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Sunday Morning Book Thread 03-19-2017


Einsiedeln Library_525.jpgEinsiedeln Switzerland Benedictine Monastery Library

Good morning to all you 'rons, 'ettes, lurkers, and lurkettes. Welcome once again to the stately, prestigious, internationally acclaimed and high-class Sunday Morning Book Thread, where men are men, all the 'ettes are hotties, safe spaces are underneath your house and are used as protection against actual dangers, like natural disasters, or a Trump's executive orders, and special snowflakes melt. And unlike other AoSHQ comment threads, the Sunday Morning Book Thread is so hoity-toity, pants are required. Even if it's these pants. Except that the 70s called, and they want their pants back.


“When I began writing The Night Bookmobile, it was a story about a woman's secret life as a reader. As I worked it also became a story about the claims that books place on their readers, the imbalance between our inner and outer lives, a cautionary tale of the seductions of the written word. It became a vision of the afterlife as a library, of heaven as a funky old camper filled with everything you've ever read. What is this heaven? What is it we desire from the hours, weeks, lifetimes we devote to books? What would you sacrifice to sit in that comfy chair with perfect light for an afternoon in eternity, reading the perfect book, forever?”

― Audrey Niffenegger, The Night Bookmobile


And this is the book Ms. Niffenegger wrote. It's actually a graphic novel, which takes bibliophilia to a whole new level:

Audrey Niffenegger, the New York Times bestselling author of The Time Traveler’s Wife and Her Fearful Symmetry, has crafted her first graphic novel after the success of her two critically acclaimed “novels-in-pictures.” First serialized as a weekly column in the UK’s Guardian newspaper, The Night Bookmobile tells the story of a wistful woman who one night encounters a mysterious disappearing library on wheels that contains every book she has ever read. Seeing her history and most intimate self in this library, she embarks on a search for the bookmobile. But her search turns into an obsession, as she longs to be reunited with her own collection and memories.


Next Sunday Is International De-Lurk Day

As of this month, I've been been doing the book thread for five years. It seemed somehow appropriate to make a note of this, and I think the best way to do that is to encourage all you lurkers and lurkettes (and I know you're out there, because I get e-mail from you) to give back what you've been given. That is, if you've enjoyed a book that you first heard about on the book thread, I think you can assume that you might know of a book or two that the rest of us would like to hear about. The value of the book thread is in the comments, where books are recommended, de-recommended, and generally discussed. So the more, the merrier.

So this is what I'd like you lurkers and lurkettes to do:

1. Either read a new book or pick an old one you've already read.

2. Write up a short review, what you liked about it, what you didn't like about it, what worked, what didn't, etc. It doesn't have to be big and fancy, a brief paragraph would be fine.

3. Select an anonymous nick-name ("nic") for yourself, hopefully one that isn't already being used by someone else. And if you've been lurking regularly, you should pretty much know who the regulars are.

4. Post your review under your anonymous nic.

5. You don't have to worry about me asking you to do this again until next year.

And that's all. You don't have to stick around, or reply to comments if you don't want to. After de-lurking, you can certainly re-lurk, and that's fine. And don't worry about what anybody says. After all, we're all morons.

A Forgotten War

I knew that prior to the outbreak of WWII, Mussolini invaded Ethiopia, but I didn't know much else. And then earlier this week, I ran across this BookBub $1.99 special, Prevail: The Inspiring Story of Ethiopia's Victory over Mussolini's Invasion, 1935–1941

It was the war that changed everything, and yet it’s been mostly forgotten: in 1935, Italy invaded Ethiopia. It dominated newspaper headlines and newsreels. It inspired mass marches in Harlem, a play on Broadway, and independence movements in Africa. As the British Navy sailed into the Mediterranean for a white-knuckle showdown with Italian ships, riots broke out in major cities all over the United States.

Italian planes dropped poison gas on Ethiopian troops, bombed Red Cross hospitals, and committed atrocities that were never deemed worthy of a war crimes tribunal. But unlike the many other depressing tales of Africa that crowd book shelves, this is a gripping thriller, a rousing tale of real-life heroism in which the Ethiopians come back from near destruction and win.

So the Ethiopians kicked the fascist Eye-talians in they hiney. That's good to know.

And unfortunately, the BookBub deal is now over. But you can get a used hardback for about $9.

Or, for 99 cents, you can pick up To Abyssinia, Through an Unknown Land: An Account of a Journey Through Unexplored Regions of British East Africa by Lake Rudolf to the Kingdom of Menelek by Chauncey Hugh Stigand, who explored that part of the world in the Victorian era. About this book, Teddy Roosevelt wrote:

"Captain Stigand is one of the most noted of recent African big game hunters and explorers, and he is also a field naturalist of unusual powers. ... Captain Stigand has written a book which ought to appeal to every believer in vigor and hardihood, to every lover of wilderness adventure, and to every man who values at their proper worth the observations of an excellent field naturalist."

Stigand was killed in action in 1919, while fighting to suppress a Sudanese uprising.


Free Books

I hardly ever go to the Reason.com site, because every time I do, I usually end up reading something by Nick Gillespie that just irritates me to no end, and makes me think, "Wow, what a d*ck." So I decided long ago that it's a waste of time to sift through all the irritating crap to find the occasional nugget of gold. Thankfully, CBD did the sifting for me, and came up with a limited time offer from the Cato Institute, to wit, three free books:

Going for Broke: Deficits, Debt, and the Entitlement Crisis

Michael Tanner examines the growing national debt and its dire implications for our future and explains why a looming financial meltdown may be far worse than anyone expects. Many politicians on the left and right know entitlements are unsustainable but fear the consequences of reforming them. In contrast, Tanner offers effective reforms to Social Security, Medicare, and Medicaid—changes that will improve our lives as well as prevent a fiscal meltdown.

I predict that news stories on the national debt will suddenly be popular again.

The Cult of the Presidency

In The Cult of the Presidency, Gene Healy demonstrates how this has become the source of much of our political woe and some of the gravest threats to our liberties, and details how the president’s role needs to return to its properly defined constitutional limits, with its powers held in check by Congress and the courts.

I agree that an unbridled executive is indeed a threat to the republic, and that this has been demonstrated throughout the late 20th and early 21st centuries. Furthermore, I firmly believe that this country does, in fact, need a full discussion of this topic with much debate, followed by a comprehensive set of traditional constitutional limitations reiterated and agreed to by both parties, which should then be scheduled for implementation just after Donald Trump leaves office.

Wait, strike all that. In light of recent events, where an arbitrary judge arbitrarly slapping an arbitrary TRO on PDT's lawful executive order, it's not going to do any good to dismantle the cult of the presidency if all we're going to do is replace it with a cult of the judiciary. How would that be any better? Thomas Jefferson once said.

"The great object of my fear is the Federal Judiciary. That body, like gravity, ever acting with noiseless foot and unalarming advance, gaining ground step by step and holding what it gains, is engulfing insidiously the special governments into the jaws of that which feeds them."
--Thomas Jefferson to Spencer Roane, 1821. ME 15:326

And since I copied this from another source, I must admit I don't know what the reference "ME 15:326" means.

An EO from Trump is out there for everybody to see (thanks to the MSM), while a court decision (a) doesn't get as much publicity and (b) frequently has implications that are only noticeable over the long term. Personally, I'd like to crank it back to 1803 and revisit the whole 'judicial review' thing established by Marbury v. Madison, but that's probably just crazy talk.

Perhaps this book, How to Dethrone the Imperial Judiciary by Edward Vieira, would be more appropriate:

The focal point of the book is the illegitimacy of Lawrence v. Texas, 539 U.S. 558 (2003), whereby the federal courts bullied the State of Texas and other sovereign states decrying their prohibition of sodomy as unconstitutional. Public morality statutes of this sort serve a purpose. Somehow, the right to sodomy was hidden in "the penumbras and emanations" of the Ninth Amendment. All the other previous judges just looked over it apparently. Sarcasm! As Justice Scalia, the voice of reason and dissent has exclaimed, "Day by day, case by case, this court is busy designing a Constitution for a country I do not recognize."

This book was written in 2004. Its protestations against the Lawrence v. Texas decision nowadays would most likely be considered a hate crime. We've changed bigly in just 13 years.


Cato Institutes Pocket Constitution

With over 6 million copies in print, the Cato Institute’s Pocket Constitution—containing both the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution of the United States—is one of the most popular editions available of our nation’s founding documents.

Always good to have these documents handy.

To get these books in pdf, epub, or mobi formats, you need to go to the promotional page and then fill out your e-mail address on a form. Don't know if it actually does anything with your e-mail address, but as soon as you enter it, it displays links to the books.


Books By Morons

Short story author Lisa Mathisen has just released her latest collection, Glimpse vo. 6 (Spirit). The stories in this volume are very spiritually-themed, Christian-oriented. Lisa says "there is some take no prisoners regarding intelligent design, sovereignty of Jesus and pro-life. I think a lot of the conservative morons might like it too."

Lisa also says:

“It is my intention and hope that Christians will find encouragement and fellowship in SPIRIT. The most important thing to remember is you're not walking alone. Everyone has felt the same highs and lows in their Christian walk. Just hang on tight and keep going.”

I've read some of the stories in this volume, and I was surprised at how dusty the room became all of a sudden.

Here is a promo video for this book.

Also available is Ms. Mathisen's last book of short-stories, which I never got around to telling you about when it was first released last November, Glimpse vol. 5 (Creature). Fun stories about animals. I especially liked the one about the honey bee having to get clearance from flight control at the hive to drop off her load of pollen.

Which reminds me of this book, A Bee Is Born by Harald Doering, a book which endlessly fascinated me when I was in grade school. I checked it out of the local library numerous times. Lots of great photographs of bees, including some cool shots from inside the hive. I think Doering, who spent his entire life studying bees, is the scientist who figured out that bees communicate by dancing and wiggling their butts at each other.


___________

I got an e-mail this week from longtime lurker Robert Zimmerman (no, not *that* Robert Zimmerman) who has written about space exploration.


Genesis: The Story of Apollo 8: The First Manned Mission to Another World

It was Christmas Eve 1968. And the astronauts of Apollo 8 - Commander Frank Borman, Jim Lovell, and Bill Anders - were participants in a mission that took them faster (24,000 mph) and farther from the earth (240,000 miles) than any human had ever traveled. Apollo 8 was the mission that broke humanity's absolute bond to the earth: it was the first manned vehicle to leave the earth's orbit. Confined within a tiny spaceship, the astronauts were aided in their journey by a computer less powerful than one of today's handheld calculators. Their mission was not only a triumph of engineering, but also an enduring moment in history. The words these three men spoke from lunar orbit reverberated through American society, changing our culture in ways no one predicted.

Yes, back then, they had to make do with primitive technology, i.e. stuff that was scarcely better than an adept nerd with a slide rule. As such, what the NASA engineers did was absolutely astounding.

Available in pdf, epub, and mobi, for $5.99.

Mr. Zimmerman is also the author of a policy paper, Capitalism in Space: Private Enterprise and Competition Reshape the Global Aerospace Launch Industry, which makes a number of recommendations for any American space program. He likes more capitalism, and less government interference. He says:

Make sure especially that you take a look at my announcement post, presently at the top of the page at Behind the Black (http://behindtheblack.com/). The table from "Capitalism in Space" that I post there is devastating to the pork-laden SLS/Orion project pushed by Congress. Private space has produced 10 times the rockets/spacecraft in half the time for about a quarter the price.

And what a big surprise that is.


___________

And another lurking moron author, Jerry Jay Caroll, has resurfaced with a new novel, The Horror Writer:

Horror writer Thom Hearn runs a fiction factory that pumps out bestsellers like Jimmy Dean does sausages. He’s got fame and fortune, but where’s the respect? He’s a sensitive guy and it hurts nobody admits they read the books or see the movies except dumb teenagers. Then he gets invited to a conference for big shots. His ego is soothed until he’s told somebody made a big mistake. And then characters from his books begin showing up. The homicidal maniac wants to kill him…slowly.

Mr. Carroll used to be a journalist, but I don't hold it against him. He reported for the SF Chronicle, the newspaper I used to read when I was growing up in the SF Bay Area. I actually remember seeing his by-line back in the day, so when his e-mail showed up in my inbox, I knew exactly who he was. I guess that makes us kind of like blood brothers, or something.

He is also the author of Inhuman Beings (which has been described as a cross between Raymond Chandler and Philip K. Dick) and Top Dog, which is about a Wall Street shark who awakes one day and finds himself in the body of a dog and caught up in the cosmic battle of Good vs. Evil. Kind of a Kafka/Tolkien mash-up.


___________

Moron author naturalfake announces that after much hassle, his comic novel 'Wearing the Cat - The Complete Novel' (the hilarious misadventures of a satyritic naval dentist) has been published as a paperback, in two volumes:

Wearing the Cat - Vol. 1
Wearing the Cat - Vol. 2


___________

Don't forget the AoSHQ reading group on Goodreads. It's meant to support horde writers and to talk about the great books that come up on the book thread. It's called AoSHQ Moron Horde and the link to it is here: https://www.goodreads.com/group/show/175335-aoshq-moron-horde.

___________

So that's all for this week. As always, book thread tips, suggestions, bribes, rumors, threats, and insults may be sent to OregonMuse, Proprietor, AoSHQ Book Thread, at the book thread e-mail address: aoshqbookthread, followed by the 'at' sign, and then 'G' mail, and then dot cee oh emm.

What have you all been reading this week? Hopefully something good, because, as you all know, life is too short to be reading lousy books.

Posted by: OregonMuse at 08:55 AM




Comments

(Jump to bottom of page)

1 Tolle lege

Posted by: Skip at March 19, 2017 08:54 AM (GPaiX)

2 I would love my own pimped out Bookmobile with leopard interior and faux zebra reading chairs. Lots of oversized art books and cheezerific paperbacks.

Oh wait, that's my living room!

Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at March 19, 2017 08:57 AM (EnKk6)

3 Finished book 15 of Thomas Carlyle's History of Frederick II which finished the War of Austrian Succession or Silesia and onto book 16 which covers the peace until the start of the 7 years war starting in Sept 1756. Thought of starting in the beginning ( stated with book 13) but in history you can do that. Wife was reading a little and thought his style is very wordy but we are not sure if its a Victorian era thing or personal.

Posted by: Skip at March 19, 2017 09:00 AM (GPaiX)

4 While looking for some new reading material and paruing Louis L'Amour titles I ran across this one, the The Kilkenny Series Bundle. It was a complete three book combined set of the Kilkenny series for $14. I said "good deal" and picked it up. But lo, they did not put the books in chronological order in the anthology. So if you get this book (and it is good) save the first book for last. It works a lot better that way.


http://tinyurl.com/lfhjhmw

Posted by: Vic We Have No Party at March 19, 2017 09:00 AM (mpXpK)

5
Off topic -- House Speaker Paul Ryan on Fox News Sunday. On now in Pennsylvania. If there's anything new or important I'll mention. For now it sounds like he's bringing a vote to floor this week.

Posted by: E Depluribus Unum at March 19, 2017 09:00 AM (ZFUt7)

6 t's Sunday, March 19, Earth Hour (turn your lights off between 8:30 and 9:30 p.m. to aid the planet)

Just in case your reading a book, get a candle for that hour of darkness.

Posted by: Colin at March 19, 2017 09:01 AM (DLV/d)

7 I’m reading “Young Frankenstein: the story of the Making of the Film” by Mel Brooks (Melvin James Kaminsky).
Mel saw James Whale’s Frankenstein as a young lad and was terrified. That night, a sweltering one in Williamsburg Brooklyn, he insisted that they keep the windows closed. “If you leave the windows open, Frankenstein will eat me!”
My mother said, “OK, let’s talk about this. First of all, the monster lives in Romania, in Transylvania. Romania is not near the ocean. He’s going to have to get to Odessa. He’s going to have to go a long way to get a boat. Then he has to have money to pay for his passage. He may not have any money if he’s a monster. He may not have pockets. Let’s say he makes his way to Odessa and he gets on a boat to America. The boat may go to Miami. It may go to Baltimore. If it does go to New York and he gets off there, he may not know the subway system. If he finds the BMT and he gets to Brooklyn, he doesn’t know out street. Let’s say he does find our street. But remember, the people on the first floor have their window open. He is not going to climb way up. If he’s hungry, he’s going to eat whoever’s on the first floor.”

Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at March 19, 2017 09:01 AM (EnKk6)

8 >>>Einsiedeln Switzerland Benedictine Monastery Library

Yeah, baby! A library with non-Euclidian geometry.

Posted by: H. P. Lovecraft at March 19, 2017 09:02 AM (W8bn5)

9 Love the architectural of these libraries

Posted by: Skip at March 19, 2017 09:02 AM (GPaiX)

10 Did not know this: Mel knew Gene Wilder from Broadway (Gene and Anne Bancroft were in a play together). They worked together on The Producers but when Mel wrote Blazing Saddles he envisioned a crusty, leathery veteran to play the Waco Kid, not Gene, and cast Gig Young. His agent assured them that Gig was completely over his alcohol problem, but when they hung him upside down in the jail cell scene, “green stuff started spewing out of his mouth” and they rushed him to the hospital. With Gig in no shape to do the film, Mel called Gene to commiserate. Gene, who had read the script six months earlier, said “Mel, I know every line”, came in for wardrobe that Saturday, did one rehearsal on Sunday, and started shooting on Monday, “and was the perfect Waco Kid!”

Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at March 19, 2017 09:02 AM (EnKk6)

11 The value of the book thread is in the comments, where books are
recommended, de-recommended, and generally discussed. So the more, the
merrier.



THis has always been my favorite thread. Sometimes I miss it because of other tings but I do try to make every one.

Posted by: Vic We Have No Party at March 19, 2017 09:02 AM (mpXpK)

12 It was meant to be. Gene Wilder: “Mike Medavoy, who was my agent at the time, said ‘Is there anything for you, Peter Boyle, and Marty Feldman?’ I said, ‘What made you think of that combination?’ He says, ‘Because now I handle you, Peter, and Marty.’” Gene showed him the script to Young Frankenstein and “Mike Medavoy said ‘I think I can sell this. What do you think about Mel directing?’ I said ‘I’d love it, but you’re whistling Dixie, because he won’t direct something he didn’t conceive of.’”

Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at March 19, 2017 09:03 AM (EnKk6)

13 My book over the past few weeks is 1777: Tipping Point at Saratoga by Dean Snow. He isn't a professional historian (an anthropologist actually) and goes over the events from that perspective. Not very much in the way of military strategy and tactics, but quite a bit on the lives of the people who were involved. It's written in an interesting narrative style that makes it a lot less dry than typical history books. I rather liked it.

Posted by: VA GOP Sucks at March 19, 2017 09:05 AM (2VN2E)

14 Been reading Resilience by Eric Greitens. Greitens is a former SEAL and the book is a collection of letters he wrote to another former SEAL who had fallen into alcoholism. Pretty good so far.

Also reading Night by Elie Weisel. It's pretty short but it doesn't feel like it.

Posted by: Nigel West Dickens at March 19, 2017 09:05 AM (FqgrG)

15
Ryan doesn't dispute $14, 600 a year insurance cost for 64 year old.

'Looking at' changing. Considering current average social security payment of $12, 000 a year for early retirement beneficiaries, something is not going to happen.

Posted by: E Depluribus Unum at March 19, 2017 09:05 AM (ZFUt7)

16 Personally, I'd like to crank it back to 1803 and revisit the whole 'judicial review' thing established by Marbury v. Madison, but that's probably just crazy talk.


Which is why only an Art V convention can stop this shit out side of an armed revolution.

Posted by: Vic We Have No Party at March 19, 2017 09:06 AM (mpXpK)

17 I struggled yesterday to convert some Kindle books to EPUB...should be easy, but I didn't know the latest Kindle format doesn't easily convert. So I ordered the cheapest Kindle reader...Then I won't waste hours doing something that should be easy....even using Epubor...

Posted by: Colin at March 19, 2017 09:06 AM (DLV/d)

18 Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at March 19, 2017 09:01 AM (EnKk6)

Love that.

Excellent Mom-fu!

Posted by: naturalfake at March 19, 2017 09:07 AM (9q7Dl)

19 I remember reading Top Dog. That's a good book. I had no idea Mr. Carroll was a lurking moron here.

Posted by: Trimegistus at March 19, 2017 09:08 AM (/LtyJ)

20 So the Ethiopians kicked the fascist Eye-talians in they hiney. That's good to know.

I don't mean to be flippant, but why would Mussolini want to invade them in the first place? Are there natural resources there?

Posted by: Steve and Cold Bear at March 19, 2017 09:09 AM (W8bn5)

21 Einsiedeln Switzerland Benedictine Monastery Library

Pretty impressive digs for monks.

Posted by: E Depluribus Unum at March 19, 2017 09:10 AM (ZFUt7)

22 Yay, Book Thread!

I finished Gaskell's Wives and Daughters last week, and enjoyed it all the way through. It ends abruptly- the author died before the last chapter was written- but the editor gives a reasonable ending for the story.

I've just started Simon Baker's Ancient Rome, because I'm filling a gap in my education. This isn't the greatest book- I think it was published by someone associated with the BBC and therefore makes a point of alluding to 'proper' European (read: leftist) thought. But it's a good basic resource and cost me a dollar, I think.

The writing is going well. I hit 100,000 words this morning, and I think about 85,000 of them are usable.

Link to the book: https://www.amazon.com/ Garia-Cycle-Kingdom-Glass-ebook/dp/B06XC9X5R4/ref =sr_1_1?ie=UTF8qid=1489929311s r=8-1keywords =the+garia+cycle+a+kingdom+of+glass

(remove spaces) I'm currently working on the sequel and planning to have a Createspace (printed) edition available in the next few weeks.

Posted by: right wing yankee at March 19, 2017 09:12 AM (26lkV)

23 Did not know this: Mel knew Gene Wilder from Broadway (Gene and Anne Bancroft were in a play together). They worked together on The Producers but when Mel wrote Blazing Saddles he envisioned a crusty

Here is the measure of how retarded drunk I am: I read this and was puzzled because I kept thinking "Mel Gibson? I didn't know he was involved with Blazing Saddles".

Posted by: Steve and Cold Bear at March 19, 2017 09:13 AM (W8bn5)

24 "Satyritic naval dentist"...thought NGU was Jewish.

Posted by: BignJames at March 19, 2017 09:14 AM (x9c8r)

25 I always have tabs open to my local library when reading the estimable Book Thread. Just added Audrey Neffineger's "The Night Bookmobile". Thanks, OM!

Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at March 19, 2017 09:14 AM (EnKk6)

26
Here is the measure of how retarded drunk I am: I read this and was puzzled because I kept thinking "Mel Gibson? I didn't know he was involved with Blazing Saddles".
Posted by: Steve and Cold Bear at March 19, 2017 09:13 AM (W8bn5)
---
Wouldn't it be hilarious if Mel G. really was a self-loathing Jew?

Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at March 19, 2017 09:15 AM (EnKk6)

27 Yay book thread!!!!

Delurk day sounds great! I hope NSA Bob joins in.

The Horror Writer sounds like a great premise - I wanna read it.

Posted by: @votermom @vm pimping great books usually free or sale at March 19, 2017 09:16 AM (Om16U)

28 Asta la vista, baby.

Posted by: Audrey Niffenegger at March 19, 2017 09:17 AM (W8bn5)

29 Musso invaded Ethiopia because the Italians got handed their asses there in 1896, at the Battle of Adowa. He figured that after beating (kinda) the Austro-Hungarian Empire in WWI, Italy could handle a bunch of Ethiopians. Trouble was, Ethiopia is brutally harsh terrain for attackers: it's on top of a plateau, virtually a fortress country. And the Ethiopians never were slouches at warfare; they managed to remain a Christian kingdom despite being surrounded by Muslim states by virtue of their superior ass-kicking skills.

Now, it should be noted that Fascist Italy actually did win that war against Ethiopia in 1935-36. It took a joint British-Ethiopian operation to kick them out in 1941, when Musso had other fish to fry in the Mediterranean and no way to resupply his army in Ethiopia.

Posted by: Trimegistus at March 19, 2017 09:18 AM (/LtyJ)

30 I find reading about Mussolini as interesting as reading about any other dictator. Anyone have any good titles that sort out the life he lived and how he got where he did?

Posted by: Colin at March 19, 2017 09:20 AM (DLV/d)

31 "Hitler's Hangman"--the story of Reinhard Heydrich. One of history's nastiest guys. Excellent with insights of Germany at the times.

Posted by: Libra at March 19, 2017 09:20 AM (u0gU9)

32 Good morning fellow Book Threadists. Love that library photo, especially those curved shelves. Maybe if you are celibate, carpentry helps fill the time.

Posted by: JTB at March 19, 2017 09:20 AM (V+03K)

33 Oooh! Freebies!

Some stuff for when the book thread winds up later -
Moron Fishbreath has a a new book that looks like an Indiana Jones type adventure. Great cover. AND he was giving away free his mil-SF book We Sail Off to War with a Smashwords coupon - I'm not sure if it still works but check it out.

And two great freebies on my blog today from Henry Vogel.
One is a read-aloud kids book, the other is a trilogy-in-one of SciFi space adventure in the pulpy mode. This has an AWESOME cover btw, very golden-age style.

Remember to go get your copies when the book thread dies down.

these are all on my blog (see my nic)

Posted by: @votermom @vm pimping great books usually free or sale at March 19, 2017 09:21 AM (Om16U)

34 Listened to the first Bulldog Drummond book on Librivox this week. The blurb at the beginning said nothing about the plot, just that the book was full of attitudes and opinions that were not considered correct in modern times. Naturally, the story was hilarious (lots of action and adventure) and I bought a compilation on Kindle. It reminded me very much of Agatha Christie's Secret Adversary which was probably written around the same time.

Also bought an inexpensive compilation of early Simon Templar stories. They were fun and the biographical information about Charteris was very interesting. He was clearly An Odd and *hated* grey goo writing.

Posted by: Polliwog the 'Ette at March 19, 2017 09:24 AM (sEDyY)

35 OM, Thanks for another book thread and happy fifth anniversary. Already ordered that Chauncy Stigand book. I love that period's tales of exploration. It will be interesting to compare it to H. Rider Haggard stories as a non-fiction aspect.

Posted by: JTB at March 19, 2017 09:24 AM (V+03K)

36 Did not know this: Mel knew Gene Wilder from Broadway (Gene and Anne Bancroft were in a play together). They worked together on The Producers but when Mel wrote Blazing Saddles he envisioned a crusty, leathery veteran to play the Waco Kid, not Gene, and cast Gig Young.

Brooks actually offered the part of the Waco Kid to John Wayne first, who said that he couldn't do it because the script was too vulgar and it would kill his career. However, the Duke added, he'd be "first in line" to see the picture.

So Gig Young was second choice and the rest is history.

Posted by: Mary Poppins' Practically Perfect Piercing at March 19, 2017 09:25 AM (xoU17)

37 Stumbled across this book from 1897. Historically it shows that there were more than one or two female authors in the past. It also shows through its selection criteria and actual selections, how fleeting even a glimmer of literary fame is.

Women Novelists of Queen Victoria's Reign
http://www.gutenberg.org/files/36641/36641-h/36641-h.htm

Also learned a new word - lupanar*

*Latin for brothel. Pompeii is known for preserve ones like the Grande Lupanare.

Posted by: Anna Puma at March 19, 2017 09:26 AM (DotZb)

38 Recommended here awhile back, I read The One Man by Andrew Gross. This is an excellent thriller. The story is about sending a man into Aushwitz to bring out one man, a Polish physicist who has the key to separating U-235 from U-238 which is necessary to build an atomic bomb. A well-written, face-paced story.

I also read Cross The Line by James Patterson. This is another in the Detective Alex Cross series. This had Cross battling ex-special forces vigilantes out to set America right again by killing drug dealers and human trafficers. A very good, light read.

Posted by: Zoltan at March 19, 2017 09:26 AM (ApkN7)

39 I cannot imagine The Duke in Blazing Saddles. That's too Meta even for me.

Although look at the top tier former leading men in the Airport movies. Their deadpan delivery made it work.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at March 19, 2017 09:29 AM (EnKk6)

40
I don't mean to be flippant, but why would Mussolini want to invade them in the first place? Are there natural resources there?
Posted by: Steve and Cold Bear at March 19, 2017 09:09 AM (W8bn5)

===

Mussolini had no political or strategic objectives. He was looking for an easy knock-off to make a demonstration of Italian military prowess that would establish some credibility with his base and especially with Germany.

Mussolini had been in power since 1922 and did not have much in the way of military spoils to show for it, while Hitler held Tyrol and had retaken the Rhineland.


Posted by: San Franpsycho at March 19, 2017 09:29 AM (EZebt)

41 Rereading "Starship Trooper". I tend to read it when get into these debates about building the perfect society. Trump is trying to get policies that work, and the Dem's are screaming that it is not perfect. Like their utopiaian ideas are wonderfull. The world goverment that Heinlein created in this book is pretty dam sweet, in my oponion.

Posted by: paladin at March 19, 2017 09:29 AM (Utogx)

42 Also learned a new word - lupanar*

*Latin for brothel. Pompeii is known for preserve ones like the Grande Lupanare.


Probably related to lupa "she-wolf" as a term for prostitutes.

Yeah, the wolf what suckled Romulus and Remus may not have had four legs...

Posted by: Grey Fox at March 19, 2017 09:30 AM (bZ7mE)

43 I'll recommend Columbus Day, Expeditionary Force Book 1. Highly entertaining sci-fi story.

Posted by: JT in KC at March 19, 2017 09:30 AM (LDGyt)

44 "Lupanar" sounds like the name of a country (!) in a fantasy world.

The Forbidden Valley of Lupanar. It kind of writes itself.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at March 19, 2017 09:31 AM (EnKk6)

45 Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at March 19, 2017 09:01 AM (EnKk6)

Somehow I suspect that exchange pretty much explains everything about Brooks. His mom sounds like a very unusual woman.

Posted by: Polliwog the 'Ette at March 19, 2017 09:32 AM (sEDyY)

46 So the leader of Lupanar is named Luap Nor?

Posted by: Anna Puma at March 19, 2017 09:32 AM (DotZb)

47 I finally started reading the copy of Meditations by Marcus Aurelius that I borrowed from the library. This is an abridged pocket volume with an informative intro and a few footnotes.

I don't know how to describe reading it except to say that I am blown away. What blows me away is knowing that MA was writing this in his tent in the wilds of Eastern Europe, defending Rome from barbarians, in the last years of his life, away from his family, his son & heir a wastrel.

It reads like cognitive therapy. It also feels so familiar. Some of it moves me to tears thinking of what he must have been going through as he wrote it.

Is it possible for a middle-aged29 year-old unemployed housewife to find a kindred spirit in a 2000 years dead Roman Emperor?

Posted by: @votermom @vm pimping great books usually free or sale at March 19, 2017 09:33 AM (Om16U)

48 Mussolini had no political or strategic objectives. He was looking for an easy knock-off to make a demonstration of Italian military prowess that would establish some credibility with his base and especially with Germany.

Had Musso been smart enough to pull a Franco and stay out of Hitler's embrace, offering up aid to the Axis and Allies, he might have been able to survive the war.

Posted by: Mary Poppins' Practically Perfect Piercing at March 19, 2017 09:34 AM (xoU17)

49 Not too much 'serious' reading this week. (Harumph! Harrumph!) I did start the introductions to Ovid's Metamorphoses and Montaigne's Essays.

I made the mistake of starting Louis L'Amour's "To Tame A Land". Typical L'Amour story from the mid-1960s but, like most of his books, difficult to put down. I always feel I can better track in the wilderness and my fast draw is a little faster after reading one of his stories. (Fortunately, I don't have to prove it.)

Posted by: JTB at March 19, 2017 09:34 AM (V+03K)

50 Never heard much about Mussolini growing up. All I remember is he "made the trains run on time". Didn't know he had been in power so long...I have a couple of YouTube videos about him saved on DVD...He sure came to a quick end in 1945!

Posted by: Colin at March 19, 2017 09:35 AM (DLV/d)

51 Il Duce when it came to strategic political thinking was Il Dunce.

In Ethiopia in order to 'win,' the Italians resorted to chemical warfare.

For further reading on the subject, there is The Man Called Brown Condor: The Forgotten History of an African American Fighter Pilot by Thomas E. Simmons.

https://www.amazon.com/Man-Called-Brown-Condor-Forgotten/dp/162087217X

Posted by: Anna Puma at March 19, 2017 09:37 AM (DotZb)

52 My new book for the next couple of weeks is Cecil B. DeMille: The Art of the Hollywood Epic, by Cecila DeMille Presley (CB's granddaughter) and Hollywood historian Mark Viera.

This thing, appropriately enough, weighs a ton and is stuffed with full-page pictures from, so far as I can tell, nearly all of DeMille's movies. I can't write about film like TheJamesMadison, sadly, but I'll come up with a short review when I'm finished.

Posted by: Mary Poppins' Practically Perfect Piercing at March 19, 2017 09:39 AM (xoU17)

53 I have a couple of YouTube videos about him saved on DVD...He sure came to a quick end in 1945!
Posted by: Colin at March 19, 2017 09:35 AM (DLV/d)
---
Don't leave us hanging. What did they do to him?

Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at March 19, 2017 09:40 AM (EnKk6)

54 This week I finished "The Nowhere Man," by Gregg Hurwitz. Can't. Recommend. Highly. Enough. Apparently, lots of other folks think so as well judging from the blurbs at the end of the book. In his acknowledgements, Hurwitz writes that Evan Smoak (the main character in the "Orphan X" series) looks forward to a long relationship with all those folks.

Evan Smoak is a cross between James Bond and MacGyver with incredible logic woven throughout. That the president of the United States wants this once-valuable asset neutralized tells you a lot about the assignments Smoak and his fellow "orphans" were tasked with.

Posted by: SandyCheeks at March 19, 2017 09:40 AM (joFoi)

55 Meanwhile in Hell, Benito and Saddam are trading stories.

Posted by: Anna Puma at March 19, 2017 09:41 AM (DotZb)

56 Had Musso been smart enough to pull a Franco and stay out of Hitler's embrace, offering up aid to the Axis and Allies, he might have been able to survive the war.
Posted by: Mary Poppins' Practically Perfect Piercing at March 19, 2017 09:34 AM (xoU17)

===

Hitler modeled his 1923 Beer Hall Putsch on Mussolini's successful March on Rome the year before. When Hitler first came to power, he looked up to Mussolini, was very solicitous, and thought of himself as the junior partner. The mess in Ethiopia and Hitler's record of success in international affairs changed all that by 1936.

Posted by: San Franpsycho at March 19, 2017 09:42 AM (EZebt)

57 Anna @ 37- That sounds pretty neat. I'm downloading it now.

Posted by: right wing yankee at March 19, 2017 09:43 AM (26lkV)

58 Now that I've finished Nowhere Man, I'm back to Joe R. Lansdale's "Rusty Puppy." This is the latest in the "Hap and Leonard" series. So far, so good.

My library also had the first season of "Hap and Leonard," which airs on the Sundance Channel (which I don't have). I binge watched all six episodes this weekend. It's way darker than the jocular tone set in the books. It was disconcerting to see the main characters' personas so different than I had put them in books, but alas and alack, that's the beauty of books, where you're in charge of casting and direction!

Posted by: SandyCheeks at March 19, 2017 09:46 AM (joFoi)

59 Mussolini > MTA, because at least he had the ability to keep the trains running on time.

Posted by: Steve and Cold Bear at March 19, 2017 09:47 AM (W8bn5)

60 Don't forget your local VA hospital for dropping off books for the vets to read.

Posted by: artisanal 'ette at March 19, 2017 09:48 AM (0mz2+)

61 For a second, I thought that was a Moron's library!

Posted by: josephistan at March 19, 2017 09:49 AM (ANIFC)

62 More on YF (sorry, it's fascinating to me): Teri Garr ("My God, what knockers!!") originally went in for the part of Elizabeth, Herr Dokter Frankenstein's flighty fiancee, but of course the incomparable Madelyn Kahn was the only choice. She was offered the part of Inga if she could do a German accent.

Teri was a dancer on Cher's variety hour show, and Cher's wig wrangler was a Cherman lady mit very thick accent, so Teri chatted with her for hours to get it down pat. She went in the next day in a fuzzy pink sweater with a very very padded bra and Renata's guttural stylings and got the part.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at March 19, 2017 09:49 AM (EnKk6)

63 Don't leave us hanging. What did they do to him?

Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at March 19, 2017 09:40 AM (EnKk6)

Wasn't he kind of left hanging at the end!

Posted by: Colin at March 19, 2017 09:50 AM (DLV/d)

64 ME stands for Memorial Edition, which is an imprint of the 20 Volume Lipscomb-Berg Edition (1903-07) of the works of Thomas Jefferson.

Posted by: CAR at March 19, 2017 09:50 AM (eC07c)

65 (lurk mode off)
Finished Console Wars by Blake Harris and Luci and Desi by Warren Harris (a strange coincidence - they aren't related). The former is a look at the rivalry between Sega and Nintendo in the 80s and early 90s, and the later is about the famously tumultuous relationship between, well, Lucy and Desi. Both were great and worth a read.
(lurk mode on)

Posted by: Joseph Dickerson at March 19, 2017 09:52 AM (LDV7V)

66 34 ... Polliwog, You are in BIG trouble! How dare you mention those Bulldog Drummond books and audio stuff. I love the mystery and adventure stories from that period. Now I have to get them (glad they are inexpensive) and add them to the 'to be read soon' list. Sigh!

Oh well. One of the many dangers of the weekly Book Thread. If it was daily, we would all be broke.

Posted by: JTB at March 19, 2017 09:54 AM (V+03K)

67 In the midst of Carrier Pilot by Norman Hanson. His memoirs as a Royal Navy aviator in WWII. As the Brits would say, a cracking good read.

Posted by: Notorious BFD at March 19, 2017 09:55 AM (Tyii7)

68 I think I've found an image of the guardian angel for all us literary Morons

http://www.gutenberg.org/files/39626/39626-h/images/i_002.jpg

The book can be found here with more illustrations and written in whimsical verse.

http://www.gutenberg.org/files/39626/39626-h/39626-h.htm

Posted by: Anna Puma at March 19, 2017 09:55 AM (DotZb)

69 Speaking of dearly departed Chuck Berry, I don't think a part of Back to the Future could be shown today, as it shows that Berry's original musical stylngs were actually resulting from a time traveling white dude.

Posted by: goatexchange at March 19, 2017 09:55 AM (YFnq5)

70 You can't fool us. You're trying to trick us in comparing Trump to Mussolini because that wouldn't be as effective as comparing him to Hitler. Sorry, not biting.

Posted by: MSM at March 19, 2017 09:56 AM (W8bn5)

71 I think Barakhenaten had the Benito chin tilt down better.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at March 19, 2017 09:57 AM (EnKk6)

72 This book was written in 2004. Its protestations against the Lawrence v. Texas decision nowadays would most likely be considered a hate crime. We've changed bigly in just 13 years.

Yep. Even if they agree with the outcome, the liberals have sold their birthright for a mess of pottage. When an outright Caesar appoints his own compliant judges, where will they hide, "the laws all being flat"?

Posted by: Grump928(C) at March 19, 2017 09:57 AM (LTHVh)

73
Reading Dutch Leonard's "Pronto" again. My memory of the Raylan Givens character was that he was quite different on the page compared to the Olyphant's version on the TV show.

Yep. Definitely different characters, both of them great, but no mistaking the differences. TV Raylan is a lot more competent, modern......and kind of a slob. Book Raylan isn't any of those things.

Posted by: IllTemperedCur at March 19, 2017 09:57 AM (cuZZW)

74 Speaking of dearly departed Chuck Berry, I don't think a part of Back to the Future could be shown today, as it shows that Berry's original musical stylngs were actually resulting from a time traveling white dude.

Posted by: goatexchange


I'd be happy to star in the remake. And to build the actual time machine.

Posted by: Neil DeGrasse Tyson at March 19, 2017 09:58 AM (W8bn5)

75 Oh, and 'Yay Book Thread!' also, i finally started to write about my grandfather. I finished (I think) the prologue. It's very hard to write - why didn't any of you warn me? I mean, i write every day, all day, at work. but NOW i have to make it, you know, interesting!

Off to visit some re-enactors today at sleeting, freezing rain Jamestown. Included are some portraying members of the 51st Engineer Combat Battalion - one of the units under the Group my grandfather commanded. should be fascinating.

Posted by: goatexchange at March 19, 2017 09:59 AM (YFnq5)

76 I recently picked up a book on WWII in Ethiopia - "Bare feet and Bandoliers" by David Shirreff. Haven't had a chance to read it yet. The book I really want to get is "The Two Thousand Mile War" by W.E. Crosskill. It's a history of WWII in all of East Africa - Somalia, Kenya & Ethiopia.

Posted by: josephistan at March 19, 2017 10:00 AM (ANIFC)

77 Although look at the top tier former leading men in the Airport movies. Their deadpan delivery made it work.
Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at March 19, 2017 09:29 AM (EnKk6)
---
AIRPLANE!, not airport.

More coffee.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at March 19, 2017 10:01 AM (EnKk6)

78 OT: Major 'The Walking Dead' character will come out as gay Sunday.

I've never seen the show and only have vague notions as to what it's about, but I suppose I should rummage around for my shocked face.

Posted by: Notorious BFD at March 19, 2017 10:02 AM (Tyii7)

79 OT: Major 'The Walking Dead' character will come out as gay Sunday.
----
Surely not Darryl.

If so, will he wear assless chaps?

Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at March 19, 2017 10:03 AM (EnKk6)

80 So that is why Darryl 'likes' the cross-bow....

Posted by: Anna Puma at March 19, 2017 10:03 AM (DotZb)

81 John is proficient.

Posted by: grammar Nazi Chuck Berry at March 19, 2017 10:04 AM (W8bn5)

82 Posted by: goatexchange at March 19, 2017 09:59 AM (YFnq5)

That's great! You are part of my #WritesOfMarch movement now.

I got lazy about blogging that but I am still doing it.

Posted by: @votermom @vm pimping great books usually free or sale at March 19, 2017 10:05 AM (Om16U)

83 I love the look of physical books but since I got my iPad I only read from Kindle because I can tailor the font and size to suit me.

It gets expensive buying in both formats so now I read a book first and then decide whether it's good enough to go on the shelf.

Posted by: Decaf at March 19, 2017 10:05 AM (Tm3Ti)

84 Good Sunday morning, horde! Trying to read the content but my husband won't stop talking to me.

Posted by: April at March 19, 2017 10:05 AM (e8PP1)

85 I guess it might be Daryl.
*sigh*

Posted by: @votermom @vm pimping great books usually free or sale at March 19, 2017 10:06 AM (Om16U)

86
I'd be happy to star in the remake. And to build the actual time machine.

Posted by: Neil DeGrasse Tyson at March 19, 2017 09:58 AM (W8bn5)








That ride SUCKS.

Posted by: Frito Pendejo at March 19, 2017 10:06 AM (cuZZW)

87 Can't be Darryl. All the female fans are in love with him. They'd lose half their viewers.

Posted by: josephistan at March 19, 2017 10:07 AM (ANIFC)

88 I picked a copy of PG Wodehouse golf stories off the shelf last week. Mrs. JTB can tell when I'm reading it because of the giggling and laughter filling the air every few minutes. I can't really swing a golf club anymore but I sure understand the attitudes in his books.

The unfortunate aspect is I went back to the book shelves and boxed up all my other Wodehouse books to see what I have. I foresee many more coming home in the near future.

Posted by: JTB at March 19, 2017 10:08 AM (V+03K)

89 I'm reading James Shapiro's "1599-A Year in the life of William Shakespeare"

Shapiro's approach, given the now century-long dearth of significant new Shakespearian biographical discoveries, is to delve into the world around Shaespeare and how it directly related to his life and work.

It's refreshing breath of fresh air from the endless stream of purely speculative books about the Bard.

As one example of Shapior's methodology: Shakespeare worked in London but his family was back in Stratford, a 3-day journey at the time. How often did he visit his family and hometown? At what times of the year was this travel possible? Who did he rent his horse from and at what inns did he stay along the way? What did he do when he was in Stratford? Shapiro found out, and he can tell us.

By rejecting what has become a speculation-based Bard book industry and focusing on facts (and the attendant educated guesses we can make from them) that can still be unearthed, Shapiro opened up a whole new and fascinating chapter in Shakespearian scholarship.





Posted by: WhatWhatWhat? at March 19, 2017 10:08 AM (ul9CR)

90 #uglypants

My life may be so discombobulated that I never get to read books...

...and rarely even get to read the book thread post, much less the comments...

...but there's always time to click on the ugly pants link.

Didn't Goldie Hawn wear those pants on Laugh-In?

.

.

.

Just how does one become combobulated?

Posted by: mindful webworker - what, me read? at March 19, 2017 10:09 AM (PukHz)

91 You just want to 'Sock it to' Goldie Hawn, admit it...

Posted by: Anna Puma at March 19, 2017 10:10 AM (DotZb)

92 The operation by German special forces to break Mussolini out of prison was evidence to me that Hitler maintained sometype of loyalty friendship with El Duce. Just a theory.

Posted by: Sebastian Melmoth at March 19, 2017 10:10 AM (IDPbH)

93 OK, think I'll try to get some work done. See you all tomorrow.

Posted by: Mary Poppins' Practically Perfect Piercing at March 19, 2017 10:11 AM (xoU17)

94 There's a nice essay by Luigi Barzini (an Italian journalist who knew EVERYONE in prewar Europe) about how disconcerting it was to read British and American news stories about Italy: the trains ran on time, the army was huge and well-trained, the economy was booming, the leader was beloved. Then he looked out his window and saw nothing of the kind.

The trains NEVER ran on time.

Posted by: Trimegistus at March 19, 2017 10:12 AM (/LtyJ)

95 I recently picked up a book on WWII in Ethiopia - "Bare feet and Bandoliers" by David Shirreff.

Is there nothing feet can't accomplish? Seriously, the only way to bring about world peace is to outlaw shoes and socks.

Posted by: Quentin Tarantino at March 19, 2017 10:12 AM (W8bn5)

96 So apparently the new gay character is "Jesus".

What's the big deal, they already have gay characters. Aaron and Tara?

Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at March 19, 2017 10:13 AM (EnKk6)

97 look at the hardware on that door.......

Posted by: phoenixgirl..spring training at March 19, 2017 10:13 AM (0O7c5)

98 I've started reading The Last Lion by William Manchester and Paul Reid.
This will be a slow read. It is too long and densely written for me to read it continuously without intervals of reading other books. The research, however, is impressive.

Posted by: Northernlurker at March 19, 2017 10:13 AM (nBr1j)

99 96 So apparently the new gay character is "Jesus".

What's the big deal, they already have gay characters. Aaron and Tara?
Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at March 19, 2017 10:13 AM (EnKk6)

He's not a major character. Big gay nothingburger.

Posted by: josephistan at March 19, 2017 10:14 AM (ANIFC)

100 a nice essay by Luigi Barzini



It was Barzini all along.

Posted by: weirdflunky at March 19, 2017 10:15 AM (qmlhV)

101 Good luck with the writing MPPPP.

Posted by: Anna Puma at March 19, 2017 10:15 AM (DotZb)

102 " I cannot imagine The Duke in Blazing Saddles. That's too Meta even for me."

-------

I remember when Blazing Saddles first came out my husband was keen to see it thinking it was a conventional western. At the end of the movie he told me he felt cheated even though he laughed throughout.

Preconceived notions are hard to shake.

Posted by: Decaf at March 19, 2017 10:16 AM (Tm3Ti)

103 Mussolini > MTA, because at least he had the ability to keep the trains running on time.
Posted by: Steve and Cold Bear at March 19, 2017 09:47 AM (W8bn5)


Actually, I've heard that this was a myth. That Italian trains were all F.U. when Mussolini was responsible for running them.

Posted by: OregonMuse, deplorable since 2004 at March 19, 2017 10:17 AM (e/R3e)

104 Mussolini's end was ignominious.

When the Allies invaded Sicily in 1943, the King asked the Fascist Grand Council to depose him, and he was imprisoned.

Italy withdrew from the Axis, so the German Army became an occupying force, they disarmed and interned the Italian Army. German commandos freed Mussolini, and Hitler installed him as leader of a rump republic in a small northern town. Mussolini remained there until shortly before the Allies liberated Italy, when partisans hung him and his entourage in the street a la Ghadafy.

Posted by: San Franpsycho at March 19, 2017 10:17 AM (EZebt)

105
Actually, I've heard that this was a myth. That Italian trains were all F.U. when Mussolini was responsible for running them.
Posted by: OregonMuse, deplorable since 2004 at March 19, 2017 10:17 AM (e/R3e)

When you are a dictator, you can tell people things are great, and they have to believe you.

Posted by: moki at March 19, 2017 10:18 AM (wuzmq)

106 Slightly OT but I see where SEIU and some other union are calling for a general strike on May 1.

Geez, doing it on the international commie holiday of May Day, plus the last couple of days that have called for people to walk off the job haven't exactly gone well for the dummies who take the commies advice and walk off the job, these people are slow learners.

And I'm sure there are some books written about the strike the air traffic controllers launched, and Pres. Reagan's response, back in the early days of Reagan. Yes they were fed employees but still, that "You're Fired"! was glorious.

Posted by: Boots at March 19, 2017 10:18 AM (EBwPV)

107 "A Canticle For Leibowitz."

After years of hearing about it on this here Book Thread, I finally got my library to order a copy.

I'm about halfway through, and it is an interesting book. Not sure where he is going yet, but damn, the man can write. It is one of the best written books I have read in many many months.

I just wish I remembered more of my high school Latin.

Posted by: CharlieBrown'sDildo at March 19, 2017 10:19 AM (rF0hx)

108 Re #6--------Get off my lawn

Posted by: Semilitterate at March 19, 2017 10:19 AM (rsX+s)

109 OT: Major 'The Walking Dead' character will come out as gay Sunday.
----
Surely not Darryl.
If so, will he wear assless chaps?
Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at March 19, 2017 10:03 AM (EnKk6)


They already had a couple of gay characters within the last 2-3 years.

So either TWD's ratings are flagging and they want to goose them back up, or some SJWs have informed them "you're not applauding loudly enough, comrade."

Posted by: OregonMuse, deplorable since 2004 at March 19, 2017 10:19 AM (e/R3e)

110 Posted by: JTB at March 19, 2017 10:08 AM (V+03K)

Have you read The Legend Of Bagger Vance? One of my favorite books. As a golfer, I had always heard of the book but had no interest in reading for some reason. I subsequently learned of Steven Pressfield when Gates of Fire was recommended years ago and ended up reading all of his historical fiction novels. It was then I learned Pressfield had gone off script or thought he did and wrote The LOBV.
He combined golf and the heart and story of ancient warriors.
Awesome .

Posted by: Sebastian Melmoth at March 19, 2017 10:19 AM (IDPbH)

111 llies liberated Italy, when partisans hung him and his entourage in the street a la Ghadafy.





Posted by: San Franpsycho at March 19, 2017 10:17 AM (EZebt)

Didn't Mussolini try and get away, but by a stroke of luck, he was recognized at a road block even though he dressed and tried to change his looks, or something like that.

Posted by: Colin at March 19, 2017 10:21 AM (DLV/d)

112 I'm about halfway through, and it is an interesting book. Not sure where he is going yet, but damn, the man can write. It is one of the best written books I have read in many many months.

Posted by: CharlieBrown'sDildo at March 19, 2017 10:19 AM (rF0hx)


I know, right? It's not often you get to see the work of a master craftsman, but that book is definitely it.

Posted by: OregonMuse, deplorable since 2004 at March 19, 2017 10:21 AM (e/R3e)

113 I have in my possession an old scrapbook that belonged to my Italian great grandfather.

One section is filled with 1920s clippings from American newspapers supporting Mussolini and I Fascisti during the early days.

I Fascisti were seen at that time as Italy's best defense against Communism. One of the clippings, from a NYC newspaper, urged patriotic Americans to join with Italian immigrants in sending money to support the Fascists.

This, of course, was well before Hitler and all that. My great-grandfather's family were staunch anti-Communists (it's in my DNA!) which must be what had interested him enough to save the clippings.


Posted by: WhatWhatWhat? at March 19, 2017 10:23 AM (ul9CR)

114 OM, thank you for another great book thread.

Just finished Challenges of the Deeps, the third book in the Grand Central Arena series by Ryk Erik Spoor. Frothy Space Opera but good in an entertaining way. There are plenty of new opportunities to fight against the factions that hate those upstarts of space, Humanity.

It's not quite as good as the original, Grand Central Arena or the sequel, Spheres of Influence, but still good.

This continues his "sense of wonder" SF. If you were raised on Doc E.E. Smith's Skylark and Lensman series, you are home again. Very good world creation, with enough in-jokes, shoutouts and references to thrill the heart of a space opera reader. It's a tad of a throwback to John W. Campbell with the plucky Terrans verses, well, everyone in the Universe, at first.

Posted by: NaCly Dog at March 19, 2017 10:23 AM (u82oZ)

115 The unfortunate aspect is I went back to the book shelves and boxed up all my other Wodehouse books to see what I have. I foresee many more coming home in the near future.
Posted by: JTB at March 19, 2017 10:08 AM (V+03K)
--------------

I've gotten back into the habit of reading P. G. Wodehouse every night before I go to sleep. It relaxes me and makes me forget all the crappy news I heard during the day, and makes me happy.

I have some of his books, and have read everything the library has at least twice, but I don't care. I still keep going. Currently reading "Jill the Reckless."

And just starting to listen to "A Torch Kept Lit: Great Lives of the Twentieth Century" by William F. Buckley, Jr.

Posted by: bluebell at March 19, 2017 10:23 AM (sBOL1)

116 Don't forget today is "lights out day", turn your lights off between 8:30 and 9:30 to save the earth...not sure about what time zone they are talking about.

Posted by: Colin at March 19, 2017 10:23 AM (DLV/d)

117 6 t's Sunday, March 19, Earth Hour (turn your lights off between 8:30 and 9:30 p.m. to aid the planet)
------------------------------

If I remember what day it is I always turn on every light in the house for that hour, just because I'm not going to live in the dark like a barbarian. North Korea lives in the darkness.

Posted by: Boots at March 19, 2017 10:24 AM (EBwPV)

118 Even if it's these pants.

((0)).((0))

I'm blind.

Posted by: Deplorable Flyover 98ZJUSMC at March 19, 2017 10:24 AM (qoAfa)

119 Good morning 'rons and 'ettes of the book. I made a reasonable amount of progress in the multiple books I've been reading:

Elizabeth: The Forgotten Years - John Guy: I've been resistant to Brit history because it's littered with so many inconsequential dickweeds that I usually get too fucking bored with figuring out who they are. This book caught my attention because of a review in the Weekly Standard that stated it covers Elizabeth's later years which other historians have neglected and scrutinizes some of her writings for the first time. It also has a lot of gossipy shit like how vain she was (not to mention prematurely bald) and spiteful to her bang toys because of their occasional need to spend time with their wives. This week I read a chapter on Sir Walter Raleigh's adventures in the New World, including how he and others parlayed her cock craving into financing the initial colonization in Virginia until she pulled the rug out from it and left Roanoke in the lurch.

The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire Volume 6 - Edward Gibbon: Constantinople was really fucked under the rule of the elder and younger Andronicus. The old guy was well intentioned but unable to arrest the decline; kind of like the GOPe. The younger was a worthless cooch hound who was incapable of not making things worse by spending like Zippy and Paul Ryan combined. He mercifully died early, leaving his 9 year old son in charge who was tutored by the seemingly well intentioned John Cantacuzene. For all of my complaints about Gibbon's writing being confusing in terms of figuring out just WTF is going on, this was remarkably coherent and easy to follow.

There's more but I'm gonna enter this now and write more subsequently.

Posted by: Captain Hate at March 19, 2017 10:24 AM (y7DUB)

120 The weirdest thing happened on the movie thread. I normally comment using my iPad but on that thread I commented using my phone.

I could see my comment but as soon as I refreshed it would disappear and I could no longer see it. At first I thought I was banned but then I saw people reply to the comment. The same thing happened when I commented again.

Has the same happened to anyone else?

Does anyone know why it happens?

Posted by: Decaf at March 19, 2017 10:25 AM (Tm3Ti)

121 Earlier this week I picked up a recurve bow at the newly opened Cabelas in our area. (That is a very dangerous place.) This will be the first time I tried a bow since Boy Scout camp five or six thousand years ago. If anyone can suggest some good beginners book on traditional bow shooting, I would appreciate it.

BTW, I'm not trying to start a longbow/crossbow argument. Part of my interest is to learn a new skill to go with traditional muzzleloader shooting. The other part is exercise. The years have taken a toll on my back and shoulders. I'm hoping using a traditional bow will encourage me to get back in shape.

Posted by: JTB at March 19, 2017 10:26 AM (V+03K)

122 Posted by: Captain Hate at March 19, 2017 10:24 AM (y7DUB)

You may enjoy the two Elizabeth movies with Cate Blanchett. Very good movies.

Posted by: Sebastian Melmoth at March 19, 2017 10:26 AM (IDPbH)

123 116 Don't forget today is "lights out day", turn your lights off between 8:30 and 9:30 to save the earth...not sure about what time zone they are talking about.
Posted by: Colin at March 19, 2017 10:23 AM (DLV/d)

I'll be sure to turn on even more lights, as well as all kitchen appliances, thanks.

Posted by: josephistan at March 19, 2017 10:26 AM (ANIFC)

124 Decaf, I comment on my phone (it's an iPhone) quite frequently, and I've never had that happen. That's weird. Maybe try a different browser?

Posted by: bluebell at March 19, 2017 10:26 AM (sBOL1)

125 I could see myself wearing those pants just to mess weith the kids

Posted by: @votermom @vm at March 19, 2017 10:27 AM (Om16U)

126 turn your lights off between 8:30 and 9:30 p.m. to aid the planet

I've always wanted to see what kind of load my breaker box could handle. I guess tonight's the night.

Posted by: Notorious BFD at March 19, 2017 10:29 AM (Tyii7)

127 8:30pm?

These virtue signaling nancy boys of indeterminate gender will flick off the lights but still be able to see since they have the monster 70in TV turned on illuminating the whole block

Posted by: Anna Puma at March 19, 2017 10:29 AM (DotZb)

128 I read Eye of the Needle by Ken Follet in one go. I could not put it down. I had never read it before.

This book directly hits my interest in strategic deception in WWII and the XX system of turning spies in England. There are a number of non-fiction books that cover this topic, but the best are Bodyguard of Lies by Anthony Cave Brown and The Double-Cross System: The Incredible True Story of How Nazi Spies Were Turned into Double Agents by J. C. Masterman.

Posted by: NaCly Dog at March 19, 2017 10:30 AM (u82oZ)

129 AMC TV Exec #1: Well The Walking Dead is a great show, and is at the top of the ratings, what can we do to make it even better?

AMC TV Exec #2: I know, let's have a main character come out as gay.

AMC TV Exec #1: Great idea! And make it a male character!

AMC TV Exec #2: Yeah! So we can have lots of scenes of men kissing, because if there's one thing that people want to see more of when they watch TV with their families, it's men kissing.

AMC TV Exec #1: Right, and I just *know* we won't lose half our audience.

AMC TV Exec #2: What could possibly go wrong?

Posted by: OregonMuse, deplorable since 2004 at March 19, 2017 10:31 AM (e/R3e)

130 "Decaf, I comment on my phone (it's an iPhone) quite frequently, and I've never had that happen. That's weird. Maybe try a different browser?"

------

Mine is an iPhone as well and I use Safari. Which browser do you use?

Posted by: Decaf at March 19, 2017 10:31 AM (Tm3Ti)

131 Guess I shall hither on and tackle creative projects. Jya ne.

Posted by: Anna Puma at March 19, 2017 10:32 AM (DotZb)

132 Heh. I missed this one first time through the comments. We get the funniest trolls on this blog:

6 t's Sunday, March 19, Earth Hour (turn your lights off between 8:30 and 9:30 p.m. to aid the planet)
Just in case your reading a book, get a candle for that hour of darkness.

Posted by: Colin at March 19, 2017 09:01 AM (DLV/d)


Seriously?

Posted by: OregonMuse, deplorable since 2004 at March 19, 2017 10:33 AM (e/R3e)

133 Mine is an iPhone as well and I use Safari. Which browser do you use?
Posted by: Decaf at March 19, 2017 10:31 AM (Tm3Ti)
-----------

Try Brave. It's faster, and no ads.

Although I've commented on my phone with Safari too, with no problems.

Posted by: bluebell at March 19, 2017 10:33 AM (sBOL1)

134 Does anyone know why it happens?

Posted by: Decaf at March 19, 2017 10:25 AM (Tm3Ti)

The world of AoSHQ is a mysterious place, filled with magic and clunky 1990s software; overseen by Pixy...a benevolent but chaotic mage....

Posted by: CharlieBrown'sDildo at March 19, 2017 10:33 AM (rF0hx)

135 AMC TV Exec #2: What could possibly go wrong?

From "American Movie Classics" to "Anal Mating Channel".

Posted by: Blanco Basura at March 19, 2017 10:34 AM (IcT7t)

136 Anybody ever heard of the Night Angels books by Brent Weeks? I've started it and it's surprisingly good. Very non-PC for one thing.

Posted by: Unranked Chevron at March 19, 2017 10:34 AM (Xo/8v)

137 Thanks bluebell, I will try that.

Posted by: Decaf at March 19, 2017 10:35 AM (Tm3Ti)

138 Posted by: Captain Hate at March 19, 2017 10:24 AM (y7DUB)

Sweet frosty Moses, it's Captain Hate! Welcome back Cap'n, you've been away too long.

Posted by: OregonMuse, deplorable since 2004 at March 19, 2017 10:35 AM (e/R3e)

139 this is a gripping thriller, a rousing tale of real-life heroism in which the Ethiopians come back from near destruction and win.

-
I wonder if this is the basis for the Rastafarians' view of Haile Selassie as a god.

Posted by: Anonosaurus Wrecks. Now worse than Hitler! at March 19, 2017 10:36 AM (Nwg0u)

140 Mrs. JTB surprised me this week with a gift for an upcoming birthday: a Renzetti Traveler rotary vise for fly tying. This is very different from my usual vise and will take some practice. So, of course, I've spent hours thumbing through my fly tying books and watching YouTube videos. That led to some other fishing books. It's a vicious circle, I tells ya!

Mrs. JTB has made some noise about learning to tie flies herself. I hope so. I love sharing activities with her. I think she may partly be inspired by the image of Victoria and Albert with their back to back desks in Buckingham Palace.

Posted by: JTB at March 19, 2017 10:36 AM (V+03K)

141 Always good to have these documents handy.

-
For old time sake.

Posted by: Anonosaurus Wrecks. Now worse than Hitler! at March 19, 2017 10:38 AM (Nwg0u)

142 I'm currently working my way through two very different but fascinating Edwardian era dystopian novels: The Iron Heel by Jack London and Lord of the World by Robert Hugh Benson. Both were published in 1908. Iron Heel is very left leaning as you would expect from a guy who had lectured on socialism and even run for mayor of Oakland as a Socialist. Lord of the World was written by an Anglican turned Catholic priest, and as one would expect is very conservative in its views. But both are good -- and you can see a LOT of what is going on today taking place in both books. The latter book has generally been pegged as a "Catholic" novel and it is steeped in pre Vatican II Church culture, but I don't think you have to be Catholic to appreciate what is taking place in it.

Posted by: Secret Square at March 19, 2017 10:38 AM (9WuX0)

143 I love Wodehouse and read everything of his I could get my hands on when I was much younger. Must go through my collection and re-read some of the most beloved ones.

Posted by: Decaf at March 19, 2017 10:39 AM (Tm3Ti)

144 For a very good novel set during Mussolini's Ethiopian "adventure", I highly recommend Wilbur Smith's "Cry Wolf". A couple of mercenaries selling antiquated armored cars to the Ethiopians, rivals for the same beautiful girl, tangle with a nasty Eytie officer.

Actually, you want adventure novels set in Africa? Once you start on Smith, you're hooked. From ancient Egypt to the Rhodesian breakaway and beyond, he's prolific and always a good read.

Posted by: That Deplorable SOB Van Owen at March 19, 2017 10:39 AM (IJX6l)

145 Eat me!

Posted by: Gay Zombie at March 19, 2017 10:39 AM (W8bn5)

146 I could see my comment but as soon as I refreshed it would disappear and I could no longer see it. At first I thought I was banned but then I saw people reply to the comment. The same thing happened when I commented again.
Has the same happened to anyone else?

Does anyone know why it happens?

Posted by: Decaf at March 19, 2017 10:25 AM (Tm3Ti)


We don't know for sure, but we think what you saw last night was the last line of defense in pixy's spam detection system. For some (mistaken) reason, your posted comments were being detected as spam and excised.

Posted by: OregonMuse, deplorable since 2004 at March 19, 2017 10:40 AM (e/R3e)

147 Based on someone's recommendation, read the first two from Patricia Wrede's Frontier Magic. Good stuff- as previous poster stated, it's a mix of Harry Potter and Little House on the Prairie. Only better, because Wrede is a better writer than Rowling.

Also into the 3rd book of the Clacker Trilogy (Liberation) by Ian Tregillis, the wrapup of his alternative history/steampunk fantasy featuring a Dutch Empire built on their robot (aka Clacker) technology at war with New France, a refugee bunch settled in what would be Quebec.

Tregillis also wrote the Milkweed Triptych, (another trilogy) where WW2 is fought with sorcery and human mutants.

Guy can write. Extremely well.

Posted by: Twin Cities Daydrunk, getcher DQ cones free next week! at March 19, 2017 10:40 AM (1aMQH)

148 The flight of Apollo 8 was incredibly risky (or ballsy, depending on your point of view). It was only the third launch of the giant Saturn V rocket. It was preceded by two unmanned launches to test the whole system of rocket and spacecraft. (Recall that the Apollo command module had to be extensively redesigned following the Apollo 1 tragedy in January 1967.)

This "all-up" testing was itself risky and was a break from tradition. Earlier rockets, such as the Saturn I, had been tested gradually: first several suborbital launches of the first stage with dummy upper stages, then launches with live upper stages and a dummy payload, etc., finally working their way to a full orbital mission.

But in November 1967, the unmanned Apollo 4 featured all three stages of the Saturn V plus the Apollo command and service modules. Only the third stage had flown before, as the second stage of the smaller Saturn I booster. The mission was ambitious. The three stages of the Saturn V put the spacecraft in Earth orbit, then the third stage restarted to simulate the trans-lunar injection burn. Following spacecraft separation, the Apollo service module fired its engine a couple of times to increase its speed in order to test the command module's heat shield in a re-entry at lunar return speeds.

Apollo 4 went well, but a second test, Apollo 6 in April 1968, suffered serious problems including premature shutdown of two engines on the second stage and failure of the third stage engine to restart. The command module was recovered safely, but not all of the mission objectives were met.

So they launched Apollo 7 with a crew to Earth orbit atop the proven Saturn I, and the very next Saturn V launch sent Apollo 8 to the moon.

Posted by: rickl at March 19, 2017 10:42 AM (sdi6R)

149 I was reading Movses Khorenatsi's History of Armenia. Not because I wanted to. It claims to be written in the late 400s (by a disciple of Saint Mashtots himself - the Saint Cyril of Armenia, who invented their cypher of an alphabet), and it contradicts all the other Armenians' histories written at the time, so it has little historical value... as such. I was told it was forged in the late 600s, which is on my turf.

The subtext seems to be a power struggle between the Mamikoneans and the Bagratids (each "Bagratuni" in Armenian). Everyone respected the Mamikoneans as heroes of independence against the Iranians. The Bagratunis were now wanting some of that action.

So the forger pretending to be "Movses" just went out and f*cking lied, rewriting all the stuff Mamikoneans did and replacing them with other families mostly Bagratunis of course.

The ends of the last two sections each bemoan that there isn't a king or a unified church, o woe is chaotic Armenia, who will save us. The reader will think - hey, why not a Bagratid.

It's like a big maisma of Lie Gas spread all over the Near East in the 600s AD and had just reached Armenia. Depressing!

For some reason most Armenian scholars today actually believe this pile of self-serving humbug, or claim they do, and their partisans have taken over their wiki page. That's depressing too.

Posted by: boulder terlit hobo at March 19, 2017 10:42 AM (6FqZa)

150 Don't forget today is "lights out day", turn your lights off between 8:30 and 9:30 to save the earth...not sure about what time zone they are talking about.

Posted by: Colin at March 19, 2017 10:23 AM (DLV/d)

I'll burn some tires to keep 'em out of the landfill...I do the same on earf day.

Posted by: BignJames at March 19, 2017 10:43 AM (x9c8r)

151 Being nice to a neighbor, He has a book on Amazon, and a hard copy he gave me. (autographed of course). I tried to read the Kindle version and didn't get very far. Not something I am really interested in...(super natural stuff).
I guess I will have to say something nice about the book, not sure how to say it....

Posted by: Colin at March 19, 2017 10:43 AM (DLV/d)

152 turn your lights off between 8:30 and 9:30 p.m. to aid the planet

I've always wanted to see what kind of load my breaker box could handle. I guess tonight's the night

Pro tip: Run your air conditioner(s) at the same time as everything else to really get that meter spinning.

Posted by: cool breeze at March 19, 2017 10:44 AM (TKf/P)

153 Barrel save?

Posted by: cool breeze at March 19, 2017 10:44 AM (TKf/P)

154 Jimmy Breslin, dead at 86.

Posted by: bluebell at March 19, 2017 10:45 AM (sBOL1)

155 Saved!

Posted by: cool breeze at March 19, 2017 10:45 AM (TKf/P)

156

Candle? Pfft.

I use a tyger, burning bright.

Posted by: @votermom @vm at March 19, 2017 10:45 AM (Om16U)

157 t's Sunday, March 19, Earth Hour (turn your lights off between 8:30 and 9:30 p.m. to aid the planet)

-
It is appropriate that our worship of our new pagan god requires a return to a dark age.

Posted by: Anonosaurus Wrecks. Now worse than Hitler! at March 19, 2017 10:45 AM (Nwg0u)

158 30 I find reading about Mussolini as interesting as reading about any other dictator. Anyone have any good titles that sort out the life he lived and how he got where he did?
Posted by: Colin at March 19, 2017 09:20 AM (DLV/d)

Mussolini's daughter, Edda, wrote a book about her father. It's called, "My Truth," and it's fine example of how even a monster can be held in high regard by those closest to them. It's unnerving to read how well she accepted her father's having her husband assassinated. It sure was a different opinion of Il Duce than what I knew.

Posted by: RondinellaMamma at March 19, 2017 10:45 AM (oQQwD)

159 Thanks to OM for another great Book Thread and thanks for the mention of the paperback version of "Wearing the Cat".

This is kind of fun.

While I was waiting around for, mainly the cover issues to get resolved - don't ask,

I decided to submit the two volumes of WTC to Kirkus Reviews for review.

Here are the blurb-worthy and non-spoilery parts:


Review for "Wearing the Cat - The Complete Novel, Volume One

"A debut satirical novel follows one man's adventures as a dentist in the U.S. Navy...Full of slapstick moments and bodily fluids (blood, vomit, and stool provide not only humor, but also help move the story along), the book makes for a nuanced, if crude, look at a small corner of the U.S. military...

An in-depth look at an officer's bawdy tour of duty." - Kirkus Reviews



Review for "Wearing the Cat - The Complete Novel, Volume Two"

"Lt Nick McGill is stationed at an air base in Japan...McGill engages in plenty of scenes of military comedy...the novel takes a darker turn, and McGill's story takes on a new level of earnestness...it gives the book a striking, unexpected realism...

The McGill that eventually emerges may still compare an indigestion-induced bowel movement to "fifty gallons of rich brown gravy," but both he and readers come away with a fuller understanding of life and loss by the end of the novel.

A raunchy but memorable military tale." - Kirkus Reviews



If WTC sounds like it might be your kind of thing,

Click on the links above.

There are good samples of WTC to read on the Kindle version pages.

Posted by: H.D. Woodard - The Complete Novel - Volumes 1 & 2 at March 19, 2017 10:46 AM (9q7Dl)

160 It's unnerving to read how well she accepted her father's having her husband assassinated. It sure was a different opinion of Il Duce than what I knew.
Posted by: RondinellaMamma at March 19, 2017 10:45 AM (oQQwD)
---
That's because you're happily married....?

Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at March 19, 2017 10:47 AM (EnKk6)

161 Has the same happened to anyone else?
Does anyone know why it happens?
Posted by: Decaf


It's extremely strange this software. I can only comment by having the code to turn italics on at the end of my nic.

Now note: It does not actually turn italics on.

But if I insert code to turn italics off my comments appear, then disappear. Like m u m r.

Posted by: E Depluribus Unum at March 19, 2017 10:48 AM (ZFUt7)

162 Posted by: boulder terlit hobo at March 19, 2017 10:42 AM (6FqZa)

1400 year old political propaganda still affecting groupthink. that's impressive even if the group involved is fairly small.

Posted by: Polliwog the 'Ette at March 19, 2017 10:49 AM (sEDyY)

163 Seven Gothic Tales - Isak Dinesen: This is a selection of my book group and is a weird collection of stories from the thirties which either get less cryptic as you progress through the tales or the reader gets used to her writing style. I think it's more the former because in the initial stories, particularly The Monkey, nobody is who they seem to be including a lot of gender shape shifting. The tale I'm reading now is a more or less straight ahead tale told by a person sailing from Kenya to Zanzibar of a working girl he was fascinated by who had a jooooo in her midst who is the embodiment of her shadow of which she sold to the devil. That I consider that "straight ahead" might illustrate how convoluted the earlier tales were.

The Commodore - Patrick O'Brian: I've been working my way through the Aubrey/Maturin books which I've found highly enjoyable as the long term portrait of a fascinating group of characters. The relationship of Maturin and his high spirited wife, Diana, is extremely well written imo, as is Maturin's intelligence work. I'm sure a lot of you are familiar with this series.

The Grand Strategy of Classical Sparta: The Persian Challenge- Paul A. Rahe - I became aware of this in another Weekly Standard review and, as I was progressing through the footnotes about Cyrus, noticed that it was the same stuff Herodotus covers in The Histories, so I'm picking that up again in parallel. Likewise a copy of Ryszard Kapuscinki's Travels With Herodotus that I picked up at a book sale.

Posted by: Captain Hate at March 19, 2017 10:50 AM (y7DUB)

164 Posted by: Colin at March 19, 2017 10:43 AM (DLV/d)

Use words like-

unusual, interesting, entertaining, thought provoking, unique etc.

Think of your review as an exercise in creative writing.

Posted by: weirdflunky at March 19, 2017 10:50 AM (qmlhV)

165 Two books. The first book, Being Mortal by Atul Gawande, has taken on particular importance given that my brother, sisters, and I are caring for our 98 year-old mother who wants to end her days living in her own home of 65 years. I highly recommend this book, but especially if you have an aging or ill family member. Here's the review I wrote for my annual book list a couple of years ago:

"A beautifully written book covering the health, familial, and societal challenges arising out of the western approach to end of life matters. Gawande is a surgeon who recognized what is often the futility and pain caused by treating end of life illnesses as strictly medical challenges. Rather than approaching the breakdown of our bodies at the end of life as technological challenge, Gawande makes us consider the questions, "What do we want for ourselves and family?" and "What would make us happiest in our final days?"

The second book is a classic that I always knew that I should read, but never got around to until last year: The Count of Monte Cristo, by Dumas. I took it on a week long vacation last year and was completely absorbed for the next ten days. The review:

"A classic story of loss, redemption, revenge, and forgiveness. This story follows the hero through 15 years following an awful twist of fate which results in the loss of his betrothed, his livelihood, and his freedom at the hands of several dastardly scoundrels. Ultimately, the protagonist succeeds in freeing himself and dedicates his life to exacting revenge--doing so in a most remarkable manner. With all the elements of an adventure story, Dumas creates tale of timeless human themes. An arm-breaker at over 1,200 pages, I couldn't put it down."

Posted by: Lawrence Larson at March 19, 2017 10:51 AM (gNKbf)

166 So they launched Apollo 7 with a crew to Earth orbit atop the proven Saturn I, and the very next Saturn V launch sent Apollo 8 to the moon.
Posted by: rickl at March 19, 2017 10:42 AM (sdi6R)


Try SCE to AUX.

Posted by: John Aaron at March 19, 2017 10:52 AM (8nWyX)

167 It's like a big maisma of Lie Gas spread all over the Near East in the 600s AD and had just reached Armenia. Depressing!
Posted by: boulder terlit hobo at March 19, 2017 10:42 AM (6FqZa)


Sounds like #FakeNews, 7th century edition.

Posted by: OregonMuse, deplorable since 2004 at March 19, 2017 10:53 AM (e/R3e)

168 110 ... Sebastian, I have a copy of Legend of Bagger Vance but haven't read it yet. Thanks for the reminder. I should probably dig it out during the British Open.

Posted by: JTB at March 19, 2017 10:54 AM (V+03K)

169 38: Recommended here awhile back, I read The One Man by Andrew Gross. This is an excellent thriller. The story is about sending a man into Aushwitz to bring out one man, a Polish physicist...

Getting out of Auschwitz was near-impossible, even if you were in one of the many satellite camps rather than the main ones. I worked with a professor at Hebrew U. who escaped from Auschwitz with his father when he was 10. They managed to make it to Slovakia. Yehuda Bauer pointed out that many of the prisoners there didn't speak Polish and had no idea where they might find protection, so escape was not really an option, even if an opportunity arose. Also, the Germans had a nasty way of punishing an escape by randomly executing remaining prisoners. I once edited a book, Escape to Life: A Journey through the Holocaust, by Patricia Herskovic, which tells the story of William Herskovic, her father, and his harrowing escape with two other men from one of the Auschwitz satellite camps, through Germany, and finally into Holland, where he hid out by working for the German Todt organization at a hidden missile factory (V-2?). This was an incredible read, although it seemed a bit Hollywood-y for my taste, but then, the daughter is a screen writer...

Posted by: Alifa at March 19, 2017 10:54 AM (sEKHe)

170 Okay Cheeseheads I just learned a lot more about you as I just finished the Aerial America episode on Wisconsin. The United States is a pretty amazing place.

Posted by: Sebastian Melmoth at March 19, 2017 10:55 AM (IDPbH)

171 It's like a big maisma of Lie Gas spread all over the Near East in the 600s AD and had just reached Armenia. Depressing!
Posted by: boulder terlit hobo at March 19, 2017 10:42 AM (6FqZa)


Which we all know is impossible because Lie Gas didn't exist until CNN invented it.

This. Is CNN.

Posted by: OregonMuse, deplorable since 2004 at March 19, 2017 10:55 AM (e/R3e)

172 I have just started re-reading The Alaskan by James Oliver Curwood, written in 1923. I got this book as an award in high school and I devoured it then. It was the memory of that book that prompted me to book us on an Alaskan cruise in 2003.

I wonder how it will be reading it again after all this time.

Posted by: Decaf at March 19, 2017 10:55 AM (Tm3Ti)

173 168 110 ... Sebastian, I have a copy of Legend of Bagger Vance but haven't read it yet. Thanks for the reminder. I should probably dig it out during the British Open.
Posted by: JTB at March 19, 2017 10:54 AM (V+03K)

You can dig it out for The Masters since Bobby Jones is one of the characters in the book.

Posted by: Sebastian Melmoth at March 19, 2017 10:56 AM (IDPbH)

174 You may enjoy the two Elizabeth movies with Cate Blanchett. Very good movies.
Posted by: Sebastian Melmoth at March 19, 2017 10:26 AM (IDPbH)

I saw the first one which partially piqued my interest in this although that was much earlier than what is covered in the book at hand. I wasn't aware of the second one (honestly I'm not much of a Whoreyweird fan) but maybe will check it out.

Thanks, OM, but if you check the latter part of last week's thread you'll find me there.

Posted by: Captain Hate at March 19, 2017 10:57 AM (y7DUB)

175 Also learned a new word - lupanar*

*Latin for brothel. Pompeii is known for preserve ones like the Grande Lupanare.

-
This s derived from "lupus", the Latin word for wolf which was a term for prostitutes. Legend has it that Rome's founders, Romulus and Remus, were raised by a wolf. The wolf in question may have been of the non-canine variety.

Posted by: Anonosaurus Wrecks. Now worse than Hitler! at March 19, 2017 10:59 AM (Nwg0u)

176
I note that when I have the code to turn on italics at the end of my nic, when 'selecting source' in Firefox, that Pixy adds the code to turn italics back off.

So there's some diverting of program flow occurring there.

I have mentioned this workaround on a couple of threads and people who were pixy-banned for no apparent reason have then reappeared - aussie was one.

Posted by: E Depluribus Unum at March 19, 2017 10:59 AM (ZFUt7)

177 Encounter with Tiber by Buzz Aldrin, John Barnes

An Apollo 11 astronaut and the Nebula Award nominated author of Directive 51 present a novel that conveys the wonder and promise of space.(Publishers Weekly).


Available on Early Bird Books, if you get their daily emails.. 1.99 using either Amazon or BN...might be worth a read.

Posted by: Colin at March 19, 2017 10:59 AM (DLV/d)

178 TWC's been dull this season because they're focussing on everything-

but the obvious conflict ahead of them.

And they've been giving us a lot of time with uninteresting people who we don't care about at all.

So, this is clearly a time-waster season meant to extend the franchise cuz it sure ain't moving the story along.

Which brings us to the gay guy or girl comes out episode....eh, sure whatevs.

Unless it's Rick.

Maybe Negan will turn out to be gay too and they can open a Bed and Breakfast together.

Moving the story along? Compelling TV?

Not so much.

Posted by: naturalfake at March 19, 2017 11:01 AM (9q7Dl)

179 Damn Grey Fox made an Amy Schumer out of me!

Posted by: Anonosaurus Wrecks. Now worse than Hitler! at March 19, 2017 11:01 AM (Nwg0u)

180 During our Alaskan cruise and land holiday I discovered an Alaskan mystery writer Sue Henry and of course had to buy all of her books.

Enjoyed them immensely but they also seemed to prolong the fabulous time we had in Alaska.

Posted by: Decaf at March 19, 2017 11:01 AM (Tm3Ti)

181 OM, Please tell those pants you linked to are for a woman! The idea they would fit on a guy is disturbing and betrays good taste. (Or any taste at all.) Yuchhh!

Posted by: JTB at March 19, 2017 11:06 AM (V+03K)

182 Posted by: Decaf at March 19, 2017 11:01 AM (Tm3Ti)

Cedar Sanderson has a fantasy series where an Alaskan gal finds out she may be the queen of Fairie. Oh, and she has a bunch of large, super protective male cousins. If I remember right, Sanderson grew up in Alaska and you can tell she has affection for the people there.

Posted by: Polliwog the 'Ette at March 19, 2017 11:07 AM (sEDyY)

183 Posted by: JTB at March 19, 2017 11:06 AM (V+03K)

It's Horde dazzle camouflage for your ass.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at March 19, 2017 11:07 AM (EnKk6)

184 Speaking of Alaskan mysteries, does anyone have an opinion on The Yiddish Policemen's Union? It looks interesting, but I never got around to checking it out.

Posted by: hogmartin at March 19, 2017 11:08 AM (8nWyX)

185 #PixyPharts

What can be made of a hash like "PukHz"?

I've had comments appear to be posted, then vanish.

Only happens when using the cell (AT&T) to connect.

There are, I surmise, many IPs that Pixy has blocked for one reason or another which are part of the AT&T pool of IPs, and I've just picked up one of those banned IPs.

I turn the phone off (actually just go into "airplane" mode) and back on, which picks up a new IP, and that's usually enough.

I have compiled a long list of such banned AT&T IPs that I've been meaning to send to Pixy to be ignored] re-instated.

(Use WhatIsMyIP.com to test your IP, see if it changes from airplane mode, router reboot, whatever you do.

Posted by: mindful webworker - what, me read? at March 19, 2017 11:09 AM (PukHz)

186 Hogmartin, YPU got thunderous Huzzahs from the critics but it never really clicked with me, and I'm a big, big Chabonehead.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at March 19, 2017 11:09 AM (EnKk6)

187 I've injured my knee so I can't stand on concrete to sing in the choir so I did something I almost never do: I went to the Saturday vigil mass, which always feels like cheating. I slept in until 6:30, even after the thread started which I NEVER do as this is the highlight of my day, after mass.

Anyway, I'm still reading that Myron Bolitar novel. It's my bedtime book, and I read about five to 10 Kindle pages before I nod off.

And I started reading Left Turns by Tim Groseclose. Interesting stuff and I look forward to reading how he assigned his bias scores to various words. This book was about quantifying press bias.

And that's it, and now I feel lazy somehow.

Posted by: Tonestaple at March 19, 2017 11:10 AM (+DRpa)

188 If you see a comment appear the disappear on refresh, likely its a TB3K ban. If Pixie IP bans them they never show up.

Trolls love them some cellular and wifi IP's. If one is banned change towers, if you can, and use a new IP.

Posted by: Tim in Illinois at March 19, 2017 11:11 AM (d76uN)

189 >>>132 Heh. I missed this one first time through the comments. We get the funniest trolls on this blog:

6 t's Sunday, March 19, Earth Hour (turn your lights off between 8:30 and 9:30 p.m. to aid the planet)
Just in case your reading a book, get a candle for that hour of darkness.

Posted by: Colin at March 19, 2017 09:01 AM (DLV/d)

Seriously?
Posted by: OregonMuse, deplorable since 2004 at March 19, 2017 10:33 AM (e/R3e)

Colin's not a troll.

Posted by: m at March 19, 2017 11:12 AM (3jGss)

190 I'm a big, big Chabonehead.

My wife dragged me to see him speak once. He came off as an irritating fuckhead. I know love the art and not the artist, but that impression was too vivid.

Posted by: Captain Hate at March 19, 2017 11:14 AM (y7DUB)

191 Posted by: Tonestaple at March 19, 2017 11:10 AM (+DRpa)

my family was going to our parishes 12:30 Latin Mass.....until they discontinued it....so now...5:00 on Sunday evening....i call it the last chance Mass......

Posted by: phoenixgirl..spring training at March 19, 2017 11:15 AM (0O7c5)

192 The old guy was well intentioned but unable to arrest the decline; kind of like the GOPe.

-
Ho you calling well intentioned?

- Paul Ryno

Posted by: Anonosaurus Wrecks. Now worse than Hitler! at March 19, 2017 11:15 AM (Nwg0u)

193 Obligatory Simpsons:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pkwDqa75c9k

Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at March 19, 2017 11:16 AM (EnKk6)

194 Does anyone know why it happens?

-
The ghost of Steve Fucking Jobs.

Posted by: Anonosaurus Wrecks. Now worse than Hitler! at March 19, 2017 11:17 AM (Nwg0u)

195 6 t's Sunday, March 19, Earth Hour (turn your lights off between 8:30 and 9:30 p.m. to aid the planet)

Just in case your reading a book, get a candle for that hour of darkness.
Posted by: Colin at March 19, 2017 09:01 AM (DLV/d)


But if you set your house on fire with the candle, that will release a whole lot of CO2 into the atmosphere.

Posted by: rickl at March 19, 2017 11:18 AM (sdi6R)

196 Don't forget today is "lights out day", turn your lights off between 8:30 and 9:30 to save the earth...not sure about what time zone they are talking about."

Thanks for the heads up- turned on all my lights (a couple hours late, alas) and will keep them burning until 9:30 tonight.

Well heck- 11:30 since I missed the first two hours.

Posted by: Twin Cities Daydrunk, getcher DQ cones free next week! at March 19, 2017 11:18 AM (1aMQH)

197 I will second Being Mortal. I read it after my mom died of gallbladder cancer. My mom decided not to fight it when her treatments stopped being effective. We enjoyed more time with her because of it. Being Mortal reinforced to me that she made all the right decisions.

I am reading In the Name of the Family by Sarah Dunant. It is set in 1500 and focuses on the Borgia family. My knowledge of history about this time is nil, so I can't speak of its accuracy. I am enjoying the book. I can imagine the intrigue of the time period being just as nasty as she portrays.

Posted by: Quirky bookworm at March 19, 2017 11:20 AM (gppsv)

198 But if you set your house on fire with the candle, that will release a whole lot of CO2 into the atmosphere.

Posted by: rickl at March 19, 2017 11:18 AM (sdi6R)

I have several of those "scented candles" around, and I think they are truly dangerous, you tend to light them and forget them....

Posted by: Colin at March 19, 2017 11:21 AM (DLV/d)

199 >>>Colin's not a troll.
Posted by: m at March 19, 2017 11:12 AM (3jGss)

. . . though I guess this could be a different Colin. We've got a good Colin who reports Chicago stats. Maybe the snark-off was just omitted.

Posted by: m at March 19, 2017 11:21 AM (3jGss)

200 It would be a shame about The Walking Dead, except I lost interest in the show a season or two back...

Posted by: Castle Guy at March 19, 2017 11:21 AM (7aeqx)

201 "Cedar Sanderson has a fantasy series where an Alaskan gal finds out she may be the queen of Fairie. Oh, and she has a bunch of large, super protective male cousins. If I remember right, Sanderson grew up in Alaska and you can tell she has affection for the people there.
Posted by: Polliwog the 'Ette at March 19, 2017 11:07 AM (sEDyY)"

-------

Thanks for the tip, I will certainly check out this author.

Posted by: Decaf at March 19, 2017 11:21 AM (Tm3Ti)

202 though I guess this could be a different Colin.
We've got a good Colin who reports Chicago stats. Maybe the snark-off
was just omitted.

Posted by: m at March 19, 2017 11:21 AM (3jGss)

I hope there is only one of me! The lights out thing is a joke to me....But I want to keep everyone informed on the latest news. /sarc

Posted by: Colin at March 19, 2017 11:24 AM (DLV/d)

203 I haven't been to breitbart in a while- what a mess. Disqus sucks donkey balls.

Posted by: Mr Aspirin Factory at March 19, 2017 11:25 AM (89T5c)

204 Last night I finished reading The Hour of Lead, by Bruce Holbert. I had previously read Nocturnal Animals by the same, and it was haunting and disturbing and beautifully written.

Hour of Lead is, also, though I am having trouble squaring the main character's actions at the end of the story with his former actions.

Holbert's books are western, though not "westerns." Spare characters, reminiscent of some of Cormac McCarthy's stoicism.

Posted by: April at March 19, 2017 11:25 AM (e8PP1)

205 165: The second book is a classic that I always knew that I should read, but never got around to until last year: The Count of Monte Cristo, by Dumas.

If you enjoyed that, pick up The Black Count by Tom Reiss. It's a biography of Dumas's black father, a famous soldier in his day, but who fell out with Napoleon and ended up in prison. I learned a lot about black slavery in the Caribbean -- basically, the author concluded that any French-held slave in the sugar plantations would have thought slavery in the southern United States was heaven by comparison. And -- the self-righteous French, so proud of their Droites de l'Homme, actually ended and then reinstated slavery. I loved this book, even the first part which might only interest someone who hangs out in academia all day, of the difficulty of getting access to critical documents for the bio. Great story all around.

Posted by: Alifa at March 19, 2017 11:26 AM (sEKHe)

206 Does this lights off thing apply to cars? It would be good to know if it does.

Posted by: Northernlurker at March 19, 2017 11:26 AM (nBr1j)

207 >>>120 The weirdest thing happened on the movie thread. I normally comment using my iPad but on that thread I commented using my phone.

I could see my comment but as soon as I refreshed it would disappear and I could no longer see it. At first I thought I was banned but then I saw people reply to the comment. The same thing happened when I commented again.

Has the same happened to anyone else?

Does anyone know why it happens?
Posted by: Decaf at March 19, 2017 10:25 AM (Tm3Ti)

We're gaslighting.

Posted by: m at March 19, 2017 11:26 AM (3jGss)

208 Dryasdust - a boring, padantic speaker or writer

Posted by: Skip at March 19, 2017 11:26 AM (GPaiX)

209 >>>203 I haven't been to breitbart in a while- what a mess. Disqus sucks donkey balls.
Posted by: Mr Aspirin Factory at March 19, 2017 11:25 AM (89T5c)

Pixy FTW!

Posted by: m at March 19, 2017 11:27 AM (3jGss)

210 Cars are producing their own lights but runon fuel so guessing they are out.
Personally I might turn on everything and fire up my burn barrel just to spite them.

Posted by: Skip at March 19, 2017 11:28 AM (GPaiX)

211 200 It would be a shame about The Walking Dead, except I lost interest in the show a season or two back...
Posted by: Castle Guy at March 19, 2017 11:21 AM (7aeqx)

I've been sticking with it, but they seem to be losing their mojo. The pacing of the show has been terrible of late.

Posted by: Insomniac - sin valor at March 19, 2017 11:29 AM (0mRoj)

212 Morning 'rons and 'ettes.

I just watched maybe the most miserable movie on Netflix...5 to 7.

If it weren't for the absolute charm of Anton Yelchin, I would have given up on it 15 minutes in.

Posted by: Tickled Pink at March 19, 2017 11:31 AM (smD62)

213 "my family was going to our parishes 12:30 Latin Mass.....until they discontinued it....so now...5:00 on Sunday evening....i call it the last chance Mass......
Posted by: phoenixgirl..spring training at March 19, 2017 11:15 AM (0O7c5)"

---------

Phoenixgirl, in our parish the last chance Mass is at 6 pm and is always packed. I joke that all these parishioners are not morning people, just like me.

Posted by: Decaf at March 19, 2017 11:32 AM (Tm3Ti)

214 203 I haven't been to breitbart in a while- what a mess. Disqus sucks donkey balls.
Posted by: Mr Aspirin Factory at March 19, 2017 11:25 AM (89T5c)


Yeah, I hate Disqus. You can have a thread with 2000 comments, and half of them are like "You suck" "No, you suck".

Posted by: rickl at March 19, 2017 11:33 AM (sdi6R)

215 Mussolini had been in power since 1922 and did not have much in the way of military spoils to show for it, while Hitler held Tyrol and had retaken the Rhineland.
Posted by: San Franpsycho at March 19, 2017 09:29 AM (EZebt)

Well, he did have that wonderful blitzkrieg through Albania to his credit in 1939. Even though the Albanians didn't even want Albania. King Zog be damned.

Posted by: Hairyback Guy at March 19, 2017 11:33 AM (5VlCp)

216 I hope there is only one of me! The lights out thing is a joke to me....But I want to keep everyone informed on the latest news. /sarc

Posted by: Colin at March 19, 2017 11:24 AM (DLV/d)


Sometimes jokes go over my head, particularly if they're delivered deadpan. or near-deadpan. Sorry I mistook you for a troll.

Posted by: OregonMuse, deplorable since 2004 at March 19, 2017 11:34 AM (e/R3e)

217 I'm a TWD fan, missed a few FTWD.
A interesting point in Frederick the Great, at Christmas 1745 when the war for Silesia was over and Prussia was in control of it, Frederick though only 33 thought his life work was over, he had no idea he was barely starting.

Posted by: Skip at March 19, 2017 11:34 AM (GPaiX)

218 I plan to have my lights on and my whale-oil lamps burning brightly.

Posted by: Insomniac - sin valor at March 19, 2017 11:35 AM (0mRoj)

219 Yeah, I hate Disqus. You can have a thread with 2000 comments, and half of them are like "You suck" "No, you suck".
Posted by: rickl at March 19, 2017 11:33 AM (sdi6R)


You think Disqus is bad, YouTube comment sections are even worse. Within 3-5 iterations, it's all "fcuk you" and "you're Hitler".

The internet brings out the worst in some people.

Posted by: OregonMuse, deplorable since 2004 at March 19, 2017 11:37 AM (e/R3e)

220
Didn't Mussolini try and get away, but by a stroke of luck, he was recognized at a road block even though he dressed and tried to change his looks, or something like that.

Posted by: Colin at March 19, 2017 10:21 AM (DLV/d)







Yeah. That shit don't always work.

Posted by: Zombie Antonio López de Santa Anna at March 19, 2017 11:38 AM (cuZZW)

221 I plan to have my lights on and my whale-oil lamps burning brightly.

Posted by: Insomniac - sin valor at March 19, 2017 11:35 AM (0mRoj)


What a lightweight. I'll be setting an entire whale on fire.

And throwing on a bunch of old tires.

Posted by: OregonMuse, deplorable since 2004 at March 19, 2017 11:40 AM (e/R3e)

222 I think Facebook comments are even worse than Disqus.

I hope ace never changes a thing. I'm serious.

Posted by: bluebell at March 19, 2017 11:41 AM (sBOL1)

223 OregonMuse: ...Sometimes jokes go over my head, particularly if they're delivered deadpan. or near-deadpan....

Well, okay! That explains your reaction to everything I ever wrote!



Seriously, talk about fooled by deadpan delivery, seems like several times a week I have to tell Milady, "I was yust yoking!"

Posted by: mindful webworker - serially at March 19, 2017 11:42 AM (PukHz)

224 I discovered something while reading this week. In my quest to learn Latin, I began to read Aurae Inter Salices (The Wind In the Willows), a book intended for fourth or fifth graders when written, and found it very difficult. I then read a classical Latin text of the Book of Mark from the Bible and found it much easier. That got me to thinking that Mark's Dragnet-like just-the-facts-ma'am style was quite appropriate for his intended audience and the majority of the early Christians, the slaves and blue-tunic workers of the Empire. You know, Tea Partiers.

P.S. I wanted to read Fundus Animalium (Animal Farm) first but Aurae Inter Salices was available sooner.

Posted by: Anonosaurus Wrecks. Now worse than Hitler! at March 19, 2017 11:42 AM (Nwg0u)

225 222 I think Facebook comments are even worse than Disqus.

I hope ace never changes a thing. I'm serious.
Posted by: bluebell at March 19, 2017 11:41 AM (sBOL1)


Yeah, this.

Personally, I dread the upgrade to Minx 0.7 beta.

Posted by: rickl at March 19, 2017 11:43 AM (sdi6R)

226 I would love my own pimped out Bookmobile with leopard interior and faux zebra reading chairs. Lots of oversized art books and cheezerific paperbacks.

Oh wait, that's my living room!

Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at March 19, 2017 08:57 AM (EnKk6)


Pics, or it doesn't exist. We've had plenty of dry-as-dust libraries anyway, mine included.

Posted by: Kodos the Executioner at March 19, 2017 11:43 AM (+sRjj)

227 Though not a lurker, I'm not a prolific poster either. Just gonna change the Nic to something more appropriate. No more Pete Seria. Hope this isn't already in use.

Oh yeah, how about them Badgers?

Posted by: Ecc 10:2 at March 19, 2017 11:44 AM (lJW6d)

228 You think Disqus is bad, YouTube comment sections are even worse. Within 3-5 iterations, it's all "fcuk you" and "you're Hitler".

The internet brings out the worst in some people.
Posted by: OregonMuse, deplorable since 2004 at March 19, 2017 11:37 AM (e/R3e)


For some reason, breitbart.com seems to get it the worst.

"That was an interesting and informative article, I'll unblock Disqus and see what whimsical and witty insights like-minded people have shared"

*firehose of pure bigotry directly into the eyeballs*

Posted by: hogmartin at March 19, 2017 11:44 AM (8nWyX)

229
An excellent book about Italy and Ethiopia is Haile Selassie's War by Anthony Mockler.

Posted by: IllTemperedCur at March 19, 2017 11:45 AM (cuZZW)

230 The internet brings out the worst in some people.

Posted by: OregonMuse, deplorable since 2004 at March 19, 2017 11:37 AM (e/R3e)


Only Nazi spawn would say something like this.

Posted by: Kodos the Executioner at March 19, 2017 11:45 AM (+sRjj)

231 Omg ya'll...has anyone found that weekend DJs on local radio stations are the WORST?

Posted by: Tickled Pink at March 19, 2017 11:46 AM (smD62)

232
P.S. I wanted to read Fundus Animalium (Animal Farm) first but Aurae Inter Salices was available sooner. Posted by: Anonosaurus Wrecks. Now worse than Hitler! at March 19, 2017 11:42 AM (Nwg0u)
=====

So nobody else has 'Winnie Ille Pu'? In truth, ecclesiatical Latin was a breeze after Vergil.

Posted by: mustbequantum at March 19, 2017 11:46 AM (MIKMs)

233 34 ... Polliwog, You are in BIG trouble! How dare you mention those Bulldog Drummond books and audio stuff. I love the mystery and adventure stories from that period. Now I have to get them (glad they are inexpensive) and add them to the 'to be read soon' list. Sigh!

Oh well. One of the many dangers of the weekly Book Thread. If it was daily, we would all be broke.

Posted by: JTB at March 19, 2017 09:54 AM (V+03K)

Another series of books in that vein, and from that era would be the "Richard Hannay" thrillers by John Buchan (aka Lord Tweedsmuir). Buchan was a friend of T.E. Lawrence, and one of the recurring characters in the Hannay Books is modeled after Lawrence.

IIRC, "The Thirty-nine Steps" is the first of the series.

Posted by: Alberta Oil Peon at March 19, 2017 11:47 AM (WDdjT)

234 I think I'll give the collected 'Wearing the Cat' a try. I bought the first two ebooks and wanted to wait until the story was consolidated.

I finished John Master's autobiographies "Bugles and a Tiger" and "The Road Past Mandalay". Masters was a British officer of one of the Gurka regiments and fought briefly in the mideast and in Burma in one of the Chindit units that went behind Japanese lines, with mixed results. Later her went on after the war to write several fiction novels set in India.

Good stuff. His autobiography reminded me a lot of "Quartered Safe Out Here" by George MacDonald Fraser. Though his fiction is not like the Flashman series at all. Worth a read.

And for you comic book fans, the Planet Hulk graphic novel is actually pretty darn good. If you want to see what Thor 3 seems to be based on, check it out. Good writing for a comic and I say that as someone who is not a Hulk fan.

Posted by: Mark Andrew Edwards at March 19, 2017 11:47 AM (xJa6I)

235 More seriously, hiding behind anonymity makes it easier to be unhinged. Except for here, I always comment under my own name. Which varies.

Posted by: Kodos the Executioner at March 19, 2017 11:48 AM (+sRjj)

236 I wish I knew Latin - but I don't eish it hard enough to actually try learning it.
Kudos to Anon Wrecks.

Posted by: @votermom @vm at March 19, 2017 11:48 AM (Om16U)

237 I finished John Master's autobiographies "Bugles and a Tiger" and "The Road Past Mandalay". Masters was a British officer of one of the Gurka regiments and fought briefly in the mideast and in Burma in one of the Chindit units that went behind Japanese lines, with mixed results. Later her went on after the war to write several fiction novels set in India.
Posted by: Mark Andrew Edwards at March 19, 2017 11:47 AM (xJa6I)


I've mentioned this one on previous book threads, but if you like that sort of thing, check out F. Spencer Chapman's The Jungle is Neutral about his stay-behind commando experiences in WWII Malaya.

Posted by: hogmartin at March 19, 2017 11:49 AM (8nWyX)

238 Yay - book thread!

I have been reading Hugh Ross's "Hidden Treasures in the Book of Job."

Recommend!

Posted by: Jade Sea at March 19, 2017 11:50 AM (QzGX6)

239 Except for here, I always comment under my own name. Which varies.

Posted by: Kodos the Executioner at March 19, 2017 11:48 AM (+sRjj)

Interesting.

I comment here under my own name.

Posted by: CharlieBrown'sDildo at March 19, 2017 11:51 AM (rF0hx)

240 More seriously, hiding behind anonymity makes it easier to be unhinged. Except for here, I always comment under my own name. Which varies.
Posted by: Kodos the Executioner at March 19, 2017 11:48 AM (+sRjj)
--------

Wait. Except for here? You mean you're not really an executioner?

Posted by: bluebell at March 19, 2017 11:52 AM (sBOL1)

241 I thought we all commented under our real names.

Posted by: Nigel West Dickens at March 19, 2017 11:52 AM (FqgrG)

242 I comment here under my own name.

Posted by: CharlieBrown'sDildo at March 19, 2017 11:51 AM (rF0hx)


You and your parents must have an interesting history.

Posted by: Kodos the Executioner at March 19, 2017 11:53 AM (+sRjj)

243 @hogmartin

Thanks, will do.

Posted by: Mark Andrew Edwards at March 19, 2017 11:53 AM (xJa6I)

244 Nood gunz

Posted by: WhatWhatWhat? at March 19, 2017 11:54 AM (ul9CR)

245
You and your parents must have an interesting history.
Posted by: Kodos the Executioner at March 19, 2017 11:53 AM (+sRjj)
-------

I hope he has no sons, for their sake.

Daughters at least can take on their husband's name.

Posted by: bluebell at March 19, 2017 11:54 AM (sBOL1)

246 "Wait. Except for here? You mean you're not really an executioner?"

Only a hobby.


Posted by: Kodos the Executioner at March 19, 2017 11:54 AM (+sRjj)

247 I read In the Heat of the Night by John Ball. This was the source material for the movie of the same title that starred Sidney Poitier. The novel is actually more about the two white police officers, Chief Gillespie and Office Sam Woods and their struggle with prejudice regarding the experienced black police officer, Virgil Tibbs. Tibbs is somewhat a secondary character and Ball never gives us a glimpse into what he is thinking compared to Gillespie and Woods. The resolution of the murder is solved with a bit of hand-waving by Ball. As a mystery it is a bit "meh" but as a time capsule of what circa 1965 small town Georgia was like it is more interesting. To my surprise, Sam Woods is the hero of the story and Tibbs is a supporting character. I give it a 4/5 rating.

I also read South African Armour of the Border War 1975-89 by Kyle Harmse & Simon Dunstan. I found it to be an interesting study of how and why South Africa got involved in fighting in Angola and South West Africa (later Namibia); essentially the leftist government of Portugal abandoned their old colonies and left a power vacuum in which the fighting was spilling over into South Africa. A bit light in actual technical details about the various South African armored vehicles studied, there are numerous contemporary photographs. My criticism of the photos is that many are reproduced in a small format (about 2" x 2") that it is difficult to see any details. I learned that the SADF troops primarily used armored cars armed with low-velocity 90mm guns to fight the T55s supplied by Russia. I give it a 4/5 rating.

Posted by: Retired Buckey Cop is now an engineer at March 19, 2017 11:55 AM (5Yee7)

248 I made a conscious decision back in the 90's to only post online using my own name. Keeps me accountable in the 'don't say anything online that you wouldn't say to someone's face'.

I do use a nic on Pornhub and Hentai sites, though Gotta draw the line somewhere.

Posted by: Mark Andrew Edwards at March 19, 2017 11:56 AM (xJa6I)

249 233 ... "Another series of books in that vein, and from that era would be the "Richard Hannay" thrillers by John Buchan (aka Lord Tweedsmuir). Buchan was a friend of T.E. Lawrence, and one of the recurring characters in the Hannay Books is modeled after Lawrence."

AOP, Oh dear, more to add to the list. Thanks for the mention about the Hannay series. It sounds really good. Fortunately, the series is available in a Kindle form for 1.99. This is one of the risks of e-readers: affordable stuff. I'll have to live into my hundreds just to catch up with what I already have downloaded.

Posted by: JTB at March 19, 2017 11:56 AM (V+03K)

250 I discovered something while reading this week. In
my quest to learn Latin, I began to read Aurae Inter Salices (The Wind
In the Willows), a book intended for fourth or fifth graders when
written, and found it very difficult.
Posted by: Anonosaurus Wrecks. Now worse than Hitler! at March 19, 2017 11:42 AM


Non illegitimus carborundum.

;-)

Posted by: Kilroy hic erat at March 19, 2017 11:57 AM (DMUuz)

251 "I think I'll give the collected 'Wearing the Cat' a try. I bought the first two ebooks and wanted to wait until the story was consolidated. "

Did try it. Pretty good stuff.

If memory serves, our author said he was shooting for a bit of Joseph Heller (Catch 22, yo). Author quite successful in this aim, just the right amount of Helleresque (heh?) absurdity without being derivative. Huzzah!

Posted by: Twin Cities Daydrunk, getcher DQ cones free next week! at March 19, 2017 11:57 AM (1aMQH)

252 221 I plan to have my lights on and my whale-oil lamps burning brightly.

Posted by: Insomniac - sin valor at March 19, 2017 11:35 AM (0mRoj)

What a lightweight. I'll be setting an entire whale on fire.

And throwing on a bunch of old tires.
Posted by: OregonMuse, deplorable since 2004 at March 19, 2017 11:40 AM (e/R3e)

Best I could do on short notice. I'm saving the baby seals and cans of CFC propellant for Earth Day.

Posted by: Insomniac - sin valor at March 19, 2017 11:58 AM (0mRoj)

253 "...and do they call me Kodos the bridge-builder? No! But you execute sixty or seventy people..."

Posted by: just the punch line at March 19, 2017 11:58 AM (8nWyX)

254 @Retired Berkley Cop

South African armored cars feature in Col. Kratman's novel Countdown: The Liberators. It discusses the low velocity 90mm and options for upgrading it. Some good action in the book, too.

Posted by: Mark Andrew Edwards at March 19, 2017 11:59 AM (xJa6I)

255 Best I could do on short notice. I'm saving the baby seals and cans of CFC propellant for Earth Day.
Posted by: Insomniac - sin valor at March 19, 2017 11:58 AM (0mRoj)
--------
Lightweight.

I've got a polar bear roasting on a spit in the backyard.

Posted by: bluebell at March 19, 2017 11:59 AM (sBOL1)

256
After considerable thought, I'm inclined to comment

Long Story warning :

A Cowboy Detective: A True Story Of Twenty-Two Years With A World Famous Detective Agency by Charles A. Siringo - 99c on the kindle. (ASIN: B01NA0KAOO). It links to a long list of other 99c kindle books on historical subjects.

The style is plain and simple, just remember that the word 'investigation' back in the old days meant going out and talking to people and getting them to gossip about their neighbors, not the modern day CSI forensic x-ray tomography DNA Laser crime scene investigation.

Wyat Erp, it was said, was 'a master of disguise' which probably meant he could ride over to the next town and adopt the persona of an ordinary anonymous cowboy, and get people to gossip about their neighbors the way small town people do. That was how you gathered 'intel' on the outlaw you were tracking.

Back in J. Edgar's time, FBI agents would talk to your neighbors and dutifully write down everything they said about you, and it went into your 'FBI File' that was stored in a warehouse some where. If your neighbor said you were a communist, well, there you go.

So there was this time that me and another truck driver found ourselves empty and parked on a dead end road at the Alameda County Airport. There was this little hole in the wall short order grill about two blocks up the street where we could get breakfast, and a land line 'phone', back in the olden times before cell phones.

So we're sitting there, the only two guys in the place, when the cook says, pointing towards the window, 'that is DEA'. We both looked out the window, and I said, "DEA? What are they doing out here?"

"Lota drugs fly in here," the cook says.

"Oh! Well, we are just two truck drivers waiting for dispatch to find us loads out of here." But I'm thinking the cook is probably DEA and the grill is a front where the DEA can get info on the pilots who fly in and out, and want a burger and fries while they wait for the plane to be unloaded before flying back to Columbia.

I did not consider the possibility that two truck drivers waiting for loads might be waiting for one of those drug flights to land. Silly me.

So, the next time you are at your favorite strip club stuffing dollar bills down the g-string of your favorite exotic dancer that the guy who sits down next to you and strikes up a conversation might be a federal agent.

Just something to keep in mind for the next time you fill out that form for a background check for the new shotgun you are buying and you come to that question, 'have you ever been arrested?'.

Posted by: Skandia Recluse at March 19, 2017 12:00 PM (I2VBa)

257 "It's like a big maisma of Lie Gas spread all over the Near East in the 600s AD and had just reached Armenia. Depressing! "

Plenty of Lie Gas to go around in the early Middle Ages. See the Donation of Constantine.

Posted by: Tuna at March 19, 2017 12:01 PM (jm1YL)

258 "What a lightweight. I'll be setting an entire whale on fire. "

HAH! Thanks for both the laugh and my fantasy football team name for the upcoming season.

"Entire Whale on Fire" will rule.

Posted by: Twin Cities Daydrunk, getcher DQ cones free next week! at March 19, 2017 12:01 PM (1aMQH)

259 Interesting how this nest of drunkards, bigots, and pornhounds has maintained relatively civil discourse over the years when others haven't.

Ricochet is by membership and that certainly helps, plus its readers are a more thoughtful and literate group than, say, YouTube. National Review is good but used to be better; it seems to be constantly under attack by the poo-flinging flying monkeys of the Left.

Breitbart was once tolerable. I came to it via John Nolte's film reviews and one could have decent conversations on the topic at hand. It started its slide to clusterfuckery in the Bush years and hit batshitery in the Obama regime.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at March 19, 2017 12:02 PM (EnKk6)

260 I've got a polar bear roasting on a spit in the backyard.

Posted by: bluebell at March 19, 2017 11:59 AM (sBOL1)

With spotted owl stuffing?

That's one of my favorites!

Posted by: CharlieBrown'sDildo at March 19, 2017 12:02 PM (rF0hx)

261 Yes! I serve it with sauce au snail darter. It's a family fave.

Posted by: bluebell at March 19, 2017 12:04 PM (sBOL1)

262 @Skandia Recluse

I had that book come up in my Amazon recs. May check it out and add it to the pile, thanks.

Posted by: Mark Andrew Edwards at March 19, 2017 12:05 PM (xJa6I)

263 Real name?
Heh, you get a sort of variation of my initials. I have made a few comments where any sleuth at all could have figured out my name though and a handful here know me through emails.

OM, thanks for the comment in the post to the lurkers about not worrying about how others respond to their comments. I know of one ette whose "company" here I really enjoyed that decided to quit commenting much at all some years back due to someone being a jackass in the book thread.
Yeah, I know, you're supposed to stand your ground, fire right back and all that but to some a "meek and gentle spirit" in a lady is a good thing.

Posted by: teej at March 19, 2017 12:06 PM (tnOuI)

264 Eris, NRO has become intolerable to me. I used to comment there infrequently, right from the time they started taking comments.

I went there less and less as TDS set in (and I was not a Trump fan, but as soon as he was the nominee, that was that) but when the Facebook comments started, that was the last straw. Done.

Posted by: bluebell at March 19, 2017 12:07 PM (sBOL1)

265 It discusses the low velocity 90mm and options for upgrading it. Some good action in the book, too.

Posted by: Mark Andrew Edwards at March 19, 2017 11:59 AM (xJa6I)

I was in the army (60's) when we upgraded from 90mm to 105mm, wouldn't want to be on the receiving end of either one!

Posted by: Colin at March 19, 2017 12:07 PM (DLV/d)

266 @220
Mussolini tried to sneak away dressed as a German soldier, but was recognise by Partisans at a roadblock.

Posted by: Cosda at March 19, 2017 12:08 PM (tHymu)

267 Is it possible for a middle-aged29 year-old unemployed housewife to find a kindred spirit in a 2000 years dead Roman Emperor?


Posted by: @votermom @vm pimping great books usually free or sale at March 19, 2017 09:33 AM (Om16U)


I have read Aurelius's Meditations several times over the years. I have found it to be quite insightful on how to deal with things you can not change. It is part of the Stoic school of philosopy.

Posted by: Retired Buckey Cop is now an engineer at March 19, 2017 12:08 PM (5Yee7)

268 For Pi Day, Milady, the reader of the house, ran across something in Joy of Cooking. (Possibly should've gone in the food thread, but, hey, cookbooks are books, right?)

"A hundred years ago, when pies were often eaten at breakfast as well as supper, many American housewives baked a dozen or more fruit pies every week."

For Pi Day, Milady made fresh strawberry-cream cheese pie, and we're enjoying the last two slices this morning.

Roll back the calendar! I'm all-in for this pies-for-breakfast thing!!

Posted by: mindful webworker - strawberry pies forever at March 19, 2017 12:08 PM (PukHz)

269 @Eris

I was a big fan of Nolte's movie reviews, too. I think I got started with Brietbart when it first launched Big Hollywood. It had posts by Mike Grell and Bill Willingham but it got pretty strident. Dunno. Things changed with Andrew's death. Not for the better, mostly. But hell, it's another allied fighter in the culture war, so I'll take all the help I can get.

Posted by: Mark Andrew Edwards at March 19, 2017 12:09 PM (xJa6I)

270 mww, sounds like I need to dig out my old Joy of Cooking and look for that quote! Peach pie for breakfast? Yes please.

Posted by: bluebell at March 19, 2017 12:10 PM (sBOL1)

271 Wow--what a thread, Oregon Muse! Rich and deluxe!

Posted by: Ladylibertarian at March 19, 2017 12:10 PM (TdMsT)

272 233 ... "Another series of books in that vein, and from that era would be the "Richard Hannay" thrillers by John Buchan (aka Lord Tweedsmuir). Buchan was a friend of T.E. Lawrence, and one of the recurring characters in the Hannay Books is modeled after Lawrence."


I've heard a theologian once claim that the '39' in Buchan's 'The 39 Steps' is an oblique reference to the Anglican confession known as The 39 Articles and the book is patterned after it. I'm not sure how he knows this, other than John Buchan was a serious Anglican, and not one of these trendy modern, liberal flaky faux Anglicans.

It sounds really good. Fortunately, the series is available in a Kindle form for 1.99. This is one of the risks of e-readers: affordable stuff. I'll have to live into my hundreds just to catch up with what I already have downloaded.
Posted by: JTB at March 19, 2017 11:56 AM (V+03K)


Yeah, tell me about it. I've got so many Kindle books now that I will probably never get to them all in my lifetime.

Posted by: OregonMuse, deplorable since 2004 at March 19, 2017 12:11 PM (e/R3e)

273 And classy and luxurious. Like all of OMuse's threads.

He's our Resident Intellectual.

Posted by: bluebell at March 19, 2017 12:12 PM (sBOL1)

274 South African armored cars feature in Col. Kratman's novel Countdown: The Liberators. It discusses the low velocity 90mm and options for upgrading it. Some good action in the book, too.

Posted by: Mark Andrew Edwards at March 19, 2017 11:59 AM (xJa6I)


Thanks for the recommendation. I assume you are talking about Tom Kratman: I haven't read all his book, but have really liked the ones I have.

Posted by: Retired Buckey Cop is now an engineer at March 19, 2017 12:12 PM (5Yee7)

275 Tonight I'm going to throw a few snail darters out into the snowbank and see if they can swim....

Posted by: Colin at March 19, 2017 12:12 PM (DLV/d)

276 191 Phoenix girl, bummer about your Latin mass. Every now and then I mention to our pastor how much I like ad orientem masses. I have been saying the Rosary in Latin because it's much more meditative for me as I can also think in English at the same time. A full Latin mass: I haven't experienced enough of those to know if I would prefer it or not, but I would definitely prefer ad orientem: at the elevation, all you can see, the only thing to look at is the Blessed Sacrament.

Posted by: Tonestaple at March 19, 2017 12:13 PM (+DRpa)

277 #271, 273

( *blushes*)

Thank you for your kind words.

Posted by: OregonMuse, deplorable since 2004 at March 19, 2017 12:13 PM (e/R3e)

278 @Retired Buckey Cop
Yep, that's the man. I try to keep up with most of Baen's stable. They've been reliably entertaining; some more than others but more good than bad.

Posted by: Mark Andrew Edwards at March 19, 2017 12:14 PM (xJa6I)

279 OMuse, it's the truth.

Also it's the least I could do since I turned your chess thread into a dress thread.

Posted by: bluebell at March 19, 2017 12:15 PM (sBOL1)

280 And for you historical fantasy fans, check out Paul Kearney's The Ten Thousand. Really good pseudo-classical Greek with a very light dusting of fantasy, no real magic, just a really good retelling of Xenophon's Anabasis.

Paul is amazingly good at characterization and putting into the dust and blood of phalanx fighting.

Posted by: Mark Andrew Edwards at March 19, 2017 12:18 PM (xJa6I)

281 "Going for Broke" looks good. In the "It's worse than you thought" chapter they say ...
"although no one believes that it is possible for deficits to remain on such a trajectory forever, only a fundamental change in budget policy can avert it."

The question has been ... At what point does the public become "woke" enough to realize buying votes with free stuff is killing our economic freedom?

The answer is unclear, but campaigner Obama called Bush unpatriotic/irresponsible for running up debt. When Trump suggested eliminating a block grant that involves 2% of the meals-on-wheels program, my local news interviewed a local person, informing her that Trump wants to eliminate funding for the program. Being misinformed, the woman was worried she would, therefore, be skipping some meals. This wasn't just an MSM national "Trump is killing Big Bird" story, it was coordinated to the local level. (and they failed to mention it was only a 2% potential cut)

So even in "good times" for markets at least, the slightest cuts in wasteful block grants are met with coordinated hysteria. Something has to "break" to stop the unpatriotic/irresponsible spending.

Campaigner Trump once mentioned restructuring our debt and was roundly condemned as wanting to default. But quantitative easing ($4T under Obama) and zero interest rate policy (for 8 years) is just a sneaky way of doing the same, but with more dire consequences to Americans (eventual inflation, zero return on safe savings).

A debt "restructuring" would punish those that bought the debt, knowing there was risk. We could even target "currency manipulator enemies" like China. But inflating our way out punishes all citizenry with inflation, hurting middle America the most, and causing many unforeseen consequences on that road to serfdom.

Peter Schiff always seems to be hyping his silver sales, but he makes many good points here with Molyneux.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kRV4hrTj2KM

Posted by: illiniwek at March 19, 2017 12:20 PM (BrMft)

282 "Suspicion breed more illness than a jungle. " Damon Runyon, page 259, by Jimmy Breslin. RIP Jimmy. Say hello to Damon.

Posted by: Locke Common at March 19, 2017 12:21 PM (2AeoE)

283 Phoenix girl, bummer about your Latin mass. Every
now and then I mention to our pastor how much I like ad orientem masses.
I have been saying the Rosary in Latin because it's much more
meditative for me as I can also think in English at the same time. A
full Latin mass: I haven't experienced enough of those to know if I
would prefer it or not, but I would definitely prefer ad orientem: at
the elevation, all you can see, the only thing to look at is the Blessed
Sacrament. Posted by: Tonestaple at March 19, 2017 12:13 PM (+DRpa)
=====

Old friend of my mom's (died last year at 99) always said that she really liked being able to go anywhere in the world and have Mass: made her feel at home wherever she was. She traveled extensively (husband with old IBM) and really appreciated the old Latin Mass. Love and miss you, Helen.

Posted by: mustbequantum at March 19, 2017 12:22 PM (MIKMs)

284 bluebell #270: mww, sounds like I need to dig out my old Joy of Cooking and look for that quote!

Looks like, ummm, 1997 printing, under "Pies & Tarts," under "About Covered Fruit Pies." p869.

Milady has, I think, three copies of Joy of Cooking, the oldest of which has become three volumes, as it were. The quote is not in the old one. There were some changes over the years, and so we can't just chuck the old, worn edition!

Posted by: mindful webworker - strawberry pies forever at March 19, 2017 12:25 PM (PukHz)

285 Test.

Posted by: Steve and Cold Bear at March 19, 2017 12:29 PM (W8bn5)

286 281
A debt "restructuring" would punish those that bought the debt, knowing there was risk. We could even target "currency manipulator enemies" like China. But inflating our way out punishes all citizenry with inflation, hurting middle America the most, and causing many unforeseen consequences on that road to serfdom.
Posted by: illiniwek at March 19, 2017 12:20 PM (BrMft)


Inflation punishes savers and rewards debtors, since they can pay their debts with inflated currency.

Deflation punishes debtors and rewards savers, since they can buy more with their savings.

Since our economy is up to its eyeballs in debt, the conventional wisdom is that deflation is the worst possible thing that could happen.

As a saver, I say, "Bring it on".

Posted by: rickl at March 19, 2017 12:31 PM (sdi6R)

287 Just because Milady brought it to my attention:

It is satisfying to have a ball of pastry in the refrigerator, ready for hurry-up desserts, cocktail snacks, and meat or chicken pies.

Pies are usually served as dessert, but in New England, warm apple pie is sometimes presented at breakfast as a special Sunday-morning treat.


-Fanny Farmer Cookbook
"Pastries and Pies"
11th Printing, 1965, p407

Posted by: mindful webworker - stuck on pie mode at March 19, 2017 12:31 PM (PukHz)

288 mww, I'm the same way. They change recipes when they do new editions - take some out, add new ones in- and not always for the better.

I love the Better Homes and Gardens classic red cookbook. I have two old but different editions, and both are falling apart but who cares. I've taken to photocopying the pages I use the most and putting them in my other recipe binders

Posted by: bluebell at March 19, 2017 12:32 PM (sBOL1)

289 Milady has, I think, three copies of Joy of Cooking, the oldest of which has become three volumes, as it were. The quote is not in the old one. There were some changes over the years, and so we can't just chuck the old, worn edition!
Posted by: mindful webworker - strawberry pies forever at March 19, 2017 12:25 PM (PukHz)
---
I love Mom's 1950's Betty Crocker cookbook. Much better than some of the newer editions.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at March 19, 2017 12:35 PM (EnKk6)

290 283 must be quantum, a very good point about the universality of the Latin mass for the "universal church."

Posted by: Tonestaple at March 19, 2017 12:37 PM (+DRpa)

291 Eris, I have an old Betty Crocker one too - way better than the newer ones.

And my oldest BH&G cookbook is where - yes! - the liverwurst pineapple may be found!

Posted by: bluebell at March 19, 2017 12:37 PM (sBOL1)

292 I have an old Meta Givens cookbook as well as a Fannie Farmer one. While I like some of the newer cookbooks I find the old ones handle classic recipes and old standards much better.

Posted by: Christopher R Taylor at March 19, 2017 12:39 PM (39g3+)

293 For those who don't know, Bluebell and I had a duel on some thread finding gut-churningly offal recipes. Here's ye liverwurst pineapple:

http://www.owlsonthetable.com/the-worst-recipe-ive-ever-met/

Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at March 19, 2017 12:40 PM (EnKk6)

294 Firing Line now has a YouTube channel, and there are several good episodes with writers. My two favorite ones are "The Southern Imagination" (with Eudora Welty and Walker Percy) and the 1977 interview with Jorge Luis Borges. I highly recommend both.

There are others that look interesting, with guests like Tom Wolfe and Christopher Hitchens, but I can't speak to those.

Posted by: dwight at March 19, 2017 12:42 PM (iAl7a)

295 This was my opening volley in the food wars: the Jell-o Aquarium:

http://vintage-ads.livejournal.com/5358958.html

Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at March 19, 2017 12:42 PM (EnKk6)

296 Eris, you were the hands-down winner. You find the best-worst stuff.

I just recognized that pineapple pic from your link, and pulled out my old cookbook to confirm my (worst) suspicions.

But you and I both know that jello aquarium will be useful in the near future, as was discussed yesterday.

Posted by: bluebell at March 19, 2017 12:49 PM (sBOL1)

297 OMG. I just checked out that liver pineapple abomination. I'll never be the same.

Reminds me, I'll have to revisit James Lileks' gallery of regrettable foods, or whatever it's called. That makes me laugh until I cry.

Posted by: April at March 19, 2017 12:53 PM (e8PP1)

298 Bluebell, here is something sure to offend the most discriminating guest:

https://ifitshipitshere.blogspot.com/2010/07/holy-mother-of-god-this-is-what-won.html

Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at March 19, 2017 12:54 PM (EnKk6)

299 For those who don't know, Bluebell and I had a duel on some thread finding gut-churningly offal recipes. Here's ye liverwurst pineapple:

http://www.owlsonthetable.com/the-worst-recipe-ive-ever-met/
Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at March 19, 2017 12:40 PM (EnKk6)


You ladies have seen Lileks' Gallery of Regrettable Food, non?
http://www.lileks.com/institute/gallery/

Personal favorite:
http://www.lileks.com/institute/gallery/french/3.html

Posted by: hogmartin at March 19, 2017 12:55 PM (8nWyX)

300 John Ball wrote a lot of books--one, Rescue Mission, is from 1966. It involves a hurricane, a defective plane, and two Civil Air Patrol pilots in the Caribbean. I was in CAP then, and we all had to read it. I remember it as being exciting (the technology will be very dated) and it certainly is a different kind of book than his Virgil Tibbs series.

Posted by: Lirio100 at March 19, 2017 12:57 PM (JK7Jw)

301 Nifty. I assume the lemon slices represent the halos?

Posted by: rickl at March 19, 2017 12:58 PM (sdi6R)

302 Eris, whoa. I'm Catholic but I don't think I could make that!

April and hogmartin - yes indeed! Regrettable is indeed the word. Love his book on 60s/70s decor too.

Posted by: bluebell at March 19, 2017 12:59 PM (sBOL1)

303 298
*crosses self*
How many Hail Mary's do you have to say if you eat one of those?

The city is cool though.

Posted by: @votermom @vm at March 19, 2017 01:04 PM (Om16U)

304 Big Lileks fan. I own "Interior Desecrations". A favorite:

http://www.lileks.com/institute/interiors/71book/7.html

Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at March 19, 2017 01:06 PM (EnKk6)

305 (Use WhatIsMyIP.com to test your IP, see if it changes from airplane mode, router reboot, whatever you do.

Posted by: mindful webworker - what, me read? at March 19, 2017 11:09 AM (PukHz)

Just a little technical detail here regarding getting yourself a new IP address, at least on your router at home.

Rebooting your router will not necessarily do the trick, unless you leave your router powered off for a little while. This is because your router is communicating to the rest of the network (the Internet) through another router, located at your ISP, whomever that may be.

That ISP router contains what is known as a ARP table. The ARP table is a list of devices that the ISP router is communicating with (including yours). Each entry is composed of a MAC address (the PHYSICAL address of your router, which never changes) and the IP address that has been assigned to it by the ISP router, which was done back when your router was first connected to the network and powered on. That is the IP address you use to communicate with other sites/devices on the network, and it may or may not have been banned by Pixy.

Thing is, if you simply reboot your router, most likely you will get the same IP address you had before, because the entry in the core router's ARP table for your device will most likely still be there, and you will be given the same (banned) IP address you had to start with.

To make sure you get a new IP address (or to increase your chances of same), power off your router, and leave it for a while, say 15-20 minutes or so. This will give your entry in the core router's ARP table a chance to "age out" and be dropped from the ARP table.

After a bit, power your router back on. It will transmit what's called an "ARP request", a message saying basically "Here I am, here's my MAC address, please give me a new IP address". The core router receives this, pulls a new (hopefully, although this is not guaranteed) IP address from it's list of available IP addresses, sends the response back to your router, and boom, you have a new IP address.

Posted by: The Oort Cloud - No-Longer-Deplorable Source of all SMODs at March 19, 2017 01:12 PM (T1H5V)

306
260 I've got a polar bear roasting on a spit in the backyard.

Posted by: bluebell at March 19, 2017 11:59 AM (sBOL1)

With spotted owl stuffing?

That's one of my favorites!
Posted by: CharlieBrown'sDildo at March 19, 2017 12:02 PM (rF0hx)

Re: spotted owls
They are being attacked and evicted from their habitat by their owl competitors. This has some bearing on population decline. Don't cha know!

Posted by: Headless Body of Agnew at March 19, 2017 01:13 PM (FtrY1)

307
Re: spotted owls
They are being attacked and evicted from their habitat by their owl competitors. This has some bearing on population decline. Don't cha know!
Posted by: Headless Body of Agnew at March 19, 2017 01:13 PM (FtrY1)
---
Coywolves can climb trees?!

Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at March 19, 2017 01:15 PM (EnKk6)

308 ""As a saver, I say, "Bring it on". Posted by: rickl

right, me too ... deflation is good, how can lower prices be bad? But bad policy has pushed debt and demands constant inflation.

Inflation does help some in debt, but not if it means they default and lose their house, for example. In the end the easy money policy has been bad for the country, good for those leveraged up in markets and for politicians giving out the candy.

It has to be fixed, but at this point if markets crash, Trump will be blamed. Same with the health care problems. Schiff points out that Clinton escaped most of the wrath for his dotcom bubble, because Bush inflated our way out of it with easy money, and then the housing bubble crashed on Bush.

The easy money enabled Obama do all his outrageous spending and regulating, but the MFM will be all in on blaming any correction on Trump. Obama came in at the market bottom (SP 666), Trump comes in at the top of another bubble (SP 2270). It could get ugly, but just like Iran/NK nukes ... they run away from the mess they make.

Posted by: illiniwek at March 19, 2017 01:16 PM (BrMft)

309
OK, Muse, I'll take you up on your offer, and double it -- not one book but two.

There are very few books I've read from start to finish in one sitting. Especially if you exclude mystery/suspense/thrillers. However, there are two NONfiction books that kept me up until 3 in the morning because I could not put them down:

Andrew Breitbart's autobiographical "Righteous Indignation"
and
Geert Wilders's autobiographical "Marked for Death."

Here are two men who are my personal heroes, who are slandered and utterly misrepresented by the leftist lackey media, and who have never, ever backed down from a principle they believed in.

Turns out that such men can really write. Dazzlingly.

These books are not long, and they grab you and won't let go. You feel that Andrew or Geert is right there in the room with you, just talking, and it is inspiring to be in the presence of a person who thinks and lives at full throttle.

By telling their own stories, both Breitbart and Wilders illuminate the Big Picture of today's social and political pathologies. Breitbart gives one of the most insightful indictments of modern media I've ever read, and Wilders' account of his youth is one of the most eloquent defenses of the nation of Israel by a non-Jew that you are likely to come across.

Both of these books are the kind of book that tempt me to just walk up to random strangers and give them a copy, with an urgent "Here, read this!!" Instead, I'll just encourage everyone here at the HQ to buy, borrow or otherwise acquire these two books posthaste.

Posted by: Kathy from Kansas at March 19, 2017 01:18 PM (6gybV)

310
---
I love Mom's 1950's Betty Crocker cookbook. Much better than some of the newer editions.
Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at March 19, 2017 12:35 PM (EnKk6)


I have several copies of The Joy of Cooking and the Betty Crocker Cookbok: my grandmother's, mother's and mine.

Many years ago at an antique store, I found an unopened--still in cellophane wrapper of the Better Homes and Gardens Cookbook published in 1931. It includes all the old time cooking terms and recipes, and pictures of the "modern" 1931 kitchen. Recipes were very basic and hearty in 1931.

Posted by: Ladylibertarian at March 19, 2017 01:28 PM (TdMsT)

311 Kathy, thank you for the recommendations! I too admire both those men. I'll put their books on my list.

Posted by: bluebell at March 19, 2017 01:31 PM (sBOL1)

312 This week finished 'Flying Under Fire 1st Edition, Canadian Fliers Recall The Second World War'
by William Wheeler.

This is an anthology of Canadian flier's experience during the war, not limited to combat or pilots. A good read.

It always astonishes me how off-hand these commentaries can be, how casually people can speak of experiences that are so beyond the imagination of anyone who has not shared them.

One of the more dramatic accounts is by pilot Don Bell, recalling the Tirpitz raid.

Hat-tip to Alberta Oil Peon for sending me the book.

Another has friend provided to me a copy of 'Pearl Harbor, FDR Leads the Nation to War', Gillon. I'm about halfway through that. It's interesting in that it focuses entirely on the 24 hours following the attack, and FDR's (and surrounding personnel) reactions.

Love or hate FDR, it's an interesting micro-level look at events. There are always details behind the details to be discovered. Well written, and an easy read.

Posted by: Mike Hammer, etc., etc. at March 19, 2017 01:32 PM (ZO497)

313 I like Lileks' little books quite a bit, his one on regrettable foods is just hilarious. His commentary is wonderful, doesn't matter the topic. He wrote a novel which my brother read and said it was a bit tough to get into but enjoyable.

Posted by: Christopher R Taylor at March 19, 2017 01:37 PM (39g3+)

314 And since I copied this from another source, I must admit I don't know what the reference "ME 15:326" means.

++++

The quotations contained herein were taken from one of the following sources now in the public domain:

The Writings of Thomas Jefferson (ME)
Memorial Edition (Lipscomb and Bergh, editors)
20 Vols., Washington, D.C., 1903-04.


http://famguardian.org/subjects/politics/thomasjefferson/jeffbibl.htm

Not that I knew myself; I am in no way a scholar. Just a curious googler.

Posted by: Anon Y. Mous at March 19, 2017 01:42 PM (R+30W)

315 OM - Wow. 5 years. What a feat. Thanks so much. SBT -- my favorite.

At loose ends, and not much time. Barely cracked open the SBT recommended The Gentleman from Moscow and Empty Mansions. Looking forward to reading them.

Posted by: gracepmc at March 19, 2017 01:42 PM (OU4q6)

316 I'm reading "Forced into Glory, Abraham Lincoln's White Dream" by Lerone Bennett, Jr. (2000)

Mr. Bennett is a black author who lives in Chicago. While he repeats his irritation at Lincoln constantly, interspersed with these lamentations are facts which explain his irritation. Such as, that Lincoln's generals issued emancipations of slaves in the areas they had taken, and Lincoln countermanded those emancipations. Includes detailed facts about legislation, legislators, generals, and Lincoln, to explain Mr. Bennett's disfavor of Mr. Lincoln, because Lincoln really wanted to gradually emancipate slaves over decades, and then deport them immediately upon emancipation.

Posted by: Bedtime Stories at March 19, 2017 01:48 PM (Kpbco)

317 As cold as it might sound, I wouldn't have much of a problem with deporting slaves who were born in Africa back to their homeland; they were stolen from there. But ones born in the USA, they have no cultural or physical attachment to Africa and were born here, no reason to throw them out.

Posted by: Christopher R Taylor at March 19, 2017 01:52 PM (39g3+)

318 I'm reading "The Power of Positive Thinking". It's the first time I've read it. Ive been dealing with others too much stress and more to come (selling two places, buying a new one and retiring). I like the book and can see how it influenced President Trump.

Posted by: Notsothoreau at March 19, 2017 02:13 PM (Lqy/e)

319 IP Check

Posted by: Flyboy at March 19, 2017 02:33 PM (Q+Qi1)

320 http://bit.ly/2mhPPuw
----
Hobby Lobby Announces Plans To Close All Stores... Here's The Disturbing Reason Why

Posted by: EVLINC! at March 19, 2017 02:36 PM (y3aQB)

321 205 : If you enjoyed that, pick up The Black Count by Tom Reiss. It's a biography of Dumas's black father, a famous soldier in his day, but who fell out with Napoleon and ended up in prison.

Alifa, you are so right. In fact, it makes the Count of Monte Cristo even more enjoyable. Great recommendation.

Posted by: Rgallegos at March 19, 2017 02:50 PM (59GQk)

322 @votermom,
You might want to subscribe to the Daily Stoic mailing list. It covers all the stoics and has been pretty interesting.

Posted by: Notsothoreau at March 19, 2017 02:53 PM (Lqy/e)

323 May have to write a story around these Monster Stomping Boots +4

http://www.shoebuy.com/demonia-poison-101-ankle-boot/776236/1649699

Posted by: Anna Puma at March 19, 2017 03:00 PM (DotZb)

324 I posted before but I highly recommend: The Train to Crystal City: FDR's Secret Prisoner Exchange Program and America's Only Family Internment Camp During World War II by Jan Jarboe Russell.

The author is not a Trump supporter but the book is amazing! Part of FDR's internment camp program, American citizens of Japanese/German/Italian descent were rounded up and sent to camps in Crystal City, Texas. While that might be bad enough (given that they were U.S. citizens) the other part of the program was that they were exchanged for U.S. POW's in Germany and Japan.

It is unbelievable read that is hard to put down along with showing a par of history that I never knew about.

It would be easy to say that it will cause some anger, but the patriotism of these U.S. citizens was unbelievable despite what they went through.

Posted by: Rgallegos at March 19, 2017 03:02 PM (59GQk)

325 Welp. Just got back from Sunday brunch.


Thanks Mark Andrew Edwards!

and

Thank you Twin Cities Daydrunk for your kind words!

Posted by: H.D. Woodard - "Wearing the Cat - The Complete Novel - Volumes 1 & 2 at March 19, 2017 03:03 PM (9q7Dl)

326 Posted by: Notsothoreau at March 19, 2017 02:53 PM (Lqy/e)

thanks

never heard of it.. googlke here I come

Posted by: @votermom @vm at March 19, 2017 03:04 PM (Om16U)

327 Ed Driscoll, commenting on Jimmy Breslin's death, quotes and links to a Tom Wolfe piece in the New Yorker about Breslin, the phenomenon.

https://pjmedia.com/instapundit/260225/

The Wolfe piece is very interesting and worth the read.

Posted by: Anon Y. Mous at March 19, 2017 03:06 PM (R+30W)

328 I have "A Guide to the Good Life" by William Irvine, which is an overview of Stoic philosophy. I havent finished it, because it was lost in my bedroom for several months. Will review when I do.

Posted by: Notsothoreau at March 19, 2017 03:11 PM (Lqy/e)

329 Posted by: Notsothoreau at March 19, 2017 02:13 PM (Lqy/e)

Think And Grow Rich is another classic. It's not just about money. A few hundred best-selling self-help books have been written by stealing from "Power" and "Think".

Posted by: Mathers at March 19, 2017 03:13 PM (3myMJ)

330 Just discovered Ivan Doig. Reading "This House of Sky", a wonderfully nostalgic look back at his rural 1940s/1950s Montana childhood and stories of his forbears.

Posted by: jix at March 19, 2017 03:15 PM (Xx3z8)

331 I did read Think and Grow Rich at one point. Probably should read it again. I have a book called "Write It Down, Make It Happen" that I like. It's mostly stories about how you focus what you want when you write things down. It's the first place I heard about burying a statue of St Joseph to make your house sell quicker. I'm going along with the author and not burying mine, but I did buy the statue.

Posted by: Notsothoreau at March 19, 2017 03:31 PM (Lqy/e)

332 Started two series, one by Orson Scott Card. Three books in the series. I read the first one and can't wait to read two and three. Some of the plot tropes are turning into cliches these days but Card's style and characterization make him a pleasure to read. The first book was "The Lost Gate". The two I have not yet read are "The Gatefather" and "The Gate Thief." Full of wonderful characters both good and bad and the development of the plot does not lag just because it's a trilogy. Very effective foreshadowing without giving too much away.
The other series is the Dresden Files series by Jim Butcher. I cannot find all the books at the library but they have most of them. I have read the first, the third and I think the SIXTEENTH. Not boring and thoroughly entertaining, though some aspects I find distasteful (you may not.) The unpacking of the life and career of the only public wizard in Chicago(!) is both entertaining and exciting. Better even than the graphic novels because my brain makes better pictures than even the greatest artists. The descriptions are very good and the internal monologues of Harry Dresden are often the most entertaining parts of the books. We get to discover things along with Harry and I have to keep reading ti find out how\if Harry's going to get out of this one. Since this is fiction I do take some of the background with at least one grain of salt, but he is very consistent in his characters both human and nonhuman. New revelations in every chapter, and the escapes are believable according to the world Harry inhabits. If there is a deus ex machina, it's a real deus and the machina follows the rules of the universe(s) Harry moves in. Delightful!
Not new books or series but they are pretty much new to me and I am going to read every one I can beg or borrow. Might be tempted to steal but that's not to say I would steal them!

Posted by: BJ54 at March 19, 2017 04:45 PM (6MPqc)

333 I just stumbled into a new (to me) author - Matt Braun

He writes westerns

Tombstone ( B004SICJNQ) might be something to look at, but, for me, it is priced out of reach. Unless I go for the used paperback editions. (Mixed reviews)

Posted by: Skandia Recluse at March 19, 2017 04:59 PM (62cGG)

334 BJ54 The Lost Gate is good. OSC exceks at writing child characters in a cruel world.

Love the Harry Dresden books.

Posted by: @votermom @vm at March 19, 2017 05:10 PM (Om16U)

335 There is geekdom and then there is true geekdom, two naval analysts explain why Manticore won against Haven.

http://www.baen.com/honorverse_analytics

Posted by: Anna Puma at March 19, 2017 05:35 PM (DotZb)

336 Re Italy in Africa read Amedeo Guillermo - the true story of an Italian's war in Abyssinia. True Lawrence of Arabia story of fighting the British invaders with loyal native troops.

Posted by: Slam at March 19, 2017 07:40 PM (C/kwd)

337 Make that Amedeo Guillet sorry

Posted by: Slam at March 19, 2017 07:41 PM (C/kwd)

338 I liked the early Harry Dresden books quite a bit but over time he's being painted more and more into a corner and he's become a bit... unlikable.

Posted by: Christopher R Taylor at March 19, 2017 07:49 PM (39g3+)

339 Robert Heinlein's The Moon Is A Harsh Mistress is difficult for some to read because of the broken English of its narrator's voice, but stick with it. After 50 pages, it will stop bugging you. Like how it takes a while to adapt to reading Shakespeare. Fun fact: the Jimmy Webb song of the same title was because of his love of this book. As of today, I have the only copy of The Moon Is A Harsh Mistress ever signed by Jimmy Webb. Webb told me when he signed it that nobody had ever asked for this before.

Posted by: Comment Monster at March 19, 2017 10:10 PM (HXsXt)

340 >I struggled yesterday to convert some Kindle books to EPUB...should be easy, but I didn't know the latest Kindle format doesn't easily convert. So I ordered the cheapest Kindle reader...Then I won't waste hours doing something that should be easy....even using Epubor...

My previous Kindle de-DRM workflow was to use Kindle for PC to download a book and then point Calibre at it to make it usable. Maybe a month or so ago, Amazon switched the format it delivers to Kindle for PC to something the available tools don't recognize.

The cheapest currently-available-new Kindle isn't likely to do much better for you, as it'll handle this newer format. IIRC, you want to get nothing newer than a 5th-generation Kindle, as reckoned by this list:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amazon_Kindle

I picked up a Kindle Touch from a random eBay seller for maybe $15 shipped. The bezel has a bit of a gouge, but it started working as it should after a couple of software updates (had to call Amazon's tech support to figure out that an update was needed, but they were pretty clueful about their devices). Because it can't be updated to handle the newer format Amazon is using, they'll have to continue delivering ebooks in a format it supports (which is a format Calibre can crack) for the foreseeable future. The serial number on the Kindle Touch is the key to stripping DRM.

Now the workflow is something like this:

1) under "Your Account" on Amazon, select "Manage Your Content and Devices"
2) pick a book, click the Actions button, and click "Download and transfer via USB"
3) pick your older Kindle device from the list and start downloading
4) import the download into Calibre

I suppose having a second reader doesn't hurt either, though the screen on my Kobo Glo HD is much nicer.

Posted by: salfter at March 21, 2017 12:48 PM (kmvkg)

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