The Book Fetish

[Note: I've been away for a long time, babies. Apologies for the long absence. Consider this a peace offering.]

What happens when homes have no books? (You'll have to imagine me saying these words in a rather aghast tone, much as one might use when asking what happens in homes that don't have flush toilets.)

Well, fear not. The question is misphrased. The problem is not houses without books, as it turns out -- the problem is houses without engaged parents.

They have this thing called the internet now, where all sorts of things are available to read at little or no cost. Written matter on the internet is far, far cheaper than a personal library of paper books. And less of a hassle to store and move (trust me on this one -- my personal library at one point encompassed more than three thousand volumes, and when I moved, boxing and moving that vast mountain of paper was the biggest headache of the whole process).

I'm all for getting kids to read and love reading, but this fetishization of books sort of misses the point. Reading books isn't like eating brussels sprouts, or at least shouldn't be -- books at their best provide food for the mind and balm for the heart; adventure, romance, hilarity, insight, solace, and pure information. But those things can be had from other media -- a book is a way to gain that information, it is not the only way. I am second to no one in my appreciation for the power of the written word, but that power can be delivered in any number of ways these days apart from being printed on paper and being bound between two covers.

I've often said that my Amazon Kindle re-ignited (appropriately enough, given the name) a passion for reading that had begun to cool as I grew older. Part of the problem was that my eyesight has gotten worse, and I found much of the print in my vast collection of books too small to read comfortably. I'm also an omnivorous reader and I crave variety: I often have two or three different books going at the same time. But since my taste in books tends to involve large heavy tomes, carrying all these books with me all the time is burdensome to say the least. The Kindle allows me to have every book I own with me at all times, and in any print size from small to VERY LARGE, depending on how fatigued my eyes are. The Amazon Kindle (and its e-reader brethren) are the best thing to happen to the written word in centuries, in my opinion. They're not flawless, certainly, but neither is the paper book.

It bugs me when people substitute the word "book" for "reading". I do a lot of reading -- a LOT of reading -- but I rarely crack an actual book these days unless I absolutely cannot find it for my Kindle. (As happened with Orlando Figes' A People's Tragedy, alas.) The problem besetting poor kids is not so much a lack of books as it is a lack of responsible adults in the house who invest the time and effort to engage them in reading -- whether the written words are in book or on an LCD screen. What's lacking here are not bound slabs of paper, but engaged parents.

And for adults? Reading of so-called "serious literature" has declined in recent decades because a lot of so-called "serious literature" is shit. The general cultural debasement started to exhibit first in the turgid academic book field, and since has metastasized out into every field of literary endeavor. Even the sci-fi and mystery ghettos have been infested with the rot of post-modernism and race/class/gender nonsense. And where that has not happened, we get the sub-adolescent rot of stuff like Twilight or its many imitators. This is the modern equivalent of the penny-dreadful, and serves as proof that just because it's a book, that doesn't mean the words inside of it are any guarantee of quality or even coherence.

It may be that most people these days eschew books for more engaging audio/visual entertainment, but that's hardly surprising: that's been the norm for most of our tenure on earth. Human beings are geared to prefer direct audio/visual stimulus over abstract symbolic input. The ability of common people to buy and consume printed books is a fairly recent one in human history -- until the 18th century, most common folk couldn't afford many books, and probably couldn't read them either (literacy being nowhere near as universal as today). And in any case most of them wouldn't have the time to while away reading -- it was an age of manual labor and no electric light. You worked the daylight hours away, and when it got dark you went to bed.

I guess what I'm saying is: there are certainly worse things than being a lover of books, but be sure you're loving the content of the book. (You can love the actual book as well, I guess, as an object of pure art or craft, but that's a different thing.) And remember that the content of the book can be delivered in any number of ways. Don't fetishize the delivery vehicle.

UPDATE: stevegg says that a proper peace offering would involve a picture of a feline reading a book. Very well.

kitten-book.jpg

Posted by: Monty at 08:46 AM




Comments

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1 Wow. First?

Posted by: Diogenes at December 17, 2015 08:42 AM (08Znv)

2 Now to read content!

Posted by: Diogenes at December 17, 2015 08:43 AM (08Znv)

3 threeeeee

Posted by: ThisBeingMilt at December 17, 2015 08:43 AM (MbrzC)

4 Welcome back.

Posted by: HH at December 17, 2015 08:43 AM (DrCtv)

5 I love books.
Physical books.


And I love the activity of reading.


Posted by: Village Idiot's Apprentice at December 17, 2015 08:45 AM (ptqRm)

6 I prefer paper books/manuals over any digital delivery system currently available.

Don't see that changing anytime soon.

Posted by: Kreplach at December 17, 2015 08:45 AM (EmUe0)

7 Books? No more freedom of thought and expression? Didn't yu get that memo?

Posted by: Nevergiveup at December 17, 2015 08:45 AM (gf8BH)

8 Don't fetishize the delivery vehicle? There goes my comic book collection.

Posted by: BignJames at December 17, 2015 08:46 AM (HtUkt)

9 I love books. They're so, you know.

Posted by: Caroline Kennedy at December 17, 2015 08:46 AM (u5gzz)

10
Where's the news dump????

Posted by: J.J. Sefton at December 17, 2015 08:47 AM (uRmWf)

11 A proper peace offering would include a kitteh.

Preferably one reading a book while doing its business.

Posted by: steveegg at December 17, 2015 08:47 AM (cL79m)

12 Where's the news dump????

Posted by: J.J. Sefton at December 17, 2015 08:47 AM (uRmWf)


Ask Ben. As for me, I want my, I want my, I want my DOOM! all day.

Posted by: steveegg at December 17, 2015 08:48 AM (cL79m)

13 I love books. They're so, you know.

Posted by: Caroline Kennedy at December 17, 2015 08:46 AM (u5gzz)

And knowing is half the battle.

Posted by: G.I. Joe at December 17, 2015 08:49 AM (cL79m)

14 I prefer paper books/manuals over any digital delivery system currently available.

Don't see that changing anytime soon.



Agreed. Old school please.

Posted by: rickb223 at December 17, 2015 08:50 AM (E9ede)

15
I guess what I'm saying is that it bugs me when people substitute the word "book" for "reading". I do a lot of reading -- a LOT of reading -- but I rarely crack an actual book these days unless I absolutely cannot find it for my Kindle.


I get what you're saying, Monty, but, although I like my Kindle (it's easy to carry around, especially on the motorcycle), I'm an odd duck in that, if I want a book, I want a book. With rare cases, I prefer to have the actual, physical thing rather than an electronic simulacrum.


Even the sci-fi and mystery ghettos have been infested with the rot of post-modernism and race/class/gender nonsense. And where that has not happened, we get the sub-adolescent rot of stuff like Twilight or its many imitators. This is the modern equivalent of the penny-dreadful, and serves as proof that just because it's a book, that doesn't mean the words inside of it are any guarantee of quality or even coherence.

Speaking of rot and mystery ghetto, you could do worse - though, admittedly, not much worse - than to buy my book, The Director's Cut: A Theda Bara Mystery for Christmas:

http://goo.gl/B8zQoX

Posted by: Mary Poppins' Practically Perfect Piercing at December 17, 2015 08:50 AM (X6fMO)

16 In the same way I crave an antique treadle sewing machine, I feel the need for real physical books. It's so I won't be helpless when the power grid collapses and we're left in a world without electricity. I may have to go to bed when the sun goes down, but dammit, I'll be the only one with entertainment and clothes to wear!

Posted by: Dr. Mabuse at December 17, 2015 08:50 AM (gjLib)

17 I've often said that my Amazon Kindle re-ignited (appropriately enough, given the name)



ISWYDT.
Golf Clap.

Posted by: rickb223 at December 17, 2015 08:51 AM (E9ede)

18 Words. Words. Words!

Posted by: Hamlet at December 17, 2015 08:52 AM (9Tun9)

19 The other problem of digital delivery is that you don't own the book on the device.

Amazon not too long ago wiped public domain ebooks on peoples kindles.

There is also the fact that the device has to be charged and operational to read the books.

No chargee, no readee.

Posted by: Kreplach at December 17, 2015 08:52 AM (ILoaF)

20 hey are we going to get a brand new SHILL for Christmas?

Posted by: Nevergiveup at December 17, 2015 08:53 AM (gf8BH)

21 In the same way I crave an antique treadle sewing
machine, I feel the need for real physical books. It's so I won't be
helpless when the power grid collapses and we're left in a world without
electricity. I may have to go to bed when the sun goes down, but
dammit, I'll be the only one with entertainment and clothes to wear!

Posted by: Dr. Mabuse at December 17, 2015 08:50 AM (gjLib)

Meanwhile, I'll be reading by the fire.
Say, didn't Amazon remotely pull a book off of all Kindles back in the day?

Posted by: steveegg at December 17, 2015 08:53 AM (cL79m)

22 The problem is not houses without books, as it turns out -- the problem is houses without engaged parents.

A leftist approach to the problem would be to require parents to become engaged.

If only that would work.

Posted by: MTF at December 17, 2015 08:53 AM (TxJGV)

23 Don't fetishize the delivery vehicle.


*****


I think though that there is something real in the tangible connection between the reader or the writer and the words or ideas being conveyed.

I see this particularly in the Electronic Medical Record vs. handwritten medical charting. If you have to take the time to transfer your thoughts into a legible handwritten note, you become much more concise in your writing and you retain the factual content of what you are writing much better.

Current electronic charting is becoming a morass of cut-and-paste and automatic data field entry and I find that the younger physicians have less sense of connection to the information they are conveying.

This is a real phenomenon.

Posted by: Seamus Muldoon at December 17, 2015 08:53 AM (NeFrd)

24 That column could easily be about me. Since I got my Kindle and then my Tablet I have completely given up paper books. Like you, my eyesight has got to the point where I have to increase the size of the type even with my glasses. Before the Kindle I was using a 2.5X set of reading glasses over my normal glasses.


I haven't read a paper book since I went electronic even though I fought it against it for so long. But I still have not surrendered on my price thing. I refuse to pay more than $10 for an e-book, and I try to buy most at between 4 and 5 dollars.

Posted by: Vic-we have no party at December 17, 2015 08:54 AM (t2KH5)

25 I see this particularly in the Electronic Medical Record vs. handwritten medical charting.

If you have to take the time to transfer your thoughts into a legible handwritten note,


That lets doctors off.

Posted by: rickb223 at December 17, 2015 08:55 AM (E9ede)

26 "simulacrum"

Ah, a reminder that this is indeed a "smart" blog...

Posted by: anon a mouse - now with more puppy! at December 17, 2015 08:55 AM (C9pBZ)

27 What kid wants to find a digital copy of 'Juggs' in his father's sock drawer?

Posted by: Pappy O'Daniel at December 17, 2015 08:55 AM (oVJmc)

28 Welcome back Monty, there has literally never been more data available for as low a cost as western civ currently possesses, and it has arguably never meant less.

The average home that spends 600 bucks a year with as little as a 400 capital investment in a PC can peruse knowledge that would have made the librarians in Alexandria blush and we get LOLCats and Goreon Warmening hysteria...

breaks my heart and has me convinced we are in fact devolving as a species.

All the best, and the most joyous of holidays and Yule Tide to you and yours,
Sven

Posted by: Sven S Blade a.k.a. El Assassin@sven10077 at December 17, 2015 08:56 AM (g8Hfr)

29 I have a challenge that is this: my son does not like fiction. I read him stories when he was younger, but early on (after we read all of the Captain Underpants books) he became much more interested in non-fiction on his topic of interest du jour (EMT, Firemen, CSI, etc.).

His nightly reading assignment became a real battle --- and then he discovered a love of geography, and through it, an interesting in learning about these interesting places around the world. Fortunately, his teachers have allowed him to read National Geographics in lieu of novels for nightly reading. I wish I could get him to read fiction, but it just hasn't "taken" yet...

Posted by: Lizzy at December 17, 2015 08:56 AM (NOIQH)

30 What kid wants to find a digital copy of 'Juggs' in his father's sock drawer?




At least the pages won't be stuck together!

Posted by: rickb223 at December 17, 2015 08:57 AM (E9ede)

31 But there was time now. It's not fair ...

Posted by: Grump928(c) says Free Sooth! at December 17, 2015 08:58 AM (evdj2)

32 8 Posted by: BignJames at December 17, 2015 08:46 AM (HtUkt)

I read the occasional comic on the Nook...

better color and less smudging...

speaking of which "Dark Circle"

Posted by: Sven S Blade a.k.a. El Assassin@sven10077 at December 17, 2015 08:58 AM (g8Hfr)

33 19
The other problem of digital delivery is that you don't own the book on the device.

Amazon not too long ago wiped public domain ebooks on peoples kindles.

There is also the fact that the device has to be charged and operational to read the books.

No chargee, no readee.


Posted by: Kreplach at December 17, 2015 08:52 AM (ILoaF)

I have had an e-book using the Kindle format now for about 5 years and Amazon has NEVER wiped anything on mine. I think they deleted one book years ago that had been in public domain but they got a notice from the publisher that it was NOT public domain and in violation of copyright law.

Posted by: Vic-we have no party at December 17, 2015 08:59 AM (t2KH5)

34 Voracious reading- of the Teleprompter- made me what I am today.

Posted by: Barack Obama at December 17, 2015 08:59 AM (Z58Xa)

35 >>The average home that spends 600 bucks a year with as little as a 400 capital investment in a PC can peruse knowledge that would have made the librarians in Alexandria blush and we get LOLCats and Goreon Warmening hysteria...

That's true --- there's a lot of crap kids can occupy themselves with online, and my son has dabbled in that (Smosh, etc.). But there's also things like Google earth --- my son love exploring a town as it he walking the streets, getting a pedestrian's eye view of the downtown, neighborhoods, etc.

Posted by: Lizzy at December 17, 2015 08:59 AM (NOIQH)

36 I didn't like the idea of reading from a Kindle, but since I got one a couple years ago I seldom read from anything else - and I read daily. As a bonus, I rarely purchase books thanks to all the free e-books available.


Posted by: Rocket J. Squirrel at December 17, 2015 08:59 AM (HhSOK)

37 >>I think they deleted one book years ago that had been in public domain

IIRC it was Orwell's "1984"

Posted by: Lizzy at December 17, 2015 09:00 AM (NOIQH)

38 I own a home filled with bookshelves in just about every room. They used to be filled with books. In preparation for selling we've been removing books and either storing them away or pitching them. Shelves are now filled with knick-knacky stuff.

We just don't think that buyers care about bookshelves anymore.

Posted by: free range jihadist at December 17, 2015 09:01 AM (7v/r5)

39 I wonder how many of the electronic books will start getting the Wiki treatment- you know, sanitized by Teh Left for your protection- without us knowing it?

Posted by: t-bird at December 17, 2015 09:02 AM (RrDm2)

40 The great thing about an ebook - in addition to easy packing for a vacation (no more stuffing 5+ books in my carry-on) is the instant gratification.
It is so easy when reading a trilogy to just - bzzt! - download the next book and keep going.

Posted by: Lizzy at December 17, 2015 09:02 AM (NOIQH)

41 38 Posted by: free range jihadist at December 17, 2015 09:01 AM (7v/r5)

I would, but I'm weird and have a lot of classic RPG stuff etc etc

once I got the Nooks and Droids I went digital and have never looked back.

Posted by: Sven S Blade a.k.a. El Assassin@sven10077 at December 17, 2015 09:03 AM (g8Hfr)

42 A book thread on Thursday? Or is this the not-book thread? And not Doom? I'm so confused. But, then, I just got up and haven't had coffee yet. I'd better go back and warm up with the morning thread...

Posted by: mindful webworker - what, me read? at December 17, 2015 09:03 AM (/B6Iw)

43 39 Posted by: t-bird at December 17, 2015 09:02 AM (RrDm2)

Good old Orwell didn't realize he was writing a cookbook for the leftoids...

Posted by: Sven S Blade a.k.a. El Assassin@sven10077 at December 17, 2015 09:03 AM (g8Hfr)

44 That lets doctors off.


Posted by: rickb223



*****


Har-dee-har-har!

Posted by: Seamus Muldoon at December 17, 2015 09:03 AM (NeFrd)

45 23 Current electronic charting is becoming a morass of cut-and-paste and automatic data field entry and I find that the younger physicians have less sense of connection to the information they are conveying.

I think you're right- the required data fields begin to drive the process, not the actual patient issues being recorded. If a field is required, then it is important, as opposed to actual descriptions of the problem.

That's what happens in data entry. It starts off as a convenience, or even as a way to "standardize". The process begins to rule. It's bureaucratic thinking made part of everyday life.

Posted by: MTF at December 17, 2015 09:04 AM (TxJGV)

46 I love books so much that I became librarian. But I also love my NOOK, for much the same reasons as Monty. I was sure I would hate an e-reader, but I was so wrong. And all of my boys are avid readers, even though they rarely open an actual book. What's important is the reading not the vehicle. And when the end times come and the grid goes out, I will be looting my local library.

Posted by: marinemom at December 17, 2015 09:05 AM (ep6ak)

47 we can has #Doom?

Posted by: redc1c4 at December 17, 2015 09:05 AM (YZH0v)

48 Good morning, Monty! Librarian/English teacher dittos for your great article. Also, don't forget comic books. I'm not sure I would have learned to read without them.

Posted by: Emily at December 17, 2015 09:05 AM (7Rn+/)

49 As a guilty pleasure, I used to watch MTV's "Cribs", where they get celebrities to give them a tour of their home. After a while you could see a definite pattern - you're just not cool unless you have a "Scarface" poster in your media room/man-cave.

It wasn't until they toured Lefty tool Moby's NYC apartment, and he made a big deal of his bookshelf (pointing out his childhood favorites) that I realized that none of these celebrities (other than Moby) *ever* have a bookshelf anywhere in their palatial mansions. Sad.

Just imagine what damage you could do on Amazon if you hit the lottery, and the giormous library you could add to your house....

Posted by: Lizzy at December 17, 2015 09:07 AM (NOIQH)

50 42 A book thread on Thursday? Or is this the not-book thread?

Posted by: mindful webworker - what, me read? at December 17, 2015 09:03 AM (/B6Iw)


I don't know, but there are enough pull quotes here to provide me with book thread material for years.

And you know, Monty is the cob who originally started the book thread.

Posted by: OregonMuse at December 17, 2015 09:08 AM (ACCTs)

51 Chique. Test fail.
Still on automatic delete apparently.

Posted by: free range jihadist at December 17, 2015 09:08 AM (7v/r5)

52 Tried to copy an article that described the whole mess but I didn't feel like fighting the 500 error BS thorough a long article.

Posted by: Vic-we have no party at December 17, 2015 09:09 AM (t2KH5)

53 Like Vic I fought against the urge to buy a Kindle for years. Now its my inseparable companion. Remember the airport panic, when you realized you only had a few more pages in your book to read and a long flight ahead? Nevermore. I carry a whole library with me and its a great comfort.

Plus, when I drive I also have Audible books on my phone! Just plug in and go; my car reads to me. This morning, for example, McCullough was telling me all about the Wright boys and their airplane.

Posted by: MTF at December 17, 2015 09:10 AM (TxJGV)

54 EMR's encourage sloppy charting, especially if there are defaults loaded.

Posted by: redc1c4 at December 17, 2015 09:10 AM (YZH0v)

55 EMR is a crony scam. We treated patients with paper charts for a century.

Posted by: Grump928(c) says Free Sooth! at December 17, 2015 09:10 AM (evdj2)

56 Don't want to have a Kindle. There simply aren't books I can get on it-I think they're out of print, really obscure, or the books themselves have memories.

I would, however, like to find a way to get rid of much of my massive family collection of books without burning them, Send them to a foreign country?

Posted by: FenelonSpoke at December 17, 2015 09:11 AM (No/ki)

57 That's what happens in data entry. It starts off as a convenience, or even as a way to "standardize". The process begins to rule. It's bureaucratic thinking made part of everyday life.

Posted by: MTF


****

Exactly. Here's an example. The EMR we use has a "required" (by whom?) entry for every single patient encounter for a "pain score", which is largely irrelevant in my field. Yet I cannot sign off on a chart entry without making an entry in that field. The actual data becomes meaningless but the act of entering the data is all-important.

Out of the couple of dozen options on the pull down menu for this field, I have entered "No Pain, Verbal report" for every single patient I have seen over the past five years. I suppose some "researcher" somewhere is scratching his head over a data anomaly coming from my clinic, but I don't care.

Posted by: Seamus Muldoon at December 17, 2015 09:13 AM (NeFrd)

58 Whut?

I don't wanna read no booo-oooks

Posted by: Bigby's Finger Foods at December 17, 2015 09:13 AM (3ZtZW)

59 56 Posted by: FenelonSpoke at December 17, 2015 09:11 AM (No/ki)


Have you checked Gutenberg? They have a massive library of old and classic books AND they are free.


http://www.gutenberg.org/wiki/Main_Page

Posted by: Vic-we have no party at December 17, 2015 09:13 AM (t2KH5)

60
Meatball Jr. reading a book he would not have had if Monty had his way...

https://goo.gl/240SC3

Posted by: Bruce With a Wang! at December 17, 2015 09:13 AM (iQIUe)

61 My problem with kindle books is the pricing. Charging as much for the electronic as for the hardcover?

GTFO.

Posted by: East Bay KG at December 17, 2015 09:14 AM (uDCdI)

62 "Don't fetishize the delivery vehicle."

I'd expect that is true in lots of other fields of life, too.

Posted by: m at December 17, 2015 09:14 AM (d4uu4)

63 55 EMR is a crony scam.

Posted by: Grump928(c) says Free Sooth! at December 17, 2015 09:10 AM (evdj2)


You got that right. All the EMR fetish has done is took a clumsy, inefficient error-prone paper system and turned it into a a clumsy, inefficient, error-prone electronic system.

Posted by: OregonMuse at December 17, 2015 09:15 AM (ACCTs)

64 On the bright we only murdered one patient last quarter so malpractice payouts will be down for the year!

Posted by: Grump928(c) says Free Sooth! at December 17, 2015 09:16 AM (evdj2)

65 I would, however, like to find a way to get rid of much of my massive family collection of books without burning them, Send them to a foreign country?
-------------------------------------------------------

Fenelon, here's a site advertising book sales and they are mostly donated books. Maybe there could be a second home for some of your duplicates?

http://bit.ly/1k4BpaY

Posted by: MTF at December 17, 2015 09:16 AM (TxJGV)

66 Blah blah blah.

Where is my flying car?

Posted by: Circa (Insert Year Here) at December 17, 2015 09:16 AM (659DL)

67 OregonMuse: And you know, Monty is the cob who originally started the book thread.

Ah, no, I didn't know that. So, he gets a pass. :-)

Posted by: mindful webworker - what, me read? at December 17, 2015 09:17 AM (/B6Iw)

68 I still like the feel of a book in my hands. I still like actually turning the pages.

Now get off my lawn.

Posted by: WhatWhatWhat? at December 17, 2015 09:18 AM (r9tFS)

69 OregonMuse: And you know, Monty is the cob who originally started the book thread.

****

Ah, but who originally banned tutus?

Posted by: Seamus Muldoon at December 17, 2015 09:18 AM (NeFrd)

70 I just stopped by to comment on the cute kitten pic.

Adorable.


Posted by: Dang at December 17, 2015 09:19 AM (2oWD2)

71 I think we getting lost in the weeds as opposed to what Monty is saying.

Sure I could rant again on the utter vapidity of the Bechtel[sp?] test that Leftist use in lieu of actual critical thinking on whether they like a book or movie.

It is not the medium's fault dear Horatio. Leaving children loose on the Internet without being engaged is akin to leaving them parked in front of the television whilst Barney cavorts and sings.

Posted by: Anna Puma at December 17, 2015 09:19 AM (iomlS)

72 All my household are big Kindle users, haven't bought a paper book in years. There's no more room in the house for lumber! All my paperback Terry Pratchetts were boxed up in the shed where the mice destroyed them. Got them for Kindle, and the whole family could finally enjoy them. The ragged dead tree copies went into the fireplace. Now there's room in the shed for the garden tools. Still plenty of paper at my house, but the Kindles have been a blessing. To each their own.

Posted by: Scott at December 17, 2015 09:19 AM (iERIu)

73 Don't fetishize the delivery vehicle.

===

I don't know about 'fetish'

I do know I'm clearing out most of my books and holding onto only those I like the most, in as quality a binding as I can find - or those books its better to have a physical copy of, such as religious texts, how to guides, artwork, and out of print rarities.

Posted by: Bigby's Finger Foods at December 17, 2015 09:19 AM (3ZtZW)

74 Here's the thing, doctors (and nurse practitioners for that matter) can only treat a certain number of patients at a time. Their time is expensive and so management wants to "improve" the ratios. But you can't do that without sacrificing quality of care no matter how many technical "assists" you give the doctor.

Posted by: Grump928(c) says Free Sooth! at December 17, 2015 09:20 AM (evdj2)

75 Book
BooM
DOOM

Good ta hear from ya, Monty! Don't be such a stranger...

Posted by: Brother Cavil, down with Eph 6:12-13 at December 17, 2015 09:20 AM (9krrF)

76 A house full of books don't mean squat when the kid's reading them to distract himself from watching his father drink himself to death. The kid still grows up to be dysfunctional. Sigh.

Posted by: Oschisms at December 17, 2015 09:20 AM (ZsN9X)

77 A house full of books don't mean squat when the kid's reading them to distract himself from watching his father drink himself to death.


So, glass half full then.

Posted by: Grump928(c) says Free Sooth! at December 17, 2015 09:21 AM (evdj2)

78 You got that right. All the EMR fetish has done is
took a clumsy, inefficient error-prone paper system and turned it into a
a clumsy, inefficient, error-prone electronic system easily accessible by unelected unaccountable HHS bureaucrats.


Posted by: OregonMuse at December 17, 2015 09:15 AM (ACCTs)

Corrected because you forgot the real benefit of EMR!

Posted by: Hrothgar at December 17, 2015 09:21 AM (ftVQq)

79 I've always loved *information*. Paper books were starting to tear up my wrists though.

I especially like Text-to-Speech (TTS) as I can work (gardening, making dinner, knitting, etc.) and intake information. I have gotten through many of the "heavy" classics this way over the last couple of years. My recall is less perfect than with seeing the print, but let's be honest, there's no way I would have actually taken the time to *read* War and Peace (which was actually less of a slig than Les Miserables).

Posted by: Polliwog the 'Ette at December 17, 2015 09:21 AM (GDulk)

80 #56 I would, however, like to find a way to get rid of much of my massive family collection of books without burning them, Send them to a foreign country?


My town does a huge used book sale four times a year to help support its history museum. I always donate my old books to them. It's one of those "buy a paper shopping bag for five bucks and leave with as many as you can fit in it" sales. Maybe you could find a similar charitable way to dispose of your unwanted books.

'Course, I tend to leave the sale with almost as many as I just got rid of! Vicious circle.

Posted by: WhatWhatWhat? at December 17, 2015 09:22 AM (r9tFS)

81 Over the years I have traveled pretty extensively for work. And I always carried a book or depending on the length of the trip, books.

Not only did that get heavy but I probably left a hundred books over the years in various hotel rooms because once finished I just didn't feel like lugging them around. And because of weight considerations the books were usually limited to paperbacks.

I didn't think I would like it but after buying an iPad I never looked back. It does lack some of the visual and tactile pleasures of a good book but it has so many benefits for the traveler over a traditional book. Next time you are on a plane, look around. The number of people using electronic readers as opposed to books is growing rapidly.

Posted by: JackStraw at December 17, 2015 09:22 AM (/tuJf)

82 Still waiting for ebooks to bust the textbook racket.

Posted by: Pappy O'Daniel at December 17, 2015 09:23 AM (oVJmc)

83 Monty and cat pictures! This is exactly what I need this morning.

Posted by: Draki at December 17, 2015 09:23 AM (0eidE)

84 Wait, what day is it?

Posted by: scottst at December 17, 2015 09:24 AM (Ltygl)

85 The thing I miss most, since adopting my Kindle, is bookstores. Walking aisles and browsing led me unexpectedly to all kinds of great finds. PG Wodehouse, for example, is an author I never read until picking a used book up in the Strand decades ago.

Posted by: MTF at December 17, 2015 09:24 AM (TxJGV)

86 Houses without books have wobbly tables and doors that won't stay open.

Posted by: Bigby's Finger Foods at December 17, 2015 09:24 AM (3ZtZW)

87 My kindle has saved so much space around the house and I've been trying hard to cull books from my library. I hate lugging these things around when I move (which hasn't happened in a while), and probably a bunch will be heading to the library the next time I move. I seem to only be able to let go of 20 or 30 at a time though.

Posted by: Lea at December 17, 2015 09:24 AM (lIU4e)

88 Wait, what day is it?



Trump Thursday!

Posted by: rickb223 at December 17, 2015 09:25 AM (E9ede)

89 Still waiting for ebooks to bust the textbook racket.
Posted by: Pappy O'Daniel at December 17, 2015 09:23 AM (oVJmc)

I've gotten to meet a few textbook writers in my field, and I think I'm beginning to value their books more than I used to.

Though, the mass produced crap for public schools should be cheap.

Posted by: Draki at December 17, 2015 09:26 AM (0eidE)

90 I've downloaded I don't know how many books onto my Kindle / iPad. I have read exactly one. Do not like e-readers. I need the book in my hand or it doesn't feel right. Mostly I get them from the library because they have (or can get) anything I want to read, and also I'm cheap. I do like audiobooks for car rides.

Posted by: grammie winger, Isaiah 9:6 at December 17, 2015 09:27 AM (dFi94)

91 Maybe Monty should use this image as part of this post?

http://preview.tinyurl.com/h8jvxrv

Posted by: Anna Puma at December 17, 2015 09:27 AM (iomlS)

92
'Course, I tend to leave the sale with almost as many as I just got rid of! Vicious circle.

Ha! I have the same problem. And because I'm a depressive, buying a book is one of the ways I self-medicate. I only wish that places like Barnes and Noble and Amazon and Alibris hadn't driven out the independent used bookstore; they're getting mighty thin on the ground here in NE Massachusetts.

Although there is a lovely one in Wells, Maine, on Route 1:

http://goo.gl/GTJUah

Posted by: Mary Poppins' Practically Perfect Piercing at December 17, 2015 09:27 AM (X6fMO)

93 Maybe Monty should use this image as part of this post?

http://preview.tinyurl.com/h8jvxrv
Posted by: Anna Puma at December 17, 2015 09:27 AM (iomlS)

That is not a pussy cat!

Posted by: Draki at December 17, 2015 09:28 AM (0eidE)

94 On the bright [side] we only murdered one patient last quarter so malpractice payouts will be down for the year!

Where do you sell your parts? We could never cover our overhead on sale per quarter.

Posted by: Planned Parenthood at December 17, 2015 09:28 AM (9mTYi)

95 A leftist approach to the problem would be to require parents to become engaged.



If only that would work.
Posted by: MTF at December 17, 2015 08:53 AM (TxJGV)


Blagojevich when mayor just started a program to buy all the children books.

I am sure that was successful.

Posted by: Kindltot at December 17, 2015 09:29 AM (q2o38)

96 Speaking of content v delivery system, and digital vs print: When the Urantia Book (bear with me) first started getting popular with enthusiastic young New Agers, their emphasis was not the Old Guard's idea of slow, personal proselytization of the message but rather trying to get lots of books out there. (This was before the online versions were available.)

Since many a gifted UB (if not most) ends up as couch-stabilizer or door-stop, that seemed kind-of silly to me. Hence, my comic strip about what might happen with an over-abundance of that original big, hefty (3.5#) hardback.

http://bit.ly/too-many-ubs

(Sorry, but, how often am I going to get a hook for that toon?)

Posted by: mindful webworker - again with that thing? at December 17, 2015 09:31 AM (/B6Iw)

97 63 55 EMR is a crony scam.

Posted by: Grump928(c) says Free Sooth! at December 17, 2015 09:10 AM (evdj2)

You got that right. All the EMR fetish has done is took a clumsy, inefficient error-prone paper system and turned it into a a clumsy, inefficient, error-prone electronic system.
Posted by: OregonMuse at December 17, 2015 09:15 AM (ACCTs)

Also...there are EMR programs that will auto-generate notes for the physician which could be problematic for a number of reasons. There's also the issue of auto-population of the new encounter record from the last one, which can carry over a bunch of irrelevant information. Plus, from personal experience, in a lot of cases the doctor is staying glued to the screen to input information during your examination, which depersonalizes the process even more.

Posted by: Insomniac - Pale Horse/Death 2016 at December 17, 2015 09:31 AM (kpqmD)

98 We just don't think that buyers care about bookshelves anymore.

Posted by: free range jihadist at December 17, 2015 09:01 AM (7v/r5)


Well, I go to auctions for fun, and though the bottom has completely fallen out of the antique furniture market, one item that ALWAYS fetches a high price is the glass-fronted lawyer's bookcase. A carved mahogany Victorian armchair? Fifty bucks. Four-level bookcase? $180 and up.

Posted by: Dr. Mabuse at December 17, 2015 09:32 AM (gjLib)

99 Draki, nope. But it is appropriate 'encouragement' for certain select members of the Moron Horde.

If any of you bibliophiles care to help make my Christmas brighter, please buy my book.

http://astore.amazon.com/aoshq-20/detail/B014BTSEYO

Thank you.

Posted by: Anna Puma at December 17, 2015 09:33 AM (iomlS)

100 Fenelon -- local jail or prison probably has a library and I think they require books rather than electronics. Also, paperbacks to soldiers overseas.

Local libraries usually have book sales every year to clean out shelves with money going to local friends of the library.

One of the local mega-churches makes gift bags for prisoners including a book.

Posted by: mustbequantum at December 17, 2015 09:34 AM (MIKMs)

101 92 - "I only wish that places like Barnes and Noble and Amazon and Alibris hadn't driven out the independent used bookstore"

For awhile, I relied on AbeBooks to find used books online, but now outrageous postage rates are killing that market. I found a small used cookbook I wanted offered by a shop in the U.S. It was priced at $10, with shipping to Canada another $11. When the shop went to ship it, they had to inform me that the shipping cost was in fact $28!!! I had to cancel the order; just can't see paying nearly $40 for a less than 200-page used book.

Posted by: Dr. Mabuse at December 17, 2015 09:35 AM (gjLib)

102 It is not the medium's fault dear Horatio. Leaving children loose on the Internet without being engaged is akin to leaving them parked in front of the television whilst Barney cavorts and sings while wearing BDSM fetish gear

FTFY. The Internet is a scary, degenerate place...

Posted by: Insomniac - Pale Horse/Death 2016 at December 17, 2015 09:36 AM (kpqmD)

103 All of that being said, nothing is cooler than watching your 11 month old learn to turn the pages of a board book (usually all at once from cover to "The end")

Posted by: tsrlbke PhD(c), rogue bioethicist at December 17, 2015 09:37 AM (tM4uk)

104 woah tl;dr lol

Posted by: peacelovewoodstock at December 17, 2015 09:38 AM (X+HRW)

105
The other problem of digital delivery is that you don't own the book on the device.

Amazon not too long ago wiped public domain ebooks on peoples kindles.

There is also the fact that the device has to be charged and operational to read the books.

No chargee, no readee.


Posted by: Kreplach at December 17, 2015 08:52 AM (ILoaF)






Yep, that's a problem. So when I buy an ebook, I run it through Calibre and strip the DRM (the DRM plugin available for Calibre does it automatically when you load it into the library). Then it gets loaded on the Kindle. If Amazon plays deletion games, I can just reload the library from Calibre.

Also, my Kindle is wifi only, and I keep it switched off unless I'm specifically buying a book.

Screw them. I paid for the book. I'm keeping it.

Posted by: IllTemperedCur at December 17, 2015 09:39 AM (gwpf+)

106
Posted by: Dr. Mabuse at December 17, 2015 09:35 AM (gjLib)


Yes, shipping costs for used books are a real roll of the dice.

My shopping habits are to browse Barnes and Noble for anything new and interesting (their remainders section used to be a treasure trove of wonderful, obscure stuff; it's garbage now), a used bookshop (when I can find one) for a couple of hours' browsing and buying, especially in the English history / true-crime sections and online for Kindle or for a really out of the way book that just popped up in my memory that I absolutely have to have.

But I'm with Vic on Kindle prices. I won't go over $9.99 for an e-book; at that point, I might just as well buy the real thing.

Posted by: Mary Poppins' Practically Perfect Piercing at December 17, 2015 09:41 AM (X6fMO)

107 The thing I miss most, since adopting my Kindle, is
bookstores. Walking aisles and browsing led me unexpectedly to all kinds
of great finds. PG Wodehouse, for example, is an author I never read
until picking a used book up in the Strand decades ago.
Posted by: MTF at December 17, 2015 09:24 AM (TxJGV)


This is very true. Browsing is harder electronically since it is set up to take you directly to what you want (because efficiency).
Some places like Amazon will show you what other people have bought - which is half ok - but I get the feeling that selling sites try to push what they want to sell as opposed to what I might want to read.


And used bookstores smell like old leaves and vanilla.

I admit that after Amazon put 1984 down the memory hole, I have tried to stay with the Sony reader that didn't have WiFi and didn't connect directly to the internet.

Posted by: Kindltot at December 17, 2015 09:41 AM (q2o38)

108 At the triple digits in comments place I feel safe in pointing out that George W Bush reads more books in one week than Barack "Crunching Gorilla " Obama has read in his entire life.

Posted by: Dr. Manbube at December 17, 2015 09:42 AM (bmlzO)

109 Leaving children loose on the Internet without being engaged is akin to leaving them parked in front of the television whilst Barney cavorts and sings while wearing BDSM fetish gear

FTFY. The Internet is a scary, degenerate place...


Rule 34 is a harsh mistress.

Posted by: Brother Cavil, down with Eph 6:12-13 at December 17, 2015 09:42 AM (9krrF)

110 Many of the books I want to read have been in print for many years. I often find a used paperback in good condition is cheaper than the eBook version.

I sincerely and deeply regret having destroyed books when I had to move. Including a copy of The Radio Engineer's Handbook dated 1910 that I bought for ten cents.

Posted by: Ouija Jamma at December 17, 2015 09:42 AM (e5C6y)

111 Monto Lives!

Posted by: The Poster Formerly Known as Mr. Barky at December 17, 2015 09:43 AM (4KoRb)

112 103 All of that being said, nothing is cooler than watching your 11 month old learn to turn the pages of a board book (usually all at once from cover to "The end")

Posted by: tsrlbke PhD(c), rogue bioethicist at December 17, 2015 09:37 AM (tM4uk)
-----------------------------------------------

11 months already! It seems like yesterday. Wow- I'm getting older at an increasing rate.

Posted by: MTF at December 17, 2015 09:43 AM (TxJGV)

113 Monty (welcome back, duuuuuude) brings up a point about many people prefer audio/visual input over written stuff.

I cannot listen to, say, a podcast, and also read. My brain won't process both at the same time. I literally have to pause the podcast to get what I'm reading. I can switch back and forth between the two modes fairly easily though.

This is one reason I don't do audio books while driving. It's like I have to process the audio words into written symbols first, and thus it ain't a good idea to read and drive. Music doesn't require comprehension, so I can handle that while driving just fine.

Anyhow, just my $0.02.

Posted by: GnuBreed at December 17, 2015 09:44 AM (gyKtp)

114
Here's a picture of Elizabeth Taylor and Richard Burton reading:

http://goo.gl/Lt5tK0

Posted by: Mary Poppins' Practically Perfect Piercing at December 17, 2015 09:44 AM (X6fMO)

115 Thanks Monty.

Posted by: steveegg at December 17, 2015 09:44 AM (cL79m)

116 Posted by: MTF at December 17, 2015 09:43 AM (TxJGV)

Nearly 12 actually.

Crawling now and into everything. Speaking of which I hear in in the other room, she's found her bookshelf and is pulling all the books off.

Posted by: tsrlbke PhD(c), rogue bioethicist at December 17, 2015 09:44 AM (tM4uk)

117 I love books in all forms. I still occasionally read paper books, but 85% of my reading is done on my Kindle or Kobo.

When I read in bed at night, I don't keep my husband awake by keeping a light on. The ereaders have built in illumination.

When I travel, I don't have to drag along a bag of books. With the ereaders I can have thousands of books at my fingertips.

It's easy and convenient to read in waiting rooms and pretty much anywhere else. A great invention.

Posted by: DangerGirl and her 1.21 Gigawatt Sanity Prod (tm) at December 17, 2015 09:44 AM (oqhrS)

118 It's been my habit for over 35 years to give my children at least one book for Christmas. Now I get to do that with my grandchildren. This Christmas, the two year old gets a book of animals that makes sounds when you push the right button. He's a little slow with his animal sounds - still thinks cats go woof woof. The four year old gets a book about John Deere tractors because frankly the only thing he cares about are John Deere tractors. The 6 year old - I am starting her on the Amelia Bedelia series. My daughter had such fun with Amelia Bedelia. And then they will all get "What A Child Should Know About God". It's a lovely book, nicely illustrated without all that simpering Sunday School look to it.

Posted by: grammie winger, Isaiah 9:6 at December 17, 2015 09:45 AM (dFi94)

119 Blagojevich when mayor just started a program to buy all the children books.

I think Tennessee will give you a couple free childrens books a year or something? I remember my cousin telling me when she moved there.

Posted by: Lea at December 17, 2015 09:45 AM (lIU4e)

120 I will always read books, I'm 51 and I am reading more books than I ever had before. There is nothing but waste on the T.V. and there is something about holding an actual book to read.

Posted by: ejazzyjeff at December 17, 2015 09:46 AM (no7vk)

121 Thing about physical books is it becomes doubtful whether there's anybody to leave them to now. I don't expect my kid to read any of them or even value them much, but I have a complete Dickens set from the 1800s that was my grandpa's just mouldering away. I suppose I ought to just sell it just its so hard to decide upon.

Posted by: Bigby's Finger Foods at December 17, 2015 09:46 AM (3ZtZW)

122 Cats dig books baby.

Posted by: eleven at December 17, 2015 09:47 AM (qUNWi)

123 116 Posted by: MTF at December 17, 2015 09:43 AM (TxJGV)

Nearly 12 actually.

Crawling now and into everything. Speaking of which I hear in in the other room, she's found her bookshelf and is pulling all the books off.
Posted by: tsrlbke PhD(c), rogue bioethicist at December 17, 2015 09:44 AM (tM4uk)

Be sure to thrash her soundly for doing so. After all, we can't have curious, independent children freely exploring things now can we?

Posted by: Insomniac - Pale Horse/Death 2016 at December 17, 2015 09:47 AM (kpqmD)

124 Fenelon -- local jail or prison probably has a library and I think they require books rather than electronics. Also, paperbacks to soldiers overseas.

Local libraries usually have book sales every year to clean out shelves with money going to local friends of the library.


I usually donate to the library, because I figure at least people who love books will get them. But the battered women's shelter I understand also takes donations. You can probably find a ton of places to unload them!

Posted by: Lea at December 17, 2015 09:48 AM (lIU4e)

125 What if teh kitteh is reading a law book?

Are we prepared for cat lawyers?

Posted by: kbdabear at December 17, 2015 09:48 AM (GrXXa)

126 ICYMI, the popular for five minutes "gangsta rap" "group" N.W.A. - which stands for something I can't even type in polite company, just made the R & R Hall of Fame. N.W.A. is best known for their charming ditty "F@#K Tha Police." Scratch that, "F@#K Tha Police" is pretty much ALL they're known for.

Besides the fact that Rap is not Rock and Roll, N.W.A beat out YES, who are still going strong after 46 freakin' years, have many iconic albums, and such legendary musicians as Bill Bruford, Rick Wakeman, Steve Howe and Chris Squire have passed through the ranks.

Yes also finished 2nd in the fan voting, so the R&R HoF obviously had to overturn the will of the voters to force in their po-po-hating favorites over a legendary band like Yes.

Posted by: WhatWhatWhat? at December 17, 2015 09:48 AM (r9tFS)

127 Between French existentialists and MPPPP we sure getting some great pictures this morning here on the fetishist thread.

Posted by: MTF at December 17, 2015 09:49 AM (TxJGV)

128 125 What if teh kitteh is reading a law book?

Are we prepared for cat lawyers?
Posted by: kbdabear at December 17, 2015 09:48 AM (GrXXa)

Drown the kitteh. Sounds cruel but trust me, you'll be doing her a favor.

Posted by: Insomniac - Pale Horse/Death 2016 at December 17, 2015 09:49 AM (kpqmD)

129 I've been reading more also and the Kindle is the reason. I am also exercising more. Trying to stationary bike or treadmill with a paper book or mag was frustrating to impossible. Now I take my Kindle and go to a different world. An hour never went so fast.

Posted by: The Poster Formerly Known as Mr. Barky at December 17, 2015 09:49 AM (4KoRb)

130 nothing is cooler than watching your 11 month old learn to turn the pages of a board book

*****


Maybe that's part of the allure of a paper book. The sense of mystery and discovery about what's on the next page. Watching the look on a child's face when they turn the page is totally awesome.

Posted by: Seamus Muldoon at December 17, 2015 09:49 AM (NeFrd)

131 Cats' major contribution to literature is to walk on/lie down on whatever it is you're reading.

Posted by: eleven at December 17, 2015 09:50 AM (qUNWi)

132 Are we prepared for cat lawyers?


****


Might be useful if you are charged with a feline-y.

Posted by: Seamus Muldoon at December 17, 2015 09:51 AM (NeFrd)

133 Maybe that's part of the allure of a paper book. The sense of mystery and discovery about what's on the next page. Watching the look on a child's face when they turn the page is totally awesome.

Especially if it's a Clive Barker picturebook. The looks of terror are a hoot!

Posted by: Insomniac - Pale Horse/Death 2016 at December 17, 2015 09:51 AM (kpqmD)

134 >>The 6 year old - I am starting her on the Amelia Bedelia series. My daughter had such fun with Amelia Bedelia

We LOVED Amelia Bedelia books. Your grandkid will be so happy!

Posted by: Lizzy at December 17, 2015 09:51 AM (NOIQH)

135 What if teh kitteh is reading a law book?

Are we prepared for cat lawyers?
Posted by: kbdabear at December 17, 2015 09:48 AM (GrXXa)


Makes sense, they start with essentially the same code of ethics.

Posted by: BurtTC at December 17, 2015 09:51 AM (Dj0WE)

136 Posted by: Insomniac - Pale Horse/Death 2016 at December 17, 2015 09:47 AM (kpqmD)

I gave up trying to keep her in her playroom. Now I just try to keep her generally safe.
Speaking of which she just found me in my office. (Which is 1 door down from where she was.)

Posted by: tsrlbke PhD(c), rogue bioethicist at December 17, 2015 09:53 AM (tM4uk)

137 Are we prepared for cat lawyers?


*****


They can add the essential claws to any contract.

Posted by: Seamus Muldoon at December 17, 2015 09:53 AM (NeFrd)

138 >>nothing is cooler than watching your 11 month old learn to turn the pages of a board book


Amen!
I remember the first time my son got book humor - he giggled at the end of "Goodnight, Gorilla."

Posted by: Lizzy at December 17, 2015 09:54 AM (NOIQH)

139 Cats' major contribution to literature is to walk on/lie down on whatever it is you're reading.

Posted by: eleven at December 17, 2015 09:50 AM (qUNWi)


I have one on the back of my chair as I type... mere inches away from major arteries. The other just got finished reaching up from the floor to see how many items on my desk he could pull down and/or knock over.


So yes, I believe the cat/lawyer connection is apt.

Posted by: BurtTC at December 17, 2015 09:54 AM (Dj0WE)

140 Of course law schools have produced so many cat lawyers that the entire landscape is littered with them, and most can barely scratch out a living.

Posted by: Seamus Muldoon at December 17, 2015 09:55 AM (NeFrd)

141
Have at it!

Posted by: Addington v Poindexter: Battle Royale of the Spurned Names (TM) at December 17, 2015 09:55 AM (BK3ZS)

142 >>Are we prepared for cat lawyers?

I think the written word might frighten and confuse them.

Posted by: Keyrock, Unfrozen Caveman Lawyer at December 17, 2015 09:56 AM (NOIQH)

143 What if teh kitteh is reading a law book?

Are we prepared for cat lawyers?


Posted by: kbdabear at December 17, 2015 09:48 AM (GrXXa)


That ship sailed.

Posted by: steveegg at December 17, 2015 09:56 AM (cL79m)

144 I love tactile experience of books but there's no doubt that the kindle is the superior reading device.

I can sit wherever I want, lay wherever I want, etc and regardless of ambient or direct light, I can still read.

For long trips, I used to carry several bulky books. Now one, slim, lightweight device and I carry hundreds.

I love the idea of the "Bluescreen" system on the new Kindle Fires, which orangifies (it is too a word!) the screen to keep blue light from interfering with your sleep cycle if you like to read at night.

The beautiful and well-read Mrs naturalfake uses a similar program on her PC-

and her sleep problems have pretty much vanished.

The big problem with kindle is that there are some low selling authors whom I like quite a bit, who will never find there way onto the kindle due to lack of market.

Also looking at all the SJWs and Obamatards in the US and who infest the humanities-

there are certain to be those who wish to eliminate certain authors and certain books from existence or bowdlerize the meaning from them.

So, physical books by there very nature are more conducive to freedom, freedom of thought, and freedom of speech.

It is a quandary.

Posted by: naturalfake at December 17, 2015 09:57 AM (KUa85)

145 >>Of course law schools have produced so many cat lawyers that the entire landscape is littered with them, and most can barely scratch out a living.

Clawing their way to the top!

Posted by: Keyrock, Unfrozen Caveman Lawyer at December 17, 2015 09:57 AM (NOIQH)

146 Also...there are EMR programs that will auto-generate notes for the physician which could be problematic for a number of reasons. There's also the issue of auto-population of the new encounter record from the last one, which can carry over a bunch of irrelevant information. Plus, from personal experience, in a lot of cases the doctor is staying glued to the screen to input information during your examination, which depersonalizes the process even more.

Posted by: Insomniac - Pale Horse/Death 2016 at December 17, 2015 09:31 AM (kpqmD)


Oh God, yes. I've been going to a group of opthamalogists here in Houston off and on since the early 1970s. I'm a rather special case, and indeed when I first went there the doctors were all doing handsprings because of my right eye (they'd never seen anything like it and never would again). They have expanded over the years and now have an office out here in the Conroe area, so I've been going there when need be, and they recently started using this EMR thing as well, plus would send me online access to my file after every visit.

I've noticed a lot of the things already commented on vis a vis the shortcomings of this system, not the least of which a lot of the information is just plain wrong. I even tried explaining the story with my eye to them, since I am rather familiar with it, plus I'd been examined by a boatload of eye doctors over the years. And yes, it seemed like they spent more time inputting data into the thing that half the time was iffy at best in terms of accuracy, and really did not pay much attention to what I tried to tell them, whether it was about my very squirrelly eyeball or much of anything else. There have been other cases of dealing with doctors who have to use this sort of software, and not all the info get into it, even when I tell them, and later the doctor gets pissed off at me for not telling them (sometimes I forget this or that detail, tell the nurse later, but apparently the nurse can't/won't update the database entry, and it's my fault).

Computers can make excellent data manipulation tools, but they do have to be set up and used correctly, or they just end up being crutches more than anything in many applications....

Posted by: The Oort Cloud - Source of all SMODs at December 17, 2015 09:57 AM (AYY6Y)

147 Of course law schools have produced so many cat lawyers that the entire landscape is littered with them, and most can barely scratch out a living.
Posted by: Seamus Muldoon at December 17, 2015 09:55 AM (NeFrd)


I would hiss at your puns, but Alger Hiss was a traitor commie lawyer, and therefore not representative of ALL cats and lawyers. Some, but not all.

Posted by: BurtTC at December 17, 2015 09:58 AM (Dj0WE)

148 Nyah?

Felonious courtroom shake down artists? The deuce you say! The 1930's movie Perry Mason will have something to say about that!

So nyah!

Posted by: Anna Puma at December 17, 2015 09:58 AM (iomlS)

149 Posted by: eleven at December 17, 2015 09:50 AM (qUNWi)

My cat likes to bite books and lick loose paper. Found out when he put his teeth marks on a new-to-me Dresden novel *while I was reading it*.

Posted by: Polliwog the 'Ette at December 17, 2015 09:58 AM (GDulk)

150 Scratch that, "F@#K Tha Police" is pretty much ALL they're known for.

===

Sorta. That song caused a lot of strife at the time, like Ice-Ts Cop Killer. It is emblematic of an era, so historic if nothing else.

Posted by: Bigby's Finger Foods at December 17, 2015 09:59 AM (3ZtZW)

151 Are we prepared for cat lawyers?


Le sigh.

Posted by: henri at December 17, 2015 10:00 AM (evdj2)

152 >>Computers can make excellent data manipulation tools, but they do have to be set up and used correctly, or they just end up being crutches more than anything in many applications....

Having worked in operations for various customer service call centers, I can attest that people are creatures of habit and expediency, and they will default their entries to the same, favorite codes. For example, when reporting on credits given to customers by one team, found that almost all of them were keyed in as "other" because why bother scrolling through a long drop-down list of options when "other" is sitting right there at the top?

Posted by: Lizzy at December 17, 2015 10:00 AM (NOIQH)

153 My previous cat used to chew the corners of whatever book I was reading. That cat was a stealth chewer -- could grab a nacho cheese dorito between bag and my mouth as well. Tiny little thing but outsize personality.

Posted by: mustbequantum at December 17, 2015 10:01 AM (MIKMs)

154 >>there are certain to be those who wish to eliminate certain authors and certain books from existence or bowdlerize the meaning from them.



See: The Book of Eli

Yes, there are definitely certain books that should be owned in printed form.

Posted by: Lizzy at December 17, 2015 10:02 AM (NOIQH)

155 Cat lawyers vs human lawyers. Both will tend to treat the courtroom as their personal litter box. But the cat lawyer will always be better groomed.

Posted by: Anna Puma at December 17, 2015 10:02 AM (iomlS)

156
Five years ago or so, our now idiotic DiL conned us into throwing down significant $$$ for a high end lounger for our son's 25th birthday. (Note for clarification: the now DiL was idiotic even then, but she was not yet the DiL.)

I saw said lounger two weeks ago, clawed by their two cats to the point where it was bleeding stuffing. "Never again!", says we.

We banished our two former cats to a single room of our house for similar transgressions.

Posted by: Addington v Poindexter: Battle Royale of the Spurned Names (TM) at December 17, 2015 10:02 AM (BK3ZS)

157 I love books. I love my Kindle. I like paper books, but, I read so much that I no longer buy them because figuring out what to do with them got to be old.

I love libraries. My wonderful Mother took me and my sisters to the library faithfully. In my will, I am leaving the library close to my house a chunk of money with the condition that they put up a plaque in my parents' honor from me. I get books at least twice a week from the library. The Tulsa City County Library system is one of the best in the nation. The library close to me was named the fifth best branch library in the nation recently. It even has a children's theater.

Posted by: Sherry McEvil, Stiletto Corsettes now franchising Lulu Snackbars at December 17, 2015 10:02 AM (kXoT0)

158 So, physical books by there very nature are more conducive to freedom, freedom of thought, and freedom of speech.

===

??

I don't think that's true at all. Publishers aren't the same gatekeepers they once were and any text can be converted to e-book or pdf and then made available to the public.

Posted by: Bigby's Finger Foods at December 17, 2015 10:03 AM (3ZtZW)

159 Posted by: Lizzy at December 17, 2015 08:56 AM (NOIQH)

I too was that kid, through 3rd or maybe 4th grade. I went through all the Time-Life "about" books I could get my hands on. Knew scads of info about dinosaurs and fish. Had no use for "stories", didn't see any value in made up tales about things that weren't true.

A wonderful librarian, don't remember her name, but do remember her face, forced me to check out "Harriet the Spy". She told me that if I couldn't tell her what it was about next week when my class had "library" again she wouldn't let me take out anything else until I did.

I grumbled and mumbled and once I started had it read in two days. By the end of the next year I was almost never without a paperback copy of something in my back pocket to be read at lunch, and between classes.

I'm sure he'll find something that will catch his interest and be off to the races. Look for some YA fiction involving things he has an interest in. Not necessarily the things he's been "researching" if you will, but with characters his age doing stuff he might do.

Sorry for the wall of text.

Break's over, back on my head

Posted by: random lurker at December 17, 2015 10:03 AM (+tRIN)

160 People who don't read end up in Folsom Prison.
J. Cash

Posted by: Eromero at December 17, 2015 10:04 AM (b+df9)

161 Five years ago or so, our now idiotic DiL conned us into throwing down significant $$$ for a high end lounger for our son's 25th birthday. (Note for clarification: the now DiL was idiotic even then, but she was not yet the DiL.)

I saw said lounger two weeks ago, clawed by their two cats to the point where it was bleeding stuffing. "Never again!", says we.

We banished our two former cats to a single room of our house for similar transgressions.

Posted by: Addington v Poindexter: Battle Royale of the Spurned Names (TM) at December 17, 2015 10:02 AM (BK3ZS)


You can have high end furniture or you can have cats. You CAN have both, but you shouldn't.


I prefer cats.

Posted by: BurtTC at December 17, 2015 10:05 AM (Dj0WE)

162 Thanks for the advice, Random Lurker!
Gives me hope.

Posted by: Lizzy at December 17, 2015 10:06 AM (NOIQH)

163 Nothin' beats a Sears catalog in the outhouse.

Posted by: Pappy O'Daniel at December 17, 2015 10:06 AM (yeZ4s)

164 People who don't read end up in Folsom Prison.
J. Cash
Posted by: Eromero at December 17, 2015 10:04 AM (b+df9)


I know a guy who has spent more than a dozen years in prison. His reading skills are severely limited. He's much smarter than most people I know who have never been to prison, and do a great deal of reading.

Posted by: BurtTC at December 17, 2015 10:07 AM (Dj0WE)

165
You can have high end furniture or you can have cats. You CAN have both


Not for long.

Posted by: Pappy O'Daniel at December 17, 2015 10:07 AM (yeZ4s)

166
Now that we have a grandson out of our son and the idiotic DiL, he shall be read stories from the Rush Revere series starting around age three.

"Hey, you sent him here for day care from time to time, but you have no say in what we choose to read to him." Her tears of frustration will sustain me.

Posted by: Addington v Poindexter: Battle Royale of the Spurned Names (TM) at December 17, 2015 10:07 AM (BK3ZS)

167 163 Nothin' beats a Sears catalog in the outhouse.
Posted by: Pappy O'Daniel at December 17, 2015 10:06 AM (yeZ4s)

Lingerie section made for decent fapping material.

Posted by: Insomniac - Pale Horse/Death 2016 at December 17, 2015 10:10 AM (kpqmD)

168
I could not give eff-all about high end furniture. I do give eff-all about having been conned into paying for it as a gift for someone, only to see it treated like shit. "Oh, you ordered something and have insufficient funds to pay for it? Sucks to be you!"

Posted by: Addington v Poindexter: Battle Royale of the Spurned Names (TM) at December 17, 2015 10:10 AM (BK3ZS)

169 >>Now that we have a grandson out of our son and the idiotic DiL, he shall be read stories from the Rush Revere series starting around age three.


That's what grandparent should do!

Whenever my parents admit to doing something with my kid they know I wouldn't do I just laugh.
The most recent case was when they took him to San Francisco, and I asked him his favorite part, he replied. "Riding the trolley --- the best view is when you're hanging off the outside!"

Posted by: Lizzy at December 17, 2015 10:11 AM (NOIQH)

170 Does anyone have an ereader that renders maps well?

Posted by: Jean at December 17, 2015 10:11 AM (fBkaR)

171 Casa del Eromero has probably 500 books ranging from the WWII big airplane book to Ramen Cookbook. From where I sit I see a koran, Nutritional Healing by Phyllis Balch, 1984, All Quite On The Western Front, and Tools For Survival by James Wesley, Rawles. And those are stacked on my rolltop computer desk.

Posted by: Eromero at December 17, 2015 10:11 AM (b+df9)

172 I love my library. I have hundreds of actual books across 8 bookcases. I live browsing my library when I take some me-time to sit in my comfy leather chair, a cup of tea, and a plate.of cheese and fruit.
My library is eclectic. I can choose from history, biographies, classic lit,.to cheesy "airplane reading" mysteries. I look at a tablet or desktop everyday for work. To kickback and settle in to a book is heaven. My kindle is gathering dust because it's just not the same.

My .02

Posted by: Russkilitlover at December 17, 2015 10:12 AM (2d98J)

173 If I tell my dog to get off the couch, he not only does it, he feels ashamed for violating one of our inside rules, huffs and puffs in his agony over being exiled to his bed on the other side of the room, and puts on his very best behavior to make up for his transgression.

Posted by: Ghost of kari at December 17, 2015 10:12 AM (xuouz)

174 So, physical books by there very nature are more conducive to freedom, freedom of thought, and freedom of speech.

===

??

I don't think that's true at all. Publishers aren't the same gatekeepers they once were and any text can be converted to e-book or pdf and then made available to the public.
Posted by: Bigby's Finger Foods at December 17, 2015 10:03 AM (3ZtZW)


A physical book once printed cannot be changed.

As we've seen over the last 7 years, simply bombing the electronic media with lies and obfuscation can change the nature of how something is viewed.

To cite a recent example-

"Huckleberry Finn" could simply be memory-holed with no evidence it ever existed if electronic media was the only source of reading.

Or "N***** Jim" could be changed to "Strong, Black, and Sassy Freedom Fighting Transgender Jim", with corresponding dialogue, which would completely change the nature of the story.

Physical printing to a certain degree means "permanence" of content- thus more conducive to freedom.

Posted by: naturalfake at December 17, 2015 10:13 AM (KUa85)

175
Anyway, there are a lot of books in our house. I have embarked on a program to finally read most of them - I'd say that half have been only partially read at this moment.

Posted by: Addington v Poindexter: Battle Royale of the Spurned Names (TM) at December 17, 2015 10:13 AM (BK3ZS)

176 I love books. Love reading books. And I love being surrounded by books.

But man, bookshelves are expensive. Does anyone know of a place that sells an assembled floor to ceiling bookshelves for under $500?

Posted by: Jake Elwood at December 17, 2015 10:13 AM (ISxUB)

177 That earthquake-proof bed was clearly designed for Democrats for other purposes, such as keeping out haram ideas and information. Word is some models are designed to trigger if the phone rings at 3 AM.

Posted by: Brother Cavil, down with Eph 6:12-13 at December 17, 2015 10:15 AM (9krrF)

178 Posted by: Lizzy at December 17, 2015 10:06 AM (NOIQH)

One more thought, look into biographical travelogue type things. That was never my genre so I can't give real examples but Lewis and Clark comes to mind. Also autobiographies of adventurers. Gets him into accepting the author's voice in the story telling, rather than just facts and data. Is he interested in the ocean? I remember really enjoying Kon-Tiki.

Good luck

Posted by: random lurker at December 17, 2015 10:15 AM (+tRIN)

179
9 I love books. They're so, you know.
Posted by: Caroline Kennedy at December 17, 2015 08:46 AM (u5gzz)


And there you have it!

Posted by: Addington v Poindexter: Battle Royale of the Spurned Names (TM) at December 17, 2015 10:15 AM (BK3ZS)

180 OT, there is another NYTimes editorial about guns, this one about suicides. Haven't read it yet, but they posted the tidbit that 20k of the firearm deaths in the country, 2/3, are suicides. So, keep that in mind next time they start throwing around numbers...

Posted by: Lea at December 17, 2015 10:16 AM (lIU4e)

181 Posted by: naturalfake at December 17, 2015 10:13 AM (KUa85)

===

The proper response is to then scan and distribute the real text. Do it once, replicate it in the thousands, offer it for free. I see no problem.

Posted by: Bigby's Finger Foods at December 17, 2015 10:16 AM (3ZtZW)

182 If I have a cold, I have to tell my daughter after the 4th Dr. Seuss book that Mommy needs a break for a few minutes. She'll play for a bit, then ask for another one. We go through 10-15 books a day, and the most effective punishment for her that I've found is taking away her bedtime book privileges. (Her middle name is my late librarian grandma's. Oh, how prescient THAT was!)

Posted by: pookysgirl at December 17, 2015 10:17 AM (K27gs)

183 Hmm. How to Serve Mankind. Puuuurrrrrrr.

Posted by: cat reading a book at December 17, 2015 10:18 AM (DLIIY)

184 When my kids started school hand scanners for checkout were coming in (90s). Found kid in the middle of the night sitting in front of a bookshelf 'scanning' title pages and stacking the books next to her. I think she was sound asleep pretend scanning.

Posted by: mustbequantum at December 17, 2015 10:18 AM (MIKMs)

185 OT, there is another NYTimes editorial about guns, this one about suicides. Haven't read it yet, but they posted the tidbit that 20k of the firearm deaths in the country, 2/3, are suicides.

They focus on the guns to keep from confronting the fact that the world they've made is so soul-crushingly shitty folks want out in droves.

Posted by: Brother Cavil, down with Eph 6:12-13 at December 17, 2015 10:19 AM (9krrF)

186 Voracious reading- of the Teleprompter- made me what I am today.

Barack Obama
--------

LOL

Posted by: Adrienne at December 17, 2015 10:22 AM (lVcuh)

187 Here's the thing: I just can't store as many books as I would like. I have physical copies of the ones that I love--1-volume red leather edition of LOTR, the Best of S J Perelman, a 2-volume Kipling, some foreign language references, and an entire bookcase of cookbooks. But it pisses me off to buy a physical book and realize I not only didn't like it, I'll bre stumbling over it physically for the next several years before I get around to dumping it at Halfprice books or Goodwill. I'm with Monty in that I can take the Kindle withme to the doctor's office and have a wealth of things to read at my fingertips. It's like you people are fighting against the printing press because illustrated manuscripts on vellum hust feel better in your hands. Lol

Posted by: Kerry at December 17, 2015 10:23 AM (haFgm)

188 Thanks for the insightful post Monty. One of the many reasons I enjoy this Very Smart Military Blog.

Posted by: Arson Wells at December 17, 2015 10:23 AM (UnJ7w)

189 I prefer cats.
Posted by: BurtTC


So do I.

Posted by: Alf at December 17, 2015 10:23 AM (FkBIv)

190 soul-crushingly shitty

Posted by: Brother Cavil, down with Eph 6:12-13 at December 17, 2015 10:19 AM (9krrF)



I rather like that turn of phrase.

Posted by: Bob's House of Flannel Shirts and Wallet Chains at December 17, 2015 10:24 AM (vgIRn)

191 I hate my iphone keyboard, btw.

Posted by: Kerry at December 17, 2015 10:24 AM (haFgm)

192 I sympathize with all of Monty's points, especially regarding the packing and moving of a library as one gets older. Then again, that activity allows one the greet and become reacquainted with volumes that perhaps haven't been seen in a while, as old friends.

Perhaps the best of both worlds is to have a good book room and a capable ereader. And a nice roaring fireplace to read by on a frosty evening.

Posted by: dissent555 at December 17, 2015 10:24 AM (VFhMt)

193 185 OT, there is another NYTimes editorial about guns, this one about suicides. Haven't read it yet, but they posted the tidbit that 20k of the firearm deaths in the country, 2/3, are suicides.

They focus on the guns to keep from confronting the fact that the world they've made is so soul-crushingly shitty folks want out in droves.
Posted by: Brother Cavil, down with Eph 6:12-13 at December 17, 2015 10:19 AM (9krrF)

I think soul-crushingly shitty is the world's default state. They certainly aren't helping matters though.

Posted by: Insomniac - Pale Horse/Death 2016 at December 17, 2015 10:25 AM (kpqmD)

194 >>One more thought, look into biographical travelogue type things.

Ooh, good idea!
Recently saw the "Kon-tiki" movie, and that might be an interesting book...

Posted by: Lizzy at December 17, 2015 10:25 AM (NOIQH)

195 And there's places for both physical books and e-readers. Books for permanence and the ability to read when the power's not there, e-readers for most of the rest of the time. Though I suggest if you suspect e-publishing shenanigans may fiddle with content, backup hard copy is never a bad choice.

Posted by: Brother Cavil, down with Eph 6:12-13 at December 17, 2015 10:26 AM (9krrF)

196 Love all of my physical books, and have quite a collection, but my Kindle is what I use for daily reading. It's good to know my 'real' books are there, but my Kindle....reading bliss. My favorite books are both in paper and on the Kindle. Best of both worlds.

Posted by: Lizabth at December 17, 2015 10:26 AM (3v3uS)

197 Hmm. How to Serve Mankind.



101 Recipes for Long Pig

Posted by: rickb223 at December 17, 2015 10:28 AM (E9ede)

198 Oh, and the mention of biographies above reminded me of the book Kabloona, written by a Frenchman who spent 15 months among the Inuit, published in 1941 or thereabouts. Fascinating book.

Posted by: Kerry at December 17, 2015 10:29 AM (haFgm)

199 What did people think of SyFy's adaptation of Childhood's End?

Posted by: Anna Puma at December 17, 2015 10:29 AM (iomlS)

200 Sherry, nice to hear about the Tulsa library. As a kid, I used to spend a lot of time in the old B'ville library. Great place. Not so impressed with the modern one. I think there's a leftish trend to what's stocked & what's removed. And I'm too old-fash - so many square feet taken up with computers, video, non-book stuff. Something to be said for the old idea of non-public libraries.

Posted by: mindful webworker - bookishly at December 17, 2015 10:30 AM (/B6Iw)

201 Corgis. BenK has a few links.

Posted by: Anna Puma at December 17, 2015 10:31 AM (iomlS)

202 What did people think of SyFy's adaptation of Childhood's End?

===

Is that where it was on? Kept reading you guys were watching that.

Posted by: Bigby's Finger Foods at December 17, 2015 10:31 AM (3ZtZW)

203 Monty,
Can we get a DOOM! report for (or before) Christmas?
Thanks and Merry Christmas.
;o)

Posted by: AC at December 17, 2015 10:31 AM (v88c+)

204 "be sure you're loving the content of the book."

Why? Why not own them because they're wonderful to look at (in addition to being wonderful to read)?

Posted by: General Zod at December 17, 2015 10:32 AM (Bdeb0)

205 Don't fetishize the delivery vehicle? There goes my comic book collection.


Posted by: BignJames at December 17, 2015 08:46 AM (HtUkt)


If Kate Upton were to go into the pizza delivery game, on the other hand...

Posted by: Alberta Oil Peon at December 17, 2015 10:33 AM (7MWCL)

206 Approaching two hundred comments and I'm surprised that no one has mentioned that the power of books to inform is only equaled by the power of books to misinform.

We celebrate books, we celebrate history, we celebrate knowledge in the presumption that the books we read are true and honest, and that we have the sense to discriminate; that we have the ability to detect that which is not true and is intended to manipulate.

True also with education. We believe in education, yet the evidence is undeniable; education can easily be subverted into indoctrination.

We believe in the power of reason, logic and fact to overcome misperception and deceit. History, I would suggest, tells us otherwise. We see George Orwell's '1984' as a warning, yet others see it as an instruction manual.

Posted by: Ouija Jamma at December 17, 2015 10:35 AM (e5C6y)

207 Monty, Thanks for an unexpected book thread. It will help fill the gap until next Sunday.

I have hundreds of books on Kindle and Nook but I don't trust them. Convenient? Yep! Often free or inexpensive books? Yep! Under my complete control? Nope! Available if the power goes out? Nope!

I've learned to dispose of casual fiction and nonfiction books that are no longer needed. But my shelves are weighed down with reference books from Bibles to home maintenance to survival skills to classics of literature (classics in MY opinion and the number keeps increasing).

If it's something I may want or need to read by candle light, I want the physical book.

Posted by: JTB at December 17, 2015 10:35 AM (FvdPb)

208 My mom, who will soon be 86 reads every single day. I'm convinced it's what has kept her mind sharp up to this point.

Posted by: jewells45 at December 17, 2015 10:36 AM (l/N7H)

209 Packing & moving books is always weird ... no longer literature - gateway to knowledge and adventure - they are reduced to blocks... sorted by size and what fits into that space left in the box!

Posted by: mindful webworker - hates moving at December 17, 2015 10:38 AM (/B6Iw)

210 You can have high end furniture or you can have cats. You CAN have both, but you shouldn't.


I prefer cats.


---------------------


Same here. They are the soul of my house.

Posted by: Soona at December 17, 2015 10:39 AM (Fmupd)

211 Headlines thread up.

Posted by: Mary Poppins' Practically Perfect Piercing at December 17, 2015 10:40 AM (X6fMO)

212 >>I think they deleted one book years ago that had been in public domain

>IIRC it was Orwell's "1984"

It was. That's one reason why my whole collection is DRM-free. If an ebook is only available with DRM, I obtain it from a source from which I know I can remove it. (So far, that includes Amazon and B&N, and excludes Apple.) Once it's been liberated, I keep it on my own server and maintain my own backups.

If it's DRM'd, you don't really own it.

Posted by: salfter at December 17, 2015 10:40 AM (kmvkg)

213 Did someone fetishize physical books? 'Cause I didn't notice.

Posted by: The Inexplicable Dr. Julius Strangepork at December 17, 2015 10:43 AM (RDQSg)

214 Ouija Jamma: ...the power of books to inform is only equaled by the power of books to misinform.

Be careful about reading health books. You may die of a misprint. -Mark Twain

Posted by: mindful webworker - healthy reader at December 17, 2015 10:43 AM (/B6Iw)

215 For donating books, I take mine to the old folks home. Most of them don't get out very much and I get the satisfaction of seeing them go to a good home!

Posted by: FCF at December 17, 2015 10:53 AM (kejii)

216 I'll get a Kindle when I'm done reading all the paper books I have - and I will never catch up because my buying habits outstrip my ability to read them.

Yes, packing up and moving books is painful - and yet I love the look of a room with filled bookcases and book shelves. Nothing makes a room look more inviting, more human and more civilized.

And I agree with whoever said that poking around in used bookstores can make for unexpected discoveries of authors you might have never read or heard about otherwise. I picked up a used copy of "The Deptford Trilogy" in a Victoria, BC, bookstore 30 years ago and the author, Robertson Davies, became one of my favorites.

Posted by: Donna&&&&V (a white) (whitely brandishing ampersand privilege ) at December 17, 2015 10:55 AM (P8951)

217 Most of them don't get out very much and I get the satisfaction of seeing them go to a good home!
Posted by: FCF at December 17, 2015 10:53 AM (kejii)

That is a really good idea!

Posted by: Donna&&&&V (a white) (whitely brandishing ampersand privilege ) at December 17, 2015 10:57 AM (P8951)

218 Posted by: naturalfake at December 17, 2015 10:13 AM (KUa85)

===

The proper response is to then scan and distribute the real text. Do it once, replicate it in the thousands, offer it for free. I see no problem.

Posted by: Bigby's Finger Foods at December 17, 2015 10:16 AM (3ZtZW)



You do realize that you just made my argument for me, don't you?

The only reason you can scan a true copy-

is because of the permanence of the printed page.


Hence, more conducive to freedom.

Posted by: naturalfake at December 17, 2015 11:00 AM (0cMkb)

219 I'm loving this thread. Not the least reason is that there are enough pull quotes in both Monty's post and the comments for a month of Sundays.

Posted by: OregonMuse at December 17, 2015 11:09 AM (ACCTs)

220 I love my Kindle and I love my physical books. When I read the post and saw that Monty mentioned his Kindle, I knew what half the comments would be.

We don't really own anything in this life. Physical books are easily destroyed by fire, floods, theft, and the burning times. Electronic readers can be wiped by Amazon or rendered useless by an EMP (see the burning times).

Posted by: Michael the Hobbit at December 17, 2015 11:09 AM (dPpmC)

221 As a child, my Mom read to me every night and took me to the library. And she read every night.

I'm sorry to say she is gone now, but I read every single night and still go to the library. And I always will.

Thanks Mom!

Posted by: shibumi who is awash in existential dread at December 17, 2015 11:17 AM (9JJgN)

222 This is well-timed with the conversation I had with my 15 y/o last night. I gave him a chance to make a case about a big life decision in the context of a recent life fvkcup of his.

His mother and I knew how he felt about it and that he had learned and grown from it, but we wanted to hear him express it. Unfortunately he lacked the ability to really express the complex ideas and emotions (through no real fault of his own, he is 15 after all) swirling around in his teenage boy brain, so we had to obliquely guide him through it in a variety of ways.

When we were done, I asked him if he finally understood the real value of being able to express himself. He did. He then offered the unsolicited idea that he wanted to get better at it. I let him know that, other than practice, an excellent way to work on it is to...read more. The boy just hates to read.

But now, I think he finally gets it. I don't think he's going to be cracking open War and Peace or scouring the internet for more cerebral pursuits anytime soon, but I think the anti-reading tide has turned.

Posted by: Burn the Witch at December 17, 2015 11:25 AM (Wckf4)

223 But now, I think he finally gets it. I don't think he's going to be cracking open War and Peace or scouring the internet for more cerebral pursuits anytime soon, but I think the anti-reading tide has turned.

Posted by: Burn the Witch at December 17, 2015 11:25 AM (Wckf4)


Thank God for victories, even the small ones.

Posted by: OregonMuse at December 17, 2015 11:37 AM (ACCTs)

224 Monty, I am interested in your Newsletter.

Do you have a bound edition?

Posted by: Garrett at December 17, 2015 11:41 AM (SG2QZ)

225 Oregon Muse, I rarely post but wanted you to know how much the book thread is appreciated here
All those lovely libraries!!

Posted by: FCF at December 17, 2015 11:42 AM (kejii)

226 >>We don't really own anything in this life.


Then why am in paying so much in property taxes?

Posted by: Garrett at December 17, 2015 11:44 AM (SG2QZ)

227 Books aren't hard to move.
Record collections are hard to move.

Posted by: Garrett at December 17, 2015 11:49 AM (SG2QZ)

228 #225 ( *blushes* )

My pleasure, FCF.

Posted by: OregonMuse at December 17, 2015 12:14 PM (ACCTs)

229 >>We don't really own anything in this life.

Then why am in paying so much in property taxes?
Posted by: Garrett at December 17, 2015 11:44 AM (SG2QZ)


Redistribution of wealth is a good thing.

Posted by: Zimbabwe at December 17, 2015 12:33 PM (dPpmC)

230
I was hoping for some fresh DOOM.. This will do. not that anyone care but I like the books more than the kindle. I just read more with the book then the device. Oh, and can we get us some DOOM please?

Posted by: Freedomlost at December 17, 2015 01:02 PM (FzpyA)

231 The only reason you can scan a true copy-is because of the permanence of the printed page.

Posted by: naturalfake at December 17, 2015 11:00 AM (0cMkb)


Politically correct Huckleberry Finn.

http://goo.gl/iRHSJE

I actually agree with you but am just yanking your chain a bit.

Book confiscation is common in totalitarianism societies and there may come a day where we'll have to secret away our most precious physical books behind a false wall or buried underground. Either that, or memorize them, as in The Book of Eli.

Posted by: Book Burnings at December 17, 2015 01:21 PM (dPpmC)

232 A home without books looks barren. Yes, living in China, I don't know what I'd do without my kindle. But wherever we go, we have to have bookshelves and books.

My best childhood memory is of my mother reading to us.

Posted by: rosemarie at December 17, 2015 05:33 PM (ioLhU)

233 I own a small specialty bookstore, and I bought a bottom of the line Kindle about three years ago because the publishers had finally come to their senses and were beginning to issue ARCs (advanced reading copies) in electronic form. I now have a Kindle Fire that is used almost exclusively for reading ARCs, playing games and reading news blogs. My husband has glommed onto the original Kindle, which has become his best friend in the whole entire world. He really enjoys reading historical fiction set in the pre-500 AD Roman Empire. There are several authors of those series who publish exclusively through Amazon and for a very reasonable price. He is also a devout Roman Catholic and has downloaded a lot of free Catholic material such as St. Augustine and the early Church fathers.

I still prefer a physical book -- and just not because I am a bookseller. I've bought a couple of books online and spent the whole time I was reading them wondering if I'd actually gotten the entire book or if it had been abridged simply because it didn't have the proper heft.

But I agree with Monty: "The problem besetting poor kids is not so much a lack of books as it is a lack of responsible adults in the house who invest the time and effort to engage them in reading -- whether the written words are in book or on an LCD screen. What's lacking here are not bound slabs of paper, but engaged parents." Only it's not just poor kids. It cuts across all class lines. I worked in a chain bookstore for several years before striking out on my own, which means I heard lots of middle class and upper middle class parents tell their kids they didn't need a $4.00 kids paperback. These, of course, were parents who had no problem shelling out lots of dollars for cable, gaming consoles and games -- but a cheap book for the kid was going to break the family budget forever. I said a lot of really bad things under my breath on those occasions.

Posted by: catlady at December 17, 2015 06:01 PM (bn5b8)

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Iraqi Prisoner Claims He Was Raped... By Woman
Wonkette Announces "Morning Zoo" Format
John Kerry's "Plan" Causes Surrender of Moqtada al-Sadr's Militia
World Muslim Leaders Apologize for Nick Berg's Beheading
Michael Moore Goes on Lunchtime Manhattan Death-Spree
Milestone: Oliver Willis Posts 400th "Fake News Article" Referencing Britney Spears
Liberal Economists Rue a "New Decade of Greed"
Artificial Insouciance: Maureen Dowd's Word Processor Revolts Against Her Numbing Imbecility
Intelligence Officials Eye Blogs for Tips
They Done Found Us Out, Cletus: Intrepid Internet Detective Figures Out Our Master Plan
Shock: Josh Marshall Almost Mentions Sarin Discovery in Iraq
Leather-Clad Biker Freaks Terrorize Australian Town
When Clinton Was President, Torture Was Cool
What Wonkette Means When She Explains What Tina Brown Means
Wonkette's Stand-Up Act
Wankette HQ Gay-Rumors Du Jour
Here's What's Bugging Me: Goose and Slider
My Own Micah Wright Style Confession of Dishonesty
Outraged "Conservatives" React to the FMA
An On-Line Impression of Dennis Miller Having Sex with a Kodiak Bear
The Story the Rightwing Media Refuses to Report!
Our Lunch with David "Glengarry Glen Ross" Mamet
The House of Love: Paul Krugman
A Michael Moore Mystery (TM)
The Dowd-O-Matic!
Liberal Consistency and Other Myths
Kepler's Laws of Liberal Media Bias
John Kerry-- The Splunge! Candidate
"Divisive" Politics & "Attacks on Patriotism" (very long)
The Donkey ("The Raven" parody)
News/Chat