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Saturday Gardening Thread: Summer Travels Begin [KT]

IMG_1351.JPG

Cactus grown by DeplorableJewells45

Well, the unusually cool weather in the San Joaquin Valley has ended, and we are now getting the scorching weather more typical of this time of year, plus some humidity. Not like in the East, but still, humidity. Uncomfortable. I am kind of hunkered down, taking care of plants, animals and people, with some extra-chaotic challenges. I appreciate the chance for virtual gardening visits with other members of The Horde. We have some great stuff in our garden mailbag, but I was only able to get to a little of it this week. Stay tuned for more from The Horde this summer.

Jewells is disappointed that the weather seems to have prevented some of the buds on her stand of cactus from opening this year. But I think it still looks pretty great. I confess that I like cactus blossoms best up close, though. I love the translucent petals. I am fond of the way the stamens look.

Anybody else out there grow cactus? Any tips for the rest of us? I used to have a neighbor who grew those climbing jungle cacti. They have somewhat different needs from desert cacti.

cacti edit.jpg

Home Improvement Corner

Most of our gardens come along with a home or apartment, and I thought this list of 5 essential hacks for summer from FEE would free up some time for gardening, and visiting gardens. Here's to drains that drain, hotter water, cleaner laundry and more satisfying showers and shaves. I'm not so sure about carrying lye in luggage. Otherwise, I like the list. Have you implemented any of these hacks?

Meanwhile intrepid internet traveler WeirdDave sent along this DIY project for growing your own shade. Looks inviting about now. Bet you could use sweet potato vines. Check the link for more photos.

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Mailbag

Concerning our REAL mystery plant last week, DJ (Texas Lurker) has sent in a message:

False Gromwell (soft-haired marble seed) appears to be it. Thanks to all in the Gardening Thread.

The name Job's Tears also came up. Another name for this plant is "Wild Job's Tears". But there is also a "regular" Job's Tears naturalized in the Southeast:

There are two main varieties of the species, one wild and one cultivated. The wild variety, Coix lacryma-jobi var. lacryma-jobi, has hard-shelled pseudocarps--very hard, pearly white, oval structures used as beads for making rosaries, necklaces, and other objects. The cultivated variety Coix lacryma-jobi var. ma-yuen is harvested as a cereal crop, has a soft shell, and is used medicinally in parts of Asia.

It is apparently the next cult gluten-free grain. Maybe you could grow some. Adapted where grains like rice are not.

jobs-tears-posole.jpg

That link reminds me: Don't forget to turn in your recipes using garden produce for the AoSHQ Cookbook!

Traveling with The Horde

Gorden sent in a gorgeous video of the Minnesota Arboretum from the air. I can't figure out how to embed it, so you'll have to click on the link. Thanks, Gordon.

And we finally have a chance to visit the innovative Weasel Acres - Sno Pea Division. The ranch is coming along nicely.

IMG_1127.JPG

We will be visiting other Gardens of The Horde (and Gardens Recommended by The Horde) this summer. I'm looking forward to it.

Meanwhile, is there anything interesting going on in your yard and garden?

If you would like to send information and/or photos for the Saturday Gardening Thread, the address is:

ktinthegarden
at g mail dot com

Include your nic unless you want to be a lurker.

Posted by: Open Blogger at 12:20 PM




Comments

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1 Good morning!

Posted by: JQ Flyover at June 17, 2017 12:11 PM (5muuD)

2 Finally, a break in the rain...

Posted by: JQ Flyover at June 17, 2017 12:14 PM (5muuD)

3 Lots of potting to do today.

Posted by: JQ Flyover at June 17, 2017 12:14 PM (5muuD)

4 And fill the birdfeeders...

Posted by: JQ Flyover at June 17, 2017 12:14 PM (5muuD)

5 And wait for the tomatoes.

Posted by: JQ Flyover at June 17, 2017 12:15 PM (5muuD)

6 Am I supposed to go get everyone?

Posted by: JQ Flyover at June 17, 2017 12:15 PM (5muuD)

7 Okay....

Posted by: JQ Flyover at June 17, 2017 12:15 PM (5muuD)

8 Thanks for the cookbook plug, KT!!

WEEKLY SNO PEA CROP HARVEST REPORT: 3 units.

Posted by: Weasel at June 17, 2017 12:15 PM (Sfs6o)

9 It's lonely here anyhow.

Posted by: JQ Flyover at June 17, 2017 12:15 PM (5muuD)

10 Hi, JQ. Hope you get some tomatoes soon. We have had a few.

Posted by: KT at June 17, 2017 12:16 PM (BVQ+1)

11 Hi, weasel! Great sno pea ranch!

Posted by: JQ Flyover at June 17, 2017 12:16 PM (5muuD)

12 I've summoned the Corgis.

Posted by: IrishEi at June 17, 2017 12:16 PM (HiDrR)

13 Weasel at June 17, 2017 12:15 PM

I'm planning on sending in recipes for a pair o' marinated salads.

Any place for general tips like "chop up green onion tops in soup"?

Posted by: KT at June 17, 2017 12:18 PM (BVQ+1)

14 Posted by: JQ Flyover at June 17, 2017 12:16 PM (5muuD)
-----------
Thanks JQ Flyover! The plants are in medium shade and aren't as hardy as I'd like. I might be over watering. Cucumbers (foreground - white trellis) seem happy but really only starting to grow.

Posted by: Weasel at June 17, 2017 12:20 PM (Sfs6o)

15 KT,

I bet it's cooking in your neck of the woods. Stay cool.

No gardening going on here because it's too hot.

I did pick some peaches yesterday.

Posted by: CaliGirl at June 17, 2017 12:20 PM (Ri/rl)

16 Only thing happening in our garden is our new puppy, Whiskey. So far, he has decimated one rhododendron, two azaleas, and one photinia. Breaks whole branches off and runs around the yard like he's carrying the Olympic torch.

Posted by: IrishEi at June 17, 2017 12:20 PM (HiDrR)

17 Hey, KT! Long time before the tomatoes ripen-- they're only about 1/2 inch diameter, lol.

Worth the wait.

Thanks for the thread!

Posted by: JQ Flyover at June 17, 2017 12:22 PM (5muuD)

18 Somebody was selling the bead form (not the edible form) of Job's Tears seeds on the intertubes for $16.00 for 60. For rosaries, bracelets, necklaces and such.

Posted by: KT at June 17, 2017 12:22 PM (BVQ+1)

19 The sno peas look great weasel.

Posted by: CaliGirl at June 17, 2017 12:23 PM (Ri/rl)

20 We finally got both sunshine and warm temperatures at the same time. Not coincidentally, we now have baby Roma and cherry tomatoes and summer squash blossoms. All the plants look healthy. I'm starting to worry about SMOD.

The salad greens are growing faster than we can eat them. We promised a friend to give her some if they grew. Looks like she has a good sized bag coming this weekend.

Posted by: JTB at June 17, 2017 12:24 PM (V+03K)

21 13 Weasel at June 17, 2017 12:15 PM

I'm planning on sending in recipes for a pair o' marinated salads.

Any place for general tips like "chop up green onion tops in soup"?
Posted by: KT at June 17, 2017 12:18 PM (BVQ+1)
---------
Absolutely! The last text box titled 'Chef's Notes' is a good place for additional ingredients or tips. Thanks, and looking forward to your recipes! The response so far has been great - over 160 really good looking recipes so far, but PLEASE keep them coming!!!

Posted by: Weasel at June 17, 2017 12:25 PM (Sfs6o)

22 CaliGirl at June 17, 2017 12:20 PM

When it's hot where you are, it's hot. 107 forecast here tomorrow. 108 Monday. We try to do outdoor stuff early. And we're moving our sister-in-law in, so things are torn up in the house, too.

Posted by: KT at June 17, 2017 12:26 PM (BVQ+1)

23 CaliGirl at June 17, 2017 12:20 PM

We picked some white nectarines. Withheld water the last few days and they taste pretty good. We also have plums and peaches in the house from a wholesale place.

Posted by: KT at June 17, 2017 12:27 PM (BVQ+1)

24 Love the photos of the cactus flowers. They are spectacular, especially against the green of the cacti. They always look like a subject that would work for an Impressionistic style painting.

Posted by: JTB at June 17, 2017 12:28 PM (V+03K)

25 Posted by: CaliGirl at June 17, 2017 12:23 PM (Ri/rl)
---------
Thanks CaliGirl. i want to rip out the bulbs behind the trellis which only bloom for about a week in the spring and work on improving the soil in the planting beds.

Anybody know the best time to transplant bulbs? They're pretty, but are taking up some prime ranch land.

Posted by: Weasel at June 17, 2017 12:31 PM (Sfs6o)

26 IrishEi at June 17, 2017 12:20 PM

Your puppy sounds adorable. Reminds me of when our Little Buddy was a pup and killed a new Pluot tree.

Posted by: KT at June 17, 2017 12:32 PM (BVQ+1)

27 KT, Thanks for the gardening thread, as always. I hope matters settle down for you soon.

And here's to Weasel's photo. I feel privileged to see the start of the Casa Weasel Snow Pea Empire.

Posted by: JTB at June 17, 2017 12:32 PM (V+03K)

28 JTB at June 17, 2017 12:24 PM

Congrats on your salad crop. Sounds great.

Posted by: KT at June 17, 2017 12:33 PM (BVQ+1)

29 16 Only thing happening in our garden is our new puppy, Whiskey. So far, he has decimated one rhododendron, two azaleas, and one photinia. Breaks whole branches off and runs around the yard like he's carrying the Olympic torch.

Posted by: IrishEi at June 17, 2017 12:20 PM (HiDrR)
Rhodos and azaleas poisonous to dogs. A friend lost a pup to an azalea 20 years ago. I banished them to the front yard (azaleas)

Posted by: CN at June 17, 2017 12:35 PM (2+tI4)

30 Weasel at June 17, 2017 12:31 PM

Do you know what kind of bulbs they are? What do the flowers look like?

Posted by: KT at June 17, 2017 12:35 PM (BVQ+1)

31 All my gardening is done in containers which sit in full sun on shelves on the outside railing of my wife's 60 foot long wheelchair ramp. After trying out those "topsy turvy" hanging tomato planters years ago and finding that it was hard to get enough water to the plants, I went to making planters out of 10 gallon plastic storage boxes with a 3 gallon water reservoir in the bottom, 7 gallons of potting soil on top and black plastic covering the soil to retain moisture and keep the squirrels from digging out the soil.

I've cut back to just 12 plants this year. 2 "Early Girl," 2 "Big Rainbow," 2 "Lemon Boy," 2 "Black Krim," 2 "Kellogg Breakfast," 1 "Better Boy," and 1 "Champion II." Plus herbs and flowers in 12 inch reservoir pots in between. They're about 18 inches tall right now and growing well. Makes enough for us and many to give away.

Posted by: geoffb5 at June 17, 2017 12:35 PM (d3wbb)

32 I really do recommend Gordon's video, even if it is from the Star Tribune. A nice break.

Posted by: KT at June 17, 2017 12:38 PM (BVQ+1)

33 Posted by: KT at June 17, 2017 12:26 PM (BVQ+1)

That does not sound fun.

I don't have A/C, my house is really old and I've had painters at my pool house all week so no swimming.

They are really doing a good job on the prep. I just went down there and told them they can use the umbrellas, they are sanding in the sun, no wind down there.

Posted by: CaliGirl at June 17, 2017 12:39 PM (Ri/rl)

34 30 Weasel at June 17, 2017 12:31 PM

Do you know what kind of bulbs they are? What do the flowers look like?
Posted by: KT at June 17, 2017 12:35 PM (BVQ+1
--------
Not really sure. I'm guessing some kind of lily? Kind of a purplish flower for a couple of weeks in the spring then they look like they do in the picture the rest of the year.

Posted by: Weasel at June 17, 2017 12:39 PM (Sfs6o)

35 geoffb5 at June 17, 2017 12:35 PM

Sounds like you did some good planning for your tomato crop. Ind it sounds like you have chosen some good varieties. "Black Krim" does not do well where I am, and I am not real fond of "Big Rainbow", but I have had good luck with all the others.

Somebody gave us one of those "topsy turvy" planters. I plant to plant flowers in it, in the fall. Too hot even for flowers right now.

Posted by: KT at June 17, 2017 12:43 PM (BVQ+1)

36 We had about 8" of rain in less than two hours on Thursday. The grass is really green now. So are the weeds.

Posted by: Duke Lowell at June 17, 2017 12:43 PM (kTF2Z)

37 Weasel,

Iris? Are there rhizomes?

KT will know.

They kind of look like agapanthus, but I'm not sure.

Posted by: CaliGirl at June 17, 2017 12:43 PM (Ri/rl)

38 Weasel,

If they are irises, I've moved them all different times, after they've bloomed. Some made it, others didn't.

I'm sure there's a time when you're supposed to move them.

Posted by: CaliGirl at June 17, 2017 12:46 PM (Ri/rl)

39 36 ... O/T, Duke, If you don't mind my asking, any good news from yesterday?

Posted by: JTB at June 17, 2017 12:46 PM (V+03K)

40 Weasel at June 17, 2017 12:39 PM

Are they evergreen? Never die back? Flowers in clusters? Drooping or upright? Do the leaves smell like onions?

Posted by: KT at June 17, 2017 12:47 PM (BVQ+1)

41 32 I really do recommend Gordon's video, even if it is from the Star Tribune. A nice break.
Posted by: KT at June 17, 2017 12:38 PM (BVQ+1)

It's very pretty, everything is so green.

Posted by: CaliGirl at June 17, 2017 12:49 PM (Ri/rl)

42 Duke Lowell at June 17, 2017 12:43 PM

Wow. That is a lot of rain. Weeds can really take advantage of that.

Posted by: KT at June 17, 2017 12:50 PM (BVQ+1)

43 I have a very healthy bunch of prickly pear cactus here in Virginia. I put mine around the base of my mailbox where it is surrounded on three sides by pavement (my driveway, the street, and the sidewalk). This was a difficult area for other plants because all the reflection off the pavement tended to bake more tender plants. It's survived being buried in feet of snow and salt from snow plows without a scratch. It also keeps the neighbors dogs from using the mailbox as a urinal. Because the soil in Virginia tends to be heavy clay, it is best to grow ornamentals on a raised mounds of good garden soil from the store. This goes double for cacti where the key is always good drainage and lots of sun. To propagate, just cut a paddle off, let the end callous over a couple of days, then stick end in soil - done!

Posted by: MM at June 17, 2017 12:50 PM (ZPWOY)

44 Cursed be the ground for our sake. Both thorns and thistles it shall bring forth for us. For out of the ground we were taken, for the dust we are...and to the dust we shall return.

Posted by: Insomniac at June 17, 2017 12:55 PM (0mRoj)

45 KT, thanks for another great gardening thread - all I can grow are herbs on my deck, and some aphids already took out my chives. But everything else is doing well, and the ones I care about the most, which are rosemary and basil, are doing great.

And thanks for the cookbook plug! I've been hoping you'd send something in to us. If you have any questions or need to make changes, you can reach us at the email address on the cookbook site. That goes for anyone, by the way.

Let's see if I did this right . . . .

Posted by: bluebell at June 17, 2017 12:57 PM (sBOL1)

46 Are they evergreen? Never die back? Flowers in clusters? Drooping or upright? Do the leaves smell like onions?
Posted by: KT at June 17, 2017 12:47 PM (BVQ+1)
-------------
Well, WeaselWoman cuts them back to little nubs every fall to clean out the planting bed, so I don't know if they would stay green all winter or not. Just went out and smelled them - no odor (and any doubt my neighbors had concerning my mental stability is resolved). Sent you a couple of close up pics.

Posted by: Weasel at June 17, 2017 12:57 PM (Sfs6o)

47 Rhodos and azaleas poisonous to dogs. A friend lost a pup to an azalea 20 years ago. I banished them to the front yard (azaleas)
Posted by: CN at June 17, 2017 12:35 PM
~~~~~

Oh, yes. We've learned the hard way. Right now, there are only two azaleas left in the back yard and we have them fenced off with hardware cloth until we can hopefully transplant them (they are quite large.) Luckily he never ingested any of the others, just ripped branches off.

Some daywalkers might remember that we had quite a scare with Whiskey when he was just 9 weeks old. He ate some holly berries off the ground and got very sick. Ended up on an IV for dehydration due to vomiting and diarrhea.

Posted by: IrishEi at June 17, 2017 12:58 PM (HiDrR)

48 And we finally have a chance to visit the innovative Weasel Acres - Sno Pea Division. The ranch is coming along nicely.

I would like to know what the plant is to the left of the snow peas in that pic, as I have it and have had no idea .

Posted by: willow at June 17, 2017 12:58 PM (iS1Cb)

49 Also, Flowers in clusters I think. Maybe droopy?

Posted by: Weasel at June 17, 2017 12:58 PM (Sfs6o)

50 MM at June 17, 2017 12:50 PM

Thanks for the detailed information and instructions. It has never really occurred to me that people might want to grow cactus inland in the East.

Posted by: KT at June 17, 2017 12:58 PM (BVQ+1)

51 Hooray! Thanks to CBD for showing me how to put in the link.

Posted by: bluebell ~ send us your recipes! at June 17, 2017 12:59 PM (sBOL1)

52 Anybody cook prickly pear pads? I ate one of the fruits once. Seems like a lot of work to make sure you get all the tiny little spines out.

Posted by: KT at June 17, 2017 12:59 PM (BVQ+1)

53 They are lilies?

Posted by: willow at June 17, 2017 01:00 PM (iS1Cb)

54 KT - The pics I just sent show the flower stalks, if that helps.

Posted by: Weasel at June 17, 2017 01:00 PM (Sfs6o)

55 Cursed be the ground for our sake. Both thorns and thistles it shall bring forth for us. For out of the ground we were taken, for the dust we are...and to the dust we shall return.
Posted by: Insomniac at June 17, 2017 12:55 PM (0mRoj)

It rains on the just and injust and we always hoep that the injust to Tshuva, and the just are comforted.

jus sayin

Posted by: willow at June 17, 2017 01:01 PM (iS1Cb)

56 Posted by: willow at June 17, 2017 12:58 PM (iS1Cb)
------
Stay tuned!

Posted by: Weasel at June 17, 2017 01:02 PM (Sfs6o)

57 hmm , so I have the wrong deal, my flower looks nothing like agapanthus

Posted by: willow at June 17, 2017 01:03 PM (iS1Cb)

58 fcol, unjust!*

Posted by: willow at June 17, 2017 01:04 PM (iS1Cb)

59 my flowers are pink and I'm trying to locate genus but, I dunno

Posted by: willow at June 17, 2017 01:05 PM (iS1Cb)

60 If you like pictures of cactus flowers, you might enjoy this site: http://cactusaficionado.blogspot.com

I've just restarted my indoor cactus garden, but it will be a few years before most bloom. Right now the seedlings are about six weeks old and look like little red or green blobs with fuzzy tops, like this: https://www.flickr.com/photos/tancos/35362117565

As far as advice goes, I'll just mention excellent drainage, careful watering, and patience. Particularly patience.

Posted by: Don at June 17, 2017 01:06 PM (0yuZ3)

61 weasel perhaps your are dwarf of the nile?

Posted by: willow at June 17, 2017 01:06 PM (iS1Cb)

62 Weasel at June 17, 2017 12:58 PM

I see telltale flower stalks. Maybe we can post a photo of your mystery plant next week.

Posted by: KT at June 17, 2017 01:07 PM (BVQ+1)

63 39 36 ... O/T, Duke, If you don't mind my asking, any good news from yesterday?
Posted by: JTB at June 17, 2017 12:46 PM (V+03K)

----------

Thanks for asking. I have a call with the SVP on Monday. Headhunter said they were preparing an offer package. Fingers crossed.

Posted by: Duke Lowell at June 17, 2017 01:10 PM (kTF2Z)

64 Love Jewell's prickly pear! Cactus blooms are my favorites.

I used to grow several kinds at my previous house, mainly in containers on the patio. San Antonio is pretty humid, so it was interesting to see how many species from drier parts of Texas would get the melting disease (rots from the inside out, then collapses) on my patio. My favorite TX cactus is Lace cactus, but the ones I bought melted immediately.
And then the horse crippler I brought back from far west Texas just loves it here. Go figure.

The serious cactus fanciers grow their plants under cover so they can control the amount of moisture they get.

My favorite is a South TX species I have that blooms repeatedly all summer. No, I can't remember its name offhand without doing some research. It's one that's had both its genus and species names changed several times which is quite irritating.

Posted by: stace at June 17, 2017 01:10 PM (Q5ALd)

65 Posted by: IrishEi at June 17, 2017 12:58 PM (HiDrR)

The holly berries are bad. I'm glad Whisky made it.

Posted by: CaliGirl at June 17, 2017 01:12 PM (Ri/rl)

66 63 ... Great news! Mrs. JTB and I will keep you in our thoughts.

Posted by: JTB at June 17, 2017 01:12 PM (V+03K)

67 Don at June 17, 2017 01:06 PM

I used to get a catalog with epiphytic cacti. Spectacular. Most of them can only be grown indoors in most of the country, like yours. I am impressed that you are starting with seedlings. Wow.

The neighbor (in Southern California) who grew them on her patio had one that had huge white blooms at night on a gawky plant, and one that had tiny stems with almost fuzzy spines.

They sold the plants at an orchid nursery in the area.

Posted by: KT at June 17, 2017 01:12 PM (BVQ+1)

68 Next task for today is to pick up the half bucket of strawberries that is being reserved for me.
The Rotary club sells buckets of chopped strawberries each year, but you have to buy the 4 gallon bucket. So families group together to buy lots

Mine is going to frozen, canned strawberries for winter, and jam.

Posted by: Kindltot at June 17, 2017 01:15 PM (mkDpn)

69 Thanks for asking. I have a call with the SVP on Monday. Headhunter said they were preparing an offer package. Fingers crossed.
Posted by: Duke Lowell at June 17, 2017 01:10 PM (kTF2Z)
----------

I hope so, I hope so, I hope so! I asked at the end of the morning thread, but I got willowed. You'll get this. I have faith.

Posted by: bluebell ~ send us your recipes! at June 17, 2017 01:17 PM (sBOL1)

70 52 Anybody cook prickly pear pads? I ate one of the fruits once. Seems like a lot of work to make sure you get all the tiny little spines out.
Posted by: KT at June 17, 2017 12:59 PM (BVQ+1)

I haven't cooked them but the young pads, nopalitos, are popular around here especially around Easter. I don't much care for them. They have some slime and not much flavor.

I think the tunas, fruits, have a great flavor, but I won't process them myself. If someone else makes the jelly I'm all over it.

Posted by: stace at June 17, 2017 01:17 PM (Q5ALd)

71 I have never lived in the East where Job's Tears are said to have gone feral, but they look a lot like a grass I have seen growing. I think it might be one grain that would be feasible for an average gardener to try. It is compared to pearled barley.

Posted by: KT at June 17, 2017 01:18 PM (BVQ+1)

72 I spent all day Wednesday at the Main Coastal Botanical Gardens. I believe that Maine has achieved the pinnacle of garden beauty, variety, design architecture with the ultimate geography.

If the Horde says there are more wondrous gardens in the world:

(1) I wouldn't believe them.

(2) I am not capable of comprehending greater beauty.

Posted by: Ladylibertarian at June 17, 2017 01:19 PM (v4pQ0)

73 I ate prickly pear fruits once and wound up with stickers under my tongue, I had no idea of what I was doing.

The pads are decent when I have eaten them, they are called "nopales" and they sell them in some stores here. I think the thorns rub off, but I am not sure about that. Mostly they are a texture hidden in a green sauce.

Posted by: Kindltot at June 17, 2017 01:21 PM (mkDpn)

74 Thanks ,Bluebell and JTB!

Posted by: Duke Lowell at June 17, 2017 01:21 PM (kTF2Z)

75 47 we have azaleas in the front

hydrangeas are poisonous to dogs also and I have 3 big ones in the back yard. I need to get some wire fences to keep vpup away

Posted by: @votermom's phone at June 17, 2017 01:21 PM (u8vcQ)

76 There are a few dozen strawberry plants in our front landscaping-- escapees from a large planter.

They've come on so heavily this year, there's enough (even *after* the wildlife get their portion) for a nice dessert at Fathers' Day supper.

Posted by: JQ Flyover at June 17, 2017 01:22 PM (5muuD)

77 Ladylibertarian at June 17, 2017 01:19 PM

Did you take any photos you would like to pass along?

Posted by: KT at June 17, 2017 01:24 PM (BVQ+1)

78 I see telltale flower stalks. Maybe we can post a photo of your mystery plant next week.
Posted by: KT at June 17, 2017 01:07 PM (BVQ+1)
--------
OK. Thanks! I also asked WeaselWoman if she know what they are.

Posted by: Weasel at June 17, 2017 01:28 PM (Sfs6o)

79 Hey, everyone. Yah, KT, it is the Star Tribune, but not quite everything they do is tinged with Marxism. James Lileks still works there, so there is some hope.

I'm late planting everything, with two more beds left to complete. But my work schedule has improved so that should happen in the next couple of days. The peppers in the grow boxes are starting to bud off some. And the strawberries...oh yes. It took three years of patience but now we're getting 2-3 cups per day.

I wanted to dig them out and plant something else. But she said I should wait, as the strawberry beds she took care of as a girl on the farm took a while to yield. She was right.

Posted by: Gordon at June 17, 2017 01:30 PM (dZfVU)

80 61 weasel perhaps your are dwarf of the nile?
Posted by: willow at June 17, 2017 01:06 PM (iS1Cb)
-----------
I'm really not sure. I always assumed it was some sort of lily or maybe an iris, but I'm just guessing.

Posted by: Weasel at June 17, 2017 01:31 PM (Sfs6o)

81 Replaced a sprinkler in the backyard this morning. It was just gone. No idea where the old one went.

No gardening this week, predicted high of 120 on Tuesday. Well, honestly, no gardening any week. Except for a hibiscus out front.

Posted by: Blanco Basura at June 17, 2017 01:32 PM (IcT7t)

82 There were four of these in the yard when we returned from the store yesterday:

http://preview.tinyurl.com/y9vk4gql

All were males, so brilliantly colored!

Posted by: JQ Flyover at June 17, 2017 01:37 PM (5muuD)

83 Saw this small yellow and gray bird - tried to take a photo but it flew off
I wonder what it was

Posted by: @votermom's phone at June 17, 2017 01:37 PM (u8vcQ)

84 I did a terrible thing to my flowers. I have a container garden on my deck and was using some ecofriendly spray to hit the ants scurrying about between the pots. I then sprayed the flowers with the same product, thinking it would be safe.

Hours later when I returned to do the evening watering, the plants were in really bad shape. A brutally hot day in conjunction with the spray just put a hurt on them. I hoped they would recover.

They're better, but I learned a lesson. The bug spray label said safe for pets and humans...but not plants!

Although I figured I could use the same spray to kill some weeds.

Posted by: kallisto at June 17, 2017 01:38 PM (kD8Fh)

85 77 Ladylibertarian at June 17, 2017 01:19 PM

Did you take any photos you would like to pass along?
Posted by: KT at June 17, 2017 01:24 PM (BVQ+1)


Ohhhhhh yes......

Posted by: Ladylibertarian at June 17, 2017 01:38 PM (v4pQ0)

86 Gordon at June 17, 2017 01:30 PM

Thanks for the outstanding video and your garden report.

Posted by: KT at June 17, 2017 01:39 PM (BVQ+1)

87 Blanco Basura at June 17, 2017 01:32 PM

Wow. And I thought 108 was bad.

Posted by: KT at June 17, 2017 01:40 PM (BVQ+1)

88 What variety of Opuntia (cactus) is that?

I like the scale of that, and the yellow flowers.

The nopales do not have much flavor (IMHO) - a little like celery. I do think that some people pickle them - an escabeche type of prep, or a sweet. tarragon bread and butter prep might work pretty nice...

Posted by: cd at June 17, 2017 01:42 PM (ti8tt)

89 kallisto at June 17, 2017 01:38 PM

Darn it. Guess gardening teaches one to deal with setbacks.

Posted by: KT at June 17, 2017 01:42 PM (BVQ+1)

90 Posted by: JQ Flyover at June 17, 2017 01:22 PM (5muuD)

There's a small raised bed on the side of my house. Wild strawberries volunteered there, so I figured I'd plant some cultivars to see if they do well.

So far, so good. Just have to figure out a way to keep the bunnies out.

Posted by: kallisto at June 17, 2017 01:43 PM (kD8Fh)

91 Posted by: KT at June 17, 2017 01:42 PM (BVQ+1)

Definitely a learning experience!

Posted by: kallisto at June 17, 2017 01:44 PM (kD8Fh)

92 Wow. And I thought 108 was bad.

You've got some humidity. We've got a dry heave heat.

Posted by: Blanco Basura at June 17, 2017 01:45 PM (IcT7t)

93 90 get a cat?

Posted by: @votermom's phone at June 17, 2017 01:45 PM (u8vcQ)

94 Saw this small yellow and gray bird - tried to take a photo but it flew off I wonder what it was
Posted by: @votermom's phone at June 17, 2017 01:37 PM
~~~~~

Eastern Goldfinch?

http://preview.tinyurl.com/yc3zs2hf

Posted by: IrishEi at June 17, 2017 01:46 PM (HiDrR)

95 No gardening this week, predicted high of 120 on Tuesday. Well, honestly, no gardening any week. Except for a hibiscus out front.
Posted by: Blanco Basura at June 17, 2017 01:32 PM (IcT7t)

Are you in Phoenix? Or Death Valley?

Posted by: CaliGirl at June 17, 2017 01:47 PM (Ri/rl)

96 Posted by: Weasel at June 17, 2017 01:31 PM (Sfs6o)



Weasel--can I post recipes this Monday?

Posted by: Ladylibertarian at June 17, 2017 01:47 PM (v4pQ0)

97 IrishEi, yes, that's it!!!


Thanks!

Posted by: @votermom's phone at June 17, 2017 01:48 PM (u8vcQ)

98 I have a feeder full of Nyjer seed just for the goldfinches. I have a bunch of visitors in the spring but I'm not sure where they are right now.

Posted by: Weasel at June 17, 2017 01:48 PM (Sfs6o)

99 IrishEi, yes, that's it!!!
Thanks!
Posted by: @votermom's phone at June 17, 2017 01:48 PM
~~~~~

If you want to attract them, they love thistle. A little pricey, but worth it.

Posted by: IrishEi at June 17, 2017 01:50 PM (HiDrR)

100 Weasel--can I post recipes this Monday?
Posted by: Ladylibertarian at June 17, 2017 01:47 PM (v4pQ0)
---------
Sure can! Thanks! The deadline is June 30th, but don't wait - submit early and submit often!

Posted by: Weasel at June 17, 2017 01:51 PM (Sfs6o)

101 Are you in Phoenix? Or Death Valley?

Phoenix metro. I looked up Death Valley for comparison, they've got a predicted high of 124 this week.

Posted by: Blanco Basura at June 17, 2017 01:51 PM (IcT7t)

102 Posted by: Weasel at June 17, 2017 01:48 PM (Sfs6o)

I had two nyjer seed feeders up last year and they did attract the little darlings. The one that was just a mesh bag got goldfinches only but the other one also attracted sparrows and finches.

Maybe the goldfinches aren't coming back to your feeder due to a cat or other predatory animal being around?

Are there any owls in your neighborhood?

Posted by: kallisto at June 17, 2017 01:51 PM (kD8Fh)

103 Here in east central Iowa we finally have been blessed with 3 inches of rain over the last 4 days. Half inch of rain is in the forecast tonight. Now we can stop watering the garden early in the morning. Eating a lot of greens, first tomatoes, baby taters, etc. We slaughtered 5 lambs last week. 3 are cut and wrapped in the freezer, one donated to the local food bank, and one in the frig. We are eating lamb twice a day. 5 more lambs will meet their waterloo next week. Four of those will go into storage at a local locker. Two of our older hens have been targeted for no longer laying eggs, so the old girls will become chicken and dumplings tomorrow.

Here's to a productive garden season for all.

Posted by: colfax mingo at June 17, 2017 01:52 PM (qJ+iT)

104 Are there any owls in your neighborhood?
Posted by: kallisto at June 17, 2017 01:51 PM (kD8Fh)
--------
There are probably owls around, but no cats that I've seen. It's really strange - we have had probably a dozen or more of them during the summer for years, then all of a sudden they were gone.

Posted by: Weasel at June 17, 2017 01:55 PM (Sfs6o)

105 Posted by: colfax mingo at June 17, 2017 01:52 PM (qJ+iT)

-----------------

What kind of abattoir are you running?

Posted by: Barnyard Animals at June 17, 2017 01:55 PM (kTF2Z)

106 Posted by: Weasel at June 17, 2017 01:55 PM (Sfs6o)

That would upset me so badly. I hope they come back!

Posted by: kallisto at June 17, 2017 01:56 PM (kD8Fh)

107 I found a hummingbird in my kitchen dead this morning. I end up having issues allowing my cat to hang out with me after such a massacre.

Posted by: willow at June 17, 2017 01:58 PM (iS1Cb)

108 Goldfinches also will eat coneflower seeds as they put on fuel for their fall journey south. We have a wren family in the orchard that delights us every summer.

Posted by: colfax mingo at June 17, 2017 01:58 PM (qJ+iT)

109 The nice thing about many bulbs (daffodils, tulips) is they come up so early and provide early color, for long enough for me. The day lilies are blooming here now, and their blooms keep coming for ... ? quite awhile, not sure how long actually.

Peonies are the ones that only last a week maybe, less if a big rain hits them. I've mowed some of mine shortly after bloom for three years but they keep coming back. That's OK, I sorta admire their determination.

My long strips of "bulk wildflowers" are coming along, but with the watering came the pigweed, purslane, grass. And man can they outgrow the more desirable flowers. 2-4D works on the lawn to kill broadleafs, but I'm not sure if there is anything safe to spray over the top on wild flowers to kill grass. At least they pull out easily from cultivated ground.

I have one more tilled bare spot to plant ... might just throw out some old pole bean seed and let the deer munch on it. The rabbits keep multiplying ... I think three families in the yard, they barely hop away now. Saw the first tiny fawn by the pond a few days ago ...

Those sweet potato trellis ideas look nice ... pretty dark green growth. cheers to all you growers.

Posted by: illiniwek at June 17, 2017 01:58 PM (O8hcu)

110 colfax mingo at June 17, 2017 01:52 PM

Thanks for the report from a real farm!

Posted by: KT at June 17, 2017 01:59 PM (BVQ+1)

111 That would upset me so badly. I hope they come back!
Posted by: kallisto at June 17, 2017 01:56 PM (kD8Fh)
------------
I'm a little bummed about it, to tell you the truth. I have a bunch of feeders in the back yard and enjoy watching them from the kitchen window, but right now I'm going through about 15 pounds of bird seed a week feeding sparrows and the occasional Cardinal.

Posted by: Weasel at June 17, 2017 01:59 PM (Sfs6o)

112 willow at June 17, 2017 01:58 PM

Kitties show their relationship to their wild relatives pretty regularly, don't they?

Posted by: KT at June 17, 2017 02:01 PM (BVQ+1)

113 Posted by: willow at June 17, 2017 01:58 PM (iS1Cb)

aaragh!

I know the kitties love to show off their trophies, but it can be very stressful to a nature-loving cat mommy. One time I drove all the way to U Penn vet hospital - 20 miles from my house - to give them a baby bunny my cat had dropped off on my step. The tech just looked at me like: ARE YOU SERIOUS?

I didn't care, the little animal was still breathing. Where there's life, there's hope.

Re;hummingbirds. I discovered that big spiders prey on hummingbirds, so be sure to take down any webs you see appearing near your hummingbird haunts.

Posted by: kallisto at June 17, 2017 02:02 PM (kD8Fh)

114 illiniwek at June 17, 2017 01:58 PM

Thanks for the report. What do you call "pigweed"? Some people call purslane "pigweed".


Posted by: KT at June 17, 2017 02:05 PM (BVQ+1)

115 We're not seeing as many goldfinches as usual this year, either.

We keep up two nyjer seed feeders and three of "regular" seed mix.

Plenty of little songbirds around, the birdhouses are full and bless the little darlings for eating so many bugs!

Posted by: JQ Flyover at June 17, 2017 02:05 PM (5muuD)

116 Weasel,

Do your purple flowers look anything like HammackPat's purple flowers from last week?

Posted by: KT at June 17, 2017 02:06 PM (BVQ+1)

117 HammockPat's flowers. The ones behind her adorable dogs.

Posted by: KT at June 17, 2017 02:09 PM (BVQ+1)

118 KT, they sure do.

Kallisto, I took down my hummingbird feeders for this exact reason but I have many garden flowers and a pond for them to feed and satisfy themselves. I just dug a new pond and am already sorry. because It's game season for my and neighbors cats.

Posted by: willow at June 17, 2017 02:09 PM (iS1Cb)

119 Re;hummingbirds. I discovered that big spiders prey on hummingbirds, so be sure to take down any webs you see appearing near your hummingbird haunts

Posted by: kallisto at June 17, 2017 02:02 PM (kD8Fh)

--------------

Do you live in Australia?

Posted by: Duke Lowell at June 17, 2017 02:11 PM (kTF2Z)

120 I laugh because this week my spouse came home from work early in the wee hours and found a strange cat on the counter in the kitchen.

we leave the back doors open so our pets can gallivant and not have accidents on the floor, but now I have to re evaluate that also.

Posted by: willow at June 17, 2017 02:13 PM (iS1Cb)

121 "5 more lambs will meet their waterloo next week.
Four of those will go into storage at a local locker. Two of our older
hens have been targeted for no longer laying eggs, so the old girls will
become chicken and dumplings tomorrow.
Posted by: colfax mingo

I'm on the farm homestead where my mom was born (7 kids born literally here, with a neighbor coming to help birth them). I came out here as a kid but never really learned all the animal husbandry and butchering type things.

I aspire toward what you are doing, but may never get that energy, and it's just me, so I'd give away most. A few chickens might be a good start.

I'm west central IL, we got 2.5" the other day, after being dry, when they had forecast 0.3". 1.6" more coming down in a hurry tonight, and major winds with it, up to 70mph they said. Don't need that. congrats on your farm operation ... thanks for the inspiring update.

Posted by: illiniwek at June 17, 2017 02:16 PM (O8hcu)

122 Posted by: KT at June 17, 2017 02:09 PM (BVQ+1)
--------
Can you help,me remember how to get back to old threads?

Posted by: Weasel at June 17, 2017 02:16 PM (Sfs6o)

123 There's a link to last week's thread under the "mailbox" heading above.

Otherwise, I use the archives or search on google using key words plus ace.mu.nu

Posted by: KT at June 17, 2017 02:21 PM (BVQ+1)

124 Other than claymore she, concertina wire , and interlocking fields of fire, anyone know how to keep the damn deer away from my sunflowers? Bambi, my ass.

Posted by: Duke Lowell at June 17, 2017 02:21 PM (kTF2Z)

125 Got some plants coming up in the garden tower. Lettuce, radishes, onions, spinach and some flowers.

Posted by: Ronster at June 17, 2017 02:22 PM (CDUSe)

126 Stupid fat fingers.

Posted by: Duke Lowell at June 17, 2017 02:22 PM (kTF2Z)

127 Link to last week's thread: REAL mystery plant . . . .

Posted by: KT at June 17, 2017 02:22 PM (BVQ+1)

128 Also, will the critters eat jalapeno seedlings? They're about three inches tall.

Posted by: Duke Lowell at June 17, 2017 02:24 PM (kTF2Z)

129 willow at June 17, 2017 02:13 PM

At least it wasn't a skunk.

Posted by: KT at June 17, 2017 02:24 PM (BVQ+1)

130 115 We're not seeing as many goldfinches as usual this year, either.

We keep up two nyjer seed feeders and three of "regular" seed mix.

Plenty of little songbirds around, the birdhouses are full and bless the little darlings for eating so many bugs!
Posted by: JQ Flyover at June 17, 2017 02:05 PM (5muuD)
--------
You know, now that I think about it, il not seeing a lot of the more interesting birds that used to frequent the yard feeders. It's almost all only sparrows now.

Posted by: Weasel at June 17, 2017 02:24 PM (Sfs6o)

131 Thankx again KT for this gardening thread. Fifty heirloom tomato plants in here and we having Juneuary with more clouds than sun in the Northwest. If summer ever does get here our tomatoes will come in late summer.

Posted by: Sherpa_K2 at June 17, 2017 02:24 PM (TUhW5)

132 Good afternoon greentumbs
Had to work today but Thursday had lettuce and herbs from garden in my salad. Guy at work gave me green and wax beans seeds so soaked them for 24 hrs and wull go put them in egg cartons with potting soil.
Garden is coming along plants are finally taking off growing.

Posted by: Skip at June 17, 2017 02:27 PM (Ot7+c)

133 I guess it is "redroot pigweed" KT, an amaranthus.
what I call purslane is more of a succulent, thick dark green juicy leaves, mostly spreads along the ground. Maybe I've been calling it wrong all this time.

https://tgcgarden.files.wordpress.com/2010/07/redroot-pigweed.jpg

But this site shows purslane that looks different.
http://tinyurl.com/yantb6np

Posted by: illiniwek at June 17, 2017 02:28 PM (O8hcu)

134 Duke Lowell,

There are some suggestions on deer control in the comments here. Tough, though problem.

http://ace.mu.nu/archives/2column-369645.php

Some critters will eat jalapeno seedlings and some won't. It may depend on how hungry they are. Birds seem to be pretty much immune to the effects of hot peppers.

Posted by: KT at June 17, 2017 02:30 PM (BVQ+1)

135 I wanted more sweet corn before it disappears in the Tx heat. I have a bunch in the freezer already. Wife was driving back roads from Corpus and found sweet corn in East Bernard. She bought 12 dozen. Turns out the old guy gave her 13 doz. and most of the bags had more than a dozen ears. I have my work cut out for me. So far 3 dozen are reduced to creamed corn and a pound of butter has disappeared.

Posted by: Dave at Buffalo Roam at June 17, 2017 02:31 PM (aCIQD)

136 Ronster at June 17, 2017 02:22 PM

Good news!

Posted by: KT at June 17, 2017 02:32 PM (BVQ+1)

137 117 HammockPat's flowers. The ones behind her adorable dogs.
Posted by: KT at June 17, 2017 02:09 PM (BVQ+1)
---------
Yep - as far as I can tell that's just like them.

Posted by: Weasel at June 17, 2017 02:33 PM (Sfs6o)

138 Sherpa_K2 at June 17, 2017 02:24 PM

Good luck with those tomatoes!

Posted by: KT at June 17, 2017 02:34 PM (BVQ+1)

139 Weasel at June 17, 2017 02:33 PM

Bearded iris. Would do better with more sun. Divide and/or move plants in late summer, when the weather starts to cool.

Posted by: KT at June 17, 2017 02:38 PM (BVQ+1)

140 this seems to be my purslane ... common purslane

http://tinyurl.com/y8saqn7p

Posted by: illiniwek at June 17, 2017 02:39 PM (O8hcu)

141 Skip at June 17, 2017 02:27 PM

Fantastic.

Posted by: KT at June 17, 2017 02:39 PM (BVQ+1)

142 "Friendly vs. Unfriendly vegetables....discuss."

Posted by: Moron troll from the downstairs thread at June 17, 2017 02:41 PM (E8apb)

143 Illininiwek,

Chickens are a very good start for producing protein on your farmstead. My parent's farm was divided between 5 siblings. Sadly, I was the only one to keep my share. We live in the farmhouse I grew up in. We have a barn, henhouse, and a toolshed. We have a small orchard (apples, pears, and sour cherries). Beyond our rather large garden we have a 5+ acre wood lot, a year round stream, and the rest is divided between pasture and alfalfa.

Life is good on a gravel road. So start small by growing some veggies and next spring buy 4 or 5 chicks. You will do well.

Posted by: colfax mingo at June 17, 2017 02:42 PM (qJ+iT)

144 @135: " I have my work cut out for me. "

Yeah. Wife was at the farmer's market late on Sunday, once. Some vendor had 4 bushels of tomatoes that would not be sellable the next day so she grabbed them, very cheap. I spent two evenings putting up tomato soup. Oh, so nice to pull a quart out of the freezer in March, with grilled cheese....

Posted by: Gordon at June 17, 2017 02:46 PM (dZfVU)

145 illiniwek at June 17, 2017 02:28 PM

I don't think you have been calling them by the wrong names. It's just that people call lots of weeds that pigs eat "pigsweed".

In the comments last week, there is some discussion of the edibility of purslane. People feed it to chickens to increase Omega 3 in eggs.

We have some purslane relatives in our yard that don't look like regular purslane. I have tasted them. They have an alkaline rather than acid flavor. Stick with the ones that have paddle-shaped leaves if you are going to eat them.

Posted by: KT at June 17, 2017 02:46 PM (BVQ+1)

146
"Friendly vs. Unfriendly vegetables....discuss."
Posted by: Moron troll from the downstairs thread


Unfriendly vegetable - The Thing From Another World

Posted by: Bertram Cabot, Jr. at June 17, 2017 02:47 PM (IqV8l)

147 olfax mingo at June 17, 2017 02:42 PM

Sounds great.

Posted by: KT at June 17, 2017 02:48 PM (BVQ+1)

148 Dave at Buffalo Roam at June 17, 2017 02:31 PM

A distinctive project. Thanks for telling us about your creamed corn.

Posted by: KT at June 17, 2017 02:50 PM (BVQ+1)

149 Regretting pulling spaghetti squash plants from compost though, they are going to get out of hand quickly.

Posted by: Skip at June 17, 2017 02:50 PM (Ot7+c)

150 Moron troll from the downstairs thread at June 17, 2017 02:41 PM

Prickly pear cactus can be an unfriendly vegetable. And wear long sleeves when picking okra.

Heh.

Posted by: KT at June 17, 2017 02:52 PM (BVQ+1)

151 Bearded iris. Would do better with more sun. Divide and/or move plants in late summer, when the weather starts to cool.
Posted by: KT at June 17, 2017 02:38 PM (BVQ+1)
---------
Thanks, KT!

Posted by: Weasel at June 17, 2017 02:52 PM (Sfs6o)

152 @143: "Life is good on a gravel road."

Colfax Mingo, I know a guy, raises hogs. He sells his meat at the Farmer's Market in Minneapolis. He put 5 kids through St. Olaf's College doing that. And all 5 are now involved in the business, as are their spouses. Now my guy doesn't have to be up at 4 a.m. on weekends; the boys do the market.

He was grouching one day, about how all the boys have ideas, and they're going to bankrupt him. I said, "Rex, how many farmers do you know who don't have any kids who want the farm? How much that hurts, to see land that's been in the family for generations go under the auction hammer? You have five kids and ALL of them want to work with you."

He looked a bit chagrined, and said "yeah, you're right."

Posted by: Gordon at June 17, 2017 02:53 PM (dZfVU)

153 Skip at June 17, 2017 02:50 PM

No way to leave one and just whack it back to a couple of squash?

Posted by: KT at June 17, 2017 02:53 PM (BVQ+1)

154 I put up a Nyjer sack feeder to try and keep the goldfinches from eating my sunflower leaves. All it has done is attract more goldfinches to the feed who then discover the lovely dessert of sunflower leaves. Oh well. They are cute little birds.

Posted by: keena at June 17, 2017 02:54 PM (RiTnx)

155 My Iris bed is in a morning sun spot, should take them all out, divide them and give them some compost in their soil and turn it over.

Posted by: Skip at June 17, 2017 02:55 PM (Ot7+c)

156 WeirdDave's link to the shade vine is excellent

Re the hacks. Could it be that Jeff Tucker is a Moron?

Posted by: Golfman at June 17, 2017 02:58 PM (r7nZa)

157 this seems to be my purslane ... common purslane
http://tinyurl.com/y8saqn7p
Posted by: illiniwek at June 17, 2017 02:39

That's what I've always called pigweed. Tho, come to think of it I've heard the other weed you pictured called pigweed.
I'm not too far from you, Dixon, IL.

Posted by: Farmer at June 17, 2017 03:00 PM (lfXAE)

158 Gordon,

I couldn't make a living on our 50 odd acres. My wife is a retired 5th grade teacher. I joined up with my best friend who grew up on the neighboring farm and we had a small construction company doing remodeling, repairs, and roofing. We build a few houses over the years from the ground up. Wife and I were frugal during the years we raised our 3 kids who are scattered across Iowa, Illinois, and Indiana. Fortunately, our 7 grandchildren are within a 6 hour drive at the most.

After I retired I decided to raise sheep simply because its our favorite red meat. Dad and mom focused on beef cattle and chicken. There used to be a cannery close by so our farm was diverse with numerous cash crops. I grew up in simpler times (1950s). Life on a gravel road remains simple and quiet. Aging in place is our goal.

Posted by: colfax mingo at June 17, 2017 03:07 PM (qJ+iT)

159
Heh.

Brother sent me a pic of a prickly pear bloom in his yard right before I sauntered over here. He's in northwest Ohio.

I'm in AZ, so have plenty of cacti. We have mostly desert plants, a grapefruit and lemon tree, and three very large Canary Island date palms. Slow growing beasts, but magnificent. Planted in 1960.

Posted by: Love Gun at June 17, 2017 03:10 PM (no0Da)

160 Posted by: colfax mingo at June 17, 2017 03:07 PM (qJ+iT)

That sounds nice.

Posted by: CaliGirl at June 17, 2017 03:10 PM (Ri/rl)

161 Posted by: Farmer at June 17, 2017 03:00 PM (lfXAE)

Around here I hear them call it Mexican lettuce. They told me you can eat the purslane.

The foodies eat it. They also use stinging nettles. The stinging nettles I questioned because I know what those feel like when I accidentally hit one.

They think my arugula is a weed and I'm crazy for eating it.

Posted by: CaliGirl at June 17, 2017 03:17 PM (Ri/rl)

162 It does sound nice. But if I ever get out your way, CaliGirl, I would love to see how you guys do farming. It seems very different from the upper midwestern kind, or the high plains kind where I grew up.

Posted by: Gordon at June 17, 2017 03:19 PM (dZfVU)

163 CaliGirl,

It is nice. And Iowa is not flat, its rolling. :-) California has many beautiful areas, but I got black, rich soil in my blood and will take tornadoes over earthquakes any day.

Posted by: colfax mingo at June 17, 2017 03:19 PM (qJ+iT)

164 That's what I've always called pigweed. Tho, come to think of it I've heard the other weed you pictured called pigweed. I'm not too far from you, Dixon

cool ... I'm near Quincy, but we have the same "Chicago runs the state" problem. The upright amaranthus kind of pigweed gets taller and puts out about a million seeds per plant (maybe slight exaggeration) so I try to pull them when I see them, but some always live in the ditches, fence rows, etc.

Posted by: illiniwek at June 17, 2017 03:20 PM (O8hcu)

165 Posted by: colfax mingo at June 17, 2017 03:07 PM (qJ+iT)

Google Joel Salatin. Not sure that I agree with his politics but he seems to have figured out the small farm.

Posted by: Golfman at June 17, 2017 03:26 PM (r7nZa)

166 Pigweed. The scourge of Roundup Ready. Amarathus species.

Posted by: Golfman at June 17, 2017 03:28 PM (r7nZa)

167 I get picked on a lot for preferring Iowa to the famous mountain states.
Standing at Ballville, in the mountains of Iowa(!), you get an idea of what Satan offered to Christ out in the desert there. I'd have been tempted.
They do sprint cars pretty well, too.

Posted by: Stringer Davis at June 17, 2017 03:30 PM (H5rtT)

168 " couldn't make a living on our 50 odd acres" colfax mingo

One of my concerns is keeping the rural areas vital. a few aggressive (and often loaded with debt) buy up all ground they can find, and farm kids often see little opportunity (that doesn't involve a LOT of hard work) on the homestead.

I saw some article about suburb people trying to form their little community around a small farm interest, in replacement of the golf course community, where the houses look over the fairways. But with livestock can come smells that not everyone likes.

But I see opportunity in the concept. And other ideas for life on fifty acres would include horticultural pursuits, where 20 acres of tillable or pasture is actually a LOT. ... But it would likely require incentives that prioritize keeping farm communities vital.

There are many reasons to keep more rural areas populated by grassroots Americans, as opposed to run by NY hedge fund billionaires hiring third world aliens. Lots of potential, especially since fiber optic internet brings a lot of culture and education right to the farm. ...


Posted by: illiniwek at June 17, 2017 03:31 PM (O8hcu)

169 Golfman,

I have had two conversations with Salatin. I knew about his politics before I contacted him, and found him someone who had crossover interests and very knowledgeable. FWIW, the only thing other music that I appreciated in the 1960s was the small is beautiful concept. All my life I have kept as much as my business as possible within 50 miles of my gravel road (which actually belongs to the township).

Posted by: colfax mingo at June 17, 2017 03:35 PM (qJ+iT)

170 Time to take the dogs out for a jog. May your gardens be fruitful and multiply. There is nothing new under the sun. The pendulum swings. Always stay cocked and locked. If John Browning didn't design it, I will not carry it. And always stay old school.

Posted by: colfax mingo at June 17, 2017 03:38 PM (qJ+iT)

171 "Pigweed. The scourge of Roundup Ready. Amarathus species.

Posted by: Golfman

ha ... yeah. 8 years ago a few weeds were showing resistance to glyphosate. Now there are several that are nearly completely resistant. I used LibertyLink corn this year, and got my revenge. lol
One acre planted with old roundup ready corn ... I spray it directly with 2 quarts "round-up" and the waterhemp literally laughed at me, felt like Little Shop of Horrors. (heh)

Posted by: illiniwek at June 17, 2017 03:44 PM (O8hcu)

172 NoLongerFamous Pat* in Idaho's Treasure Valley:
Last week I put up a magnum opus... this week I have a pie in the oven, to take with me to a board gaming party later. Let me see if I can manage to keep this shorter, by only writing about what's different.

We've had more rain, and cooler weather, than I was expecting, these last 2 weeks. I shouldn't complain!, it will head for the 90's soon enough. Still hoping for a cooler than average summer.

My spinach and Bibb lettuce are trying to bolt, but this cooler weather is letting me prolong the harvest a bit. I know people say I could preserve the spinach by freezing, but I don't like frozen spinach, so I'm just eating all of it fresh. I've pulled out one plant so far.

Two of our wild roses collapsed after heavy winds broke their bases. If the rest of the row (aggressive root-runners) don't start filling in, we can replace them next spring.

The plant that I think is a red penstemon is flowering. One of my 2 lavender 'Provence' looked very sickly, but after the fertilizer, it perked up and has a few small flower stems.

I'm harvesting strawberries. It's annoying having the bird netting on, since I have to stick my head in under it to do my picking - but if I didn't have the netting, I'd have no berries at all.

I've spotted a very few blueberries on my bushes - the Snowpocalypse didn't do those young bushes any good. Definitely have to remember to do the fertilizer regime every year.

By next Saturday I should be harvesting Asian snow peas.

(Other than that, and the usual weeding, I sent in a soup recipe for the Moron Cookbook, helped husband brew a batch of a pre-Prohibition cream ale, and went to the range to practice with a .223 for a carbine event next weekend.)

Posted by: Pat* at June 17, 2017 04:17 PM (qC1ju)

173 103, colfax mingo at June 17, 2017 01:52 PM

My wife, before we were together, had 28 acres and raised sheep. She loves lamb and I cook it whenever we can afford it. Couple of legs, cut in half, in the freezer right now. She'd love eating it daily.


Posted by: geoffb5 at June 17, 2017 04:18 PM (d3wbb)

174 52 Anybody cook prickly pear pads? I ate one of the fruits once. Seems like a lot of work to make sure you get all the tiny little spines out.
Posted by: KT at June 17, 2017 12:59 PM (BVQ+1)

This is the first year I have cactus growing in my garden. It's the kind that grows wild in the Northeast Opuntia Humifusa . I like its vernacular name: devil's tongue! The farmer who gave it to me said to just plant it in full sun and leave it.

I doubt I'll try the pads, but in a couple of years when there is ample fruit, it's supposed to make a nice jelly because these fruits will be smaller and not as sweet as the Mediterranean kind of prickly pear.

Posted by: RondinellaMamma at June 17, 2017 04:23 PM (oQQwD)

175 Was just looking at the spaghetti squash plants and wondered the same thing, keep it cut back and see what happens. They already have lots of flowers.
Getting lots if passing showers today, muggy out too.

Posted by: Skip at June 17, 2017 04:28 PM (Ot7+c)

176 Love Gun at June 17, 2017 03:10 PM

My aunt and uncle had grapefruits and a date palm in Scottsdale. Pollinating the date palm was quite an undertaking, according to the stories I heard. Do people eat the dates from a Canary Island Date Palm?

Posted by: KT at June 17, 2017 05:37 PM (BVQ+1)

177 RondinellaMamma at June 17, 2017 04:23 PM

If I ever knew there was an Eastern prickly pear, I had forgotten. I looked it up. Pretty flowers. Long spines.

Posted by: KT at June 17, 2017 05:50 PM (BVQ+1)

178 Pat* at June 17, 2017 04:17 PM

You're still famous even when you just summarize the things that are different. Glad you didn't die from a spinach overdose. Heh.

Posted by: KT at June 17, 2017 05:52 PM (BVQ+1)

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