Support




Contact
Powered by
Movable Type





Sunday Morning Book Thread 11-22-2015: Ace of Trump [OregonMuse]


Trump Soho Hotel Library.jpg
Trump SoHo® Hotel Library, New York City.


Picture stolen from here. This is the description from the hotel web site:

LIBRARY. Displaying an array of art and design books, The Library overlooks the Trump SoHo® New York lobby and streets of New York through a wall of glass. The modern fireplace and custom cherry-blossom wallpaper of this SoHo lounge create a subdued setting, perfect for a cup of a coffee or cocktail. The Library is open from 9:00 am to 10:00 pm daily.

Eh. Not really my cup of tea.

This is the book thread. Sunday morning. Morons and moronettes all invited. It's yuuge. Big audience. International. Obama's got nothin' on me. So it's a cut above. I polished up the spittoons and hosed down the restrooms. Hey, I run a classy joint, just ask anybody. You pervs had better be wearing pants. Yeah, ok, kilts are fine. And who the hell would hang out on the book thread wearing a tutu?? I guess girls can. But nobody else.


Love Him Or Hate Him Or Both

And speaking of Trump, here is an excerpt from his new book, Crippled America: How to Make America Great Again (look at that scowl!). And this being the Democratic media outlet abcnews, it shouldn't surprise you that the section the liberal lackwits chose to excerpt was the part where he praises higher government spending on "infrastructure" jobs.

And here is an excerpt of the excerpt:

In Washington, DC, I’m converting the Old Post Office Building on Pennsylvania Avenue into one of the world’s greatest hotels. I got the building from the General Services Administration. Tthe GSA sold it to me for four reasons. Number one—we’re really good. Number two—we had a really great plan. Number three—we had a great financial statement. Number four—we’re EXCELLENT, not just very good, at fulfilling or even exceeding our agreements.

That’s the way the country should be run.

The guy writes just like he talks. When I read the excerpt, I could hear his voice in my mind saying the words I was reading.

My first dose of Trump came a few years ago when I was listening to the radio and happened to hear him testify before some congressional committee that was investigating a proposal to build an entirely new building for the U.N. - at the cost of $1 billion. Trump told them that actually, he could build it easily for $750 million and explained that the higher price tag on the original proposal was due solely to union corruption. He laid out his argument calmly, dispassionately, and thoroughly, using facts and logic. I thought the case he was making was irrefutable, and I'm sure the Democrats on the committee didn't want to hear it, but they had no answer. After all, who better knows the NYC real estate market than Donald Trump? From then on, Trump was a "guilty pleasure" of mine and I would never admit to anyone I liked the guy, despite his egoistical asshattery and his crappy toupé. So when he opens his mouth, it's equally likely you're going to hear something really smart, or something incredibly dumb. Sometimes both at once:

When you talk about building, you had better talk about Trump. There is no single builder in this country who has his name on as great a range of projects as I’ve constructed. New York City wasted seven years trying to get a skating rink done. I did it in less than four months—and got it done under budget. There was a huge railroad yard overlooking the Hudson River that nobody could figure out how to develop. Drive by there now and you’ll see thousands of magnificent apartments, all with the same name on the buildings—Trump.

That's pure Trump.

His planet-sized ego makes Bill O'Reilly look like Mother Theresa, and yet I like him, but I can't abide O'Reilly. Go figure.


Quiz

Test your knowledge of Middle Earth by taking this quiz. I regret to say that I only got 88%, as some of the questions were based on what went on in the films -- which doesn't necessarily coincide with the books.

Saving Shakespeare

We came this close: -><- to not having Shakespeare to read. Such is the contention Andrea Mays in her book,The Millionaire and the Bard: Henry Folger's Obsessive Hunt for Shakespeare's First Folio

When Shakespeare died in 1616 half of his plays died with him. No one—not even their author—believed that his writings would last...By the time of his death his plays were rarely performed, eighteen of them had never been published, and the rest existed only in bastardized forms that did not stay true to his original language.

Seven years later, in 1623, Shakespeare’s business partners, companions, and fellow actors, John Heminges and Henry Condell, gathered copies of the plays and manuscripts, edited and published thirty-six of them. This massive book, the First Folio, was intended as a memorial to their deceased friend.

How important is this First Folio?

If this book wasn’t published, half of the plays, including “Macbeth,” “Two Gentlemen of Verona,” “Cymbeline” and “Antony and Cleopatra” would not have existed.

Supposedly everyone in the business back then - including Shakespeare himself - thought Shakespeare was a flash in the pan and would quickly disappear. Except for his two foresighted friends who collected his plays into a single volume.

This interview with the author contains some interesting bits about the theater business in Shakespeare's day, the fear of piracy and the resulting loss of revenue.

I am reminded of a book thread item of a few weeks ago, where I contrasted, in point/counterpoint fashion, this piece vs. this piece, which ably contrasted the "writing as Art" vs. "writing as a job" views of the task of putting words to paper. I've never liked the view that sets up art with a capital 'A' and the artiste is some elevated being whose devotion to pursuing his Art places him far above the rest of us schlubs. From what we know of him, Shakespeare was just some guy trying to make a buck writing plays and managing a theater company. He was not an artiste crafting words into Art. He was writing plays to earn coin for himself and his acting company, and the more coin, the better. I really am a proponent of Larry Correia's view, also held by Isaac Asimov, that writing is an everyday job that you do, well, every day, 8 (or more) hours a day, week in, week out. The only way you get good at something is practice, practice, practice, and writing is no different than anything else.


Another EBook Service

I've been touting BookBub for a long time as an excellent service that finds low cost (and FREE) e-book bargains and presents them to you in a daily e-mail. Much better than Amazon's Kindle Daily Deal, all of which stink. Last week, moronette author Sabrina Chase introduced another one, which I immediately signed up for:

I...wanted to point out a very handy tool for the reading Moron on a budget. EreaderIQ (http://www.ereaderiq.com/) is a free service that lets you sign up for price watches on particular books, or a particular author. Was *very* handy last week when a huge swath of Georgette Heyer went on sale for $1.99 apiece (vs. 9.99, sheesh!). It has other clever options for freebies and suchlike, but the author/book watch is the one I use the most.

Check it out. The only drawback is that it's for Kindle editions only.


Bombs, Not Books-- Er, I Mean...

Some real bad timing here:

A group of UK authors, along with their publishers, are donating some of their bestselling titles and forgoing the profits to raise one million pounds for Syrian refugees.

Because recent events have taught us that if there's one thing Western Europe needs more of, it's even more boatloads of dubiously-vetted refugees from dysfunctional, western-hating Mideast countries.

As part of the #BuyBooksForSyria campaign, some of the book industry's top authors – Neil Gaiman, Hilary Mantel, David Nichols, Khaled Hosseini, Bill Bryson, Ian Rankin, Philip Pullman, and Salman Rushdie – are donating their books for UK bookseller Waterstones to sell in their stores under the "Buy Books for Syria" banner, with 100 percent of the retail price going to Oxfam's Syria Crisis Appeal.

So what are you cheap bastards waiting for? Buy some of these books! Those fraudulent Greek passports aren't going to forge themselves, you know.


New & Recommended

Moron commenter 'The Great White Snark' passed along a couple of books that he thought looked interesting, and I'll be adding one of my own.

First up, It Ended Badly: Thirteen of the Worst Breakups in History by Jennifer Wright. There's no "official" Amazon blurb, so this is from one of the reviews:

Did I mention that each of these memorable, irreverent essays is side-splitting-laugh-out-loud-funny and yet still presents all the historical facts surrounding the breakups? True. Not only are you guaranteed mirth and laughter with each breakup story you are also going to learn a plethora of facts along the way. And it is extraordinarily well written! Educational, well written, and funny: a wonderful combination!

"It Ended Badly is for anyone who's ever loved and lost and maybe sent one too many ill-considered late-night emails to their ex, reminding us that no matter how badly we've behaved, no one is as bad as Henry VIII."

GWS's second choice is a a 72-page novella that he describes as "a footnote to Vietnam". Ghosts in the Forest by Corinne Purtill is described by a reviewer as

...so bizarre, so seemingly unlikely, so gripping and larger-than-life, that it makes you wonder how you've never really heard it before, how this isn't a story everyone knows. And then, once you read it, you kind of feel like everyone else you know should read it, too, because it reinforces ideas like - the truth is always stranger than fiction, and that the human spirit is indomitable. Like other stories of survival against all odds, it's complicated, dark, sad, and, ultimately uplifting. It's also fast-paced, and elegantly written. Purtill is a compassionate, thorough and insightful interviewer, getting showing - and telling - details from her subjects decades after the events occurred.

Yeah, I had to buy it. What the heck, it was only $2.99.

As of today (Saturday), this book has been marked down to FREE, but I don't know how long that price will last. I'm talking about the military-historical adventure novel A Sailor of Austria: In Which, Without Really Intending to, Otto Prohaska Becomes Official War Hero No. 27 of the Habsburg Empire by John Biggins:

In this ironic, hilarious, and poignant story, Otto Prohaska is a submarine captain serving the almost-landlocked Austro-Hungarian Empire. He faces a host of unlikely circumstances, from petrol poisoning to exploding lavatories to trigger-happy Turks. All signs point to the total collapse of the bloated empire he serves, but Otto refuses to abandon the Habsburgs in their hour of need.

Submarines being employed by the Habsburgs sounds a bit anachronistic to me, but it sounds like a fun book. And Biggins has written a whole slough of other books featuring the adventures of Otto Prohaska, as recounted by him, now over 100 years old, as he finishes out the rest of his days in a Welsh nursing home.

And incidentally, I heard about this via BookBub, not the Amazon Daily "Deal", which never gives you books like this.


What I'm Reading

I finished An Act of Self Defense this week. It's a pretty good political thriller and keeps you turning the pages.

I was amused by the Amazon blurb for this novel. This is how it starts out:

What if Congress were captured by corrupt politicians who think they own their offices?

What do you mean, "what if"?

Critics and readers nationwide praised its riveting premise of an unscrupulous Washington aristocracy passing legislation for the benefit of themselves and their friends

Yeah, because that's total fantasy, and can never happen in real life.

Actually, the plot is somewhat similar to that of Vince Flynn's thriller Term Limits, where career congressmen who have managed to entrench themselves in Washington DC and who don't believe in term limits nonetheless get term limits imposed upon them, with extreme prejudice.

Term Limits is also a good page-turner.

___________


Moron commenter Seamus Muldoon's book "To Save Us All From Ruin" will be available for the low, low price of FREE today and tomorrow. Get it here.

___________

Don't forget the AoSHQ reading group on Goodreads. It's meant to support horde writers and to talk about the great books that come up on the book thread. It's called AoSHQ Moron Horde and the link to it is here: https://www.goodreads.com/group/show/175335-aoshq-moron-horde.


___________

So that's all for this week. As always, book thread tips, suggestions, bribes, rumors, threats, and insults may be sent to OregonMuse, Proprietor, AoSHQ Book Thread, at the book thread e-mail address: aoshqbookthread, followed by the 'at' sign, and then 'G' mail, and then dot cee oh emm.

What have you all been reading this week? Hopefully something good, because, as you all know, life is too short to be reading lousy books.

Posted by: Open Blogger at 08:58 AM




Comments

(Jump to bottom of page)

1 Yeah, ok, kilts are fine. And who the hell would hang out on the
book thread wearing a tutu?? I guess girls can. But nobody else.






Aaaahhhhh....comfy!

Posted by: GGE Hades of the Kilted Horde, NC Chapter at November 22, 2015 09:00 AM (UQGss)

2 I don't know, that Trump hotel library looks pretty nice.

Posted by: EC at November 22, 2015 09:00 AM (j8YpL)

3 Your rhetoric will become an Islamic State recruiting tool.

Posted by: King Barack the Magnificent at November 22, 2015 09:01 AM (7v/r5)

4 I'm re-reading The Legend of Bagger Vance by Steven Pressfield after a couple of years. Any golfer who has not read this book is missing something special.

Posted by: Max Rockatansky at November 22, 2015 09:06 AM (3r2w8)

5 If we read books, ISIS will have won!

Posted by: Village Idiot's Apprentice at November 22, 2015 09:09 AM (ptqRm)

6 I wonder what a Mussie library has in it, endless books praising Allah.

Much like the North Korean libraries has almost all books by the great "Kim Family" and nothing else.

Posted by: Colin at November 22, 2015 09:09 AM (8BlfF)

7 Not really a library, but I found a terrific place to read while staying in Philadelphia on a recent combination business-pleasure trip. I stayed at the historic Bache House, which has a wonderful little reading room, with shelves loaded with 18th and 19th century books (and an assortment of current magazines and newspapers.) I passed a pleasant hour and a half reading up on Ben Franklin's various adventures in Philly (he stayed in that very house while his own home was being renovated) while sipping delicious coffee from an enameled mug and enjoying a Danish from the friendly catering staff (only on weekends, they told me).

A friend from Philly arrived to take me to the airport, and we played a game of speed chess on the reading room's Yankees vs. Redcoats chess set. All in all, it was a wonderful place to read.

Just finished Bill Bryson's "In a Sunburned Country" which I liked a lot more than his way over-rated (IMHO) "A Walk in the Woods.

Makes a nice companion piece to Tony Horwitz's "One for the Road" when it comes to exploring Australia from the comfort of your living room armchair.





Posted by: WhatWhatWhat? at November 22, 2015 09:09 AM (HMt16)

8 Great book thread as usual, OM!

heads up for the goodreads groupies - I will be offline for most of the day, so if I don't get back to you, I'm not ignoring you. I should be back by 2pm EST.

Those not in the group yet, you are missing great orgies, I'm tellin ya.
(book orgies that is)

Posted by: @votermom at November 22, 2015 09:09 AM (cbfNE)

9  I'm re-reading The Legend of Bagger Vance by Steven Pressfield after a couple of years. Any golfer who has not read this book is missing something special.Posted by: Max Rockatansky at November 22, 2015 09:06 AM (3r2w

The 'magic negro' genre? I watched the movie and thought it silly. Was the book based on any reality?

Posted by: se pa moron - call it what it is, treason at November 22, 2015 09:11 AM (7v/r5)

10 >>>Submarines being employed by the Habsburgs sounds a bit anachronistic to me, but it sounds like a fun book.<<<

Georg von Trapp was an Austro-Hungarian u-boat ace. He sank 13 allied ships, including a French armored cruiser.


Posted by: the guy that moves pianos for a living... at November 22, 2015 09:12 AM (tEDMc)

11 I bought Cruz's book , A Time For Truth, about a couple of months ago and just can't get myself to start it. I guess I just donated to his campaign / pocketbook.

Posted by: Max Rockatansky at November 22, 2015 09:12 AM (3r2w8)

12


His planet-sized ego makes Bill O'Reilly look like Mother Theresa, and yet I like him, but I can't abide O'Reilly. Go figure.

O'rally does it to put you down.
Trump appears to be trying to motivate you.

Posted by: Pappy O'Daniel at November 22, 2015 09:13 AM (oVJmc)

13
Books? What are those? I'm confused y'all....

*hic*

Posted by: Hillary Clinton at November 22, 2015 09:13 AM (WYBi3)

14 The guy writes just like he talks. When I read the excerpt, I could hear his voice in my mind saying the words I was reading.

--

OM that's exactly what I thought when I was reading it! GMTA

I have a review in my blog (link in nic)
Some reviews of Horde writers too and more to come.

Posted by: @votermom at November 22, 2015 09:13 AM (cbfNE)

15 The Folger Library, in DC, is one of my favorite museums. It is really special to be able to read the Bard's work in his actual handwriting. Difficult too, because Elizabethan English is a mess, but still special. Plus they have performances of his plays during the "school" year, which are well priced.

Posted by: Moki at November 22, 2015 09:14 AM (7q2ch)

16 Trump writes like Ace. I've got proof...

Posted by: Bruce With a Wang! at November 22, 2015 09:14 AM (iQIUe)

17 Aaaahhhhh....comfy!
Posted by: GGE
---------------


*clicks his Cree-driven flashlight into strobe mode, just for the hell of it*

Posted by: Mike Hammer,etc., etc. at November 22, 2015 09:15 AM (9mTYi)

18 Posted by: se pa moron - call it what it is, treason at November 22, 2015 09:11 AM (7v/r5)

The movie was nothing like the book . And the magic negro structure had a purpose. Lastly , as with all of Pressfield's books, it has a warrior theme. If you're a golfer, give the book a chance though I think the overall message is something anyone would enjoy.

Posted by: Max Rockatansky at November 22, 2015 09:17 AM (3r2w8)

19 This week I finished two excellent books. The first was Lamentation by C. J. Sansom. This is the sixth book in the Matthew Shardlake series. Matthew is a London lawyer during the reign of Henry VIII. In Lamentation it's 1546 and Shardlake is deep in religious and political intrigue in an effort to help the queen, Catherine Parr, keep her head firmly upon her neck. Shardlake almost looses his head in the process. I like the other books in the series and I think this one is the best.

Many of you are familiar with the second book, On Basilisk Station by David Weber. It is the first in the Honor Harrington series. It's not only a good space-opera tale, but the characters are more fleshed-out and developed than in most sci-fi. I'm looking forward to reading more in the series. Just what I need, another great series with over 15 works on my list.

Posted by: Zoltan at November 22, 2015 09:17 AM (THsLo)

20 Hail, Book Thread!

Some Nameless Moron, many Book Threads ago, recommended A Sailor of Austria and I loved it. Know that this book is now FREE on Amazon. Here is a direct link http://preview.tinyurl.com/outhjke or you can use the Ewok link and search for the book. (Flea dip is not cheap, folks.)

The book is worth the price of admission purely for the scene involving getting a camel in a submarine. As a gearhead I also appreciated the general spit and baling wire WWI submarine tech, too.

Read some books, none of them exciting enough to mention (or bad enough to mention). And now back to the work in progress. It turns out experience dealing with crafty warlords in the 'stans is useful when encountering wily space-age Neanderthals trying to escape a prison planet. Who knew?

Posted by: Sabrina Chase at November 22, 2015 09:18 AM (GG9V6)

21 Trump library still has a bit of the Babylonian-whorehouse feel Ace pithily described once.

Posted by: Bob's House of Flannel Shirts and Wallet Chains at November 22, 2015 09:18 AM (yxw0r)

22 Posted by: Pappy O'Daniel at November 22, 2015 09:13 AM (oVJmc)

Unless you disagree with him.

Posted by: Max Rockatansky at November 22, 2015 09:18 AM (3r2w8)

23 Still wading through 'A Winter's Tale'. Helprin is an astonishing, even astounding writer. As a novelist?, I haven't made up my mind, but he certainly weaves interesting stories.

Posted by: Mike Hammer,etc., etc. at November 22, 2015 09:18 AM (9mTYi)

24 "Term Limits is also a good page-turner instruction manual."

FTFY.

Posted by: SDN at November 22, 2015 09:20 AM (Y+SJ+)

25 I thought the Trump testimony about the UN was a reconditioning, because he talked about doing the job from the top-down, because if the roof has problems, refurbishing anything below may be a waste. He also discussed the ability to do it in stages in order to avoid renting an equivalent space to house everyone.

But maybe it was a new building and that's why I couldn't find the video again.

Posted by: First-Rate Political Hack at November 22, 2015 09:21 AM (oqDpn)

26 15 The Folger Library, in DC, is one of my favorite museums. It is really special to be able to read the Bard's work in his actual handwriting.
Posted by: Moki at November 22, 2015 09:14 AM (7q2ch)

**************

I didn't think there were any extant samples of his handwriting outside a few signatures.

Posted by: Bob's House of Flannel Shirts and Wallet Chains at November 22, 2015 09:22 AM (yxw0r)

27 I finally got my tail-end reserve copy from the library of Brad Thor's latest, Code of Conduct. The scary part is that Thor gets lots of intel from friends on the inside.

I'm curious to know if he got the kernel of the theme for the book from the fact that Obola had no qualms about letting ebola patients/undiagnosed travelers into the U.S.

Posted by: RushBabe at November 22, 2015 09:23 AM (/NEnw)

28 On a number of book threads I've mentioned that I'm not a fan of sciFi but that one of my favorite books is Armor by John Steakley. How do real fans of SciFi rank that book?

Posted by: Max Rockatansky at November 22, 2015 09:25 AM (3r2w8)

29 Problem with Henry VIII, is that saying no to him, put you and your family at great risk. Sure, if you were royality in another country it was okay but if you were a subject shudder!

Posted by: Bruce With a Wang! at November 22, 2015 09:25 AM (iQIUe)

30 Books I have read recently: Son of the Black Sword by Larry Correia. A completely different world, more of a samurai type story with a very interesting plot twist. As with all Correia books, highly recommended.

Sparrowhawk 3 by Edward Cline, continues the adventure as set forth in the first two; it's a story about people living and trying to survive in England and the English colonies in North America just before the American Revolution.

David Weber's first three Honor Harrington books, I liked them but then again I am a fan of sci fi milfic.

Her Brother's Keeper by Mike Kupari. First solo work from co author of Dead Six (with Larry Correia), a space yarn that I found completely enjoyable. I'm not quite sold on spaceships that land on their fins, but it's been a sci-fi staple for years so who am I to judge? I liked the book.

Amy Lynn; Lady of Castle Dunn by our very own Jack July (oldsailorspoet). If you don't love Amy Lynn then you are quite possibly a commie plant and because of you the terrorists will win. Also, you are worse than Hitler.

Worlds Apart: Charlemagne by our very own James Wittenbach (Gregory of Yardsdale). I'm loving this series and can't wait to see where it ends up.

Currently reading: Pixie Noir by Cedar Sanderson. So far so good, if you like Harry Dredsden you will likely enjoy this book.

Posted by: GGE Hades of the Kilted Horde, NC Chapter at November 22, 2015 09:25 AM (UQGss)

31 I finished not too long ago a book entitled,

Gut: The Inside Story of Our Body's Most Underrated Organ.

by Enders and recommend it to all highly. It is a quick, fun read with very important information that will positively affect your health written by a young German Dr. awarded for her science writing.

This is a currently an international best seller I wish I had read (esp. the third part) a year ago for it would have saved my health.

See what others are saying about it.

Thanks to all the other Morons for their kind book suggestions over the years. And thanks for the GoodReads group. Get the Platinum membership. It pays!!

Posted by: (not J.J.) Sefton at November 22, 2015 09:27 AM (wi0rD)

32 I believe Shakespeare contributed greatly to the English language. Dont you go dissing on Bill!

Posted by: Bruce With a Wang! at November 22, 2015 09:28 AM (iQIUe)

33 Finally got the wife say OK to putting the Kindle app on her iPhone and iPad, so we can share all the Kindle content and she can stop buying paper books.

It is annoying, though, that the Amazon app you put on your iPhone or iPad cannot allow you to buy Kindle content.

You have to do it from the Amazon website.

Posted by: the littl shyning man at November 22, 2015 09:28 AM (U6f54)

34 Posted by: GGE Hades of the Kilted Horde, NC Chapter at November 22, 2015 09:25 AM (UQGss)

You seem to be the perfect one that could comment on Armor, a military sciFi book.

Posted by: Max Rockatansky at November 22, 2015 09:28 AM (3r2w8)

35 Hey - I mostly lurk to see all you smart and well-read morons every Sunday, but the goodreads group said to say hi on the thread to get joined up, so here I am. HI!

Posted by: bookaday at November 22, 2015 09:29 AM (xg1NR)

36 Bookbub can make a book a bestselller overnight, but they've become very selective about the books they accept. Here's a tip tho: If they turn you down in the "paid" category, apply again for the "free" category. It will sell your other books, and likely get you on one of the bestseller lists. Also, see if your book has a crossover genre. When I wanted to advertise my book HARD BITE after a successful run in "Mysteries," they turned me down in that category but accepted it in "Action & Adventure."
Good luck,
Anonymous-9

Posted by: Anonymous-9 at November 22, 2015 09:29 AM (vmHHv)

37 You seem to be the perfect one that could comment on Armor, a military sciFi book.

Posted by: Max Rockatansky at November 22, 2015 09:28 AM (3r2w


I haven't read it, I'll have to look it up.

Posted by: GGE Hades of the Kilted Horde, NC Chapter at November 22, 2015 09:31 AM (UQGss)

38 Small announcement-

"To Save Us All From Ruin" will be available for the low, low price of FREE today and tomorrow. What's the downside you ask? Well, you might just enjoy it. Aw, hell, who am I kidding? There is no downside!

Here's what the critics are saying:

"Woof! It's a great book! Now where's my dang treat?"--Buckley, Seamus' dog
"Wow! It's a great book! Now where's my dang treat?"--Missus Muldoon
"It sucks!" Seamus' brothers.
"It really sucks!" One of Seamus' brothers in particular



Direct link to Amazon page- http://tinyurl.com/muldoon-book


Link to sample chapter in my nick. In lieu of compensation, drop a couple bucks in Ace's tip jar.

ENJOY! (Did I mention it's free?)


I now return you to your regular programming.

Posted by: Seamus Muldoon at November 22, 2015 09:31 AM (NeFrd)

39 Muslims burnt the library of Alexandria, the quote being

If those books are in agreement with the Quran, we have no need of them; and if these are opposed to the Quran, destroy them.

Posted by: Bigby's Knuckle Sandwich at November 22, 2015 09:34 AM (Cq0oW)

40 Pretty library, but it needs more shelf space and better lighting. I have more books piled up in my living room waiting for shelf space than there is in that reading room. (And they are GOOD book, the best. You'd love reading them, they are that well written, and well worth keeping)

I finished re-reading O'Brien's Aubrey and Maturin book, Letter of Marque, and I am now re-reading both Guns, Sails and Empires by Carlo Cipola - he doesn't write about technology as such, but the themes of how technology was adopted - and I am also re-reading Doris Egan's Gate of Ivory.

I do wish Egan would write more books. I am sure she makes wonderful money writing for TeeVee, but her pattern of snark and low-grade bitchiness among people who love each other is unmatched by any writer today, I think.

She could be an Ette.

Posted by: Kindltot at November 22, 2015 09:35 AM (q2o38)

41 Georg von Trapp was an Austro-Hungarian u-boat ace. He sank 13 allied ships, including a French armored cruiser.


His autobiography of the war years has now been published, too.

Georg was quite different from how he was portrayed in The Sound of Music, BTW.

Posted by: Grey Fox at November 22, 2015 09:36 AM (bZ7mE)

42 Posted by: GGE Hades of the Kilted Horde, NC Chapter at November 22, 2015 09:31 AM (UQGss)

As I said I'm not a reader of SciFi but I can't imagine any scifi book being much better.

Posted by: Max Rockatansky at November 22, 2015 09:37 AM (3r2w8)

43 How could I have forgotten???


To Save Us All from Ruin by our very own Seamus Muldoon. If Buckley and Mrs Muldoon had actually read the book they would have realized the read is a treat in and of itself. The story centers around the Muldoon brothers and the battle for Anzio. This is a great book regardless of what Seamus's brothers think (and they should be thankful for him and his hamster, the ungrateful jerks).

Posted by: GGE Hades of the Kilted Horde, NC Chapter at November 22, 2015 09:37 AM (UQGss)

44 The only reason I mention Shakespeare's handwriting is that I've always suspected there would be very few corrections in an original manuscript...a mind like that would probably write on that many levels with minimal changes, like Mozart.

Posted by: Bob's House of Flannel Shirts and Wallet Chains at November 22, 2015 09:38 AM (yxw0r)

45 Thank you, Seamus, I can't resist a free book.

Posted by: OregonMuse at November 22, 2015 09:38 AM (6IfH2)

46
In the stores now - Captain in Calico by George MacDonald Fraser:

When George MacDonald Fraser, creator of the Flashman series of novels, died in 2008, he left a fireproof safe, locked. There was a bit of trouble opening the safe but they cracked it in the end, and inside they discovered two thick cardboard folders, one blue, one green, containing 326 sheets of yellowing paper on which was typed, in old-fashioned Courier, their fathers first, unpublished novel, written in 1959: Captain in Calico, a piratical romp based on the life of Calico Jack Rackham.

http://tinyurl.com/oza56oq

From the reviews, as you'd expect, it's a rough first effort, but with episodes of the familiar Flashman-like style.

Posted by: Laurie David's Cervix at November 22, 2015 09:38 AM (kdS6q)

47 Voter mom- Thanks for the mention on The Book Horde.

/Seamus

Posted by: Seamus Muldoon at November 22, 2015 09:39 AM (NeFrd)

48 ENJOY! (Did I mention it's free?)





I now return you to your regular programming.

Posted by: Seamus Muldoon at November 22, 2015 09:31 AM (NeFrd)




Also, there is pie. What more could you ask for?

Posted by: GGE Hades of the Kilted Horde, NC Chapter at November 22, 2015 09:39 AM (UQGss)

49 Pretty library, but it needs more shelf space and better lighting

====

Trump clip on reading lights are HYUUUUUGE

Posted by: Bigby's Knuckle Sandwich at November 22, 2015 09:40 AM (Cq0oW)

50 Posted by: Brother Cavil at November 21, 2015 10:14 AM (m9V0o)

Yes, this. I knew he was a submarine captain in WWI but either didn't know, or had forgotten, how successful he was. About the only thing I remember from reading all the Von Trapp books I could find 25 years ago was how few submariners survived.

Posted by: Polliwog the 'Ette at November 22, 2015 09:41 AM (GDulk)

51 Bob Beckel's book 'I Should Be Dead' arrived this week.

I'll put it with the dozen other unread books on my side-table.

Posted by: Niedermeyer's Dead Horse at November 22, 2015 09:41 AM (PMlgt)

52 Thank you, Seamus, I can't resist a free book.


Posted by: OregonMuse


*****

Wish I could say it will be worth every penny...

Posted by: Seamus Muldoon at November 22, 2015 09:41 AM (NeFrd)

53 Wish I could say it will be worth every penny...

Posted by: Seamus Muldoon at November 22, 2015 09:41 AM (NeFrd)



damn...and I paid full price for it...

(but it was worth every penny)

Posted by: GGE Hades of the Kilted Horde, NC Chapter at November 22, 2015 09:42 AM (UQGss)

54 Hello fellow bookists. This has been another week for edification and entertainment from books.

Reading LOTR continues but at a slower pace. As I've learned more about British culture leading up to WW I and after has given a deeper appreciation of Tolkien's approach to his characters and their place in the story: the importance of the individual in the world and to its creator. Understanding that lends a freshness to the book.

Posted by: JTB at November 22, 2015 09:43 AM (FvdPb)

55 Wish I could say it will be worth every penny...

Posted by: Seamus Muldoon at November 22, 2015 09:41 AM (NeFrd)


And I've updated the thread accordingly.

Posted by: OregonMuse at November 22, 2015 09:43 AM (6IfH2)

56 If those books are in agreement with the Quran, we have no need of them; and if these are opposed to the Quran, destroy them.

Posted by: Bigby's Knuckle Sandwich at November 22, 2015 09:34 AM (Cq0oW)


Beat me to it.

Posted by: OregonMuse at November 22, 2015 09:46 AM (6IfH2)

57 Holy crap, did the thread just up and die on me??

Posted by: OregonMuse at November 22, 2015 09:46 AM (6IfH2)

58 Posted by: GGE Hades of the Kilted Horde, NC Chapter

****


Thank you sir! One day I will have to refund your purchase price in the form of an adult beverage. My treat.

Posted by: Seamus Muldoon at November 22, 2015 09:47 AM (NeFrd)

59 When do you all find the time to read these books? Are all of you unemployed?

Posted by: Soona at November 22, 2015 09:48 AM (Fmupd)

60 Holy crap, did the thread just up and die on me??


****

Probably my fault. Did not mean to hijack the thread. Sorry.

Posted by: Seamus Muldoon at November 22, 2015 09:49 AM (NeFrd)

61 His planet-sized ego makes Bill O'Reilly look like Mother Theresa, and yet I like him, but I can't abide O'Reilly. Go figure.

Yup. Same here.

Posted by: rickl at November 22, 2015 09:49 AM (sdi6R)

62 Posted by: Soona at November 22, 2015 09:48 AM (Fmupd

What do you do before you go to bed ?

Posted by: Max Rockatansky at November 22, 2015 09:52 AM (3r2w8)

63 A week or so ago RD Brewer posted a Maxfield Parrish painting on one of his open threads. I've always liked Parrish's art. He shows the world as it SHOULD be, full of beauty and the promise of pleasure. But I didn't know how varied his work was or how he exploited modern technology for the time. The last chapter of one book gave details on how he developed his techniques, influenced by some of the Renaissance and Dutch Master painters, and some of the restoration problems arising from his techniques. Just lovely and fascinating reading.

Posted by: JTB at November 22, 2015 09:55 AM (FvdPb)

64 http://www.c-span.org/video/?c4529229/donald-trump-2005-un-testimony

sound problem, but this is it

Posted by: First-Rate Political Hack at November 22, 2015 09:56 AM (oqDpn)

65 Trapp's success was why the Nazis wanted him so badly. He was a genuine war hero, which would help legitimize them, and he was good at ship-sinking, which I suspect they already realized they might need to do more of.

Posted by: Trimegistus at November 22, 2015 09:57 AM (7o+tb)

66 Probably my fault. Did not mean to hijack the thread. Sorry.

Posted by: Seamus Muldoon at November 22, 2015 09:49 AM (NeFrd)


No apologies necessary, you didn't hijack the thread.

Posted by: OregonMuse at November 22, 2015 09:58 AM (6IfH2)

67 Oh, and now bothering to read the *post* I see the splendid and worthwhile OregonMuse gets the same Bookbub mail I do...so, what he said! (But I said it TOO and he didn't mention the camel.) Just read a Sailor of Austria, OK?

Posted by: Sabrina Chase at November 22, 2015 09:58 AM (GG9V6)

68 "His planet-sized ego makes Bill O'Reilly look like Mother Theresa, and yet I like him, but I can't abide O'Reilly. Go figure."

That says more about you than either O'Reilly or Trump. Just saying.

Posted by: tops116 at November 22, 2015 09:59 AM (Wn+fE)

69 If you're a golfer, give the book a chance though I think the overall message is something anyone would enjoy.Posted by: Max Rockatansky at November 22, 2015 09:17 AM


I'm not much of a golfer, through some strange process of life I have exceptional upper body strength and good hand eye coordination. I can hit the hell out of the ball and put it where I want it. That part of the game I found boring. The 'short game' was challenging, though.

Putting greens fascinated me therefore I installed a pair of them on my property. I researched the best seed for my location and discovered that Donald Trump uses velvet bentgrass on his greens at his New Jersey club. Great stuff, some of the highest blades per square inch counts to be found. If you think golf is challenging, the care and feeding and proper maintenance of the greens is unbelievable. The end result is amazing if everything goes right. For me it was greatness followed by little failures that eventually curbed my enthusiasm. But if anyone ever gets the opportunity to play a round at Trumps course in New Jersey I would imagine it is unbelievable. When my green was top-notch it was like walking on the most plush carpet imaginable. Never got much more than a six or seven on the Stip count, though. Too afraid to cut lower and risk disease.

Posted by: se pa moron - call it what it is, treason at November 22, 2015 10:01 AM (7v/r5)

70 Good morning, Book Thread Hordelings! Not much activity on the writing front at maison de whippersnapper, but I've sent queries of my novel to a few publishers (introductory letter, summary, first 5-pages), and I'm waiting to hear back from them.

On the reading side of things, I'm plowing through Atlas Shrugged for the dozenth time. I can't get enough of that book, although I think Rand was being paid by the word, it's so long and purple. But the philosophy appeals to me, because I like thinking about the world around me and I like being happy, so it makes sense that critical thinking and happiness should be the natural state of humanity. Unfortunately, I'm reading it before, during, and after the Paris attacks, and the contrast between the super-rational fictional characters and the completely irrational and very real terrorists was extremely jarring. Alas.

Posted by: right wing whippersnapper- quietly rebellious at November 22, 2015 10:01 AM (26lkV)

71 Finished Snowberry's Veil by our own Christopher Taylor. I like it. He created a "traditional" fantasy world with plenty of room for more writing while keeping the story focus tightly on the characters. Lots of adventure, a little philosophy, a little magic and a lot of outwitting of enemies seem to be hallmarks of CT's writing.

Now I need to go copy/paste this into an Amazon review, with suitable editing.

Posted by: Polliwog the 'Ette at November 22, 2015 10:03 AM (GDulk)

72 68 "His planet-sized ego makes Bill O'Reilly look like Mother Theresa, and yet I like him, but I can't abide O'Reilly. Go figure."

That says more about you than either O'Reilly or Trump. Just saying.
Posted by: tops116 at November 22, 2015 09:59 AM (Wn+fE)

Insightful analysis, sir!

Posted by: Dr. Fraiser Crane at November 22, 2015 10:03 AM (oqDpn)

73 Yup. Same here.

Posted by: rickl at November 22, 2015 09:49 AM (sdi6R)

There is a haughtiness in O'Reilly's tone and demeanor that I find off-putting. I get the sense that he looks down on everyone.

Trump, for all of his bluster and self-promotion, has an everyman quality that softens his ego. He has flashes of a softness and gentleness and kindness in his speaking that makes it tolerable.

I still don't like many of his policy prescriptions though......

Posted by: CharlieBrown'sDildo at November 22, 2015 10:04 AM (Zu3d9)

74 I like the way the lounge looks, but not as a reading room. It's too dimly lit.

Posted by: Insomniac - Pale Horse/Death 2016 at November 22, 2015 10:04 AM (kpqmD)

75 Reread two books this week: Titan Ron Chernow's bio of John D Rockefeller and The Rascal King, a bio of Boston's notorious Mayor, James Michael Curley.

The former is a good read, though I felt something was missing. Chernow goes into great, almost overwhelming detail, but there's a disconnect between JDR the avaricious pirate of Standard Oil and the lovable, generous JDR of foundations, countless donations and fellow-man-type concerns. They're not reconciled in the book. Maybe they can't be.

Curley, on the other hand, you gotta love. Yes, he was liberal, greedy, not overly concerned about the law, liberal and overbearing (did I mention liberal?) but, like LBJ, comes across as a giant, loved by many who weren't exposed to his bad side. And he helped a lot of Ordinary People. In a way, it's a shame that modern politics has no room for likable rogues, but has replaced them with humorless yappers like Crazy Uncle Bernie, Choom Boy and their kind. Making people smile while stealing from them was an art more common among past politicos and, while I couldn't stomach their politics, I would support them before backing nonentities like Rubio, Clinton and Cruz.

Have The Last Hurrah (somewhat patterned after Curley) out to read next.

Posted by: MrScribbler at November 22, 2015 10:05 AM (dbC6X)

76 What do you do before you go to bed ?
Posted by: Max Rockatansky at November 22, 2015 09:52 AM (3r2w


--------------


I cook, eat, feed the cats, answer my overnight emails and then go to bed so that I can have some daylight hours while awake (I work nights). The next day is filled with informing myself about the world around me, answering phone calls, errands, and then getting ready for that night's work and meetings. Weekends are full of trying to get all the domestic shit done around the house that has to be precluded during the week.

Posted by: Soona at November 22, 2015 10:05 AM (Fmupd)

77 63 A week or so ago RD Brewer posted a Maxfield Parrish painting on one of his open threads. I've always liked Parrish's art. He shows the world as it SHOULD be, full of beauty and the promise of pleasure.
Posted by: JTB at November 22, 2015 09:55 AM (FvdPb)



Lots of Parrish stuff here at the Broadmoor in Colorado Springs. He did a number of promotional pieces for them. And lots of Western artists...Remington, Russell, etc. all just hanging in the hallways. Some are original, some are copies. They rotate them out, and only one person on staff knows which are which.

Posted by: Bob's House of Flannel Shirts and Wallet Chains at November 22, 2015 10:06 AM (yxw0r)

78 I have only just started The Girl's Guide to Predators. Since she used Ted Bundy as the jumping-off point for her research, I'm not really expecting anything new but we shall see.

Finished "Airframe". Crichton really hates "60 Minutes" and like shows.

Still reading "The Africans" and still finding it remarkable for a reporter to be so even-handed, and occasionally actually pro-American even though this was published in 1982. We're in Ethiopia/Somalia right now and, surprise, surprise, there's a war going on.

And I am still reading "What Happens At Mass" by Jeremy Driscoll, OSB. Fascinating and really adding to my experience and reminding me to be very mindful when making the responses at mass.

Posted by: Tonestaple at November 22, 2015 10:06 AM (dCTrv)

79 >>Trump, for all of his bluster and self-promotion, has an everyman quality that softens his ego. He has flashes of a softness and gentleness and kindness in his speaking that makes it tolerable.

Just don't ever criticize him. The softness and gentleness and kindness will be replaced with something less nice.

Posted by: JackStraw at November 22, 2015 10:06 AM (/tuJf)

80 And who the hell would hang out on the book thread wearing a tutu??

Someone reading on her cell during a slack moment at ballet practice? (Don't mess with the ballerinas, OM. They kick hard. Daughter Webworker also took years of karate.)

===

Milady Webworker wrote a book review for me to post to the Book Thread. The date on the file is Aug 7, so I've been a bit slow getting to this. Digital file fell back behind a digital file cabinet is my excuse.

I notice she said she was only half through the book. This must be dozens of books back for her now. Here 'tis:

The Girls of Atomic City

I've been reading "The Girls of Atomic City: The Untold Story of the Women Who Helped Win World War II"

This is the story of Oak Ridge, Tennessee, a town created during the war for the sole purpose of trying to enrich Uranium and send it on to Los Alamos where it could be made into a bomb. Well, I'm pretty sure that's what they were doing. Being only half way through the book I feel like one of the girls in the story: I have my suspicions of what's going on. Unlike them, I can talk about it.

Denise Kiernan, the author, does a good job of mixing the personal stories of various women in many different kinds of jobs with the scientific and technical aspects of "The Project". There are several pages of pictures, including then and now pics of three of the women.

This is a very compelling story. I've been somewhat aggravated to have so much going on in my life at the moment that I can only read a few pages each evening when I should already be asleep.

Aside from the story itself, this book is making me think about how much has changed since the war. Some of these girls seem much younger than the average 16-20 year old today. I don't know, maybe they seem older, now that I really think about an average 20 year old. They didn't really know what they were doing, just that it would help to win the war. That was enough for them.

I can't help but wonder what these women must think as they watch our government work as hard as they can to turn nuclear weapons over to the mullahs in Iran. These young girls may not have known exactly what they were doing, but they evidently knew more and cared more about protecting the security of our nation than most of the people in Washington today.

Posted by: mindful webworker - what, me read? at November 22, 2015 10:07 AM (GHHRC)

81 Looking for an inexpensive basic meteorology book, preferable Kindle. Suggestions?

Just finishing C. J. Box's "Endangered." Excellent

Reading Edward Lucas' new "Cyberphobia." Currently 4.5/5 for 3 reviews on Amazon. Intended as a security discussion for the general public, not nerds. Very accurate, but not a technological deep dive. While I'm kind of nerdy, I picked up the book due to the 55 minute Leo Laporte interview on youtube -- https://goo.gl/dLggP3 Worth a listen even if you don't plan to get the book.

Posted by: doug at November 22, 2015 10:07 AM (GctRZ)

82 Damn Ace for getting me back onto an Arthur Conan Doyle binge.

Ladies and gentlemen, morons and moronettes of all ages, I commend to your attention "Micah Clarke", ACD's novel set during the Monmouth Rebellion of 1685. It's a page turner in its own right as adventure fiction, but read it as an allegory for today's political landscape. A repressive monarch, a dedicated but small band of people intent on preserving their rights who put their trust and their fate into the hands of a leader who ultimately betrays them for the sake of his own skin, a vicious reprisal by the government.

It's all there in a great story. Best of all, you can get it, along with the rest of Doyle's works, in the Delphi Collected Works of ACD for free (or maybe $.99)

Posted by: That SOB Van Owen at November 22, 2015 10:08 AM (J0jXd)

83 64, JTB, please give us a hint what book you are talking about. Just a hint.

Posted by: Tonestaple at November 22, 2015 10:09 AM (dCTrv)

84 Listened to Brandon Sanderson's The Way of Kings through OverDrive library app. I had read it a couple of years ago but wanted a refresher before listening to the next in the series (which will be a while since I'm 6th on the list). I remembered things from the beginning and middle but the twists at the end still completely surprised me (which of course surprised me).

Posted by: Polliwog the 'Ette at November 22, 2015 10:10 AM (GDulk)

85 I got 25% on the Lord of the Rings quiz. I've never read any of the books or seen any of the movies, so there's a baseline for you. I figured if I kept guessing Gandalf I'd be right sooner or later.

I tried reading "The Hobbit" in college, but gave up about 30 pages in. It just didn't interest me. I've never been much of a fiction reader.

Posted by: rickl at November 22, 2015 10:10 AM (sdi6R)

86 You're a life-saver, OM. You too, 'rons. Every damn book I've downloaded lately on Kindle Unlimited seems to have a lib agenda. Thanks for the tips.

Posted by: creeper at November 22, 2015 10:10 AM (U40dD)

87 Posted by: That SOB Van Owen at November 22, 2015 10:08 AM (J0jXd)

"The White Company" is an historical novel by Arthur Conan Doyle set during The Hundred Years War. It's not bad!

Posted by: CharlieBrown'sDildo at November 22, 2015 10:11 AM (Zu3d9)

88  I like the way the lounge looks, but not as a reading room. It's too dimly lit.Posted by: Insomniac - Pale Horse/Death 2016 at November 22, 2015 10:04 AM

But if you look carefully, there are eyeball lights directed down at the seating areas. Right were you want the lighting, while not overwhelming the rest of the room.

I may have some skepticism about Trump the politician, but he seems to attract people who know what they are doing and pay attention to important details.

Posted by: se pa moron - call it what it is, treason at November 22, 2015 10:12 AM (7v/r5)

Posted by: Laurie David's Cervix at November 22, 2015 10:13 AM (kdS6q)

90 I got a copy of CS Lewis' The Screwtape Letters. annotated edition. Some of the annotations are perhaps a bit basic (explaining what the BBC is) but others make a big difference in understanding local or cultural allusions that never made it across the Atlantic. Definitely worth the price.

The high point, so far, is in the preface Lewis wrote to the 1961 edition. It includes these passages:

"We must picture Hell as a state where everyone is perpetually concerned about his own dignity and advancement, where everyone has a grievance, and where everyone lives the deadly serious passions of envy, self-importance, and resentment."

Followed by:

"I live in the Managerial Age, in a world of 'Admin.' The greatest evil is not now done in those sordid dens of crime that Dickens loved to paint. ... But it is conceived and ordered ... in clean, carpeted ... offices by quiet men with white collars ... who do not need to raise their voice."

Sheesh! Talk about prescient. Too many connections to our situation today for comfort.

I wonder if Lewis, Tolkien in his quiet way, and Chesterton, with their emphasis on the importance of the individual over the state, felt lonely. Did they feel they were trying to hold back a tide of state supremacy?

Yet their books continue to sell. No need to offer discounts to boost sales. Even the prices at a local used book store are higher than usual. Our public library often has a waiting list for Lewis' religious and academic books. Somebody, besides me, is reading them. Did the continued interest in their writings offer some solace as the rest of the culture went the other way?

Posted by: JTB at November 22, 2015 10:13 AM (FvdPb)

91
That blank was after damned near an hour's frustration to get pixy to take a simple text post.

Posted by: Laurie David's Cervix at November 22, 2015 10:14 AM (kdS6q)

92 g'mornin', 'rons

Posted by: AltonJackson at November 22, 2015 10:16 AM (KCxzN)

93 I read this week The Female Soldier or The Surprising Life of Hannah Snell a short book I found on Gutenberg.org. It's the story of a woman who joined take British marine regiment in the early colonial period. She served on a few ships and served overseas and was wounded in battle but never was discovered to be a woman. But to me this is not out of the ordinary, many woman served without being discovered in fact a Prussian woman in the Napoleonic wars Sofia Kruger served and was discovered but was allowed to finish out her enlistment. Hannah stayed undiscovered and didn't come out until discharged and fully paid up for her service. The amazing thing in this period was soldiers had to sleep in the same bed and as I wrote served aboard a few ships.

Posted by: Skip at November 22, 2015 10:16 AM (KSdzX)

94 Posted by: Laurie David's Cervix at November 22, 2015 10:14 AM (kdS6q)

This site will convert to HTML.

It might help.

It might not. This is pixy and AoSHQ after all.

http://www.unicodetools.com/unicode/convert-to-html.php

Posted by: CharlieBrown'sDildo at November 22, 2015 10:17 AM (Zu3d9)

95 People forget that the Dual Monarchy had a considerable Adriatic coastline, from Trieste to the frontier with, as it was then, Servia (when the Allies found themselves stuck with them, they thought Serbia-With-A-V sounded better). The Dual Monarchy started the war with 6 subs in commission and added another 21 before the end.

Posted by: Markham Shaw Pyle at November 22, 2015 10:17 AM (WlkUc)

96 59 Soona

I'm retired. My reading time is in inverse proportion to the length of my honey-do list.

Posted by: Zoltan at November 22, 2015 10:19 AM (THsLo)

97 100?

Posted by: Rhonda Rousey at November 22, 2015 10:21 AM (xU0ng)

98
This site will convert to HTML.
Posted by: CharlieBrown'sDildo



No -- it just doesn't matter anymore. Site doesn't care how unusable it is. Just a big #twoweeks joke to everyone behind the currents.

Posted by: Laurie David's Cervix at November 22, 2015 10:22 AM (kdS6q)

99 >>"We must picture Hell as a state where everyone is perpetually concerned about his own dignity and advancement, where everyone has a grievance, and where everyone lives the deadly serious passions of envy, self-importance, and resentment."

There used to be a time when the classics and classical philosophers were at the core of a strong liberal education and they were most assuredly at the core of academics such as Lewis. What Lewis is describing here is exactly what Plato predicted in the Republic about the demise of democracy; when freedom runs completely unrestrained you basically get anarchy followed by a strongman who promises to reinstitute stability (Trump?).

http://tinyurl.com/p57wfx5

Some of those old dudes were wicked smaht.

Posted by: JackStraw at November 22, 2015 10:23 AM (/tuJf)

100
Review: The Eternal World by Christopher Farnsworth

Five hundred years ago, a group of Spanish conquistadors searching for gold, led by a young and brilliant commander named Simon De Oliveras, land in the New World. What they find in the sunny and humid swamps of this uncharted land is a treasure far more valuable: the Fountain of Youth.

When the source of the fountain is destroyed in our own time, the loss threatens Simon and his men, and the powerful, shadowy empire of wealth and influence they have built. For help, they turn to David Robinton, a scientific prodigy who believes he is on the verge of the greatest medical breakthrough of all time. But as a centuries old war between the cabal and a mysterious adversary reaches its final stages, David makes a horrifying discovery about his employers and the mysterious and exotic woman he loves. Now, the scientist must decide: is he a pawn in a game of immortals or will he be its only winner?

Recommended: Excellent book. Very much a Critchon type "Science!" novel, in this case biotech, crossed with The Firm. A quite enjoyable action romp.

Best part is everyone, including the nominal villains, has believable understandable motives for their actions. You may not agree or even sympathize, but you understand why, and thats pretty rare in media -- where the bad guys are bad because they wear black suits and speak with German accents.

Sample chapters:

http://tinyurl.com/o6vlqb2

Posted by: Laurie David's Cervix at November 22, 2015 10:23 AM (kdS6q)

101 100

Posted by: Rhonda Rousey at November 22, 2015 10:24 AM (xU0ng)

102 25 I thought the Trump testimony about the UN was a reconditioning...

But maybe it was a new building and that's why I couldn't find the video again.
Posted by: First-Rate Political Hack at November 22, 2015 09:21 AM (oqDpn)

That fits better with my recollection of his testimony; I do recall it because, as a lifelong NY'er, that was the first time I was ever impressed with Trump.

Posted by: Oschisms at November 22, 2015 10:25 AM (ZsN9X)

103 If that Trump Library is a library then where are the books?

Posted by: THDeering at November 22, 2015 10:26 AM (evQ4x)

104 87:
"The White Company" is an historical novel by Arthur Conan Doyle set during The Hundred Years War. It's not bad!

"The White Company " isn't bad, but I found "Micah Clarke" much more enjoyable. For those who have only read the Sherlock Holmes canon, this is a far different Doyle.

Posted by: That SOB Van Owen at November 22, 2015 10:26 AM (J0jXd)

105
Ah -- the mysterious pixy error was -- a hidden encoded space in the book title.

Thanks for protecting us pix. Blank Live Matter.

Posted by: Laurie David's Cervix at November 22, 2015 10:26 AM (kdS6q)

106 Posted by: JTB at November 22, 2015 09:43 AM (FvdPb)

The BBC series "All Creatures Big and Small" based on James Herriott's life was once on Netflix. It was extremely well done in my opinion, and gave a lot of insight into a rural English culture (late thirties, early forties) long gone and never to be seen again. I think you might like to take a look at this!

Posted by: Hrothgar at November 22, 2015 10:27 AM (ftVQq)

107 What do you do before you go to bed ?

Posted by: Max Rockatansky at November 22, 2015 09:52 AM (3r2w


Please provide explicit details, or video, if available.

Posted by: Read "The History of the 2nd Amendment" at November 22, 2015 10:27 AM (+GH2F)

108 His planet-sized ego makes Bill O'Reilly look like Mother Theresa, and yet I like him, but I can't abide O'Reilly. Go figure.

Trump built thing that people wanted.

BOR built nothing but his own ego.

Posted by: John P. Squibob at November 22, 2015 10:28 AM (DQZLr)

109 OT and probably already Moron'd:

Catalyst IS a database of Un-Americans.

Posted by: DaveA at November 22, 2015 10:28 AM (DL2i+)

110 I managed to get 100 percent on the Middle Earth quiz but had to guess a bit on the movie-based questions.

Posted by: JTB at November 22, 2015 10:29 AM (FvdPb)

111 http://www.unicodetools.com/unicode/convert-to-html.php

Posted by: CharlieBrown'sDildo at November 22, 2015 10:17 AM (Zu3d9)


That link has become invaluable to me. Every time I copy something from an Amazon review or some other web page, before I paste it to the book thread, I run it through that converter first. It's the only way to escape The Curse of the Black Diamonds.

Posted by: OregonMuse at November 22, 2015 10:30 AM (6IfH2)

112 Posted by: THDeering at November 22, 2015 10:26 AM (evQ4x)

That was my first thought as well. Although it looks like it probably smells good and would be great for a cup of coffee (if I wanted a $10 cup of coffee).

Posted by: Polliwog the 'Ette at November 22, 2015 10:31 AM (GDulk)

113 Take my hand. We're off to Bernie Sanders land.

Posted by: Rhonda Rousey at November 22, 2015 10:33 AM (xU0ng)

114 Posted by: That SOB Van Owen at November 22, 2015 10:26 AM (J0jXd)

My thought on The White Company was that I could see why ACD was remembered for Sherlock Holmes instead. It wasn't bad, but nothing really sticks in my mind either.

Posted by: Polliwog the 'Ette at November 22, 2015 10:34 AM (GDulk)

115 Well that was enlightening. The entire panel on Meet The Press wants you to know that the biggest problem we face right now is Islamaphobia and backlashing and if you think we need at least a pause in our Syrian refugee program you're un-American.

Liberalism is a brain disorder.

Posted by: JackStraw at November 22, 2015 10:34 AM (/tuJf)

116 That fits better with my recollection of his testimony; I do recall it because, as a lifelong NY'er, that was the first time I was ever impressed with Trump.

Posted by: Oschisms at November 22, 2015 10:25 AM (ZsN9X)


I googled for "trump testimony congress" and found a link to a cspan video which I am too lazy to figure out how to get pixy to accept.

You guys are right, it's a renovation, not a complete reconstruction.

Posted by: OregonMuse at November 22, 2015 10:35 AM (6IfH2)

117 100

Posted by: Rhonda Rousey at November 22, 2015 10:24 AM (xU0ng)

How many seconds you were unconscious?

Posted by: Carnac the Magnificent at November 22, 2015 10:35 AM (nFdGS)

118 And Term Limits is from 1998. We were warned all the way back then. And things have gotten infinitely worse.

Posted by: Bruce Boehner at November 22, 2015 10:35 AM (xU0ng)

119 Hey, man, I wasn't even willing to Google it. Don't call yourself lazy while I'm drawing breath.

Posted by: Oschisms at November 22, 2015 10:37 AM (ZsN9X)

120 Ha. Just refreshed the page and noticed by the elevator bar that there's lots more comments, and the first comment I read is this:

OregonMuse: Holy crap, did the thread just up and die on me??

I'd say, apparently not permanently.

Posted by: mindful webworker - what, me read? at November 22, 2015 10:38 AM (GHHRC)

121 One of the details of It Ended Badly that caught my eye was, "And poor volatile Caroline Lamb sent Lord Byron one hell of a torch letter and enclosed a bloody lock of her own pubic hair."

Posted by: The Great White Snark at November 22, 2015 10:39 AM (Nwg0u)

122
Review: The House of Shattered Wings - Aliette de Bodard

Paris has survived the Great Houses War - just. Its streets are lined with haunted ruins, Notre-Dame is a burnt-out shell, and the Seine runs black with ashes and rubble. Yet life continues among the wreckage. The citizens continue to live, love, fight and survive in their war-torn city, and The Great Houses still vie for dominion over the once grand capital.

Within a House, three very different people must come together: a naive but powerful Fallen Angel, an alchemist with a self-destructive addiction, and a resentful young man wielding spells from the Far East. They may be Silverspires' salvation. They may be the architects of its last, irreversible fall

Sample chapters: http://tinyurl.com/oqpcnvc

Recommended: De Bodard writes a lot like Jack Vance. An almost perfumed style of writing, about people tying to act within the strict constraints of their exotic society.

Posted by: Laurie David's Cervix at November 22, 2015 10:40 AM (kdS6q)

123 I need to read Christopher Taylor's A Life Unworthy and review it on Amazon. The problem is that I don't *like* werewolf stories. So far the writing has been engaging and I'm curious how he resolves the situation, but if it weren't that he needs the reviews I probably wouldn't have even started it (as I haven't with the first Amy Lynn book or Muldoon's first) and considered the purchase price a gift.

Posted by: Polliwog the 'Ette at November 22, 2015 10:43 AM (GDulk)

124 The BBC All Creatures Great and Small are lovely filmed series, but the books are even more fun to read, they get more into detail, and a loving flow to them.

Herriot clearly loved what he did, and loved where he did it.

http://preview.tinyurl.com/aoshq-herriot-books

Posted by: Kindltot at November 22, 2015 10:44 AM (q2o38)

125 #28

Steakley is generally well regarded but he was very difficult for any publisher to make into a popular author. He didn't produce much or with any regularity, he didn't like to travel, and generally just didn't seem to want it much.

His other novel, Vampire$, is the basis of the John Carpenter movie starring James Woods but is significantly different. Worth reading but comparing it to the movie would undermine it as the tone is very different.

Posted by: Epobirs at November 22, 2015 10:45 AM (IdCqF)

126 Ahh ... no time for reading much else, as I am in the middle of the Christmas marketing season, for my own books and my daughter's creations of beading and origami jewelry ... but over the last two days during slack times at my table I was reading The Magnificent Rogues of San Francisco by Charles Adams ... getting ready to write about San Francisco in 1855-56 for my next book. It's an amusing collection of short sketches about certain 19th century residents of that city.

My most recent book - the Chronicles of Luna City has just had the look-inside feature enabled for the e-book version, so I invite all 'rons and 'ronettes to take a look. This collection of short stories and mock-informational essays about a tiny South Texas town came about because my daughter and I binge-watched Northern Exposure, and then began to wonder what Cecily Alaska would be like ... in Texas. So - Luna City, where the HS football team is the Mighty Fighting Moths, half the town is surnamed Gonzales or Gonzalez and they're all related although the family tree is more of a Gordian knot, and a refugee English celebrity TV chef runs the cafe ... and lives in an aged Airstream trailer parked on the local campground ... which is part of a goat farm run by the last remnants of a hippie nudist commune...
http://tinyurl.com/pvpthpy

Posted by: CeliaHayes at November 22, 2015 10:47 AM (95iDF)

127 Speaking of the Dual Monarchy, I've been reading two hooks by Frederick Morton about Vienna. The first is Thunder at Twilight about the last few months before WWI in glorious, decadent Vienna (at which time Hitler, Stalin, and Trotsky were all in Vienna). The second is A Nervous Splendor about Vienna in the late 1880s ending with the murder/suicide of the crown prince at Mayerling and the birth of Hitler.

Posted by: The Great White Snark at November 22, 2015 10:50 AM (Nwg0u)

128 To work as intended, Congressional term limits would need to also apply to their staffs. Otherwise it would just be a revolving door for the powers behind the throne with even less respect for the constituency's voters.

Posted by: Epobirs at November 22, 2015 10:50 AM (IdCqF)

129 101 100
Posted by: Rhonda Rousey at November 22, 2015 10:24 AM (xU0ng)

You got knocked the FUCK OUT, man!

Posted by: Smokey at November 22, 2015 10:54 AM (kpqmD)

130 28 Posted by: Max Rockatansky at November 22, 2015 09:25 AM (3r2w

I'm not a big fan, either, but my husband asked me to read this. I found it pretty interesting, but I haven't finished it yet. I've been busy working six days a week and get too tired to follow. I like that even though it was written in the 80's, it doesn't seem dated to then.

Posted by: April at November 22, 2015 10:54 AM (79ZSg)

131 @128 yeah, wouldn't want a Yes, Minister situation.

Posted by: Bruce Boehner at November 22, 2015 10:54 AM (xU0ng)

132 I've just started reading Wise Blood by Flannery O'Connor. Can anybody tell me something about O'Connor? I don't even know if O'Connor is a man or woman.

BTW I bought cheap through iBooks.

Posted by: Northernlurker, feeling grumpy today at November 22, 2015 10:54 AM (4rzL1)

133 Posted by: Epobirs at November 22, 2015 10:50 AM (IdCqF)

Agreed since I think we are already seeing that effect as congressional staff seems to stay the same no matter what letter the current title-holder had after his name. A bunch of poli-sci graduates from Stanford, Harvard, and Yale telling the R pols what *they* think is important in each bill would explain at least part of the flup we see in even Tea Party type candidates once they hit the Beltway.

Posted by: Polliwog the 'Ette at November 22, 2015 10:56 AM (GDulk)

134 Trump 2005 U.N. renovation congressional testimony here:

http://www.c-span.org/video/?c4526092/un-renovation

Lasts about 35 minutes

Posted by: OregonMuse at November 22, 2015 10:57 AM (6IfH2)

135 Iowa caucus-goers Trump 30%, Cruz 21%, Carson 19%, Rubio 11%, Bush 5%, Fiorina 4 N.H. GOP primary voters Trump 32%, Rubio 13%, Carson/Cruz 10%, Kasich 8%, Bush/Fiorina/Paul 6%, Christie 5%.

Posted by: Velvet Ambition at November 22, 2015 10:57 AM (QPdNE)

136 Flup = *flip*

Posted by: Polliwog the 'Ette at November 22, 2015 10:58 AM (GDulk)

137 @132 It's a Catholic woman. Her sister Carol played Archie in All In The Family.

Posted by: Caitlyn Jenner at November 22, 2015 10:58 AM (xU0ng)

138 All Creatures Great and Small story...

living on a ranch in N. AZ summers after highschool. Me and a friend in the bunkhouse, an old guy and his wife as the caretaker in the big house. 90 miles to town, 40 miles to a phone, no radio signals at all till after sundown, when Abq. and West Texas would skip in.

So we read paperback books in off time...

Friend is reading "GReat and Small" and becoming ever more disgusted with James' hopeless pursuit of Helen Alderson.

Late on a sunday afternoon, he hurls the book off into the sagebrush and yells," JUST KISS HER YA' DUMB SONOFABITCH! " ... and stomps off with his .22 to go rabbit hunt. We were 18.

Posted by: retropox at November 22, 2015 10:58 AM (rSvZ7)

139 I saw a reference to the Austro-Hungarian Navy above. I don't know if this has been mentioned, but one of the most famous, and well used by Hollywood, clips of a warship sinking is the Austrian Battleship Szent Istvan.

It was torpedoed by a small torpedo boat of the Italian Navy in 1918.

Most of you will recognize this footage:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fYkMGom8KSg

Posted by: Jinx the Cat at November 22, 2015 10:58 AM (l3vZN)

140 Recommend 'Monstrous Regiment' by Terry Pratchett. Another take on women in combat. Not as many footnotes as usual, but some really cute and funny takes on women in a male profession. (Socks are essential.) Almost time for 'Hogfather' reread.

Posted by: mustbequantum at November 22, 2015 10:59 AM (MIKMs)

141 "The Curse of the Black Diamonds"

Posted by: OregonMuse at November 22, 2015 10:30 AM (6IfH2)

Sounds like an Ace of Spades Mystery.

Posted by: CharlieBrown'sDildo at November 22, 2015 11:00 AM (Zu3d9)

142
In fop news:

UK Bookshops launch Civilised Saturday as antidote to Black Friday

In Kibworth next Saturday a bookshop will be offering tea, cake and hand massages in a green velvet armchair. In Crickhowells local bookstore, theyll be a butler on the door serving prosecco. Mince pies, mulled wine, art and singing will be on offer at Burway Books in Church Stretton, and at the Edinburgh Bookshop, staff on the day will be dressed in cocktail outfits, complete with evening gloves, and giving out genteel snacks and drinks to customers.

Independent booksellers up and down the country are preparing to host a "Civilised Saturday"; next week, as the perfect antidote; to the cut-throat bargain-hunting and frenzied shopping of the upcoming Black Friday.

So far, some 100 bookshops have signed up to the initiative on 28 November, the day after Black Friday on 27 November.

http://tinyurl.com/qdkd7oz

Posted by: Laurie David's Cervix at November 22, 2015 11:00 AM (kdS6q)

143 132 I've just started reading Wise Blood by Flannery O'Connor. Can anybody tell me something about O'Connor? I don't even know if O'Connor is a man or woman.

Posted by: Northernlurker, feeling grumpy today at November 22, 2015 10:54 AM (4rzL1)


Flannery O'Connor was a woman, born, raised, and lived all of her life in the deep South. Took her Roman Catholic faith very seriously, and her books are frequently filled with biblical allegories. They are not easy reads.

She died (too young) from lupus.

Posted by: OregonMuse at November 22, 2015 11:00 AM (6IfH2)

144 Also, Max, I am not a veteran, but my husband is a USMC vet from the Reagan era. So, you have a vet's recommendation on it.

Posted by: April at November 22, 2015 11:01 AM (79ZSg)

145 Eh. Not really my cup of tea.

Yeah, has kind of a Frank Lloyd Wright feel to it. No thanks.

Posted by: t-bird at November 22, 2015 11:02 AM (J3phO)

146 Already addressed but...
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Austro-Hungarian_Navy#Submarine_fleet

Posted by: andycanuck at November 22, 2015 11:03 AM (xodPA)

147 Outside of a dog, a book is man's best friend.

Inside of a dog, it's too dark to read.

-Grouch Marx

Posted by: BackwardsBoy at November 22, 2015 11:04 AM (LUgeY)

148 My secret shame: Some moron recommended the Chet and Bernie mysteries by Spencer Quinn a few weeks ago and I'm addicted. Bernie is a rather low rent PI former cop who was apparently forced out for being a little too honest and Chet is a washout from police dog training because a cat interfered with his final test. The fun in these so-so myteries is that Chet is the narrator. His stream of consciousness, imperfect understanding of the world generally and humans particularly is great fun. If you're a dog person, you may well like these. CAUTION: They are addictive.

Posted by: The Great White Snark at November 22, 2015 11:04 AM (Nwg0u)

149
Eight purple passages are up for the prize every author dreads, the annual Literary Review Bad Sex in Fiction award.

Book of Numbers by Joshua Cohen

Her mouth was intensely ovoid, an almond mouth, of citrus crescents. And under that sling, her breasts were like young fawns, sheep frolicking in hyssop -- Psalms were about to pour out of me.

"Vous?"

"Josh," I said.

http://tinyurl.com/o6ywrq5

Posted by: Laurie David's Cervix at November 22, 2015 11:04 AM (kdS6q)

150 7 Just finished Bill Bryson's "In a Sunburned Country" which I liked a lot
more than his way over-rated (IMHO) "A Walk in the Woods.

WhatWhatWhat?

Bryson's funniest book. I lived in Australia while growing up and rolled as he described a continent actively trying to kill people. For me and the rest of the family, it was a "Well, duh" series of moments.

Bryson unfortunately feels a need to insert his personal politics into a lot of his writing, to the detriment of the story he's telling. Shocking, I know.

Posted by: Long Running Fool at November 22, 2015 11:06 AM (L0bUn)

151 143 132 I've just started reading Wise Blood by Flannery O'Connor. Can anybody tell me something about O'Connor? I don't even know if O'Connor is a man or woman.

Posted by: Northernlurker, feeling grumpy today at November 22, 2015 10:54 AM (4rzL1)

Flannery O'Connor was a woman, born, raised, and lived all of her life in the deep South. Took her Roman Catholic faith very seriously, and her books are frequently filled with biblical allegories. They are not easy reads.

She died (too young) from lupus.
Posted by: OregonMuse at November 22, 2015 11:00 AM (6IfH2)

Thank you. I've heard her name often. This will be my first time to read one of her novels.

Posted by: Northernlurker, feeling grumpy today at November 22, 2015 11:07 AM (4rzL1)

152 83 ... Sorry about that. The book is "Maxfield Parrish: 1870 - 1966" by Sylvia Yount.

Posted by: JTB at November 22, 2015 11:07 AM (FvdPb)

153 A group of UK authors, along with their publishers, are donating some of their bestselling titles and forgoing the profits to raise one million pounds for Syrian refugees.

Ugh, I used to like Hilary Mantel. I even have a letter from her - I was quite young, and wrote her a question about her novel "Fludd", and to my surprise, she actually wrote back! (The English are like that.) But she's really gone full-bore leftist crackbrain in the last few years. Fantasizing about killing Margaret Thatcher, griping about Princess Kate being prettier than her, etc. When I downsized our book collection a month ago, I donated all her books, except for "A Place of Greater Safety", and I'm glad I did. I'll never buy anything of hers again.

Posted by: Dr. Mabuse at November 22, 2015 11:07 AM (gjLib)

154 Speaking of Georg von Trapp...

His oldest daughter was Agathe, called 'Lisle' in the play and movie. She was my kindergarten teacher in Md. Maria visited once, and we all sang an Austrian folk song for her, with Agathe playing the recorder. Agathe hated that play and movie, refused to see either, because as she said to my mom once, " There were no cartoon Nazi's".

Molly Mulligan came down with measles at the Christmas pageant that year, and every kid caught them.

Old times.

Posted by: retropox at November 22, 2015 11:08 AM (rSvZ7)

155 and considered the purchase price a gift.

Believe me, I appreciate it. The first thing you have to figure as a writer is that your books aren't for everyone, so some people just aren't going to care for them no matter how good they are or how much you like them. That's no slur on you as an author, its just personal opinion. Sense and Sensibility might be the best book ever written but I have absolutely zero interest in reading it. And that's no insult to Jane Austen or her talent.

Posted by: Christopher Taylor at November 22, 2015 11:08 AM (39g3+)

156 Speaking of submarines, a very interesting book I read a few years ago is "Disasters of the Deep" by Edwyn Gray.

It is an exhaustive compilation of all submarine accidents in history. Combat losses are not covered; only accidents. In so doing the book also traces the development of submarine technology, from the earliest designs in the 17th century to the loss of the Kursk in 2000. There is also an appendix listing submarine accidents with tallies of the crew numbers and survivors, if any. The book also details rescue attempts.

I would have posted this comment an hour ago but I picked the book and got lost in it. It sort of makes me wonder that while modern subs are probably pretty safe and reliable, whatever made the pioneers think that deliberately sinking a boat was a good idea? For thousands of years mariners had tried hard to avoid having their ships sink.

Posted by: rickl at November 22, 2015 11:09 AM (sdi6R)

157 "The White Company" is an historical novel by Arthur Conan Doyle set during The Hundred Years War. It's not bad!

And it actually includes a crossbows vs longbows debate and contest - right up AoSHQ alley.

Posted by: no mention of Ginger vs Mary-Ann, tho at November 22, 2015 11:09 AM (76jcv)

158 "His planet-sized ego makes Bill O'Reilly look like Mother Theresa, and yet I like him, but I can't abide O'Reilly. Go figure."

In the immortal words of Dizzy Dean, "If you can do it, it ain't braggin'." Trump's ego, however bloated, is based on real accomplishment; O'Reilly's, like Obama's, is built purely on bluster. Trump has done it. O'Reilly can only talk about it. Therein lies the difference.


Posted by: Brown Line at November 22, 2015 11:11 AM (a5bF3)

159 Posted by: Northernlurker, feeling grumpy today at November 22, 2015 10:54 AM (4rzL1)


Hey bub, watch your hands.

Posted by: Grumpy at November 22, 2015 11:12 AM (LUgeY)

160 Sheesh! Talk about prescient. Too many connections to our situation today for comfort.

C.S. Lewis had a gift, a genius at seeing where trends, ideas, and cultural patterns were leading and would end up, long down the road. He could tell what was going to happen if people did not change and warned everyone.

Of course, he ended up a Cassandra: nobody cared or listened to him, they were too busy building a perfect utopia of progressive ideology.

Posted by: Christopher Taylor at November 22, 2015 11:12 AM (39g3+)

161 The BBC series "All Creatures Big and Small" based on James Herriott's life was once on Netflix. It was extremely well done in my opinion, and gave a lot of insight into a rural English culture (late thirties, early forties) long gone and never to be seen again. I think you might like to take a look at this!

Posted by: Hrothgar at November 22, 2015 10:27 AM (ftVQq)


Agreed. And the "Young James Herriot" series (about Herriot's vet school years) that came out two three years ago should be absolutely avoided at all costs. It could have been good, but no, they had to kowtow to modern prejudices by introducing as a character a female student who DEFIES CONVENTIONS and FIGHTS THE PATRIARCHY by parroting modern day feminst twaddle and also Herriot's landlady who hits on him like a ton of bricks, thus introducing a sexual element that is simply unnecessary and completely absent from the original series. Mrs. Muse and I were completely disgusted 15 minutes into it, and went on to something else.

Posted by: OregonMuse at November 22, 2015 11:13 AM (6IfH2)

162 "The White Company" is an historical novel by Arthur Conan Doyle set during The Hundred Years War. It's not bad!

I love that book, and its prequel Sir Nigel. Its a bit romanticized, but wonderful reading. For a long time it was a well-known classic (one of JFK's favorite books) but then it kind of disappeared.

By the way, if you're interested in non-werewolf, non-historical fantasy reading I have two other novels:

Old Habits about a thief in over his head trying to recover jewels and uncovering a dark conspiracy...

Snowberry's Veil about a King's Ranger trying to survive the wilderness so he can return to his love in the wagon train he was trying to escort to a new land.

Posted by: Christopher Taylor at November 22, 2015 11:14 AM (39g3+)

163 100 ... "Some of those old dudes were wicked smaht."

Jack, Do I detect a Rhode Island accent (except for Cranston) coming through? Lost almost all of mine but 'idea' still comes out as 'ideer.'

Posted by: JTB at November 22, 2015 11:14 AM (FvdPb)

164 Listened to Ashes of Victory (Honor Harrington #9), where Honor and Nimitz are recovering from injuries received in previous books and there is more fighting between Haven (socialist non-paradise) and Manticore. Good story and characters, though I mostly enjoyed the scenes with Honor.

Read Dana Epperson's Outward Frontier, where in the future Man has colonized the stars and suffers attacks from a merciless alien race. It starts a bit slow but quickly became an exciting page-turner. Waiting now for the sequel.

Listened to Day Of The Triffids (Triffids #1), an apocalyptic novel brought about by plant life. A British chemist fights to survive while struggling with whether to help himself or victims still clinging to life. Written in 1951 you can see echoes of the story in The Stand, The Walking Dead and so on. Pretty good, will have to take a look at the sequel Night Of The Triffids.

Posted by: waelse1 at November 22, 2015 11:15 AM (zZEi2)

165 159 Posted by: Northernlurker, feeling grumpy today at November 22, 2015 10:54 AM (4rzL1)


Hey bub, watch your hands.
Posted by: Grumpy at November 22, 2015 11:12 AM (LUgeY)

LOL

Posted by: Northernlurker, feeling grumpy today at November 22, 2015 11:16 AM (4rzL1)

166 The longbow/crossbow debate in The White Company is actually exactly what I think of every time the topic comes up and why I don't participate. I see it as sort of nostalgic because of the book.

Posted by: Christopher Taylor at November 22, 2015 11:16 AM (39g3+)

167 "Mrs. Muse and I were completely disgusted 15 minutes into it, and went on to something else."

A travesty it was. woof! ...so bad. Stagnation a' ta lungs.

The original show is a classic.

Posted by: retropox at November 22, 2015 11:17 AM (rSvZ7)

168 LOL

And next time, let me sleep in, OK?

Posted by: Grumpy at November 22, 2015 11:19 AM (LUgeY)

169 Thank you. I've heard her name often. This will be my first time to read one of her novels.

Posted by: Northernlurker, feeling grumpy today at November 22, 2015 11:07 AM (4rzL1)


Let us know what you think. I tried reading Wise Blood a number of years ago, and it was so bizarre, I could not get through it. I should try it again some time. It's definitely not a book for the faint of heart.

She has written a number of excellent short stories, though, and if you find you can't get through Wise Blood, try some of them instead.

Posted by: OregonMuse at November 22, 2015 11:19 AM (6IfH2)

170 106 ... Hrothgar, I saw most of the episodes back in the day and they were good. I've read all the books and enjoyed them and dip into them every few years.

Posted by: JTB at November 22, 2015 11:19 AM (FvdPb)

171 are donating some of their bestselling titles and forgoing the profits to raise one million pounds for Syrian refugees.

Pounds of what, C-4? Does Nobel have a symbol on the stock exchange?

Posted by: t-bird at November 22, 2015 11:21 AM (J3phO)

172 Can't bring myself to pay more than ten bucks for an ebook. Just can't do it.

Posted by: GGE Hades of the Kilted Horde, NC Chapter at November 22, 2015 11:22 AM (UQGss)

173 OregonMuse @161 - The British used to be the gold standard for literary adaptations, but I think they've completely lost it. Now they contaminate everything they touch with trendy, hypersexualized crap. The original Agatha Christie "Poirot" adapations, from the 80s to the 90s, were superb. They started them up again in the 2000s, and they're crap. Miss Marple, even worse.

I got very excited when I saw that they were going to film Chesterton's "Father Brown" stories. The first story was "The Hammer of God", and wouldn't you know, it was all fagged up with the victim a closeted homo and his sensitive, sympathetic lover. I never watched another one, and now I don't even bother giving them a try anymore.

Posted by: Dr. Mabuse at November 22, 2015 11:22 AM (gjLib)

174 Testing? My comments have been being eaten. I suspect tutu discrimination!

Posted by: sugar plum fairy slept late at November 22, 2015 11:22 AM (hnCis)

175 I haven't actually read any of the books but I have been truly enjoying watching the BBC Poirot series. What's fascinating to me is that Christie wrote her first Hercule Poirot book while Sherlock Holmes stories were still coming out. I didn't realize there was such a crossover, or that they started so early. You can see both parallels and where she tried to be different, but the influence is definitely there.

Posted by: Christopher Taylor at November 22, 2015 11:22 AM (39g3+)

176 If you like "Wise Blood" which has grim but funny/weird characters read the short stories of Flannery O'Connor. I love them. You might too. I like them better actually than the novel

Here are some quotes of hers. The one about the university stifling authors makes me laugh.

http://tinyurl.com/4ak4za

In "Wise Blood" Hazel motes starts the "The church of Holy Christ without Christ". Too bad too many churches are like that today

Posted by: FenelonSpoke at November 22, 2015 11:23 AM (No/ki)

177 THEN WHO WROTE FOLIOS?

Posted by: a meme at November 22, 2015 11:23 AM (xodPA)

178 "I'm re-reading The Legend of Bagger Vance by Steven Pressfield after a couple of years. Any golfer who has not read this book is missing something special. "

Thank you for this. Going to give it a try. Although after a few beers in the grill, my friends might take issue with my identifying myself as a golfer.

Posted by: RM at November 22, 2015 11:24 AM (U3LtS)

179 Posted by: Christopher Taylor at November 22, 2015 11:16 AM (39g3+)

How did something like that manage not to stick in my memory? Maybe one of the kids was talking to meduring that scene, and I do notice that my recall of listened-to books isn't as good as that of ones I've read. John Ringo's There Will be Dragons has a longbow vs. crossbow debate as well.

Posted by: Polliwog the 'Ette at November 22, 2015 11:24 AM (GDulk)

180 I heard that Trump Congressional Testimony too, Oregon Muse.

That's why I do not discount the idea that Trump could be a decent President, even though I don't tend to agree with him.

I have been trying to find a tape of that testimony. If anyone finds it, please leave it at my blog:

ibloga.blogspot.com

Posted by: Pastorius at November 22, 2015 11:24 AM (gMAUH)

181 >>Jack, Do I detect a Rhode Island accent (except for Cranston) coming through? Lost almost all of mine but 'idea' still comes out as 'idea.'

Mostly Bahstan but I am in Rhody now and I love it. Been coming here off and on for many years to sail and fish so I finally decided to just move here.

But I moved around a lot as a kid, just ended up in Boston so I really don't have much of an accent. But we always used to say wicked smart when I was a kid. Particularly when we were shopping at Jordan Mahsh or going to the packie.

Posted by: JackStraw at November 22, 2015 11:25 AM (/tuJf)

182 OK, that's it for me, off to bed so I can be awake all night tonight. Later roonz and roonettez, fear no evil!

Posted by: GGE Hades of the Kilted Horde, NC Chapter at November 22, 2015 11:25 AM (UQGss)

183 "I've just started reading Wise Blood by Flannery O'Connor. Can anybody
tell me something about O'Connor? I don't even know if O'Connor is a man
or woman."

North, I see that the question was answered above. I don't know what your tastes are, but if they run toward theology or philosophy, her letters, published under the title "The Habit of Being" are superb - in addition to being very, very funny at times. In the letters, she explains her work far better than any other critic I've seen.

Also, I think she was more at home in the short story than the novel. Her two collections of stories, "A Good Man Is Hard To Find" and "Everything That Rises Must Converge" are outstanding.

Brad Gooch's biography of her, "Flannery: A Life of Flannery O'Connor" was published in 2010. I thought it was quite good, well worth reading.

Finally, on YouTube, you can hear a recording of O'Connor reading her novella "A Good Man Is Hard To Find". Hearing O'Connor read her words in her Georgia accent makes a huge difference in appreciating her work: as with any good prose stylist, cadence is everything, and I find that I can only truly grasp the cadence of her prose when I hear it read in its native voice.

I hope you enjoy her work. She's one of my "faves", as I guess you can tell.

Posted by: Brown Line at November 22, 2015 11:25 AM (a5bF3)

184 Can't bring myself to pay more than ten bucks for an ebook. Just can't do it.

Nor should you. 9 bucks is really the outer limit for an e-book, 5-6 is closer to reasonable. Publishers are just trying to gouge people for their product and keep those sweet 90's era profits going.

It costs about 8 bucks to physically print a single copy of a book. It costs... basically nothing to publish an e-book. There's a lot of formatting and layouts, but that's true for physical books as well, so its not part of the comparison cost. So every dollar charged for an e-book is basically profit - and Amazon doesn't even get a majority of that (roughly 30% depending on how cheap you price it).

So publishers are trying to charge the same price as a print book, but earn like 500% more profit while paying the writers the same piddling amount.

Posted by: Christopher Taylor at November 22, 2015 11:26 AM (39g3+)

185 I have just finished MPPPP (Christopher DiGraztia's) book, " The Director's Cut-a Theda Bara mystery." I enjoyed it. He asked me to do a review on "Good Reads" so I will have to do that.

Posted by: FenelonSpoke at November 22, 2015 11:26 AM (No/ki)

186 speaking on Pratchett, there was a made for TV movie based on Going Postal

Only seen the trailer, but it doesn't seem completely awful.

Postal was really a new voice for Pratchett, and I wondered what was the cause. I thought it might be his brain thing, but he might have been writing for a script too.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UKSfel7Bj_E

Posted by: Kindltot at November 22, 2015 11:27 AM (q2o38)

187 128, et al, I have given term limits a great deal of thought. Short of a constitutional amendment, the courts won't stand for it, so carrot plus stick.

Carrot: big honkin' pension, which is only fair because the system that should result will involve people taking time out of their prime earnings years to do actual public service.

Stick: drastic reductions in pensions if you try to stay in office.

So: we set 12 years as the max for both houses: six terms in the House, two in the Senate. You get a big fat pension starting at age 75. It starts late because you will have to live with the consequences of what you inflicted on the populace.

If you stay past your allotted time, your pension gets cut in half for each year (not term) that you stay, so the stick is rather large.

Further, because of the problem of staff, we apply it to them too.

And because of the problem of having people rotate through government and lobbying doors, we also cut the hell out of the pension if you work anywhere but the private sector, and that includes state and local government. Once you are out of office, you will, by God, live with what you have wrought so you will think twice before you vote for yet another ever-so-helpful program.

One detail I haven't figured out is the jackwagons who give us a "life of "public service"" by starting local and then working their way up, creating havoc all the way. Perhaps states need their own carrot & stick system.

Posted by: Tonestaple at November 22, 2015 11:28 AM (dCTrv)

188 Sugar Plum Fairy - with some IPs, comments appear to post, then vanish. I think that's what happens. I've got a list of AT&T IPs I've have trouble with. Banned because of some past user or based on the hashtag, I imagine.

May have to add a note to the unofficial unauthorized Ace of Spades Blog Commenters Survival Guide (link in nic) about this.

Posted by: mindful webworker - what, me read? at November 22, 2015 11:29 AM (GHHRC)

189 I read all those "All Creatures" books several years ago after enjoying the televised series. They were very entertaining.

Posted by: FenelonSpoke at November 22, 2015 11:29 AM (No/ki)

190 128 To work as intended, Congressional term limits would need to also apply to their staffs. Otherwise it would just be a revolving door for the powers behind the throne with even less respect for the constituency's voters.

Posted by: Epobirs at November 22, 2015 10:50 AM (IdCqF)


Agreed, and this is why I can't make up my mind whether term limits is actually a good idea or not. There's always a powerful permanent class somewhere, either out in front, or behind the scenes, that remains the same despite any changes to the government. Term limits may, as you suggest, may simply shift power from elected officials to unelected bureaucrats and government functionaries.

But if you force THOSE guys out, then you're faced with the problem of the new guys having to learn things all over again that the last group knows but can no longer use. It's grossly inefficient, but maybe that's what we have to have in order to maintain integrity in government at the federal level.

Posted by: OregonMuse at November 22, 2015 11:29 AM (6IfH2)

191 Carrot: big honkin' pension, which is only fair because the system that should result will involve people taking time out of their prime earnings years to do actual public service.

Stick: drastic reductions in pensions if you try to stay in office.


Gross reductions in pay would help as well, but you know what the best encouragement would be?

Gutting the federal government. The less power, prestige, and influence the job of congressman has, the less desperate people would be to hold on to it. And the reason it has that kind of power, prestige, and influence is because congress is so powerful and handles such inconceivably vast amounts of money.

Cut that, and you solve most of the problems.

Posted by: Christopher Taylor at November 22, 2015 11:30 AM (39g3+)

192 to film Chesterton's "Father Brown" stories. The first story was "The
Hammer of God", and wouldn't you know, it was all fagged up


A benefit of never having read the original is I don't know how badly they've BBC'd it.

It's well acted, great scenery and locations, cool old English cars.

Posted by: DaveA at November 22, 2015 11:31 AM (DL2i+)

193 Posted by: Dr. Mabuse at November 22, 2015 11:22 AM (gjLib)

Wow, that's a complete rewrite of that character. Then again, just about everyone would probably cheer for the murderer if they'd left the victim as the bullying semi-rapist (use of his powerful social position against women with no right to tell him "No").

Posted by: Polliwog the 'Ette at November 22, 2015 11:31 AM (GDulk)

194 132, Flannery O'Connor was a most devout Catholic, and a southerner through and through. She is the reason I am not Catholic.

The story goes, she was at a dinner party with Mary McCarthy, among others. McCarthy was saying things about the Catholic church that led everyone to expect O'Connor to speak in its defense. What O'Connor said about the Real Presence in the Eucharist was, "Well, if it's just a symbol, then to hell with it."

There was nothing I could argue with in that statement. (Or the fact that Christ said, "This IS my body....")

Posted by: Tonestaple at November 22, 2015 11:32 AM (dCTrv)

195 Thanks for the comments re: O'Connor. I gather her novels can be a difficult read.

I don't mind difficult reads--but I get impatient at times.

Any how I do look forward to diving in.

Posted by: Northernlurker, feeling grumpy today at November 22, 2015 11:32 AM (4rzL1)

196 He asked me to do a review on "Good Reads" so I will have to do that.

Post the review on Amazon as well, if you can. Bigger buying audience and every review helps get the book more attention from the company for features and suggestions.

Posted by: Christopher Taylor at November 22, 2015 11:32 AM (39g3+)

197 Trying again.

I read James Joyce's Dubliners recently. What a depressing collection of stories! it must have been terrible to be Irish in Ireland back then!
Had so many bad dreams while reading it that i had to pick up Winnie the Pooh after just to make up for it.

Now after visiting my grandma, I have four books sitting on my dresser to read: Atlas Shrugged, the new Harper Lee ( gramma said she didn't think it was that good. Said the whole book seemed to be trying to prove her father wrong. Guess I'll see. ), Boys in the Boat about a 1930s Olympic rowing team and the new Gloria Steinam ( recommended to grandma but she gave it to me saying she'd never have time to read it during the holidays. Lol!)
don't know how much time she thinks i have to read!

Posted by: sugar plum fairy slept late at November 22, 2015 11:33 AM (hnCis)

198 Another "All Creatures Great and Small" story... I grew up in a family with five kids, and we all loved reading. We had read-alouds even into high school, and Mom read this whole series aloud to us. It was a great way to share a reading experience, and I wonder if people still do that in today's busy electronic world.

Posted by: April at November 22, 2015 11:34 AM (79ZSg)

199 term limits

Already ruled out as contrary to right to vote.
And like others are mentioning not extensive enough to the bureaucracy.

After the Iranians nuke DC we can just make them all work in the crater. Cancers should provide plenty of disincentive.

Posted by: DaveA at November 22, 2015 11:35 AM (DL2i+)

200 I know that in the grand scheme of things this is small potatoes but it chaps my ass. The entire world and everyone in it must suffer the consequences of Obozo's corruption and incompetence except for Obozo and Mooch. They'll be on easy street for the rest of their lives at our expense.

Posted by: The Great White Snark at November 22, 2015 11:36 AM (Nwg0u)

201 Posted by: Christopher Taylor at November 22, 2015 11:32 AM (39g3+)

Thx for the suggestion, Christopher.

Posted by: FenelonSpoke at November 22, 2015 11:36 AM (No/ki)

202 Adding Term Limits to the constitution with an amendment would necessarily make it constitutional and impossible to negate (by that argument).

Posted by: Christopher Taylor at November 22, 2015 11:38 AM (39g3+)

203 192 to film Chesterton's "Father Brown" stories. The first story was "The
Hammer of God", and wouldn't you know, it was all fagged up

A benefit of never having read the original is I don't know how badly they've BBC'd it.

It's well acted, great scenery and locations, cool old English cars.
Posted by: DaveA at November 22, 2015 11:31 AM (DL2i+)

I've been watching some of the Father Brown series available on Netflix. I think they are okay but no more than okay.

One episode that bothered me featured an Indian guru/fakir. I the television show he was a sympathetic character and that doesn't ring true to Chesterton. I actually think I've read that particular short story and I'm confident that's not true to Chesterton as written.
The series also lacks, IMHO, Chesteron's quirky humour.

Posted by: Northernlurker, feeling grumpy today at November 22, 2015 11:38 AM (4rzL1)

204 In "Wise Blood" Hazel motes starts the "The church of Holy Christ without Christ". Too bad too many churches are like that today

Posted by: FenelonSpoke at November 22, 2015 11:23 AM (No/ki)


I read somewhere that she once said that if Catholics get goofy about religion, they join a convent or monastery and are thus removed from public, but when Protestants get goofy about religion, there's no such-like places for them to go, so they just wander around spilling their craziness all over the place.

Like Hazel Motes' Church Without Christ. Where the dead are dead and Stay That Way.

Posted by: OregonMuse at November 22, 2015 11:39 AM (6IfH2)

205 Polliwog I don't read werewolf or vampire stories usually but I enjoyed CT's Life Unworthy. SnowBerry's Veil is more my preferred style of novel, just a fun read to get away from thinking about how stupid people are, but the Life Unworthy novel could make for some interesting discussions.

Posted by: PaleRider at November 22, 2015 11:42 AM (1OLmv)

206 Gum thread for those interested.

Posted by: Polliwog the 'Ette at November 22, 2015 11:43 AM (GDulk)

207 OM, Thanks, as always, for the book thread. It's a regular joy for the weekend. I keep a notepad to hand listing all the books and references to check into. That keeps me busy for some time.

Posted by: JTB at November 22, 2015 11:44 AM (FvdPb)

208 198 Another "All Creatures Great and Small" story... I grew up in a family with five kids, and we all loved reading. We had read-alouds even into high school, and Mom read this whole series aloud to us.

Posted by: April at November 22, 2015 11:34 AM (79ZSg)


Mrs. Muse and I read to our kids all of the time. When I heard that they were planning to make the LoTR books into movies, I told them they wouldn't be able to see them until we read them first. So we made it through the entire series before the movies came out.

It was good, family fun.

Posted by: OregonMuse at November 22, 2015 11:44 AM (6IfH2)

209 I am reading your book right now, Seamus, I am about 25 pages in.
It seems like a really great read, congratulations!
And, thank you.

Posted by: navybrat at November 22, 2015 11:45 AM (ETxiG)

210 Mww

So you don't think it's tutu discrimination?

Posted by: sugar plum fairy slept late at November 22, 2015 11:46 AM (hnCis)

211 I like Trump as well for some reason. There is a book (cannot remember the name, maybe "Trumped"?) by a guy who managed one of his casinos in the late 80s/early 90s.

It was a hit piece, but it rang true to me. The book took the style of simply relating incidents that occurred during this exec's employment by Trump, and the accompanying dialogue, without a lot of analysis. Let the reader be the judge.

If true it revealed Trump as a bizarre mix of cunning, obsessiveness with details mixed with impatience with details, short attention span, manipulative, ruthlessness, bluster, short tempered, sometime kindness with occasional meanness, and relentlessness.

After reading it I certainly wouldn't want to work for him and cannot even conceive of him as POTUS. However, I still like him and often find myself pulling for him, against my better instincts and logic. I also like his kids and how they respect and support him. That goes a long way with me.

Posted by: RM at November 22, 2015 11:46 AM (U3LtS)

212 But if you force THOSE guys out, then you're faced with the problem of the new guys having to learn things all over again that the last group knows but can no longer use. It's grossly inefficient, but maybe that's what we have to have in order to maintain integrity in government at the federal level.

Posted by: OregonMuse at November 22, 2015 11:29 AM (6IfH2)


The only effect of term limits would be to enhance the power of lobbyists (who would wind up writing most of the legislation) and the permanent civil service/bureaucracy, who could stonewall anything they didn't like until the "problem" is term-limited away.

Posted by: HTL at November 22, 2015 11:48 AM (oEoeA)

213 181 ... That second 'idea' was supposed to be spelled ideer. Damn impudent autocorrect.

I was a voice major for a while in college. Having to sing in English, French, Italian, German and Latin meant that, sooner or later, I had to use the letter R appropriately. It made a permanent change but the process wasn't pretty.

Posted by: JTB at November 22, 2015 11:51 AM (FvdPb)

214 Thank you. I've heard her name often. This will be my first time to read one of her novels.

Posted by: Northernlurker, feeling grumpy today at November 22, 2015 11:07 AM (4rzL1)



She's known more for her short stories than her novels.

so, if you haven't read her before, that might be the place to start.

John Huston directed a movie version of "Wise Blood".

It's pretty good. But like most libtards, he was an atheist and undercut some of O'Connor's message and tone.

Posted by: naturalfake at November 22, 2015 11:51 AM (KUa85)

215 >>I was a voice major for a while in college. Having to sing in English, French, Italian, German and Latin meant that, sooner or later, I had to use the letter R appropriately. It made a permanent change but the process wasn't pretty.

When I sing it's not pretty, period. And I have full control over my "Rs".

Posted by: JackStraw at November 22, 2015 11:56 AM (/tuJf)

216 Thank you, OM.

Posted by: Pastorius at November 22, 2015 11:59 AM (gMAUH)

217 Maybe I missed it, but I cannot recall any references on this thread to the book I am halfway through, "Unlikeable", by Ed Klein about her wretchedness, St. Hilary.

It has a lot of juicy tidbits about her and Bill and sometimes seems gossipy in tone. But there is a lot of meat on the bone about her unending list of scandals, the vast systems of favors for cash, and the mountains of $ that roar through the Clinton Foundation.

Not done yet, but if even half true, the woman has NO business being the President or having any other meaningful role in the governance of this country.

I am stunned by the magnitude of the incredible venality of the family in general and what they have gotten away with (and continue to get away with).

In comparison with Hilary and Bill, when I think of guys like Scooter Libby doing time, Bob Livingston resigning from the House after an affair came to light, the flapdoodle about Gingrich getting a $250K book advance, etc., the mind absolutely boggles.

If they were not liberal icon Democrats, they would be either in jail somewhere, or disgraced has beens. Truly incredible.

Posted by: RM at November 22, 2015 12:02 PM (U3LtS)

218 His planet-sized ego makes Bill O'Reilly look like Mother Theresa, and yet I like him, but I can't abide O'Reilly. Go figure

I think that's pretty simple. Trump has a massive ego, but its pretty much "I'm awesome." O'Reilly's ego is pretty much "I'm a genius and I am doing all this for you little people so you need to listen."


One thing I wish that Trump had achieved in NYC that he didn't was his proposal to just rebuild the WTC with the Twin Towers.

Posted by: buzzion at November 22, 2015 12:02 PM (zt+N6)

219 Holy cow!!! My comment at 192 is so wrong, I may die of embarrassment. Flannery O'Connor's comment about the Eucharist is why I AM, AM, AM, AM now a Roman Catholic.

Posted by: Tonestaple at November 22, 2015 12:03 PM (dCTrv)

220 From a glowing review in the local Sunday rag a few weeks ago, that doubled as an obit, I started reading Ruth Rendell's "Dark Corners." Not only hadn't I read any of this prolific writer's books, I had never heard of her.

From the first few pages of her last, and according to the review, best book, it's zipping right along. If you saw the late '80s/early '90s film, "Pacific Heights," about the renter from Hell terrorizing the naive homeowner, I'm guessing that's what this is going to be like.

Any Rendell fans here?

Posted by: RushBabe at November 22, 2015 12:03 PM (/NEnw)

221 >>> What O'Connor said about the Real Presence in the Eucharist was, "Well, if it's just a symbol, then to hell with it." 

---

I hate it when they just give you money for Christmas, in the card. I prefer real presents.

Posted by: Joe Biden at November 22, 2015 12:04 PM (xU0ng)

222 I read James Joyce's Dubliners recently. What a depressing collection of stories!

I especially liked the one where the copyist left his job early, which put his employment in danger as he did this a lot, and pawned his watch so he could get drunk,but couldn't get as drunk as he wanted, so he went home and beat on his kid.

Very cheerful.

Posted by: OregonMuse at November 22, 2015 12:06 PM (6IfH2)

223 Hi! Lurker trying to join the Ace goodreads group. Happy Sunday to you all.

Posted by: AS at November 22, 2015 12:11 PM (v1yzO)

224 Thanks, Seamus!

Posted by: Jack Reacher's frozen turkey fists at November 22, 2015 12:15 PM (ZedYY)

225 As I thought about which books will go in the 'good' bookcase (a three tier, glass front case inherited from my grandfather and I treasure it) I made an executive decision to amass as many CS Lewis books over time. I have most of the fiction and a good amount of the religious material but not many of the academic books. These are physical books. I don't want to be at the mercy of digital gremlins or PC thought police for this material.

Posted by: JTB at November 22, 2015 12:16 PM (FvdPb)

226 Off, disgruntled sock.

Off to a baby shower for one of B'Gal's friend's kids.

No alcohol will be served. Pray for me.

Y'all try and behave.

Posted by: BackwardsBoy at November 22, 2015 12:17 PM (LUgeY)

227 From a glowing review in the local Sunday rag a few weeks ago, that doubled as an obit, I started reading Ruth Rendell's "Dark Corners." Not only hadn't I read any of this prolific writer's books, I had never heard of her.

From the first few pages of her last, and according to the review, best book, it's zipping right along. If you saw the late '80s/early '90s film, "Pacific Heights," about the renter from Hell terrorizing the naive homeowner, I'm guessing that's what this is going to be like.

Any Rendell fans here?
Posted by: RushBabe at November 22, 2015 12:03 PM (/NEnw)



I've read a few of her books. Not a big Wexford fan but he's ok.

The books of her's that I liked best and still remember were:

Talking to Strange Men

The Rottweiler

Adam and Eve and Pinch Me (love that title)

Posted by: naturalfake at November 22, 2015 12:21 PM (KUa85)

228 I haunt book stores--much to my book spending averse wife's dismay. I've noticed a book called something like The Road Character by David Brooks.

I can't even bring myself to open it thanks to his sharp trouser crease idiocy. It strikes me, very slightly, that I might be missing a decent book.

Posted by: Northernlurker, feeling grumpy today at November 22, 2015 12:31 PM (4rzL1)

229 Posted by: RushBabe at November 22, 2015 12:03 PM (/NEnw)

I read Rendell years ago -- and a few more recently because someone here mentioned her. I really like her. I don't remember the first one I read but it was written under her pseudonym Barbara Vine -- BV -- darker and more psychological. Weird too sometimes.

Posted by: gracepc at November 22, 2015 12:32 PM (OU4q6)

230 Posted by: naturalfake at November 22, 2015 12:21 PM (KUa85)

Thanks for the suggestions. If I like this one as much as I anticipate, I'll be tracking down the others.

OM - Since Thursday and Friday will be slooooow for the interwebz, maybe we could have a free-form book thread, without you having to prepare a whole theme. If we need a jumping off point, how's about, "What's the best book you've ever read and why," or "What book or portions thereof do you remember after x number of years?" It may spur some gift suggestions for Christmas.

Just a thought. There are only so many sharp-elbowed cheerleaders to go around.

*ducks and runs from horde*

Posted by: RushBabe at November 22, 2015 12:34 PM (/NEnw)

231 Was Rendell the author who when young killed someone? A movie was made about that.

Posted by: HH at November 22, 2015 12:36 PM (DrCtv)

232 I've noticed a book called something like The Road Character by David Brooks.

His books actually aren't terrible. He does a pretty good job of analyzing culture and its oddities, although he just can't help that Northeastern ivy league elitism slipping through on occasion.

Posted by: Christopher Taylor at November 22, 2015 12:49 PM (39g3+)

233 230 ... Good thought, RushBabe. I would be there.





Posted by: JTB at November 22, 2015 12:52 PM (FvdPb)

234 Arrgh. I yam a idjit.

Milady tells me I'd already posted the Atomic City review. It was another review she wrote later that I haven't passed along. That file is on another computer on another location.

Well, later I will.

Posted by: mindful webworker - what, me read? at November 22, 2015 12:55 PM (GHHRC)

235 Also, maybe Laura and Her Hump could drop by for a little Thanksgiving Haiku contest?

I fondly remember one from a 'ron who I thought won the day:

I need a sammich
Wifey says she won't make one
She is a beeyotch

Posted by: RushBabe at November 22, 2015 01:03 PM (/NEnw)

236 Posted by: JTB at November 22, 2015 12:52 PM (FvdPb)

I'll second that. And usually a thread like that will really take off.

Posted by: HH at November 22, 2015 01:04 PM (DrCtv)

237 Very cheerful.
It's funny because it's true.

Posted by: andycanuck at November 22, 2015 01:05 PM (xodPA)

238 OM
Yes, that was favorite too! :/ the whole thing left me with a bad taste in my mouth. The only story i didn't think was terribly depressing was the one about the drunk (that's 90 percent) who ends up going to church with his friends. I enjoyed the preacher 's talk at the end. Only story that didn't leave me feeling terribly hopeless about humanity!

Posted by: sugar plum fairy slept late at November 22, 2015 01:08 PM (lFi5f)

239 #231 - you are thinking of anne Perry - and the movie made about the killing was Heavenly Creatures, directed by Peter Jackson.

Posted by: OregonMuse at November 22, 2015 01:29 PM (oRo90)

240 [20]Some Nameless Moron, many Book Threads ago, recommended A Sailor of Austria and I loved it. Know that this book is now FREE on Amazon. Here is a direct link http://preview.tinyurl.com/outhjke

--------

Thanks! I just bought it.

Posted by: microcosme at November 22, 2015 01:29 PM (8QCtS)

241 Posted by: OregonMuse at November 22, 2015 01:29 PM (oRo90)

Ah, thanks. I saw the movie first (very disturbing), and later found out it was based on the early life of a best selling author.

Didn't know it was by Jackson.

Posted by: HH at November 22, 2015 01:39 PM (DrCtv)

242 [220] Any Rendell fans here?
----------------------

I read her books avidly years ago. She also wrote under the name Barbara Vine.

Posted by: microcosme at November 22, 2015 01:52 PM (8QCtS)

243
"I read James Joyce's Dubliners recently. What a depressing collection of stories!"

True. Yet at their best, they're so very good. "The Dead", I think, is a classic.

John Huston, who made that weird version of "Wise Blood" (along with such classics as "The Maltese Falcon" and "The Treasure of Sierra Madre") also filmed "The Dead". It was his last movie, made as Huston knew he was dying and it was his farewell to the world: a deeply moving, elegiac film, well worth seeing.

Posted by: Brown Line at November 22, 2015 02:14 PM (a5bF3)

244 I read 'An Act of Self Defense' a week or two ago. It had been recommended here previously, and I too found it to be a page-turner. It's in the vein of 'Shelly's Heart', I thought, though less complex.

Posted by: Mike Hammer,etc., etc. at November 22, 2015 02:22 PM (9mTYi)

245 Any Rendell fans here?
Posted by: RushBabe
---------------------

Pretty sure I have read them all. I'll point out that she is The Baroness Rendell.

Posted by: Mike Hammer,etc., etc. at November 22, 2015 02:26 PM (9mTYi)

246 Herriot fans might be interested in the books by John McCormack DVM, a sort of Alabama version, and well worth your time.

Posted by: Markham Shaw Pyle at November 22, 2015 03:00 PM (WlkUc)

247 Any Rendell fans here?
Posted by: RushBabe
---------------------

Pretty sure I have read them all. I'll point out that she is The Baroness Rendell.

Posted by: Mike Hammer,etc., etc. at November 22, 2015 02:26 PM (9mTYi)

As an old H.S. friend was fond of saying, "Well, smell me!"

LOL

Posted by: RushBabe at November 22, 2015 03:19 PM (/NEnw)

248 "...when I was listening to the radio and happened to hear him testify
before some congressional committee that was investigating a proposal to
build an entirely new building for the U.N. - at the cost of $1
billion. Trump told them that actually, he could build it easily for
$750 million and explained that the higher price tag on the original
proposal was due solely to union corruption. He laid out his argument
calmly, dispassionately, and thoroughly, using facts and logic...."
~~~~~~~~~~~

Saw that too. I was impressed and thus find him more than capable as the next Chief Executive.["This fat government is stupid and a big waste. Get rid of those Departments Commerce, Energy, Education. Put their people on the border or doing paperwork for the deportations. By next week!]

Posted by: eureka! is troubled these days at November 22, 2015 03:21 PM (g1MTt)

249 I'm taking the Tolkien quiz that you linked to.

Question #8 is bogus - all of the answers are wrong, actually. I picked the one that was least wrong and they still dinged me for it.

Other than that, it seems all of my mistakes were due to differences between the movie and book. 90% score. But I was surprised at the paucity of questions on the Silmarillion.

Posted by: Philip at November 22, 2015 03:29 PM (gyEkU)

250 Finished Forstchen's "Daes Irae," which was a whole lot of fun to be two-thirds of the way through on the night of the 13th....

I enjoyed it enough (if you can call that kind of horror show "enjoyable") as a dark thriller (fortunately I don't expect real-world ISIS goons are quite as competent as Forstchen's ISIS goons, though unfortunately I don't think they need to be).

It did remind me that insertion of an agenda that's secondary and unnecessary to the plot of a story is not only distracting but can actively undermine a narrative, even when I'm actively sympathetic to that agenda (which is a rarity, though not here). You see it most commonly with liberal authors in all forms of media creating caricature villains with nefarious Republican traits, or ascribing Democrat traits to what are meant to be sympathetic characters, and having these crop up in stories that have absolutely nothing to do with those aspects of political ideology, or even political ideology at all.

I suppose I can't say Forstchen's transgressions are quite so brazen (it is, after all, a geopolitical book), but there's at least one instance of a character who's so clearly a proxy for "Progressive" Americans that I can't help but wonder if the book's message would have been more on-point without her. Or maybe such things just seem to me like pandering (I don't expect, after all, that many Sanders supporters will be picking up any Forstchen novellas).

Posted by: Blacklake at November 22, 2015 04:15 PM (b9GlI)

251 Speaking of Amazon and their Kindle programs, I now wonder about how they support authors... or don't support them. I print published using Createspace, their publishing arm. I e-published via KDP Select. And I honestly don't have much to show for it.

I never (Well, almost never.) had any illusions that my novel Pilot Point would be a best seller. But I feel Amazon has forgotten me once they got my money.

Having said that, I am having a Kindle Countdown deal this week - Pilot Point for only 99 cents. If I may say so myself, it's a good Texas novel for a good price.

Posted by: WannabeAnglican at November 22, 2015 04:56 PM (hjp5Z)

252 Having said that, I am having a Kindle Countdown deal this week - Pilot Point for only 99 cents. If I may say so myself, it's a good Texas novel for a good price.

Posted by: WannabeAnglican at November 22, 2015 04:56 PM (hjp5Z)


Hey, next time you have one of these sales, e-mail me in advance and I'll be sure to announce it on the thread.

Posted by: OregonMuse at November 22, 2015 05:17 PM (6IfH2)

253 Posted by: WannabeAnglican at November 22, 2015 04:56 PM (hjp5Z)

Hey, next time you have one of these sales, e-mail me in advance and I'll be sure to announce it on the thread.
Posted by: OregonMuse at November 22, 2015 05:17 PM (6IfH2)

--

Ditto.
I can include in my blog & twitter

Posted by: @votermom at November 22, 2015 05:58 PM (cbfNE)

254 Herriot fans might be interested in the books by John McCormack DVM, a sort of Alabama version, and well worth your time.
Posted by: Markham Shaw Pyle
--------------

Have read all of Herriot. What surprised me each time was how he could see the humor in his experiences, and describe it. Many, many times laughed aloud at his (generally self-deprecating) humor.

Posted by: Mike Hammer, whining at November 22, 2015 06:07 PM (9mTYi)

255 Thanks, OM and votermom.

@votermom, is it too late? It starts Tuesday and goes the rest of the month.

OM, I'll be back with you. I forgot to mention it goes that long.

Posted by: WannabeAnglican at November 22, 2015 06:19 PM (hjp5Z)

256 no not too late
send me an email link to vm at bookhorde dot org and I'll mention it tuesday
thanks!

Posted by: @votermom at November 22, 2015 06:28 PM (cbfNE)

257 Thank you!

Posted by: WannabeAnglican at November 22, 2015 06:38 PM (hjp5Z)

258 Subs are not an anachronism for the A-H Empire. In fact, the famous Capt. Von Trapp (Sound of Music) served as a sub commander during WWI. He commanded two different boats and was credited with the sinking of 13 Allied ships.

Posted by: Dr. Todd at November 22, 2015 07:13 PM (0fnEa)

259 >>>Submarines being employed by the Habsburgs sounds a bit anachronistic to me, but it sounds like a fun book.
Georg von Trapp was an Austro-Hungarian u-boat ace. He sank 13 allied ships, including a French armored cruiser.
Posted by: the guy that moves pianos for a living

Whoever OM is quoting states the Austro-Hungarian Empire was almost landlocked.
Hardly, the empire included about half of latter day Yugoslavia which boarder the Adriatic Sea.

Posted by: Farmer at November 22, 2015 07:52 PM (o/90i)

260 Voter Mom, I've been trying to e-mail you. I don't know if I've gotten through. Give me a shout. Thanks.

Posted by: WannabeAnglican at November 23, 2015 12:17 PM (hjp5Z)

261 Only beta males are threatened by Trump.

Posted by: george strong at November 23, 2015 08:31 PM (8/wUZ)

(Jump to top of page)






Processing 0.04, elapsed 0.0385 seconds.
15 queries taking 0.0111 seconds, 270 records returned.
Page size 190 kb.
Powered by Minx 0.7 alpha.



MuNuvians
MeeNuvians
Polls! Polls! Polls!
Frequently Asked Questions
The (Almost) Complete Paul Anka Integrity Kick
Top Top Tens
Greatest Hitjobs

The Ace of Spades HQ Sex-for-Money Skankathon
A D&D Guide to the Democratic Candidates
Margaret Cho: Just Not Funny
More Margaret Cho Abuse
Margaret Cho: Still Not Funny
Iraqi Prisoner Claims He Was Raped... By Woman
Wonkette Announces "Morning Zoo" Format
John Kerry's "Plan" Causes Surrender of Moqtada al-Sadr's Militia
World Muslim Leaders Apologize for Nick Berg's Beheading
Michael Moore Goes on Lunchtime Manhattan Death-Spree
Milestone: Oliver Willis Posts 400th "Fake News Article" Referencing Britney Spears
Liberal Economists Rue a "New Decade of Greed"
Artificial Insouciance: Maureen Dowd's Word Processor Revolts Against Her Numbing Imbecility
Intelligence Officials Eye Blogs for Tips
They Done Found Us Out, Cletus: Intrepid Internet Detective Figures Out Our Master Plan
Shock: Josh Marshall Almost Mentions Sarin Discovery in Iraq
Leather-Clad Biker Freaks Terrorize Australian Town
When Clinton Was President, Torture Was Cool
What Wonkette Means When She Explains What Tina Brown Means
Wonkette's Stand-Up Act
Wankette HQ Gay-Rumors Du Jour
Here's What's Bugging Me: Goose and Slider
My Own Micah Wright Style Confession of Dishonesty
Outraged "Conservatives" React to the FMA
An On-Line Impression of Dennis Miller Having Sex with a Kodiak Bear
The Story the Rightwing Media Refuses to Report!
Our Lunch with David "Glengarry Glen Ross" Mamet
The House of Love: Paul Krugman
A Michael Moore Mystery (TM)
The Dowd-O-Matic!
Liberal Consistency and Other Myths
Kepler's Laws of Liberal Media Bias
John Kerry-- The Splunge! Candidate
"Divisive" Politics & "Attacks on Patriotism" (very long)
The Donkey ("The Raven" parody)
News/Chat