Don't Do It!" plot, where we're even told outright that here are the signs of a depressive, like it was from a brochure. The book also offers some pointers on Consent, Teaching Men Not To Rape, as if the predator in this book (Bryce) doesn't know all that already. That last was just annoying.

(Bryce does rape at least one girl in the book. His lawyer would probably be able to demonstrate that Hannah wasn't one of them, in fact that Hannah had seduced Bryce. Although, by that point, Hannah is insane.)

There's also a question about whether the book is just a massive kamikaze fantasy. I could see why Hannah made and sent those tapes, because insane. Unsure about the author of this book though.

Posted by: boulder terlit hobo at June 18, 2017 10:42 AM (6FqZa)

141
I'm just about to wrap up reading Roy E. Appleman's "East of Chosin: Entrapment and Breakout in Korea, 1950" (Williams-Ford Texas A and M University Military History Series) is the story of the US Army forces (Task Force Faith) that were attacked by the Chinese in late November 1950, trapped without hope of relief, and made their way down to Honshu-ri at the south end of the Chosin Reservoir as best they could where they joined the Marines from the west side for the next breakout -- to the Korean seacoast. These Army forces, as well as the Marines in this area, were ill-served by Douglas MacArthur's contempt and dismissal for Chinese units known to have been infiltrating Korea for several weeks prior to the last week of November 1950. That as many of our fighters made it out as they did is testimony to their courage, doggedness and initiative. Heartbreaking and inspiring both, I have lined up Applebaum's following tale, "Escaping the Trap: The Us Army X Corps in Northeast Korea, 1950" (Texas A and M University Military History Series), to learn more about the breakout from Honshu-ri to the seacoast. Well worth reading and highly recommended!

Posted by: Krebs v Carnot: l will not cease from mental fight, nor shall my sword sleep in my hand at June 18, 2017 10:43 AM (uVmqw)

142 "Pep pills" and "diet pills" containing various kinds of amphetamines were perfectly legal until the mid-1960s. The Rolling Stones song "Mother's Little Helper" was about them.

Posted by: rickl at June 18, 2017 10:30 AM (sdi6R)


Mrs. Muse lost an entire year out of her life (during high school) due to an adverse reaction to the "diet pills" she was prescribed. She remembers waking up in the hospital and being accused of snorfling up the pills to get high. But I think what really happened was that her mother tried to give her some of her own diet pills, but the pills were of a larger dose, and then she lied about it to the docs to cover her own ass.

Yes, her mother was capable of doing something like that. She was an, uh, "interesting" woman.

It's very scary waking up not knowing where you, are surrounded by adults looking at you with concern, and then coming to understand that several months have elapsed since you last remember anything.

Posted by: OregonMuse, AoSHQ Thought Leader at June 18, 2017 10:43 AM (Ybs+3)

143 "You cannot make the past go away by turning your back on it or refusing to look at it."

-
The hell you can't.

- #BLM and SJWs everywhere

Posted by: Anonosaurus Wrecks, the Real Anonosaurus Wrecks at June 18, 2017 10:43 AM (Nwg0u)

144 It's very scary waking up not knowing where you are surrounded by adults looking at you with concern and then coming to understand that several months have elapsed since you last remember anything.
Posted by: OregonMuse, AoSHQ Thought Leader at June 18, 2017 10:43 AM (Ybs+3)
-----------

Oh my goodness, how utterly horrible. Your poor wife. Thank God she made it through that nightmare. I can't even being to imagine how scared she - and her family - must have been.

Posted by: bluebell ~ send us your recipes! at June 18, 2017 10:47 AM (sBOL1)

145 being = begin. Sigh. And I've already had my coffee.

Posted by: bluebell ~ send us your recipes! at June 18, 2017 10:48 AM (sBOL1)

146 Instapundit plugged a book by Nathan Lowell. I have the author's earlier books "Quarter Share - Half Share - Full Share - Double Share" and enjoyed each of them. They read like sea stories, or Poul Anderson's "The Van Rijn Method." Or much like Rick Locke's "Temporary Duty"

I was surprised to see the author has a whole list of books. Search for the author's name, especially on Amazon. I'm reading "Captain's Share" by Nathan Lowell at the moment and liking it. It is about characters, motivation, behavior.

I don't remember why I stopped buying them. Might have been the price; at $5 bucks each, the bill adds up quickly, and it is just too easy to click the buy button.

Nothing new on my blog since "65mph" which is just a picture. "Hauling Limestone" is a pictorial essay with text on moving bulk commodities by the hundreds of thousands of tons.

Words are beginning to flow on some stalled story lines. My version of Romeo and Juliet involving aliens is just at the courtship stage. There will probably be an arrest warrant in the future, for drama.

Well, back to "Captain's Share" and see if they got the grease fire out in the galley.

Posted by: Skandia Recluse at June 18, 2017 10:49 AM (m9X4Y)

147 I am reading A Long Time Until Now by Michael Z Williamson, and Williamson is again a fabulous writer, and can handle a plot and multiple characters very well.
I don't think I can call this survival pr0n, but it might be more along the lines of survival erotica.
The plot is 10 soldiers in two MRAPs get sucked into the past and discover there are other groups that also have been sucked in also, neolithic herders, Roman legionaries, and Moghul matchlock infantry.
The first part is about surviving the ferocious weather, and dealing with the other groups. The interplay between individuals and the various groups is what Williamson excels at.

I am about a third of the way through, and got bogged down. Not because of Williamson's writing or his plotting, but because the damned book is a thousand pages

I have one problem with this trend to giant books, it is too much to do in one stretch. This could have been knocked into three volumes and would have been much more manageable. ( I keep hoping some publishing house will bring back the DAW yellow-spine format: 180 pages on the average that could be read it two sittings. This is why I used to read two books a week and now take a month - well, that and work)

So I am back to reading O'Brien's Far Side of the World again to let the brain cool off.

Posted by: Kindltot at June 18, 2017 10:49 AM (mkDpn)

148
139 Dammit! I feel asleep on the train ride home last night & must have left my book on the train!
Posted by: josephistan at June 18, 2017 10:42 AM (ANIFC)


I left a watercolor painting of winter ice on a bay near my home town on a plane's window seat between the armrest and the body. Not a happy camper when it wasn't found and returned to me.

Posted by: Krebs v Carnot: l will not cease from mental fight, nor shall my sword sleep in my hand at June 18, 2017 10:50 AM (uVmqw)

149 Reading may be a bit sparse this coming week. We put in an application to adopt two older rescue poodles in real need of a permanent home. Not everyone wants dogs in their teens even if healthy.

The reading hiatus is because we need to straighten up the house and make it dog friendly again. It's been 2 years since our last one passed and the floor space has been gradually taken up with boxes of books, reloading gear, and other essentials of life. Fortunately, the backyard is already set for them.

This is where Backwoodsman magazine, just arrived yesterday, is a gem. I can read an article in a few minutes then get back to work. Each issue is always fun and I can think about the content as I try to restack everything.

Posted by: JTB at June 18, 2017 10:52 AM (V+03K)

150 While I like Nash's book, there's a problem with the things he's said since. He conflates (a) the necons with the old anti-communists, and (b) the newer social conservatives with the older traditionalists. There really isn't all that much in common between either Irving Kristol and James Burnham, or Cal Thomas and Russell Kirk. The "three-leg" model is obsolete.

Posted by: George LeS at June 18, 2017 10:54 AM (+TcCF)

151 Finally read Twin Snipers by Ken Berry.
Yeah Slappy, if you're around, "that" Ken Berry.

Very simply written. No overabundance of adjectives or descriptions of surroundings. Two twins who grew up on a ranch in Texas and had a military father.
He brings up subjects that probably few authors and certainly the LSM (thank you Mrs Palin) want to talk about.

Is he CS Lewis or Clancy? No.
Then again, they weren't gold glovers that live in the town I grew up in.
I approve as a fairly quick read that gets certain subject matter out there.
Now for laundry and breakfast and if the rain will stay away, some mowing.

Posted by: teej at June 18, 2017 10:54 AM (ezX5B)

152 Posted by: boulder terlit hobo at June 18, 2017 10:42 AM (6FqZa)

That's the one that's running as a tv show now. A couple of the Horde who've seen it have said they wondered if the girl who committed suicide wasn't the actual villain of the story. That would fit with your observation of a "Kamikaze fantasy" by a person who is completely mad.

Posted by: Polliwog the 'Ette at June 18, 2017 10:55 AM (sEDyY)

153 This would make a good Da Vinci Code style fictional religious thriller. Unfortunately, it's true.

http://tinyurl.com/y93lx64k

Posted by: Anonosaurus Wrecks, the Real Anonosaurus Wrecks at June 18, 2017 10:56 AM (Nwg0u)

154 I have my kids read The Great Divorce when we do British Lit in high school. Two of them have said it is their favorite book ever.

Posted by: bluebell


I own that as well. It's pretty amazing in that we instinctively think egoism is *smart* and he makes it look *stupid* in example after example.

One more CSL recommendation: Weight of Glory

Pretty freaking conservative:

"To be happy at home, said Johnson, is the end of all human endeavour. As long as we are thinking only of natural values we must say that the sun looks down on nothing half so good as a household laughing together over a meal, or two friends talking over a pint of beer, or a man alone reading a book that interests him; and that all economies, politics, laws, armies and institutions, save insofar as they prolong and multiply such scenes are a mere ploughing the sand and sowing the ocean, a meaningless vanity and vexation of spirit".

Posted by: Steve and Cold Bear at June 18, 2017 10:56 AM (xAvrH)

155
The movie "Starfighters" from the early 60s about a squadron of F-104 pilots, has them being issued "pep pills" before a long flight.

That was one of my all-time favorite MST3K episodes.
---
Poopy suit!

http://mst3k.wikia.com/wiki/The_Poopy_Suit_Anthem

I should say right here, right now that I am not 100% against a little stimulation. I get that people in demanding jobs with long hours will need occasional assistance in maintaining focus and fighting fatigue.

I guess I'm just miffed that I can't get crack chockies at my local confectionary. Thanks, Mommy State!

Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at June 18, 2017 10:57 AM (QGoUX)

156 117 ... We have both an older Kindle Paperwhite and a newer version. The only difference I can see is the newer one has twice the storage space. Don't know about the Voyager.

The Paperwhite is my favorite e-reader as long as I don't need color or an expandable screen. It really does work well in bright light and I find it easier on my eyes.

Posted by: JTB at June 18, 2017 10:59 AM (V+03K)

157 This week I read "Double Cross" by Ben Macintyre, about the Allied double agents who help deceive Hitler and the Nazis as to where and when D-Day would take place. Very interesting and makes you realize how history swings on tiny hinges. Some of the double agents were truly dedicated to helping the anti-Nazi side, some were adamantly opposed to Communism and thus wanted to finish the fighting with Germany so they could get back to fighting the Reds, and some were opportunists who figured the Brits and Americans would be with winning side.

Macintyre has written several books about WWII espionage, "Agent Zigzag", "Operation Mincemeat, "Man Called Intrepid", and several other history books, including one on Ian Fleming and James Bond and another on Kim Philby. I like his books and find them easy to read even if you don't know all the details about WWII. I'm passing Double Cross on to my dad as part of my Father's Day gifts.

And unrelated to books, this morning I drove to my parents' house, which gave me the opportunity to hear most of Karl Jenkins's "The Armed Man: A Mass for Peace" on the Sirius classical station. Really beautiful music sung by a very good choir, with lots of brass, which is always a good thing. I recommend it, if you like that sort of thing.

Posted by: biancaneve at June 18, 2017 10:59 AM (QeLWM)

158
The reading hiatus is because we need to straighten up the house and
make it dog friendly again. It's been 2 years since our last one passed
and the floor space has been gradually taken up with boxes of books,
reloading gear, and other essentials of life. Fortunately, the backyard
is already set for them.- JTB
=====

We are always so fortunate for whatever time we have with our pets. Bless you for opening your heart and home.

I have been in the same type of reading hiatus. Trying to get #3 kid's room cleared out (nagging for the past 2 yrs did not work) to use for toddler and infant grandkids, and getting distracted by every little thing. Had to draft 13yo gkid to do the preliminary sorting because I can't concentrate any more.

Posted by: mustbequantum at June 18, 2017 11:01 AM (MIKMs)

159 I guess I'm just miffed that I can't get crack chockies at my local confectionary.

That would be the Haagen-Dazs Belgian chocolate milkshake I got at the mall yesterday afternoon :^x

Posted by: boulder terlit hobo at June 18, 2017 11:01 AM (6FqZa)

160 Scalise is awake & able to talk with his family.

While the hospital won't say it, I have the impression that the doctors no longer feel that he's in imminent risk of death any longer.

Posted by: mnw at June 18, 2017 11:02 AM (9lTjk)

161 Thankfully my lost book is fairly cheap to replace, unlike the keychain multitool that I had to surrender to the Marines during Fleet Week, which as it turns out is a collector's item & can't be found for less than $40.

Posted by: josephistan at June 18, 2017 11:03 AM (ANIFC)

162 Posted by: Kindltot at June 18, 2017 10:49 AM (mkDpn)


The same thing happened to me! I really, really enjoyed that book but just couldn't take the slog (maybe I need to take Pervitan when I read it).

I need to pick up where I left off. I loved that the Roman soldiers immediately saw common ground with the motley U.S. military folks, at least as regards military discipline.

I like Williamson's "Better to Seek Forgiveness" better than "Freehold".

Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at June 18, 2017 11:03 AM (QGoUX)

163 That would be the Haagen-Dazs Belgian chocolate milkshake I got at the mall yesterday afternoon :^x
Posted by: boulder terlit hobo at June 18, 2017 11:01 AM (6FqZa)
---
They're just brazenly selling that stuff out in the open?

Are you already itching for another?

Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at June 18, 2017 11:04 AM (QGoUX)

164 Damn, OM, that's some serious shit your wife went through. It doesn't sound like she suffered any side effects other than her temporary insanity when she married you.

Posted by: Captain Hate at June 18, 2017 11:05 AM (y7DUB)

165 Scalise is awake & able to talk with his family.

While the hospital won't say it, I have the impression that the doctors no longer feel that he's in imminent risk of death any longer.

Posted by: mnw at June 18, 2017 11:02 AM (9lTjk)


That's good news. No clue what his first words were, mine would have been "Is that motherfucker dead?"

Posted by: Berserker- Dragonheads Division at June 18, 2017 11:05 AM (aMlLZ)

166 11
The Republican congressman who was wounded in a shooting on Wednesday
saw his condition upgraded from "critical" to "serious" on Saturday and
continued to show signs of improvement, according to hospital officials.


He was shot by a disgruntled Democrat from IL.


http://tinyurl.com/ydgonks3

Posted by: Vic We Have No Party at June 18, 2017 11:06 AM (mpXpK)

167 About half way through "Neanderthals at Work."

Interesting read. Gist of it is that those who are rebels, and those that believe that "hard work" is needed to get ahead are kidding themselves.

The only way to get ahead in most work situatuions is competition, and that includes "politics."

So... about that "not sucking up" statement. Probably don't agree with it, since I've seen it work.

Posted by: shibumi at June 18, 2017 11:08 AM (aT+Bx)

168 Eris, I liked Freehold better, but it is because of my politics and my fascination about the American Revolution.

"Ain't gonna" is a terrible basis for a revolutionary philosophy, but it was wildly successful

Posted by: Kindltot at June 18, 2017 11:08 AM (mkDpn)

169 Thankfully my lost book is fairly cheap to replace, unlike the keychain multitool that I had to surrender to the Marines during Fleet Week, which as it turns out is a collector's item & can't be found for less than $40.

Posted by: josephistan at June 18, 2017 11:03 AM (ANIFC)


I have a small keychain swiss army knife. They wanted to take it from me when I was in NYC for some star trek orchestra thing. The dude in security tells me, just go outside and hide it somewhere and grab it when you leave. Hell yeah that's just what I did. Buried it in some flower planter.

Posted by: Berserker- Dragonheads Division at June 18, 2017 11:09 AM (aMlLZ)

170 That's good news. No clue what his first words were, mine would have been "Is that motherfucker dead?"
Posted by: Berserker- Dragonheads Division at June 18, 2017 11:05 AM (aMlLZ)
--
Be honest, isn't that the first thing you always say when you wake up?

Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at June 18, 2017 11:09 AM (QGoUX)

171 George MacDonald Fraser wrote a Flashman book on it, Flashman on the March. It plots like a Sir Walter Scott novel, but apparently that was pretty much how it went.

Posted by: Kindltot at June 18, 2017 10:10 AM (mkDpn)


That was the last of the 12 Flashman novels that Fraser wrote and it is one of the best. Highly recommended, as is the whole series.

Fraser died three years later in 2008. Rest in peace.

Posted by: cool breeze at June 18, 2017 11:09 AM (TKf/P)

172 Pervitan is the best name for a drug ever.

Posted by: rickl at June 18, 2017 11:09 AM (sdi6R)

173 The attempted assassination of Trump by proxy may swing the tight race in Tuesday's election in GA's 6th District. Developing ...

MSM tries to blame the shooting on Trump's tone. If he only didn't tweet. Ignores that tweeting is a response to leaking, which has already bootstrapped nothing into three Congressional investigations and a special counsel.

Posted by: Ignoramus at June 18, 2017 11:10 AM (pV/54)

174 172 Pervitan is the best name for a drug ever.
Posted by: rickl at June 18, 2017 11:09 AM (sdi6R)

Not Fuckitol?

Posted by: josephistan at June 18, 2017 11:10 AM (ANIFC)

175 Damn, OM, that's some serious shit your wife went through. It doesn't sound like she suffered any side effects other than her temporary insanity when she married you.

Posted by: Captain Hate at June 18, 2017 11:05 AM (y7DUB)


I should go tell her this.

brb...

Posted by: OregonMuse, AoSHQ Thought Leader at June 18, 2017 11:11 AM (Ybs+3)

176 In spite of this blurb giving out major plot points while misrepresenting others, I did take the plunge and buy the eARC from Baen of Hodgell's latest Jame book - The Gates of Tagmeth.

http://www.baen.com/the-gates-of-tagmeth-earc.html

Things are moving forward even as things get more clear and dire it seems for our hero Jame and her brother Torisen Black Lord. Once again Kallystine outwits herself and Lyra Lack-wit might finally be growing up. Lord Caldane still seems not in touch with himself.

And it also seems the story arc is finally catching up with the short story Stranger Blood that was first published in 1994 by Hypatia Press and can be found in the Meisha Merlin edition Blood + Ivory. Or simply buy a digital copy - http://www.baen.com/blood-and-ivory-a-tapestry.html

And I already want to read the next book.

Posted by: Anna Puma at June 18, 2017 11:12 AM (I6YUj)

177 152 Posted by: boulder terlit hobo at June 18, 2017 10:42 AM (6FqZa)

That's the one that's running as a tv show now. A couple of the Horde who've seen it have said they wondered if the girl who committed suicide wasn't the actual villain of the story. That would fit with your observation of a "Kamikaze fantasy" by a person who is completely mad.
Posted by: Polliwog the 'Ette at June 18, 2017 10:55 AM (sEDyY)

It's on Netflix. I watched the first episode. It was meh. Then I cheated and read up on the episodes and it sounds pretty dumb.

Posted by: Insomniac at June 18, 2017 11:16 AM (0mRoj)

178
Having computer troubles? Really hot in your neighborhood?
The devil is behind it and admits it during exorcisms...

http://www.thedailybeast.com/this-secret-catholic-exorcist-
cult-in-brazil-is-making-a-deal-with-the-devil

I thought click-bait from Drudge, which it is, but actually pretty interesting. Decide for yourself, but the devil is in the details.

Posted by: E Depluribus Unum at June 18, 2017 11:16 AM (HTdUD)

179 Lewis also has a lot of good talks that are recorded as essays: for example, Fernseed and Elephants. I have that book somewhere.

Weight of Glory also has the essay "Transposition". It's an amazingly clarifying piece. Basically about how liberals try to dehumanize activities by reducing them to their physical characteristics. Good in conjunction with Abolition of Man.


Posted by: Steve and Cold Bear at June 18, 2017 11:17 AM (xAvrH)

180 If you like the Flashman series, also try Fraser's The Pyrates and his Mr. American

Posted by: Ignoramus at June 18, 2017 11:17 AM (pV/54)

181 Of course the 'ultimate twist' about the kamikaze fantasy with Hannah might just be the big reveal at the end that she isn't really dead. And we are back to Agatha Christie's Ten Little Indians. *thud*

Posted by: Anna Puma at June 18, 2017 11:19 AM (I6YUj)

182 175 Damn, OM, that's some serious shit your wife went through. It doesn't sound like she suffered any side effects other than her temporary insanity when she married you.
Posted by: Captain Hate at June 18, 2017 11:05 AM (y7DUB)

I should go tell her this.
brb...

Posted by: OregonMuse, AoSHQ Thought Leader at June 18, 2017 11:11 AM (Ybs+3)


Mrs. Muse said: "I rate this statement: true."

Posted by: OregonMuse, AoSHQ Thought Leader at June 18, 2017 11:19 AM (Ybs+3)

183 So this guy is in a horrendous accident, trapped inside his car.

First responder runs up and asks "Are you seriously injured?"

The guy replies: "I'm a doctor, damn it. Not a lawyer!"

Posted by: Ignoramus at June 18, 2017 11:20 AM (pV/54)

184 I lost a keychain multitool because I wasn't allowed to take it into the U.S. Capitol and it wasn't in my hiding place when I came out. (I suspect a security guard got it.)

On the other hand, I was visiting the USS Constitution and had my Swiss Army Knife (which I got to replace the multitool lost at the Capitol) on my keychain. The sailor manning the security checkpoint told me that if I could do any harm with a pocket knife on a ship full of men half my age I deserved a medal anyway.

Posted by: Trimegistus at June 18, 2017 11:20 AM (wokl9)

185 It's an amazingly clarifying piece. Basically about how liberals try to
dehumanize activities by reducing them to their physical
characteristics. Good in conjunction with Abolition of Man.

=====

If you get the opportunity and you have guts for it, listen to a 'certified teacher' micro analyze a lesson plan as they are taught and how the kids are supposed to respond to the cues. Disgusting and fascinating trainwreck.

Posted by: mustbequantum at June 18, 2017 11:21 AM (MIKMs)

186 174 172 Pervitan is the best name for a drug ever.
Posted by: rickl at June 18, 2017 11:09 AM (sdi6R)

Not Fuckitol?
Posted by: josephistan at June 18, 2017 11:10 AM (ANIFC)


You're right. There was an old SNL sketch about using the sleeping pill Damitol to commit suicide. I can't find it on YouTube.

Posted by: rickl at June 18, 2017 11:21 AM (sdi6R)

187 So this guy is in a horrendous accident, trapped inside his car.

First responder runs up and asks "Are you seriously injured?"

The guy replies: "I'm a doctor, damn it. Not a lawyer!"

Posted by: Ignoramus


DeForest Kelley?

Posted by: Steve and Cold Bear at June 18, 2017 11:21 AM (xAvrH)

188 I have my kids read The Great Divorce when we do British Lit in high school. Two of them have said it is their favorite book ever.

Posted by: bluebell ~ send us your recipes! at June 18, 2017 10:40 AM (sBOL1)


It is also Mrs. Muse's favorite CSL book.

Posted by: OregonMuse, AoSHQ Thought Leader at June 18, 2017 11:22 AM (Ybs+3)

189 Pervitan is the best name for a drug ever.

Posted by: rickl at June 18, 2017 11:09 AM (sdi6R)



Not Fuckitol?

Posted by: josephistan at June 18, 2017 11:10 AM (ANIFC)

Or Damnitol?

Posted by: Count de Monet at June 18, 2017 11:22 AM (JO9+V)

190 Damnitol is saved for when you get the hospital bill.

Posted by: Anna Puma at June 18, 2017 11:25 AM (I6YUj)

191 The sailor manning the security checkpoint told me that if I could do any harm with a pocket knife on a ship full of men half my age I deserved a medal anyway.
Posted by: Trimegistus at June 18, 2017 11:20 AM (wokl9)
------------

I assume you took that as a challenge. Did you get your medal?

Posted by: bluebell ~ send us your recipes! at June 18, 2017 11:25 AM (sBOL1)

192 NaCly Dog @ 65 - You forgot the rest of it, shipmate. A sea story begins "This is a no-shitter ..."

Posted by: Butch at June 18, 2017 11:28 AM (hXu8T)

193 Heroin was marketed as a pain killer, the super aspirin, which was Bayer's previous wonder drug.

Mark Twain's business manager had his migraines treated by prescription of heroin and wound up completely hashing up the business accounts. Twain stated that was part of the reason he went broke at one point.

Posted by: Kindltot at June 18, 2017 11:29 AM (mkDpn)

194 Thanks for the Pohl Anderson link.
Love his work but haven't seen much on shelves since the 80's.

This week I burned through the Screwtape Letter, which were funnier than I recalled as well as profound.

Read another Chuck Dixon action-adventure novel and finished "The Boy Who Wanted Wings", a sorta YA novel, more of a historical fiction set in 1680's Poland. Light but good, I thought.

Posted by: Mark Andrew Edwards at June 18, 2017 11:30 AM (xJa6I)

195 And unlike other AoSHQ comment threads, the Sunday Morning Book Thread is so hoity-toity, pants are required. Even if it's these pants, who will never be president.

++++

Mumus qualify as pants these days? That's a shame. I can remember when the book thread's standards really meant something.

Posted by: Anon Y. Mous at June 18, 2017 11:32 AM (FUu/Z)

196 Great Divorce was brilliant. My quibble? Okay, okay, I recognize repulsive aspect of my character in many of these scenes. It's a bit horrifying. But that doesn't prove anything. I can think of evolutionary reasons why a) these impulses exist, b) we are oblivious to them.

Posted by: Steve and Cold Bear at June 18, 2017 11:33 AM (xAvrH)

197 What kind of high are you trying to reach with Elmers Glue?

Posted by: Corona at June 18, 2017 11:33 AM (RdEp6)

198 Sorry, that was unclear. Twains business manager took heroin. It treated the business manager's migranes. The business manager mis-managed Twain's business.

Posted by: Kindltot at June 18, 2017 11:35 AM (mkDpn)

199 Hi all.

If you have nothing better to do, take a gove at a tale of another Curious Disappearance of a Colorado man this past week. Link in nick.

Posted by: Muldoon at June 18, 2017 11:36 AM (wPiJc)

200 Just read the Industrial Revolution story. Nice to get some reading in before it gets classified 'subversive' literature. I'm not a Uni-Party member, so I wouldn't be permitted access.

Posted by: t-bird at June 18, 2017 11:38 AM (k8DTS)

201 Happy Fathers Day all you Dads. And the rest of you guys, get busy.

Posted by: Javems at June 18, 2017 11:38 AM (yOqwj)

202 Oh, I just found a great song for next week's pet thread.

Posted by: rickl at June 18, 2017 11:40 AM (sdi6R)

203
Worst drug name?

Oxycontin. Dangerous. Habit forming. Did I mention addictive as hell yet?

compare to:

Oxytocin. Natural 'bonding' drug. It apparently elicits that desire in woman to cuddle post-coitus. Used to facilitate childbirth -- when a womans labor is 'induced' it is the drug used. Facilitates milk production in women after childbirth. May possibly be a natural cure for depression in humans.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oxytocin

Posted by: E Depluribus Unum at June 18, 2017 11:41 AM (HTdUD)

204 187 So this guy is in a horrendous accident, trapped inside his car.

First responder runs up and asks "Are you seriously injured?"

The guy replies: "I'm a doctor, damn it. Not a lawyer!"

Posted by: Ignoramus

DeForest Kelley?
Posted by: Steve and Cold Bear at June 18, 2017 11:21 AM (xAvrH)

I was going to get his autograph at a Star Trek con one time. But somehow I got buttonholed by this one Trekkie and just couldn't shake him loose. He was going on and on and I never made it to the autograph line. Trekkie said his name was DeTries.

So I wound up missing DeForrest for DeTries.

Posted by: Insomniac at June 18, 2017 11:42 AM (0mRoj)

205 Happy Fathers Day all you Dads. And the rest of you guys, get busy.

Posted by: Javems at June 18, 2017 11:38 AM (yOqwj)


I must be doing something wrong. Can't put my finger on it.

Posted by: Peter North at June 18, 2017 11:43 AM (HTdUD)

206 "Mr. Insomniac, your Agonizer please."

Posted by: Anna Puma at June 18, 2017 11:43 AM (I6YUj)

207 Thanks Muldoon, will do.

Posted by: Mark Andrew Edwards at June 18, 2017 11:43 AM (xJa6I)

208 196 Great Divorce was brilliant. My quibble? Okay, okay, I recognize repulsive aspect of my character in many of these scenes. It's a bit horrifying. But that doesn't prove anything. I can think of evolutionary reasons why a) these impulses exist, b) we are oblivious to them.

Posted by: Steve and Cold Bear at June 18, 2017 11:33 AM (xAvrH)


There's no doubt in my mind that the characters in TGD were based on people Lewis knew in real life.

For example, Lewis had a friend in WWI he made a pact with that he would take care of his parents if he should be killed (and he would take care of Lewis if Lewis' parents were killed). So it was the friend who lost his life and so Lewis took on the obligation of supporting his mother and it developed into an unhealthy sexual relationship. I think she's definitely one of the characters in the book.

And the brilliance of the book is that these people aren't uncommon, and we know people like them, too. Or we see our own selves in them.

Posted by: OregonMuse, AoSHQ Thought Leader at June 18, 2017 11:45 AM (Ybs+3)

209 So I wound up missing DeForrest for DeTries.

Posted by: Insomniac at June 18, 2017 11:42 AM (0mRoj)

---------------------

Very punney.

Posted by: Javems at June 18, 2017 11:45 AM (yOqwj)

210 Among the curmudgeon's day-to-day tips for the workplace:

Excise the word "like" from your spoken English
Don't suck up
Stop "reaching out" and "sharing"
Rid yourself of piercings, tattoos, and weird hair colors
Make strong language count




I am at a complete loss as to the popularity of tattoos and piercings. They don't look good at all. And it's not just the 30 and under crowd it's people in their 50s and 60s who really look ludicrous with them

Posted by: TheQuietMan at June 18, 2017 11:45 AM (auHtY)

211 OregonMuse, if you need some photos of libraries, this from Reddit Europe has lots of them.

http://tinyurl.com/y74vfq57

Posted by: JHW at June 18, 2017 11:46 AM (kn0BL)

212 *pauses*

I should probably make that Vivian is a bit of a movie/TV geek more obvious in the story Sun, Sand, and Subversion.

Posted by: Anna Puma at June 18, 2017 11:48 AM (I6YUj)

213 I am at a complete loss as to the popularity of tattoos and piercings. They don't look good at all. And it's not just the 30 and under crowd it's people in their 50s and 60s who really look ludicrous with them

Posted by: TheQuietMan


De-evolution. In contemporary society, just as in tribal societies, markings on face and body denote tribal allegiance.

Posted by: E Depluribus Unum at June 18, 2017 11:50 AM (HTdUD)

214 http://tinyurl.com/y74vfq57

Posted by: JHW at June 18, 2017 11:46 AM (kn0BL)


Thank you for this link.

Posted by: OregonMuse, AoSHQ Thought Leader at June 18, 2017 11:51 AM (Ybs+3)

215 I'd have to say to the whiny millenial who blew 180k on intersectional Zoroastrian study only to find no employment related to that study the following--tough shit, champ.

Can't find gainful employment?

Go die.

Posted by: irongrampa at June 18, 2017 11:57 AM (S/hVx)

216 De-evolution. In contemporary society, just as in tribal societies, markings on face and body denote tribal allegiance.

Posted by: E Depluribus Unum at June 18, 2017 11:50 AM (HTdUD)



Maybe they should start wearing the red flower pots on their heads as well

Posted by: TheQuietMan at June 18, 2017 11:58 AM (auHtY)

217
I am at a complete loss as to the popularity of tattoos and piercings. They don't look good at all. And it's not just the 30 and under crowd it's people in their 50s and 60s who really look ludicrous with them

Posted by: TheQuietMan

De-evolution. In contemporary society, just as in tribal societies, markings on face and body denote tribal allegiance.
Posted by: E Depluribus Unum at June 18, 2017 11:50 AM


They are not men.

Posted by: Bertram Cabot, Jr. at June 18, 2017 11:59 AM (IqV8l)

218 gloar, gove?


'Twas brillig, and the slithy toves
Did gyre and gimble in the wabe;
All mimsy were the borogoves,
And the mome raths outgrabe.

Posted by: Lewis Carroll at June 18, 2017 11:59 AM (g6yUI)

219 The Czech National library and the Vatican Apostolic Library are especially beautiful.

Posted by: JHW at June 18, 2017 12:01 PM (kn0BL)

220 215
Can't find gainful employment?

Go die.
Posted by: irongrampa at June 18, 2017 11:57 AM (S/hVx)

Typical Republican "solution."

Posted by: Alan Grayson at June 18, 2017 12:01 PM (0mRoj)

221 Especially whiny millennials that have racked up $180,000 in student loan debts so they could pursue their study of intersectional Zoroastrian poetry.




Quite agree. There are far more opportunities available for those who major in Vogon poetry

Posted by: TheQuietMan at June 18, 2017 12:02 PM (auHtY)

222 We are all gloar-ons now.

Posted by: teh Wind at June 18, 2017 12:03 PM (x2bNT)

223 Doth spake ein Vogon upon smiting yon crystalline crabs mit brillig hammer

Posted by: Anna Puma at June 18, 2017 12:03 PM (I6YUj)

224 @ 220

Damn right.

Keeps the gene pool clean.

Posted by: irongrampa at June 18, 2017 12:05 PM (S/hVx)

225 Here are some beautiful personal libraries:

http://flavorwire.com/261320/20-beautiful-private-and-personal-libraries/

I love the ones that enrobe you in books, but I also dig the minimalist one that looks out over the woods.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at June 18, 2017 12:05 PM (QGoUX)

226 The cucks are in an uproar over those alt-right activists interrupting the play where they symbolically kill Trump.

Man I hate these bow tie wearing fags. Be useful or get the hell out of the way. Fucking losers.

Jeebus all they did was protest the play. It's not like they opened fire on the stage or the crowd.

Posted by: Dack Thrombosis at June 18, 2017 12:05 PM (4ErVI)

227 206 "Mr. Insomniac, your Agonizer please."
Posted by: Anna Puma at June 18, 2017 11:43 AM (I6YUj)


---

what do you want his wife for?

Posted by: buzzsaw90 at June 18, 2017 12:07 PM (vChNs)

228 "Which one of de Valera? I've read Tim Pat Coogan's, which describes de
Valera as a pious self-rightious cardsharper. I understand there is
another biography not as negative.
"


I tried reading the Coogan biography too, and I kept falling asleep over it.

This one is "Eamon de Valera: A Will to Power" by Ronan Fanning, just published within the last five years or so. Better balanced; the negatives are still there, but so are the positives, some of which I'd never heard about before. e.g., covert aid to the British during WW2. It had to be covert because Ireland was officially neutral, and formally allying with the Brits would have brought some unwelcome German attention. Anyway, I am happy to recommend it.

Posted by: Annalucia at June 18, 2017 12:08 PM (a5bF3)

229 what do you want his wife for?

His wife is named Stella Mudd?

Posted by: Anna Puma at June 18, 2017 12:08 PM (I6YUj)

230 They are not men.

Posted by: Bertram Cabot, Jr. at June 18, 2017 11:59 AM (IqV8l)

I think they can be men. But I think what they're saying is -- I am of this tribe; which is not being of the 9-5 corporate tribe with suit and tie, I may be either poor or wealthy - willing to either spend hard earned dollars on frivolous body markings -- or even I have so much money I can spend freely on frivolous body markings, I'm not worried about religions proscribing against bodily mutilation or burial practices, and I wish to identify with people who think like I do so that we can have a quick common bond.

Posted by: E Depluribus Unum at June 18, 2017 12:12 PM (HTdUD)

231 I wish to identify with people who think like I do so that we can have a quick common bond.


I believe "think" is an exaggeration.

Posted by: Deplorable Jay Guevara at June 18, 2017 12:14 PM (SRKgf)

232 As someone said on another site, the Play attendees were not there to enjoy the performance

They were there to make a political statement themselves.

Posted by: Village Idiot's Apprentice at June 18, 2017 12:14 PM (J+eG2)

233 229 what do you want his wife for?

His wife is named Stella Mudd?

---

now wondering how hot mirror mirror Stella Mudd must be....

Posted by: buzzsaw90 at June 18, 2017 12:16 PM (vChNs)

234 76
Why is it getting rebuilt? The 5/8" shelves started to sag a little, now I get to remake all the shelves with 3/4", which I should have done in the first place seeing the sides are all 3/4. I used the 5/8, because my asshole friend who volunteered to pick up the shelf material can't read a fucking ruler. I figured well how bad can 5/8 be? Yeah, I found out, sagged in 2 years. I have some of the new shelves in place unstained as a test. Solid as a rock.

Anybody here going to build shit, don't use anything less than 3/4 for shelves, that 1/8" matters.
Posted by: Berserker- Dragonheads Division


5/8" is spec for Harleguin Romances and graphic novel shelving, isn't it?

Posted by: Iron Mike Golf at June 18, 2017 12:16 PM (di1hb)

235 Blame rickl. Now I'm watching "Best of MST3K: Starfighters" instead of reading:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D5cEpoHLFOk

Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at June 18, 2017 12:17 PM (QGoUX)

236 226 The cucks are in an uproar over those alt-right activists interrupting the play where they symbolically kill Trump.

Man I hate these bow tie wearing fags. Be useful or get the hell out of the way. Fucking losers.

Jeebus all they did was protest the play. It's not like they opened fire on the stage or the crowd.
Posted by: Dack Thrombosis at June 18, 2017 12:05 PM (4ErVI)


I know that "cuck" has been a controversial term around here, but it is absolutely correct and needs to be employed widely. Those people are useless wastes of oxygen, and they are not on *my* side.

Posted by: rickl at June 18, 2017 12:22 PM (sdi6R)

237 yo

Posted by: Ralph at June 18, 2017 12:23 PM (ocNJ7)

238
Right now, if I were to attend a Trump rally and saw a number of biker type dudes outside the entrance loaded with tattoos I would not be overly concerned for my safety. I certainly would be the very last to call them 'not men'. Through their apparel and body markings they quickly indicate their tribal membership.

In fact, I'd probably say to them, "Glad you guys are here today''.

Now replace that tribe with MS-13 type dudes, also with tattoos but different apparel and body markings and the equation changes 180 degrees.

Posted by: E Depluribus Unum at June 18, 2017 12:23 PM (HTdUD)

239 227 206 "Mr. Insomniac, your Agonizer please."
Posted by: Anna Puma at June 18, 2017 11:43 AM (I6YUj)


---

what do you want his wife for?
Posted by: buzzsaw90 at June 18, 2017 12:07 PM (vChNs)

Ex-wife. EX-wife!

Posted by: Insomniac at June 18, 2017 12:24 PM (0mRoj)

240 Another book on the list is the all-time classic The Conservative Intellectual Movement in America Since 1945 by George H. Nash. This history is "indispensable for anyone interested in learning more about libertarians, traditionalists, anti-Communists, William F. Buckley Jr. and National Review, the debate between freedom and virtue, and the original neoconservatives. The big weakness of this 1976 book is that it was published in 1976. There's been a lot of water under the bridge since then. What it desperately needs is a sequel.

A second edition in the '90's had a too short additional chapter on the Reagan Revolution.

Nonetheless, it is an excellent review of the intellectual foundation of modern conservatism. It is very thorough and rather good as simply presenting the various threads of thought, rather that being preachy.

Two other, more modern books, worth reading that help lay out conservatism and where it came from are Daniel Hannan's "Inventing Freedom: How English Speaking Peoples Made the Modern World" and Yuval Levin's "The Great Devate: Edmund Burge, Thomas Paine, and the Birth of Right and Left".

From the blurb for "Inventing Freedom":

"British politician Daniel Hannan's Inventing Freedom is an ambitious account of the historical origin and spread of the principles that have made America great, and their role in creating a sphere of economic and political liberty that is as crucial as it is imperiled.

"According to Hannan, the ideas and institutions we consider essential to maintaining and preserving our freedoms - individual rights, private property, the rule of law, and the institutions of representative government - are the legacy of a very specific tradition that was born in England and that we Americans, along with other former British colonies, inherited.

"By the tenth century, England was a nation-state whose people were already starting to define themselves with reference to inherited common-law rights. The story of liberty is the story of how that model triumphed. How it was enshrined in a series of landmark victories - the Magna Carta, the English Civil War, the Glorious Revolution, the U.S. Constitution - and how it came to defeat every international rival.

"Today we see those ideas abandoned and scorned in the places where they once went unchallenged. Inventing Freedom is a chronicle of the success of Anglosphere exceptionalism. And it is offered at a time that may turn out to be the end of the age of political freedom."

From the blurb for "The Great Debate":

"For more than two centuries, our political life has been divided between a party of progress and a party of conservation. In The Great Debate, Yuval Levin explores the origins of the left/right divide by examining the views of the men who best represented each side of that debate at its outset: Edmund Burke and Thomas Paine. In a groundbreaking exploration of the roots of our political order, Levin shows that American partisanship originated in the debates over the French Revolution, fueled by the fiery rhetoric of these ideological titans.

"Levin masterfully shows how Burke's and Paine's differing views, a reforming conservatism and a restoring progressivism, continue to shape our current political discourse - on issues ranging from abortion to welfare, education, economics, and beyond. Essential reading for anyone seeking to understand Washington's often acrimonious rifts, The Great Debate offers a profound examination of what conservatism, liberalism, and the debate between them truly amount to. "

Posted by: The Political Hat at June 18, 2017 12:27 PM (vBeA5)

241 In another world, most private clubs in England and NYC had very extensive libraries.


University Club in NYC is amazing.



Before the days of the internet and TV a library was a must, that and a bar

Posted by: Ralph at June 18, 2017 12:28 PM (ocNJ7)

242 They are not men.

Posted by: Bertram Cabot, Jr. at June 18, 2017 11:59 AM (IqV8l)

I think they can be men. But I think what they're saying is -- I am of this tribe; which is not being of the 9-5 corporate tribe with suit and tie, I may be either poor or wealthy - willing to either spend hard earned dollars on frivolous body markings -- or even I have so much money I can spend freely on frivolous body markings, I'm not worried about religions proscribing against bodily mutilation or burial practices, and I wish to identify with people who think like I do so that we can have a quick common bond.

Posted by: E Depluribus Unum at June 18, 2017 12:12 PM (HTdUD)



Maybe if you whip it, whip it good, they can become men

Posted by: TheQuietMan at June 18, 2017 12:32 PM (auHtY)

243 Thanks for the feedback JTB at 156.

Posted by: nc at June 18, 2017 12:33 PM (iopMS)

244 The Russian Foreign Ministry has criticized President Donald Trump's decision to freeze a detente with Cuba and his verbal attack on the Caribbean island's leaders.

Russia's Foreign Ministry said in a statement Sunday that Trump is "returning us to the forgotten rhetoric of the Cold War."



Odd behavior for Russia's puppet in the White House now isn't it?

Posted by: TheQuietMan at June 18, 2017 12:34 PM (auHtY)

245 All Hail Eris, not sure if this will display since PhotoBucket has declared war on AdBlock software.

http://preview.tinyurl.com/yd6cl5rb

Posted by: Anna Puma at June 18, 2017 12:34 PM (I6YUj)

246 And now some lovely libraries from film and television:

http://flavorwire.com/392753/the-20-most-beautiful-libraries-on-film-and-tv/

Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at June 18, 2017 12:36 PM (QGoUX)

247 245 All Hail Eris, not sure if this will display since PhotoBucket has declared war on AdBlock software.

http://preview.tinyurl.com/yd6cl5rb
Posted by: Anna Puma at June 18, 2017 12:34 PM (I6YUj)
---
Anna, I busted out laughing! That's amazing!

And knowing Tom Servo's affinity for cross-dressing, he probably whipped that up out of his own closet.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at June 18, 2017 12:38 PM (QGoUX)

248 I know that "cuck" has been a controversial term around here, but it is absolutely correct and needs to be employed widely. Those people are useless wastes of oxygen, and they are not on *my* side.

Posted by: rickl at June 18, 2017 12:22 PM (sdi6R)


Hear, hear.

Posted by: OregonMuse, AoSHQ Thought Leader at June 18, 2017 12:41 PM (Ybs+3)

249 My father gave my son the violin he bought on a whim a few years ago and never learned to play. My son is a musician, and a wizard on guitar in particular.

A violin is not a guitar.

It sounds like there is a very unhappy cow in my living room. I'm hiding in my bedroom with the door closed. It helps, a little.

Posted by: bluebell ~ send us your recipes! at June 18, 2017 12:41 PM (sBOL1)

250 I know that "cuck" has been a controversial term around here, but it is absolutely correct and needs to be employed widely. Those people are useless wastes of oxygen, and they are not on *my* side.

Posted by: rickl at June 18, 2017 12:22 PM (sdi6R)

I generally avoid deploying it, but here it has to be. David French is OUTRAGED and boy howdy you should be ashamed of yourself if you support this protest.

I'm of the opinion these guys are finished, but they're still floating along on exhaust fumes. They're entire worldview was rejected in the election. It'll just take time for them to disappear.

Posted by: Dack Thrombosis at June 18, 2017 12:43 PM (4ErVI)

251 Now replace that tribe with MS-13 type dudes, also
with tattoos but different apparel and body markings and the equation
changes 180 degrees.
Posted by: E Depluribus Unum at June 18, 2017 12:23 PM


Using polar coordinates, I see. Do you know how many icebergs have given up their existence due to climate change to enable math on this blog?

Posted by: Evergreen Adjunct Professor at June 18, 2017 12:44 PM (DMUuz)

252
Fox News Sunday with Chris Wallace really got contentious with Trumps lawyer Jay Sekulow. Wallace kept trying to pin him on whether or not Trump was under investigation and the lawyer refused to take the bait - insisting that their was no notification given that Trump is under investigation. But yet he (Wallace) persisted - insisting he had it on tape. Lawyer was speaking to a hypothetical, which Wallace didn't get. Obviously.

I really thought Wallace might be turning a new leaf after he scored a Trump interview, but it looks like he's aboard the Never-Trump (HO Gauge) Train.

http://www.businessinsider.com/trump-lawyer-jay-sekulow-interview-
russia-investigation-fox-news-2017-6

Posted by: E Depluribus Unum at June 18, 2017 12:45 PM (HTdUD)

253 Happy Fathers day to all the morons. I racked my brain trying to think of something special I could do for hubby today. I decided to take him down to his old neighborhood where he grew up. He's always talking about going down there but never has. His younger brother, who is a fricking hoot is coming along so it should be a fun ride. Coming back and grilling some burgers and hot dogs.

Posted by: DeplorableJewells45 at June 18, 2017 12:48 PM (CNHr1)

254 I am at a complete loss as to the popularity of tattoos and piercings. They don't look good at all. And it's not just the 30 and under crowd it's people in their 50s and 60s who really look ludicrous with them

I understand the tattoos and piercings thing slightly better than I understand the shitty dye-jobs people are doing with hair these days.

In twenty years, the pierced, tattooed bad dye-job people are going to look as stupid as the 70's disco suit people or the 80's big hair and shoulder pads people. Only, with permanent scars.

Posted by: V the K at June 18, 2017 12:49 PM (jn7FC)

255 My "library" is being redone at the moment. I built an insane 16 foot wide ceiling to floor corbeled monolith with fluted molding and rope crown molding patterned after the old world. All the hardwood facial appointments I made from flame maple. {/i]

I always knew I loved you; I just never knew how much til this moment!

I wish I could hire you to come on out to the boonies and make my built in bookcases.

Posted by: Tammy al-Thor at June 18, 2017 12:49 PM (Y9+RI)

256 Glad I made you laugh All Hail Eris. They also had a Crow T. Robot.

Now I must scoot, off to work I go.

Posted by: Anna Puma at June 18, 2017 12:50 PM (I6YUj)

257 We are tits on the bull of humanity.

Posted by: The SJW Cucks at June 18, 2017 12:51 PM (Tyii7)

258 Chris Wallace has removed any doubt that he's on the side of MSM and by extension the Deep State and the Left. Compare stable mate Hannitty, who's called out the Deep State/MSM for trying to orchestrate a coup.

MSM is now like a bad plaintiff's lawyer. There's always a disingenuous self-serving argument that can be made.

e.g.,MSM tries to blame the shooting on Trump's tone. If he only didn't tweet. Ignores that his tweeting is a response to leaking, which has already bootstrapped nothing into three Congressional investigations and a special counsel.

Posted by: Ignoramus at June 18, 2017 12:52 PM (pV/54)

259 The reason that cuckservatives are so outraged about the word is because it describes them so precisely. That must be uncomfortable for them.

Posted by: rickl at June 18, 2017 12:53 PM (sdi6R)

260 Have fun at work Anna. Lots of opportunity for character sketches for your work, I'm sure.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at June 18, 2017 12:54 PM (QGoUX)

261 Et tu Noode?

Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at June 18, 2017 12:56 PM (QGoUX)

262 "For more than two centuries, our political life has been divided between a party of progress and a party of conservation."

I'm of the belief that old school categories of Left and Right don't apply so well any more.

In a related thought, what we used to call Conservatism is dead as a political movement.

Posted by: Ignoramus at June 18, 2017 12:57 PM (pV/54)

263 Chris Wallace has removed any doubt that he's on the side of MSM and by extension the Deep State and the Left. Compare stable mate Hannitty, who's called out the Deep State/MSM for trying to orchestrate a coup.

Guess we can't call it a 'bloodless coup' anymore, can we?

I hope Ann Coulter reads here, because I know she has the balzzz to use that expression in her next article. Because it needs to be widely disseminated.

Posted by: E Depluribus Unum at June 18, 2017 12:58 PM (HTdUD)

264 "Argue with people, get in their face." "If they bring a knife to the fight, we bring a gun." - Barack Hussein Obama

Posted by: V the K at June 18, 2017 12:59 PM (jn7FC)

265 There's a nood political thread up.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at June 18, 2017 01:00 PM (QGoUX)

266
I generally avoid deploying it, but here it has to be. David French
is OUTRAGED and boy howdy you should be ashamed of yourself if you
support this protest.
I'm of the opinion these guys are finished, but they're still
floating along on exhaust fumes. They're entire worldview was rejected
in the election. It'll just take time for them to disappear.
=====

I have always used Euroweenies. Old-fashioned, I know, but just as descriptive.

Posted by: mustbequantum at June 18, 2017 01:00 PM (MIKMs)

267 264 "Argue with people, get in their face." "If they bring a knife to the fight, we bring a gun." - Barack Hussein Obama
Posted by: V the K at June 18, 2017 12:59 PM (jn7FC)

This needs to be interspersed with reportage of Scalise and the other republicans being shot and played over and over and over wherever and whenever possible.

Posted by: Insomniac at June 18, 2017 01:11 PM (0mRoj)

268 Posted by: V the K at June 18, 2017 12:49 PM (jn7FC)

I've been saying for many years now that investing in tattoo removal will pay off bigly in 10-20 years. They're all oh I don't care what they look like when I'm old but that attitude is going to change quickly. Guaranteed.

What I find odd is that their fashion doesn't seem to change. I'm seeing the same fruit loop colored hair and faggy 1930s razor cuts that I saw five years ago.

Posted by: Dack Thrombosis at June 18, 2017 01:14 PM (4ErVI)

269 Still reading Donald Miller's 'Masters of the Air' account of the 8th Air Force in WWII. I have read enough about the 8th to be well of aware of their losses, but each time that I visit it again, I am struck anew by how awful their sacrifices were. It is truly a wonder that any of the men could steel themselves to climb into a plane for another mission.

Posted by: Mike Hammer, etc., etc. at June 18, 2017 01:25 PM (ZO497)

270 I've heard that when they first learned how to make heroin, they used it as an ingredient in kids' cough syrups. As a cough-suppressant, I guess heroin couldn't be beat.

Posted by: OregonMuse, AoSHQ Thought Leader at June 18, 2017 10:29 AM (Ybs+3)


"Heroin" was actually the trademarked brand name from Bayer...

Posted by: The Addictive Hat at June 18, 2017 01:34 PM (vBeA5)

271 The author of "Blitzed" is now at the Medical Academy of the Bundeswehr in Munich. The captain of the Navy Medical Corps tells Ohler his personal vision of a future German Army, arguing in favor of entirely humanitarian deployments, without weapons. "The Germans can't fight properly any more anyhow -- and perhaps they shouldn't. Our strengths lie elsewhere."

Is it an Army if it is unwilling to fight? Is NATO still valid if its members aren't willing to actually engage in combat?

Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at June 18, 2017 01:41 PM (QGoUX)

272 Right now, if I were to attend a Trump rally and saw a number of biker type dudes outside the entrance loaded with tattoos I would not be overly concerned for my safety. I certainly would be the very last to call them 'not men'.

In fact, I'd probably say to them, "Glad you guys are here today''.

Posted by: E Depluribus Unum at June 18, 2017 12:23 PM (HTdUD)

The "not men" comment was a reference to the new wave band Devo whose slogan was "Are we not men? We are Devo." That was brought up after another comment said that tattoos and piercings were evidence of a "de-evolution"--which was the root of the band's name.....

Posted by: Late '70's New Wave Fan at June 18, 2017 01:48 PM (7uYFy)

273 167 The only way to get ahead in most work situatuions is competition, and that includes "politics."

politics don't get my code written.

Posted by: Anachronda at June 18, 2017 02:20 PM (lwx4E)

274 Check these out ...

http://www.collegerank.net/amazing-college-libraries/

I spent my undergrad years at #3

Posted by: Islamic Rage Boy at June 18, 2017 02:42 PM (e8kgV)

275 politics don't get my code written.

Granted, but I think the point is that if you aspire to something besides Successful Coder, like say Sr. VP of Successful Coders, then getting your code written is necessary but not sufficient.

Posted by: Bob the Bilderberg at June 18, 2017 02:43 PM (7oUUT)

276 And the other books I'm reading are about dog training. In particular I'm reading a very short one by Patricia McConnell called "Feisty Fido" which is about leash aggression. My Sophie is actually dog aggressive (or reactive, if you prefer) because she very resource-guardy when we're out and about. I'm not sure what the resource is - it could be me or it could be the cookies I carry or it could be the tennis balls that always linger in her mind - but she does not want the other doggies anywhere near her. Anyway, the ideas in Feisty Fido definitely won't hurt and they might help.
Posted by: Tonestaple at June 18, 2017 09:16 AM (STkEV)

Not sure if it has a chapter on dog aggression, but I gave an old-timer a copy of "Lucky Dog Lessons," by
Brandon McMillan, and he said it was outstanding. He doesn't have dogs or even want dogs, but his new neighbors have a couple, and he's training them to do what HE wants!

I saw McMillan on a daytime TV show do a demo with the shelter dogs he trains for TV and movies. I could've watched all day -- and I don't have a dog either. His parents were circus animals trainers, so I figured someone who grew up around lions and tigers and lived to tell about it must know what he's talking about.

Posted by: SandyCheeks at June 18, 2017 02:46 PM (joFoi)

277 I see that among the Poul Anderson short stories at Gutenberg is a long personal favorite of mine, "The Valor of Cappen Varra".

Posted by: sock_rat_eez, they are gaslighting us 24/7 at June 18, 2017 02:55 PM (i81II)

278 Finally rounding the bend on Windswept House by Malachi Martin; more than 600 pages of microscopic type. It's all about Vatican skullduggery in the era of John Paul II. It's billed as a "thinly veiled" version of what really happened during his tenure, and there are supposed web sites that match the "fictional" names with the real folks.

What I have no doubt about were the descriptions of the beginnings of the EU and how the US and Europe tried to gain the favor (or steamroll) the Vatican in that regard. Population control via abortion and "2 children per household" diktats -- advocated by the U.S. president, wanting papal approval, is enough to make your head spin.

Dark, dark stuff. Makes me have lots of questions re what was real and what is actual papal power vs the army of bishops out there.

I knew JPII was one of the good guys, who is described as a geopolitical genius -- who worked with Reagan, Thatcher and Kohl -- but this book makes him sound like an absolute naif when it came to dealing with rotten, rotten churchmen essentially running the Vatican, making pronouncements that weren't theirs to make (altargirls, anyone?) and operating in the U.S. against the wishes of Rome. The schism between the US bishops and Rome as well as their "unity" was quite an eye opener. I can't wait to talk to my parish priest.

Posted by: SandyCheeks at June 18, 2017 03:24 PM (joFoi)

279 Islamic Rage Boy

Thank you. My library is #4.

Spent a lot of romantic moments in the stacks. /s

Posted by: NaCly Dog at June 18, 2017 03:34 PM (u82oZ)

280 I am reading "The Watchful Mind" by a monk of St Athos. It is teaching on the Jesus prayer- "Lord Jesus Christ, son of God, have mercy on me" which has a long meditative practice in the Eastern Orthodox Church.
Posted by: FenelonSpoke at June 18, 2017 10:08 AM (qES5k)

Fenelon -- I quite enjoy the stuff you're reading, but this one is a tad pricey. My 90-year-old father is quite a spiritual guy, and I'm taking him belated Father's Day gifts in a couple weeks. I know he'd like this one. Where do you get the occasional high-dollar books you read (that are out of the mainstream)?

Posted by: SandyCheeks at June 18, 2017 03:40 PM (joFoi)

281 Regarding the Hipster Foods, I wonder if the bathtub sundae was at Bubbie's. If so, totally worth it.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at June 18, 2017 04:01 PM (QGoUX)

282 Oops, wrong thread!

*backs out, bowing and scraping*

Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at June 18, 2017 04:01 PM (QGoUX)

283 Never read KODT, but I can't pass up the chance to push "Nodwick" plus all the other comics by writer/artist Aaron Williams.

Nodwick is the henchman for a party of adventurers. This means he gets all the dangerous jobs, plus he has to carry all the stuff the adventurers ... umm ... let's say "acquire." He can't quit because he signed a contract.

Standalone stories with overarching plot. Utterly hilarious. Wish Aaron were still doing the book.

Posted by: Weak Geek at June 18, 2017 05:57 PM (+ENun)

284 I was very impressed with Lafayette when my son applied (he didn't get in). They look like they have their priorities straight up there. Strong academics and a nicely maintained (though not gold-plated) campus.

Posted by: Otto Zilch at June 18, 2017 06:33 PM (4+iS9)

285 I gloared and I goved and I still didn't get in her pants......

Posted by: saf at June 18, 2017 08:27 PM (+zN6H)

286 So I finished Divergent. Review: Meh. A little burned out on the KAF genre for the moment. So, of course, I pick up a Christian romance novel, KAF without the KA, I guess: "From a Distance" by Tamera Alexander. I liked her "Rekindled" series. Anyway, it's fine.

Posted by: sinalco at June 18, 2017 10:45 PM (yODqO)

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