Sunday Morning Book Thread 10-11-2015: True Grit [OregonMuse]


sell grit.jpg
Be Honest: How Many Of You Morons Used To Look Like This Kid?


Good morning to all of you morons and moronettes and bartenders everywhere and all the ships at sea. Welcome to AoSHQ's stately, prestigious, internationally acclaimed and high-class Sunday Morning Book Thread. The Sunday Morning Book Thread is the only AoSHQ thread that is so hoity-toity, pants are required. Or kilts. Also, assless chaps don't count. Serious you guys. Kilts are OK, though. But not tutus. Unless you're a girl.


I read a lot as a kid. Some of my favorite books were The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde by Robert Louis Stevenson, The Three Musketeers by Alexander Dumas and The Man Who Would Be King by Rudyard Kipling. Reading opened up the world like nothing else. One day I might be sword fighting in 17th Century France, the next I might be fighting off crazed assassins in 19th Century India. Video games just can’t compare with the variety and intensity of reading.
-Kareem Abdul-Jabbar


More Stuff From Comic Books

I don't have much opportunity to goof off at work anymore (my oppressive tyrant employer actually expects me to do the job I'm being paid for), so I miss out on all of ace's weekday threads, so I'm reduced to posting derivative copycat threads. Like this post from Friday, about dumb stuff you could order from the back pages of comic books, and how much dumber it actually turned out to be when it arrived in the mail and you could finally look at it up close. There were lots of fun comments that brought back memories from my misspent youth, but I was surprised nobody brought up the one thing that I remember most from comic book advertising:

Grit.

That's right, Grit. With a capital 'G'. As you can see from the book thread pic, it's some sort of newspaper. I never knew what it was, I never saw it in real life, but it was advertised in every comic book I ever read back in the day. I never could figure out how I was supposed to sell something I knew nothing about, or who would want it, and so of course I never bothered to investigate further.

Until now.

So I looked at Grit's wikipedia entry, and it turns out, it used to be quite popular:

Grit is a magazine, formerly a weekly newspaper, popular in the rural US during much of the 20th century. It carried the subtitle "America's Greatest Family Newspaper". In the early 1930s, it targeted small town and rural families with 14 pages plus a fiction supplement. By 1932, it had a circulation of 425,000 in 48 states, and 83% of its circulation was in towns of fewer than 10,000 population.

So those sales figures suggest that perhaps an enterprising young man could do well selling it (as long as he didn't run into market saturation). Also, with a name like "America's Greatest Family Newspaper", you know Grit is going to be to progressives like crucifixes are to vampires. This is further confirmed by how the owner described what he liked to see in Grit:

Always keep Grit from being pessimistic. Avoid printing those things which distort the minds of readers or make them feel at odds with the world. Avoid showing the wrong side of things, or making people feel discontented. Do nothing that will encourage fear, worry, or temptation... Wherever possible, suggest peace and good will toward men. Give our readers courage and strength for their daily tasks. Put happy thoughts, cheer, and contentment into their hearts.

Holy crap, avoid "distort[ing] the minds of readers", "showing the wrong side of things", and "suggest peace and good will toward men"? I can scarcely imagine a more anti-progressive editorial policy than this.

So what was in an issue of Grit? Here's a description of a 1956 issue:

Bennett Cerf wrote a column for Grit. The funnies included Blondie, Joe Palooka, The Lone Ranger, Donald Duck and Henry. There was a crossword puzzle and a serial, a murder mystery called, Tell Her It's Murder. This copy of Grit contained the 29th and final chapter. The first Grit of 1956 also contained predictions for the upcoming year. The unicycle would be the number one sport in the summer of 1956. And the TV program that would replace The $64,000 Question would be one called Can You Trust Your Wife? And in 1956 just like today, doctors still couldn't cure the common cold. Grit carried a full-page ad offering Valentine cards for seven cents each. Grit also carried an ad for Sinclair Gasoline. (Willie Munn operated a Sinclair station at the corner of Main and Jackson streets in Kingstree.) Grit was recruiting carriers to sell their paper. You could make 4¢ for each paper you sold.

The content is actually quite substantial. Now I'm kind of sorry I never saw an issue.

So whatever happened to Grit? It's still around. It was bought and sold and merged by various publishers until:

Beginning with the September 2006 issue, Grit converted to an all-glossy, perfect bound magazine format and a bi-monthly schedule. The revamped editorial policy encompasses more of a contemporary rural emphasis on content, rather than the nostalgic themes of the previous decade. With a print run of 150,000 and Time Warner as the national newsstand distributor, Grit was displayed and sold at general newsstand outlets, bookstores and specialty farm feed and supply stores, including Tractor Supply Company.

And to this day, I (still) have never seen an issue.

I don't suppose it advertises much in comic books anymore, though. I think someone needs to round up every old issue they can find and scan them all in as .pdf documents. What a treasure trove of Americana that would be.

A Slam Dunk

Now here's something you don't see every day: a former NBA superstar who has writes Holmesian fiction. Moron commenter The Great White Snark e-mailed me about this last week, and I had an item about it ready to go, but it disappeared when I had to run s system restore. Thanks, Microsoft. And then I didn't realize it was missing until after the book thread went live, so GWS had to mention it in the comments.

So for those of you morons who were drunk or passed out last week, or simply missed the comments, the book mentioned by GWS is Mycroft Holmes, and the author is none other than Kareem Abdul-Jabbar.

Which perhaps shouldn't surprise us that much, since he was an English/History major at UCLA.

So his novel (co-written with Anna Waterhouse) actually isn't about Sherlock Holmes, but instead

spotlights Sherlock’s older brother Mycroft. He’s 23, engaged and looking forward to a successful career as at this young age he’s already the secretary to the Secretary of War. He has an uncanny power of observation and deduction that sets him apart from others. His best friend Cyrus Douglas, a Negro tobacconist, tells Mycroft of the current incidents in his homeland of Trinidad. It seems that people are vanishing. Children are said to be found dead, drained of blood and if they have not been baptized “they are condemned to walk the earth forever on little backwards-facing feet”. Holmes reasons this is “an ugly fate….not to say impractical”. The legendary Lougarou and their companion demons the Douen are said to be responsible.

...and so they're off to Trinidad, where the game is, as they say, afoot.

And that's not the only book Mr. Abdul-Jabbar has written. Another is On the Shoulders of Giants: My Journey Through the Harlem Renaissance, co-written with Raymond Obstfeld, and there's not much I can say about it since the title makes it pretty much self-explanatory. He's also written a military history, Brothers in Arms: The Epic Story Of The 761st Tank Battalion, WWII's Forgotten Heroes, about which an Amazon reviewer said:

The author has written a well balanced account of life as a black tanker during World War II. He goes into detail showing the differences in their training compared to white soldiers and the racism they encountered. For all the humiliation they suffered in the USA, they didn't let it get them down and soldiered on when called to fight. The battle accounts are detailed and the focus is in the soldiers and not the equipment.

No maps, though. A number of reviewers mentioned this as a big drawback to an otherwise worthy effort.

And I have to close with this quote from one of Kareem's interviews:

I don’t think it will be any surprise that my favorite class was history. I’ve said many times that if I hadn’t become a professional basketball player, I would have become a history teacher. There’s so much to learn from history. The saying, “Those that don’t learn from history are condemned to repeat it” doesn’t just apply to politicians and world leaders, it applies to all of us on a daily basis. We can learn from mistakes of others, whether they’re kings or our parents. When we do learn those lessons, we’re better equipped to make our own dreams come true.

And it seems me that the fact of A-J's authorship of a Holmsian novel can be used to win some sort of bar bet.


The Woman Who Would Be President

Ace linked to this earlier in the week as evidence of Hilary's drinking problem, but I'm not seeing much drinking here. However, I am seeing a lot of hitting and punching and throwing of heavy objects.

The book that discusses these things is The Clintons' War on Women and it's scheduled for release on Oct. 13th. It's sure to be controversial and I hope Roger Stone, the author, is prepared to get reamed by the MSM, his financial records pawed through by Democrat aides, and his home address spilled all over Twitter. And the only reason he's probably not going to be getting a big, fat audit is because Obama and Hillary! aren't really allies.

Anyway:

“Hillary Clinton has a long history of being domestically violent with Bill,” Stone writes. “Hillary has beaten Bill, hit him with hard objects, scratched and clawed him, and made him bleed.”

Well, Bill probably earned it. Perhaps I shouldn't make light of this sort of thing, but I don't have a lot of sympathy for him.

And apparently, this physically abusive behavior is not a recent phenomenon:

Arkansas state troopers assigned to then-Gov. Bill Clinton’s detail had seen worse. Once, when Hillary awoke in the middle of the night to find Bill gone, she called the trooper assigned to Bill and demanded he bring the governor home immediately.

She was waiting in the kitchen, and as Chris Andersen wrote in “American Evita: Hillary Clinton’s Path to Power,” the ensuing fight got violent, with “shattering glass and slamming doors” reverberating throughout the mansion. “When it was over, staff members . . . [found] broken glass, smashed dishes and a cupboard door ripped off its hinges.”

Ugh. Sounds like WWIII. Question: why did Bill marry her? Especially when you see the women he usually hits on (blonde, busty). I wonder what he saw in Hillary that he found attractive?

Also, I've been hearing these kinds of stories about Hillary! for nearly 20 years now, and I am still waiting for the "Hillary is really a kind and decent person and these are all right wing lies" defense from her allies and apologists, but I never have.


The Worst Bad Books

From the Intercollegiate Review website, here are The 50 Worst Books of the 20th Century, and by bad, they mean "pernicious and destructive". Actually, the article says

We define “Worst” as books which were widely celebrated in their day but which upon reflection can be seen as foolish, wrong-headed, or even pernicious.

So I was close. Anyway, the list contains the usual rogues' gallery of crap: Margaret Mead, Albert Kinsley, John Kenneth Galbraith, Margaret Sanger. But here are some you may not have heard of:

The New Basis Of Civilization by Simon N. Patten. Thanks to this yutz, we now have a federal income tax. First published in 1907. Combine that with Herbert David Croly's celebration of the welfare state, The Promise of American Life, first published in 1919, and you've got a can't-miss formula for national bankruptcy and collapse.

Most of the books on the list appear to be quack science, quack sociology, quack economics, quack history, or quack psychology. For example:

The Function of the Orgasm by Wilhelm Reich. Yes, you read that right. Get a load of this:

Wilhelm Reich (1897-1957) was an Austrian psychoanalyst, who tried to reconcile psychoanalysis with Marxism, and contended that neurosis is rooted in a lack of what he called "orgastic potency." He claimed to have discovered a cosmic sexual energy he call “Orgone,” self-publishing books about his increasingly controversial theories, and selling “Orgone Accumulator” boxes commercially...

Quack, quack, quack!

The crap British band Hawkwind had a song called "Orgone Accumulator" I used to listen to back in the 70s when I was stoned and stupid. I always wondered where it had come from, and what an 'orgone' was, and now I know.

Authors inexplicably missing from the list: Rachel Carson, Howard Zinn, Betty Friedan, Al Gore. Quack, quack. Quack.

Oops! I just checked, this is not the first time I mentioned this list. The first time was in 2014.


New Twilight Installment

And speaking of bad books, Stephenie Meyer has penned a new 'Twilight' novel:

I'll probably skip it:

“Life and Death: Twilight Reimagined,” a, well, reimagining of the same story updated with a female vampire and human teenage love interest. Clocking in at 442 pages, the novel challenges the common interpretation of Bella Swan as a “damsel in distress,” Meyer said. “That’s always bothered me a little bit… I thought, what if we switched it around a little bit and see how a boy does?” Answer? “It’s about the same.”

I don't think so, Tim. Er, Steph. Look, the sexes aren't symmetrical. Males and females don't have the same reactions. They don't have the same likes and dislikes.

"Softly he brushed my cheek, then held my face between his marble hands. 'Be very still,' he whispered, as if I wasn't already frozen. Slowly, never moving his eyes from mine, he leaned toward me. Then abruptly, but very gently, he rested his cold cheek against the hollow at the base of my throat."

Can you imagine a male character in a novel mooning like that? Ugh. This is Pajama Boy on stilts.

And as the boss says in the sidebar, "sales are already going to be lower anyway because how many times can you expect people to pay money for the same story?" Also, the more progressive you are, the more untethered you get from reality, and then one day, reality rises up behind you and bites you on the butt. Meyers will get a does of this if the book tanks.

From Amazon, it appears that Life and Death: Twilight Reimagined is currently only being sold as part of the 10th anniversary (dual) edition of the original Twilight novel.

Next up for Steph Meyers: gay.


What I'm Reading

Finally got around to starting Jim Gavin's homage to Edgar Rice Burroughs and pulp sci-fi Smartass of Mars after pimping it on the book thread awhile back. It's quite entertaining, and shot through with moron characters and content. So far there's been gladiatorial combat, a bar fight, an escape in a hover-car, and a visit to a cathouse. And I've only read about a third of the book. All that's missing is the ValuRite.


___________

I downloaded, but haven't started. William Goldman's The Princess Bride. A couple of weeks ago, I heard from Kristen, a lurking moronette who
recommended this 25th Anniversary Edition which came out in 2007, and it has some new material:

In an appendix there's a considerable amount of background on the making of the movie, as well, which Goldman intertwines within this almost-reality land that he created for the story.

Also, a story called "Buttercup's Baby".

Kristen says she especially likes

Goldman's delightful narrative style: matter-of-fact explanations of the ridiculous, a conversational style without being patronizing, and of course, the rollicking adventures. And it's impossible to read Inigo Montoya's famous line without hearing Mandy Patinkin's voice in your head.

It's definitely different than the movie.


___________

So that's all for this week. As always, book thread tips, suggestions, bribes, rumors, threats, and insults may be sent to OregonMuse, Proprietor, AoSHQ Book Thread, at the book thread e-mail address: aoshqbookthread, followed by the 'at' sign, and then 'G' mail, and then dot cee oh emm.

What have you all been reading this week? Hopefully something good, because, as you all know, life is too short to be reading lousy books.

Posted by: Open Blogger at 08:50 AM




Comments

(Jump to bottom of page)

1 Anyone ever check out book tv? Often see author interview interesting

Posted by: Skip at October 11, 2015 08:51 AM (gY61M)

2 And not not going for another hat trick, this just happens.

Posted by: Skip at October 11, 2015 08:52 AM (gY61M)

3 Top 10!

Posted by: Weasel at October 11, 2015 08:57 AM (e3bId)

4 Just preventing the hat trick as a community service.

Posted by: Bandersnatch, Opus/Bill the Cat 2016 at October 11, 2015 08:57 AM (1xUj/)

5 Reading through the Russian Snows, interesting twin story of two Britains, one a young officer aid to Gen. Wilson sent to Russia, the other a enlisted man forced into joining the French army.

Posted by: Skip at October 11, 2015 08:58 AM (gY61M)

6 Yesterday had 3 number 1's and 1 number 2.
Last week had 2number 1's and 1 number 8
Week before had 2 number 2's and 1 number3

Posted by: Skip at October 11, 2015 09:00 AM (gY61M)

7 I had relatives who read GRIT all the time. It was a lot like Readers Digest back before the progressive long march through publishing.

I finally gave up on the Readers Digest when I finally notice it was the same stories every issue, only the words changed.

Posted by: Yilmaz Bohm at October 11, 2015 09:02 AM (xmGV4)

8 Nice post about Grit! Likewise, I remember the comic book ads but never saw an actual issue.

Posted by: rickl at October 11, 2015 09:02 AM (sdi6R)

9 Be Honest: How Many Of You Morons Used To Look Like This Kid?


***

Be Really Honest: How Many Of You Morons still Look Like This Kid?

Posted by: Muldoon at October 11, 2015 09:03 AM (NeFrd)

10 Don't know if I ever saw a copy of Grit, but remember ads well.

Posted by: Skip at October 11, 2015 09:05 AM (gY61M)

11 Good morning all
Got Anna Puma's book in the mail, will start reading it soon

Posted by: chemjeff at October 11, 2015 09:05 AM (uZNvH)

12 Kareem Abdul Jabbar wants to be a pundit, and based on what he has said about current events and current politics I'm somewhat uncertain about his analytical abilities, and when his books are 'co authored', I'm somewhat suspicious of his writing credibility, but that's just my cynicism saying that.

Posted by: Yilmaz Bohm at October 11, 2015 09:08 AM (xmGV4)

13 Stephanie Meyer doesn't have to worry if her new book tanks. The first lousy book and movie made her so wealthy she'll never have to write another book again.

Posted by: FenelonSpoke at October 11, 2015 09:08 AM (GERXL)

14 Kid looks like D-Fens from the movie Falling Down.


"Listen fellas, I've had a really rare morning . . ."

Posted by: Count de Monet at October 11, 2015 09:09 AM (JO9+V)

15 "Be Really Honest: How Many Of You Morons still Look Like This Kid?"


Less hair
More stomach

I'm more like his grandfather maybe.

Posted by: Village Idiot's Apprentice at October 11, 2015 09:10 AM (VPLuQ)

16 Kareem Abdul Jabbar wants to be a pundit, and based on what he has said
about current events and current politics I'm somewhat uncertain about
his analytical abilities, and when his books are 'co authored', I'm
somewhat suspicious of his writing credibility, but that's just my
cynicism saying that.



The hell I don't! LISTEN, KID! I've been hearing that crap ever since I
was at UCLA. I'm out there busting my buns every night! Tell your old
man to drag Walton and Lanier up and down the court for 48 minutes!

Posted by: Roger Murdock at October 11, 2015 09:10 AM (oVJmc)

17 Also, I've been hearing these kinds of stories about Hillary! for nearly 20 years now, and I am still waiting for the "Hillary is really a kind and decent person and these are all right wing lies" defense from her allies and apologists, but I never have.

Hillary Clinton is the kindest, bravest, warmest, most wonderful human being I've ever known in my life.

Posted by: rickl at October 11, 2015 09:11 AM (sdi6R)

18 Hey Morons, anyone know a good, reputable way to buy magazine subscriptions on discount? Just had my first baby which means I have a whole lot more reading time, but also can't get to a PC to habitually hit refresh to see if Ace's latest ad is going to crash my browser.
Any recommended reading? I used to like Wired but the articles don't feel quite as trustworthy as they used to. Still a fan of Popular Mechanics though. Anything else out there I should give a spin?

Posted by: allenlou at October 11, 2015 09:11 AM (us5tr)

19 "Be Honest: How Many Of You Morons Used To Look Like This Kid? "

I did look like that kid, only scrawnier. That kid has a chest.

Posted by: Yilmaz Bohm at October 11, 2015 09:12 AM (xmGV4)

20 I don't know about Grit PDFs but, if you know your way around teh interwebz, you can find a zip file containing high-quality scans of the first 500+ issues of Mad Magazine.

Posted by: Top.Man at October 11, 2015 09:12 AM (YAiVr)

21 This week I read Live Free Or Die by John Ringo. It's the first volume in his Troy Rising series. In the near future, shortly after the first alien contact, earth learns that not all alien civilizations are friendly. It's up to Vermonter Tyler Vernon to build the space infrastructure to save the planet and keep it safe. It's a good story with lots of science and small bits of dark humor. I'm looking forward to reading the next two in the series that are out.

Posted by: Zoltan at October 11, 2015 09:12 AM (THsLo)

22 And good news! Accidental Heroes: A Muldoon Adventure is in final editing. What with formatting and cover art I hope to have it available by the end of the month.

An historical novel loosely based on my dad's WWII diaries from the beachhead at Anzio this lively tale follows the adventures of three Colorado farm boys as they team up to neutralize Anzio Annie, the daunting German 280 mm railroad gun. It's got thrills, chills, airplane rides, beautiful Italian maidens, hamsters, romance (but no sex, this is my parents' generation after all) and...best of all... it's got pie!

Posted by: Muldoon at October 11, 2015 09:12 AM (NeFrd)

23 I looked just like that kid in the 60s, except for a smaller chin, slightly bigger ears, and a rounder head. Think Charlie Brown with those glasses.

Still look the same, except for a double chin, gray hair, different glasses, and Hillary wrinkles (well, maybe half of those wrinkles).

Posted by: {Kevin C} at October 11, 2015 09:13 AM (GDkWJ)

24 Just got the latest Danial Silva.

Nic, easy reads that are just fun.

Posted by: Village Idiot's Apprentice at October 11, 2015 09:13 AM (VPLuQ)

25 Hillary Clinton is the kindest, bravest, warmest, most wonderful human being I've ever known in my life.

Posted by: Muldoon at October 11, 2015 09:14 AM (NeFrd)

26 OM, how did you get ahold of that picture of me?

B'Gal, you got some 'splainin' to do...

Posted by: BackwardsBoy at October 11, 2015 09:17 AM (LUgeY)

27 Use to watch the cspan book/author interviews all the time. Then everyone runs to their local library thinking they are being clever and there is a run on the book. I always thought Brian Lamb was a great interviewer.

Posted by: Bruce With a Wang! at October 11, 2015 09:17 AM (iQIUe)

28 OMG! rickl and muldoon have been taken over by pod people!

Posted by: Count de Monet at October 11, 2015 09:18 AM (JO9+V)

29 My grandmother read Grit. She , as far as I know , did not read much of anything else. A kid in our neighborhood who was older sold Grit.
Very popular in the rural South.

Posted by: Lower Class person whose opinions need to be guided at October 11, 2015 09:18 AM (3ZttN)

30 No Grit, but I read Boy's Life a lot.

Posted by: BackwardsBoy at October 11, 2015 09:21 AM (LUgeY)

31 I am curious about this "Grit" now. I shall have to go to the TSC and see if they have them.

Posted by: Ricardo Kill at October 11, 2015 09:22 AM (ghhmx)

32 I looked like Napoleon Dynamite.


[...]Any recommended reading? I used to like Wired but
the articles don't feel quite as trustworthy as they used to. Still a
fan of Popular Mechanics though. Anything else out there I should give a
spin?
Posted by: allenlou at October 11, 2015 09:11 AM (us5tr)


Allenlou, I always loved Make Magazine, but you have to get past a lot of the slant. And the silliness.

On the other hand, Gutenberg.org is full of stuff. I mean "lost in the stacks for an hour looking for the stairway" type full

Posted by: Kindltot at October 11, 2015 09:22 AM (3pRHP)

Posted by: Kindltot at October 11, 2015 09:22 AM (3pRHP)

34 Trailer parks are orgone accumulators, from the metal/wood/metal layered construction of individual trailers.
That' why they naturally attract tornadoes.

Posted by: Dr. Varno at October 11, 2015 09:22 AM (GdFQh)

35 No Grit, but I read Boy's Life a lot.

Posted by: BackwardsBoy at October 11, 2015 09:21 AM (LUgeY)



Hairy Reid: Does it have lots of pictures?

Posted by: TheQuietMan at October 11, 2015 09:24 AM (DiZBp)

36 I found the book Princess Bride to be unreadably bad, and I love the movie. I like most books, so it's a bit of a mystery.

An even worse book IMO was The Black Swan. I read through to the end, expecting some sort of grand conclusion, but it wasn't there. Like a big mysterious buildup to nothing.

Posted by: {Kevin C} at October 11, 2015 09:25 AM (GDkWJ)

37 Good morning, Hordelings!

I've been re-reading some of my Dick Francis books recently (10 lb Penalty and To the Hilt) and I'm amazed at his ability to tell a good, clean story over and over again. And the amount of research he must have done for each book is staggering because each of them focuses on a different profession (political campaigning, art, history, architecture) along with the horse racing story. Cool stuff.

I've started sending out query letters for my first novel, so I'll be a basket case for the next few weeks or until I get responses. Keep your fingers crossed!

Posted by: right wing whippersnapper- quietly rebellious at October 11, 2015 09:25 AM (26lkV)

38 I wonder if Grit carried ads for Sea Monkeys?

Posted by: Dr. Varno at October 11, 2015 09:25 AM (GdFQh)

39 We could use Grit's format and sell an up to date version just change the GR to SH and our new newspaper could be full of lies, distortions, omissions, slander, race baiting and whatever else the DNC would like to put out there. Plus we could update the kid in the ad with tattoos, piercings, hat on backwards, drawers down around his knees and with purple hair to do the ad for us. Our prizes for best sellers would be EBT cards, Obama phones and free condoms to keep the baby momma's away.

Posted by: Hairyback Guy at October 11, 2015 09:27 AM (ej1L0)

40 Good luck right wing whippersnapper

Posted by: chemjeff at October 11, 2015 09:27 AM (uZNvH)

41 Orgone boxes were also supposedly used to affect the weather. They had long metal poles sticking out of them pointed at an angle toward the sky. (Gee, I don't see the sexual references there.) The boxes were filled with layered organic and inorganic materials (metal sheet, compost, metal sheet, compost, etc.). I think it was the FBI that finally jailed this guy for the heinous crime of being a really annoying pain in the ass.

Posted by: Corona at October 11, 2015 09:28 AM (tWUja)

42 Finished Lee Child's latest "Reacher" book "Make Me." As a former Reacher fan, I have to say "don't bother." I'd give it a 2/5.
***
Reading Ace Atkins' 2002 "Dark End of the Street." Too early to judge the book, but the back cover blurb from Kinky Friedman caused me to borrow it from the library: "If Raymond Chandler came from the South, his name would be Ace Atkins." Seems about right.

If the author's name sounds familiar, it might be because he has written some books with the late Robert B. Parker's "Spencer" character. As a Parker fan, I thought Atkins did about as well as anyone could in emulating Parker.
***
Looking forward to the new "Mitch Rapp" book called "The Survivor", started by the late Vince Flynn and completed by Kyle Mills. Early goodreads reviews 4.5/5.

Posted by: doug at October 11, 2015 09:29 AM (byczL)

43 Truth be told I looked a lot like that kid's nerdy skinnier younger brother.

Posted by: Muldoon at October 11, 2015 09:29 AM (NeFrd)

44 Don't remember if Mom ever bought the Grit, but I remember several kids coming to the house on Saturday's yelling "Wannabuyagrit!" Very annoying.

Posted by: olddog in mo at October 11, 2015 09:31 AM (IEp5v)

45 The Grit story triggered a vague memory that I thought was the Horatio Alger story, but upon further review, Horatio Alger wrote about rags to riches.

So I tried searching for the newspaper mogul who got his start selling papers on the street, but Who Boy! did that turn up the ugly side of the newspaper business.

So was there a real life person who started out selling newspapers for pennies and became successful?

Posted by: Yilmaz Bohm at October 11, 2015 09:32 AM (xmGV4)

46 I did look a bit like that kid, glasses included, but my hair was longer. I remember the ads but it has been a while since I stopped getting comic books shortly after they went to 12 cents. (I miss the cents symbol. My manual typewriters have it.) Never saw an issue but my home town, while small, was hardly rural. Our daily newspaper carried a lot of the same features.

I'm going to Tractor Supply tomorrow. I have to see if they have an issue of Grit.

Posted by: JTB at October 11, 2015 09:33 AM (FvdPb)

47 I was a mixed race kid who threw newspapers in a black neighborhood....going door to door to collect was a thrill...

Posted by: Judas Washington at October 11, 2015 09:34 AM (hCdMd)

48 Well, I just picked up a couple books on early American furniture, an older book on restoring antique guns (i.e., muzzloaders), and "The Log of a Cowboy," apparently the reminiscences of cowboy who was part of the cattle drives of the 1880s, at the library book sale. I've decided to build myself a blanket chest, I think...

Also borrowed a couple books on frontier/American Indian history and the Whiskey Rebellion. Haven't read those yet.

Posted by: Grey Fox at October 11, 2015 09:34 AM (bZ7mE)

49 Oh, and I used to look like that kid but w/o the glasses. And a big cowlick on the right front of hairline.

Posted by: olddog in mo at October 11, 2015 09:35 AM (IEp5v)

50 Grit even has a Facebook page

https://m.facebook.com/GritMagazine

Looks fine to me!

Posted by: TexasJew at October 11, 2015 09:35 AM (2GjZZ)

51 Good heavens, I'll have to check out Tractor Supply next time we're in for Grit ... (TSC has awesomely good dog and cat food, in addition to chicken feed and supplies at very competitive prices although we do feel a little ... suburbanish, among all the pick-up trucks in the parking lot, and the supplies for horses, cattle, pigs and goats inside for people who have ranches and farms.)

And good news - I worked away all this week on finalizing the next book - Sunset & Steel Rails and getting the Kindle version up at Amazon. It's here and available for pre-order
http://tinyurl.com/pddv6a7
The official release date is November 10, and there will be a print version available by then. Amazon hasn't activated the "look inside' feature, but anyone who wants to look at a sample chapter can go to my website for it. (OM, I'll send you word for the Book Thread when we're closer to the release date.)

Posted by: Sgt. Mom at October 11, 2015 09:36 AM (95iDF)

52
So was there a real life person who started out selling newspapers for pennies and became successful?

Posted by: Yilmaz Bohm at October 11, 2015 09:32 AM (xmGV4)


Edison started out as a paperboy, but that was different.

By the way, paper deliverers are still generally considered "contractors" and work for piece-rate, and unlike most other employees are often not only paid below minimum wage, but have to make their own fuel and vehicle costs out of that.

So the next time the local rag moans on about "living wage" ask about when they will guarantee that for the paperboys.

Posted by: Kindltot at October 11, 2015 09:37 AM (3pRHP)

53 Someone who sold newspapers and became successful (put not in publishing) was Walt Disney:

On July 1, 1911, Elias purchased a newspaper delivery route for The Kansas City Star. It extended from the Twenty-seventh Street to the Thirty-first Street, and from Prospect Avenue to Indiana Avenue. Roy and Walt were put to work delivering the newspapers. The Disneys delivered the morning newspaper Kansas City Times to about 700 customers and the evening and Sunday Star to more than 600. The number of customers they had increased with time. Walt woke up at 4:30 AM and worked delivering newspapers until the school bell rang. He resumed working the paper trail at 4PM and continued to supper time. He found the work exhausting and often received poor grades from dozing off in class. He continued his paper routine for more than six years.[23]

Posted by: FenelonSpoke at October 11, 2015 09:38 AM (GERXL)

54 I believe I've seen copies of Grit at my local Barnes and Noble
I'll have to check.

I've spent most of my adult life working in rural South, so I'm sure I've seen the magazine from time to time..

Posted by: TexasJew at October 11, 2015 09:38 AM (2GjZZ)

55 Kindltot, thanks. I did my share of paper boy, paper route, but I never figured out how to make any money at it. I was also very bad at collections.

Posted by: Yilmaz Bohm at October 11, 2015 09:39 AM (xmGV4)

56 #53 Information from Wikipedia.

Posted by: FenelonSpoke at October 11, 2015 09:39 AM (GERXL)

57 I haven't received it yet, but this week I ordered a copy of "Like A Rolling Stone: Bob Dylan at the Crossroads" by Greil Marcus.

https://tinyurl.com/q4hs3gb

Yes, it's an entire book about that one song. The author fleshes it out with historical context, current events, and such, but I'm hoping it also contains material about the actual recording sessions.

I figure I better read up on those recording sessions before I get hit in the face with the firehose in November.

Posted by: rickl at October 11, 2015 09:42 AM (sdi6R)

58 Our version of the traditional Paperboy is a ten year old plymouth mini-van, overloaded to the max.
One bleach blond smoking a cigarette and driving slowly on the wrong side of the road, flinging papers in roughly the same compass quadrant as the intended home.

And of course, delivering at least three publications simultaneously, you have a one-in-three chance that the publication you actually subscribe to will land somewhere within twenty foot of your property.

Posted by: Village Idiot's Apprentice at October 11, 2015 09:44 AM (VPLuQ)

59 Jabbar's family were middle class Jamaicans, I believe, and from my experience with middle class Jamaicans, they are VERY big on education.

Posted by: TexasJew at October 11, 2015 09:47 AM (2GjZZ)

60 Beware counterfeit copies of Grit. You want to make sure you get the True one.

Posted by: Muldoon at October 11, 2015 09:48 AM (NeFrd)

61 I don't think Walter Rauschenbusch had one of the worst books in American history (Compared to the pervert Kinsey?-nope. Yes-he promulgated the "Social Gospel" but I think he was always an evangelical Baptist. He was just appalled at the working conditions of the poor in the later 1800s and the early 1800s, and they were really bad and needed to be addressed. But yes, religious progressives have taken his thought in ways that Rauschenbusch probably wouldn't be entirely comfortable with.

Posted by: FenelonSpoke at October 11, 2015 09:48 AM (GERXL)

62 Grit sales boys are out on strike seeking $15/hr.

Posted by: Muldoon at October 11, 2015 09:49 AM (NeFrd)

63 My boss subscribes to the Wall Street Journal and it's delivered to my workplace every morning. It's there when I arrive to open up.

In the past, it often fell short of the porch overhang and got rained on. We had to open it up and spread the pages out on various tables to dry it out.

Not anymore. Whoever is delivering it now had the arm of Sandy Koufax. BAM. Right up against the door every day, safe and sound from the weather.

Posted by: rickl at October 11, 2015 09:50 AM (sdi6R)

64 20 I don't know about Grit PDFs but, if you know your way around teh interwebz, you can find a zip file containing high-quality scans of the first 500+ issues of Mad Magazine.
Posted by: Top.Man at October 11, 2015 09:12 AM (YAiVr)


I know! I have that archive on my Nexus tablet. Reading those early back issues gives you very entertaining glimpses into the popular culture of the 50s and 60s.

Posted by: OregonMuse at October 11, 2015 09:52 AM (XXDSi)

65 Meant late 1800's, early 1900's. He would have favored the book of James. which is in the Bible. :^)

Have to go to church now so if anyone has any other comments about Rauschenbusch I won't be able to read them or comment until later. :^)

Posted by: FenelonSpoke at October 11, 2015 09:52 AM (GERXL)

66 @28 Hi, I'm That Guy.

the kindest, bravest, warmest, most wonderful human being is what all the brain-washees said about The Manchurian Candidate. Get it?

Interesting rumors, best told by others, about how that got away from Sinatra.
Or, maybe changed him, once he figured it out.

Posted by: Stringer Davis at October 11, 2015 09:52 AM (xq1UY)

67 Grit sales boys are out on strike seeking $15/hr.

And the local newspaper is hyperventilating over this, while paying their adult newspaper men below min wage.

Posted by: Colin at October 11, 2015 09:52 AM (Espnc)

68 I never saw a newspaper edition of Grit either, but I buy it every time I see a new issue. It's full of good a advice on gardening / small and large animal care / good home cooking.

Very interesting and my recommendation for a good subscription to allenlou at 18.

And they are the company (Storey) that published the book about cooking with LARD. yum.

Posted by: Mephitis at October 11, 2015 09:53 AM (dAWHU)

69 English artist Roger Dean came up in the thread about the groove-a-liciously tacky organic shapes in some French designer's coastal pleasure place (too lazy to scroll through old entries).

Lo and behold, I was spelunking through my books and found Roger Dean's "Views". Didn't remember I'd pinched it on my last visit to the family estate! All the spongiforms, geological phallusii, floating fragments, and planetscapes are there. I just read that band member Jon Anderson didn't want a Roger Dean cover for a Yes album, suggesting instead a Holiday Inn match book cover, but "cooler" heads prevailed. Idiot! That's why people bought your albums!

Interestingly, Dean's concept of a home consisting of many separate but connected pods came from his conviction that "The role of the home is to provide security and privacy. All else follows from this. Each individual should ideally have somewhere to go which is completely their own domain... ((it provides)) psychological security: the defendable-castle concept. " As an introvert I embrace the pod concept wholeheartedly, but it would drive the extroverts in the family nuts.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, bursting with genuine enthusiasm and unbridled perkiness! at October 11, 2015 09:53 AM (jR7Wy)

70 Obviously you didn't hang around the tractor store enough. Likely that's the source of your existential angst.

Posted by: Uncle Jed at October 11, 2015 09:55 AM (OmBeX)

71 My little brother sold Grit. In Houston during the 70's. Didn't make squat or win any prizes. I sold cigarettes @ 25 cents a piece. I had folding money.

Posted by: Mr. Mxyzptlk at October 11, 2015 09:56 AM (kHJ3a)

72 "The role of the home is to provide security and privacy. All else follows from this. Each individual should ideally have somewhere to go which is completely their own domain... ((it provides)) psychological security: the defendable-castle concept. " As an introvert I embrace the pod concept wholeheartedly, but it would drive the extroverts in the family nuts.
Posted by: All Hail Eris, bursting with genuine enthusiasm and unbridled perkiness! at October 11, 2015 09:53 AM (jR7Wy)


I think thorough-going progressives would hate this, too. How dare you think you can live outside and apart from the almighty State?

Posted by: OregonMuse at October 11, 2015 09:58 AM (XXDSi)

73
From Adrian Goldsworthy's wonderful biography "Augustus."--

"The Romans won the war after a hard struggle (90 b.c.), to a great extent because they finally and grudgingly gave the Italian communities what they wanted. The number of citizens was greatly expanded, giving politicians new voters to cultivate, and again shifting the political balance."

Plus ca change...

Posted by: Libra at October 11, 2015 10:01 AM (GblmV)

74 My dad had a subscription to Grit. Kept it around at work to read on slow days. I always enjoyed reading it. Good stories.

Posted by: Soona at October 11, 2015 10:01 AM (Fmupd)

75 Thanks for the recommendation about "Eifelheim". Mrs. JTB was born in the area in the book (U.S. Army base) and is descended from the those people. She is really enjoying it and has said I HAVE to read it. Must be pretty damn good.

Similar thanks for the mention of "American Craftsmen" by Tom Doyle. I'm only about a third of the way into it and am captivated. The author's approach and constant plot twists keeps me turning the pages. Luckily, the local library has his books. Have to get this finished, as well as "Eifelheim", in the next week or two as it is almost time for the annual LOTR reading.

Posted by: JTB at October 11, 2015 10:01 AM (FvdPb)

76 Never sold Grit, but I did sell greeting cards door to door. Made money!

Posted by: Nip Sip at October 11, 2015 10:02 AM (jJRIy)

77 Finished The Storyteller by Picoult
Good read but graphic

Posted by: Velvet Ambition at October 11, 2015 10:03 AM (7ln+i)

78 I have to check out "Smartass of Mars" if it's a good spoof of ERB. Not to mention that 'sorta' Fratzetta cover.

Posted by: JTB at October 11, 2015 10:04 AM (FvdPb)

79 Can't find the picture I'm looking for.

http://www.shorpy.com/node/2699

The one I remember is two boys, one is maybe six or seven and shoeless, and his older brother is taking care of him while selling newspapers. The older brother has the face of an adult. There was a picture of another kid who worked in the textile mill, maybe twelve or fourteen. He also had the face of an adult.

http://www.shorpy.com/node/2928

http://www.shorpy.com/node/25

My search on shorpy wasn't successful, neither was google. The expressions on the faces of dust bowl era migrant workers in California tells you just how tough it was. We're wimps by comparison

Posted by: Yilmaz Bohm at October 11, 2015 10:04 AM (xmGV4)

80 41 Orgone boxes were also supposedly used to affect the weather. They had long metal poles sticking out of them pointed at an angle toward the sky.
Posted by: Corona at October 11, 2015 09:28 AM (tWUja)
---
Kate Bush's song "Cloudbusting" was about Wilhelm Reich and his son Peter.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pllRW9wETzw

Posted by: All Hail Eris, bursting with genuine enthusiasm and unbridled perkiness! at October 11, 2015 10:05 AM (jR7Wy)

81 J. Paul Getty made his first million by the time he was 24, but he made his very first dollar in Bartlesville, Oklahoma, selling newspapers downtown on Cherokee Avenue.

Posted by: Just Passing Through at October 11, 2015 10:07 AM (+ZSW1)

82 Oh, and if you buy the COOKING WITH LARD book in paperback, they have a coupon in the back for a year subscription to GRIT.

So it's win win. But I haven't sent mine in yet because ... shut up that's why. lazy i guess.

full name

Lard: The Lost Art of Cooking with Your Grandmother's Secret Ingredient

Posted by: Mephitis at October 11, 2015 10:07 AM (dAWHU)

83 Yeah, I could have posed for that Grit sales pic too. Too damn close for comfort. And I don't remember ever reading a copy of it either.

Speaking of ERB, Philip Jose Farmer wrote a Tarzan book that was authorized by the ERB estate, A Dark Heart Of Time (1999) which I've never read. But I did read and enjoy

Lord Tyger is an American novel by Philip Jose Farmer. Originally released in 1970, the book is a metafictional pastiche of one of Farmer's favorite subjects, Edgar Rice Burroughs' Tarzan.

quoted from wiki

Posted by: GnuBreed at October 11, 2015 10:08 AM (gyKtp)

84 Reading Killing Patton by O'Reilly. Very interesting and a fast, easy read.

Oh, and Utah is overrated.

Posted by: Blacksheep at October 11, 2015 10:08 AM (bS6uW)

85 As to comics , how could you or anyone forget " Sgt. Rock and Easy Company ' ?? The best and in fact the only good thing , about haircuts when I was a lad in the late 50's was the time waiting or in the chair catching up with the men of Easy Co . Naps or Nazis they're all going down .

Posted by: jay hoenemeyer at October 11, 2015 10:10 AM (uvj0z)

86 @84 Utah is overrated.
Well, I'd flesh that out a little.
The state, the team, the beach, what?
The speakers, well, yeah.

Posted by: Stringer Davis at October 11, 2015 10:11 AM (xq1UY)

87 I generally am liking Smartass of Mars but can't listen to it in TTS because of the author's decision to include *all* The Swears including a large number of f-bombs, which means I have to actually *read* and makes for slow going.

Posted by: Polliwog the 'Ette at October 11, 2015 10:11 AM (GDulk)

88 I'm glad Adorno's "Authoritarian Personality" is up there.

I'm going to suggest some bad-idea books in the fantasy/science-fiction genre, books which inspired young people to take bad turns in life -

* Isaac Asimov, "Foundation" (the original shorts, plus the 1980s books "Foundation's Edge" and "Foundation and Earth"). History needs to be controlled by social-scientists. The 1980s books double down: individuality must be destroyed.

* Marion Zimmer Bradley, "Mists of Avalon". Being pro-woman means being a bisexual pagan and perv. Enough said about her.

* Frederick Pohl, "Merchants of Venus". A short-story. Capitalism means exploitation and misery, and the only way to get rich is by luck.

Posted by: boulder terlit hobo at October 11, 2015 10:12 AM (aLXXe)

89 I remember a kid from down the street who sold Grit and won top salesman. He seemed like a tycoon with $$ in his pocket and won cool prizes like a radio and a bike.

Lol.. I wound up getting a paper route instead.

looking back, either was a good way to foster work ethic and the entrepreneurial spirit.

Posted by: Willy at October 11, 2015 10:13 AM (1WyYe)

90 I think thorough-going progressives would hate this, too. How dare you think you can live outside and apart from the almighty State?
Posted by: OregonMuse at October 11, 2015 09:58 AM (XXDSi)
---
Yeah, Dean went on to say it "extends from areas of civil liberties and legal rights, which cannot be gotten into here".

Also, try and build anything experimental with all the intrusiveness of modern laws.

Another favorite book of mine is "Handmade Houses: A Guide to the Woodbutcher's Art". Very much in the 70's hippie quest for personal autonomy and freedom. You can smell the redwood planks and patchouli.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, bursting with genuine enthusiasm and unbridled perkiness! at October 11, 2015 10:14 AM (jR7Wy)

91 " either was a good way to foster work ethic and the entrepreneurial spirit. "

Didn't work for me. I didn't learn a thing from it.

Posted by: Yilmaz Bohm at October 11, 2015 10:15 AM (xmGV4)

92 >>>Always keep Grit from being pessimistic. Avoid printing those things which distort the minds of readers or make them feel at odds with the world. Avoid showing the wrong side of things, or making people feel discontented. Do nothing that will encourage fear, worry, or temptation... Wherever possible, suggest peace and good will toward men. Give our readers courage and strength for their daily tasks. Put happy thoughts, cheer, and contentment into their hearts.



So did it deal with the gritty underbelly of inner city life?

Posted by: Caitlyn Jenner at October 11, 2015 10:15 AM (oZxN4)

93 @86 - The team. That game against Cal sucked ... nine turnovers between them.

Posted by: Blacksheep at October 11, 2015 10:16 AM (bS6uW)

94 How many looked like that?

I owned that shirt. I wore those glasses. My dad took me to the basement every couple weeks and cut my hair like that.

Never fell for the true grit sales pitch. Has anyone ever seen a copy of true grit magazine?

Posted by: se pa moron at October 11, 2015 10:16 AM (sI4OA)

95 I forgot:
* Margaret Atwood, "The Handmaid's Tale". Because deep down, Christian conservatives want to be Iran. Also vagina.

Posted by: boulder terlit hobo at October 11, 2015 10:17 AM (aLXXe)

96 47 I was a mixed race kid who threw newspapers in a black neighborhood....going door to door to collect was a thrill...
Posted by: Judas Washington at October 11, 2015 09:34 AM (hCdMd)
--
My sister's Bohunk boyfriend used to drive the Detroit News delivery truck in The City. I think he was attacked twice.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, bursting with genuine enthusiasm and unbridled perkiness! at October 11, 2015 10:19 AM (jR7Wy)

97 Capitalism means exploitation and misery, and the only way to get rich is by luck.
Posted by: boulder terlit hobo at October 11, 2015 10:12 AM (aLXXe)


I've heard Obama articulate this view pretty specifically.

Posted by: OregonMuse at October 11, 2015 10:20 AM (XXDSi)

98 "Shoggoth of the Baskervilles"- by Kareem Abdul Al-Hazred

Posted by: Caitlyn Jenner at October 11, 2015 10:20 AM (oZxN4)

99 Click my name for proof positive that NO LEVEL of douchebaggery can't have a credulous Amen Chorus.

Posted by: Retard Strength at October 11, 2015 10:20 AM (ENfFB)

100 "Bohunk." Damn. There's one you don't hear much any more. I think Mike Nomad was a bohunk.

Detroit, another "The City"? Never ever heard it called that, way way Down River here. Now, "That City," you heard that a lot.

Posted by: Stringer Davis at October 11, 2015 10:21 AM (xq1UY)

101 >>Stephanie Meyer doesn't have to worry if her new book tanks. The first lousy book and movie made her so wealthy she'll never have to write another book again.

Kinda like JK Rowlings still milking the Harry Potter series.

I saw part of the HBO series based on her first non-HP book, "The Casual Vacancy" and I wanted to slit my wrists. Just depressing, Lefty everybody-is-corrupt hypocrites, life is futile stiff. Ugh!

Posted by: Lizzy at October 11, 2015 10:22 AM (NOIQH)

102 I filled in for a buddy doing the door to door collecting for Grit. The homes were spread out randomly over a huge contiguous group of tract home developments.

Half the people were not there when you knocked on the door, and some of those who were home asked you to "Come back later." I spent the better part of a weekend doing it and I think I made about 40 cents.

40 cents was no small amount for a 10 year old back then but even then I realized there had to be easier ways to make some extra money. I recall you could pick up say, about 50 cents for mowing the yard and trimming at one of these tract homes on small lots, and probably about the same for snow shoveling.

Posted by: RM at October 11, 2015 10:22 AM (Sj3r3)

103 And as to Kareem , I would not put so much emphasis on the academics at UCLA but on the foundation he acquired at Power Memorial , one of those old line Catholic / Christian Bros institutions where you flew straight or else . My dad and my uncles all went to the equivalent in Cincy , St X , the Jesuit variety and as all know far far superior to Brothers regime . I myself had to make do with the Benedictine model for which I have received decades of' not bad but not Jesuits' . And BTW for the unwashed ( and as anyone who read Joyce's PortraiT ) , the hierarchy is CB ,Benies , and Jevies

Posted by: jay hoenemeyer at October 11, 2015 10:22 AM (uvj0z)

104 * Margaret Atwood, "The Handmaid's Tale". Because deep down, Christian conservatives want to be Iran. Also vagina.
Posted by: boulder terlit hobo at October 11, 2015 10:17 AM (aLXXe)


The list was limited to non-fiction.

But that's a good summary of Atwood's novel. They made a crappy movie out of it, too.

Posted by: OregonMuse at October 11, 2015 10:22 AM (XXDSi)

105 Last fall, the weirdos in Ferguson dressed as "newsies" and passed out some stupid sheet of paper. They looked ridiculous. Performance art I guess. Blacks would do that shit so it was just the fat white chicks and the one gay guy. They really thought they were hot shit. And then there as the pumpkin smashing in front of the police station. When they were arrested for it people were outraged!!!!11!!! Fine, you clean that shit up before someone slips and falls.

Posted by: Bruce With a Wang! at October 11, 2015 10:23 AM (iQIUe)

106 >>* Margaret Atwood, "The Handmaid's Tale". Because deep down, Christian conservatives want to be Iran. Also vagina.


Oh, YES! SO, so bad and feminists really believe this is the secret plan of white, Christian men everywhere!

Posted by: Lizzy at October 11, 2015 10:24 AM (NOIQH)

107 Old Sailor Poet's third Amy Lynn novel is now out in book format. Kindle conversion is still happening.

The Lady of Castle Dunn.
http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1516922255

And ChemJeff thanks again, hope you enjoy the story.

Posted by: Anna Puma at October 11, 2015 10:26 AM (I6UVN)

108 I forgot:
* Margaret Atwood, "The Handmaid's Tale". Because deep down, Christian conservatives want to be Iran. Also vagina.
Posted by: boulder terlit hobo at October 11, 2015 10:17 AM (aLXXe)
___________

When I go to the library, I have to find Sherri Tepper's earlier books. She was a Planned Parenthood director somewhere and her books had some powerful scenes of the black bags (women) following their theological leaders to the spaceships.

Atwood and Tepper did not talk about the ambiguity of their writing and I think they are dismissed too readily as fymynyst nuts because of their personal opinions. Their writing does not really reflect that.

Posted by: mustbequantum at October 11, 2015 10:28 AM (MIKMs)

109 I'm going to suggest some bad-idea books in the
fantasy/science-fiction genre, books which inspired young people to take
bad turns in life -



Posted by: boulder terlit hobo


And then there is also the great SF Classic, "Childhood's End", where the Earth and most of its people are annihilated, and the children are subsumed into some great galactic hive mind.

There is always something to be hopeful about, isn't there?

Posted by: Bossy Conservative...a rube in America at October 11, 2015 10:28 AM (+1T7c)

110 Detroit, another "The City"? Never ever heard it called that, way way Down River here. Now, "That City," you heard that a lot.
Posted by: Stringer Davis at October 11, 2015 10:21 AM (xq1UY)
---
We lived in the sticks, so Going Into Town meant going to the small suburban town (now city). Going to The City meant Detroit.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, bursting with genuine enthusiasm and unbridled perkiness! at October 11, 2015 10:28 AM (jR7Wy)

111 Anyone ever check out book tv? Often see author interview interesting


Posted by: Skip at October 11, 2015 08:51 AM


Watched (at least some of) it every weekend until local cable dropped CSPAN-2. Always worthwhile and entertaining.

Posted by: Mickey and Sylvia at October 11, 2015 10:29 AM (QP2lF)

112 *reads All Hail Eris' tag line*

Who gave her a quadruple shot of Espresso?

Posted by: Anna Puma at October 11, 2015 10:30 AM (I6UVN)

113 OM, Did you get the Chess course from Great Courses? If so, what did you think? I'm through the first five lessons but will go back over them before proceeding. There is a LOT of material in each lecture, especially for a beginner and it will take at least several iterations to grasp it all. The books that come with the DVDs are helpful but only to reinforce the lectures.

Posted by: JTB at October 11, 2015 10:31 AM (FvdPb)

114 Years ago I started reading a book of short stories by Atwood. The first one was about troubled relationship with a frenemy, and ended with her taking her extracted ovarian cyst, dusting it with powdered sugar, and delivering to said frenemy as a b-day gift.
Craaaaazy!

Posted by: Lizzy at October 11, 2015 10:32 AM (NOIQH)

115 I actually read "The Handmaid's Tale" back in the 80s. I probably still have it around here somewhere.

Posted by: rickl at October 11, 2015 10:33 AM (sdi6R)

116 Wasn't Grit the company from "Fall and Rise of Reginald Perrin"?

Posted by: Caitlyn Jenner at October 11, 2015 10:34 AM (oZxN4)

117 Hi Anna! *waves, sloshes coffee*

How goes the next installment?

Posted by: All Hail Eris, bursting with genuine enthusiasm and unbridled perkiness! at October 11, 2015 10:35 AM (jR7Wy)

118 The Grit..

Another fine slice of americana originating in Williamsport PA. Along with little baseball world series and the lycoming engine.

Posted by: Phil at October 11, 2015 10:36 AM (39FGM)

119 Never liked Boys Life. Loved reading about WWII though. It was still fresh in everyone's minds back in the late 50's.

Posted by: Soona at October 11, 2015 10:37 AM (Fmupd)

120 36. Agree, Princess Bride was unreadable. One of those rare examples where (unlike The Martian ) the screenplay transformation is much better than the book.

Posted by: Edmund Burke's Shade at October 11, 2015 10:41 AM (cmBvC)

121 I had shrimp and grits in Charleston a few weeks ago. They kind of tasted like soggy paper pulp. Maybe it was shrimp and Grit.

Posted by: Caitlyn Jenner at October 11, 2015 10:41 AM (oZxN4)

122 116 Wasn't Grit the company from "Fall and Rise of Reginald Perrin"?

Posted by: Caitlyn Jenner at October 11, 2015 10:34 AM (oZxN4)


No, that was Grot.

Posted by: OregonMuse at October 11, 2015 10:42 AM (XXDSi)

123 119 Never liked Boys Life.

---

You too? Join the club.

Posted by: Caitlyn Jenner at October 11, 2015 10:43 AM (oZxN4)

124 I read a few William Goldman novels back in my yute, and one I can recommend is was Soldier in the Rain. It was made into a movie, also worth doing, that starred Jackie Gleason and Steve McQueen.

Posted by: Mickey and Sylvia at October 11, 2015 10:44 AM (QP2lF)

125 Started reading "Overcoming Sinful Anger" this morning. I blame the need for this ENTIRELY on Microsoft.

I'm still slowing reading "The Africans" by David Lamb, a reporter. It was published in 1982 and makes me terribly pessimistic about the entire continent, and this was before the Muslims decided to make it even more of a living hell.

I started "Flashback" by Dan Simmins based on everyone's recommendations here, and there will be hell to pay if it's as disappointing as the last (only other) book of his I read. I'll probably look at this page over the tops of my glasses, frowning. You really don't want that to happen.

And if I don't get a move on right now, I am going to be perfectly awful in choir this morning. Later, gators.

Posted by: Tonestaple at October 11, 2015 10:45 AM (dCTrv)

126 Grew up 30 miles outside of New Orleans, always wondered why someone would want to read a magazine about grits.

Posted by: Edmund Burke's Shade at October 11, 2015 10:45 AM (cmBvC)

127 >>>No, that was Grot.
Posted by: OregonMuse

---

Being an ass on a lazy Sunday. Sorry.

Posted by: Caitlyn Jenner at October 11, 2015 10:46 AM (oZxN4)

128 I used to read SF voraciously. Some time ago. I never got to Riverworld though the guys I knew raved about it.

Not all that long ago picked it up at the library. Riverworld was old and created a fantastic milieu for stories. And then Farmer just went nuts or something. It was a real letdown after the first book.

Posted by: blaster at October 11, 2015 10:46 AM (2Ocf1)

129 "I think someone needs to round up every old issue they can find and scan them all in as .pdf documents."
~~~
I nominate: OregonMuse

Posted by: socalcon at October 11, 2015 10:47 AM (vHlQ5)

130 Both stories are cooking away. Still wondering if the Flavian Amphitheater will still be standing by the end of the Rome story, sure the nuns don't have explosives I know.

Since some expressed no desire to donate via GoFundMe, investigated other other crowd funding sites. Kickstarter is that all or nothing gig. Looked at that 'conservative' one pushed but it seems too new and sketchy, would hate to see friends get bilked. Tim linked one called RocketHub.

RocketHub looks cool since it is like GoFundMe and has ties to Arts + Entertainment. That is a nifty carrot. There does not seem to be much traffic. But I found it hard to navigate to find books.

And when I do find the books, there is this turd in the punch bowl that comes close to checking every Soviet Justice Wanker check-box to get a Hugo. And the writer raised $1,800.

http://preview.tinyurl.com/oxr4sbb

Still not sure where the title comes into play. Athena Rising? Unless we are talking the birth of Athena where she gave Zeus a headache.

Posted by: Anna Puma at October 11, 2015 10:48 AM (I6UVN)

131 126
Grew up 30 miles outside of New Orleans, always wondered why someone would want to read a magazine about grits.

Posted by: Edmund Burke's Shade at October 11, 2015 10:45 AM (cmBvC)

They fascinate Yankees.

Posted by: Nip Sip at October 11, 2015 10:50 AM (jJRIy)

132 I really like both The Princess Bride book and movie. Have to admit to muttering "It was *sharks*!" though.

Posted by: Polliwog the 'Ette at October 11, 2015 10:51 AM (GDulk)

133 The late Andrew Breitbart'sfather-in-law, Orson Bean, was into Reichian thought for awhile. "Me and the Orgone" was the name of the book -1971.

Posted by: mbabbitt at October 11, 2015 10:51 AM (6VS4X)

134 85 As to comics , how could you or anyone forget " Sgt. Rock and Easy Company ' ??

Ah yes.
Also Sgt. Fury and his Howling Commandos.

Posted by: drowningpuppies at October 11, 2015 10:51 AM (FTYF8)

135 omg, Anna, "Athena Rising" looks awful. Mary Sue with the minority sidekick. As for "finding love" at the end I bet it's with the sidekick.

Please tell me that it's a joke, like Spinrad's "Iron Dream".

Posted by: boulder terlit hobo at October 11, 2015 10:53 AM (aLXXe)

136 Whoops. Wrong day. 21st. The 21st.

Posted by: Doc Emmett Brown at October 11, 2015 10:55 AM (qjyQp)

137
Today I recommend the author William Martin.

He's a Boston writer who writes fictional. Martin is also a Boston historian, so his books are loaded with interesting historical facts.

Back Bay is a fun read. Kind of a mystery-thriller that spans two centuries.

Posted by: Soothsayer's Home For Imaginary Friends at October 11, 2015 10:55 AM (6YhNm)

138 Someone could troll that author hard about cultural appropriation, and treating First Nations cultures as wank-off material for First World head-tilters . . .

Posted by: boulder terlit hobo at October 11, 2015 10:56 AM (aLXXe)

139 113 OM, Did you get the Chess course from Great Courses? If so, what did you think? I'm through the first five lessons but will go back over them before proceeding. There is a LOT of material in each lecture, especially for a beginner and it will take at least several iterations to grasp it all. The books that come with the DVDs are helpful but only to reinforce the lectures.
Posted by: JTB at October 11, 2015 10:31 AM (FvdPb)


Yes, and while I was waiting for it to arrive, I watched the first 2 lessons online. As I may have already told you, I will be going through these lessons with a friend of mine who doesn't necessarily want to play chess, but rather is intrigued by chess reasoning and wants to learn more about it. Her schedule is not regular, and we haven't had a chance to start yet. And when we do, we'll be going VERY slowly, as you noticed, there's a LOT of material in each lesson, there will be lots of repetitions and questions which hopefully I'll be able to answer, and we'll have a board set up if we need it.

So I'm looking forward to it.

Posted by: OregonMuse at October 11, 2015 10:59 AM (XXDSi)

140 Anna, I've enjoyed OSP's Amy Lynn novels and I was wondering why the third is coming out first in dead trees format. Isn't it easier to issue in Kindle format?

Posted by: All Hail Eris, bursting with genuine enthusiasm and unbridled perkiness! at October 11, 2015 11:01 AM (jR7Wy)

141 Second the William Martin suggestion. Wife has read all of the Cape/Boston ones, I think I've missed one or two. I'll have to check a list. Back Bay was great.

Posted by: Lincolntf at October 11, 2015 11:02 AM (2cS/G)

142 I've actually read the "Grit" newspaper. My Grandma who lived in a small rural town in Appalachia used to subscribe.

A bottled Coke (in the thick green bottles); a peanut butter sandwich and a Git newspaper were how rainy days were spent.

Those were the days.

Posted by: The Walking dude at October 11, 2015 11:04 AM (lr0ot)

143 122
No, that was Grot.

I am Groot.

Posted by: I am Groot at October 11, 2015 11:04 AM (o78gS)

144 Finished and reviewed Running: A Long Distance Love Affair. Finished Children of the Lens by Doc Smith. Good to read some fiction with good vs. evil minus modern 'nuance.'

Preparation done for a trip to Kenya, so I have time and attention to tackle Bonhoeffer by Metaxas. I don't expect that to be a quick read.

This afternoon, I'll start a purge on the book shelves, getting rid of everything that I don't need/want. Might be able to get the remainder off the floor and onto shelves. Maybe even organized so I can actually find something when I go looking.

Posted by: Long Running Fool at October 11, 2015 11:04 AM (AVRWt)

145 Harvard Yard is the Martin novel I haven't read, but intend to.

Posted by: Lincolntf at October 11, 2015 11:05 AM (2cS/G)

146 Best thing about the Grit ad: "Are You a Boy?"

Different times, man. Different times.

Posted by: WhatWhatWhat? at October 11, 2015 11:05 AM (HMt16)

147 I mentioned last week that I was going to start reading some classic children's books. Thank for all of the recommendations by the way. I've been reading the Winnie-the-Pooh stories. They are beyond charming, as are the original illustrations. To my surprise, even shock, I am completely absorbed while reading them and able to forget the news and events that have me living at a near boil most of the time. That's a treasure to be savored.

Posted by: JTB at October 11, 2015 11:06 AM (FvdPb)

148 All Hail Eris, the dead tree version could be out first for a simple reason. He used CreateSpace. And as I experienced putting together the book version of Golden Isis, once you have the book version formatted properly and ready to sell they will ask if you want to convert the book to Kindle format. That is where the production lag might be happening. Silly me, I did it backwards with Kindle and then book version.

Posted by: Anna Puma at October 11, 2015 11:08 AM (I6UVN)

149 What is a grit?

Posted by: Weasel at October 11, 2015 11:08 AM (e3bId)

150 130
And when I
do find the books, there is this turd in the punch bowl that comes
close to checking every Soviet Justice Wanker check-box to get a Hugo.
And the writer raised $1,800.


Global warming causes underwater earthquakes?

Posted by: Anachronda at October 11, 2015 11:08 AM (o78gS)

151 Anne Perry mysteries.

Follows a male Metro detective and his upper class born wife as they solve crimes. Sometimes together and sometimes apart.

Nick and Nora without the dog but with Hansom cabs and bustles.

She did two separate but equal series one with the wife being from the upper class and marrying down and one with the wife being a suffragette nurse during the Crimean war come home to all the sexist male crap.

Surprisingly done subtly enough that even my misandry and SJW alarms don't go off very loudly of often.

And she's written rather contemporaneously too.

I thought she did a Vampire Series which is why I hadn't read her before.

I'm working my way through my local library. I search for series so as to engage my time for longer periods than just book by book. It passes the time.

Posted by: Bitter Clinger and All That at October 11, 2015 11:10 AM (Xo1Rt)

152 Might be able to get the remainder off the floor and onto shelves. Maybe even organized so I can actually find something when I go looking.
Posted by: Long Running Fool at October 11, 2015 11:04 AM (AVRWt)
__________

My explanation/excuse for the stacks on the floor is 'winter insulation' -- a totally believable excuse in No Illinois.

Posted by: mustbequantum at October 11, 2015 11:11 AM (MIKMs)

153 I never sold Grid, but I did sell greeting cards to our neighbors, who -- in retrospect -- were amazingly kind to buy anything from me. Also, I was supposed to sell chocolate bars to raise funds for my Little League team, but my parents ended up buying most of them. In short, it was apparent to me at an early age that sales was not the right career for me. (This was all back in the early 1960s.)

I would much rather spend my time reading the World Book Encyclopedia and the Time-Life Science and Nature book series. And comics. And anything else I could get my hands on; the first novel I ever read was a Heinlein 'juvenile' in 3rd grade, and I became a voracious SF/F reader after that. I was a geek in embryo.

Posted by: Fritzworth at October 11, 2015 11:12 AM (B92Ag)

154 Posted by: Muldoon at October 11, 2015 09:12 AM (NeFrd)


I'm sorry, but I read that as "Accidental Herpes."

Posted by: CharlieBrown'sDildo at October 11, 2015 11:13 AM (Zu3d9)

155 BTH, troll away.

Anachronda, science has never been their strong suit.

Posted by: Anna Puma at October 11, 2015 11:13 AM (I6UVN)

156
William Martin has been on the Howie Carr show a couple of times.

Posted by: Soothsayer's Home For Imaginary Friends at October 11, 2015 11:13 AM (6YhNm)

157 Wasn't Grit the company from "Fall and Rise of Reginald Perrin"?

Amazingly enough, I was watching that last week.

It's a frozen dessert company. Sunshine Desserts.

Posted by: Roger Murdock at October 11, 2015 11:14 AM (oVJmc)

158 146 Best thing about the Grit ad: "Are You a Boy?"

Different times, man. Different times.
Posted by: WhatWhatWhat? at October 11, 2015 11:05 AM (HMt16)
---
Also, because it was a Yes/No answer.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, bursting with genuine enthusiasm and unbridled perkiness! at October 11, 2015 11:16 AM (jR7Wy)

159 Posted by: Anna Puma at October 11, 2015 11:08 AM (I6UVN)

I have a file of about 50 of my favorite poems:
"Dildo's Anthology of Great Poetry."

Anyway, I tried formatting it and sending it to my Kindle, but it isn't nearly as effortless as one would think.

I can't imagine doing it for an entire book. Or maybe I am just a <Bostonaccent> retaaad </Bostonaccent>

Posted by: CharlieBrown'sDildo at October 11, 2015 11:17 AM (Zu3d9)

160 Listened to the audio book of Dowager Empress Xixci (not sure of name spelling, but I already returned the book). It really helped "place" things like the Boxer Rebellion that I had never officially learned about. From the symptoms, I wonder if she had been poisoning here nephew with arsenic long before the fatal dose.

Posted by: Polliwog the 'Ette at October 11, 2015 11:17 AM (GDulk)

161 The Weapon Shops of Isher. by A.E. Van Vogt.

If you want to teach your miniature morons what access to self defense could mean to the future, while being entertained, let them read this.

He did 2 or 3 of them and you can still get the compilation at Amazon.

They were written in the early fifties so they're a bit dated in some ways but still a good story and the point of gun control and government always tending towards repression that has to be balanced in some way.

Posted by: Bitter Clinger and All That at October 11, 2015 11:18 AM (Xo1Rt)

162 147 I mentioned last week that I was going to start reading some classic children's books. Thank for all of the recommendations by the way. I've been reading the Winnie-the-Pooh stories.

Posted by: JTB at October 11, 2015 11:06 AM (FvdPb)


Did someone recommend 'The Wind in the Willows' by Kenneth Grahame? If not, let me be the first. C.S. Lewis has written that he greatly admired Grahame's descriptions of the inside of the homes of the various animal characters (Mr. Badger in particular, if I recall correctly), and did his own imitation in The Lion, The Witch, and The Wardrobe.

Posted by: OregonMuse at October 11, 2015 11:19 AM (XXDSi)

163
All Hail Eris, Pixels was pretty damn good. I think you'll like it.

Sean Bean is in it, too.

Posted by: Soothsayer's Home For Imaginary Friends at October 11, 2015 11:19 AM (6YhNm)

164 I'm sorry, but I read that as "Accidental Herpes."


Posted by: CharlieBrown'sDildo at October 11, 2015 11:13 AM (Zu3d9)


*****


Oddly enough that might attract more readers than the original.

Posted by: Muldoon at October 11, 2015 11:20 AM (NeFrd)

165 And Yes, Yes I did look like that.

Glasses, checked shirt, buzz cut hair and stupid grin.

Posted by: Bitter Clinger and All That at October 11, 2015 11:21 AM (Xo1Rt)

166 It's a frozen dessert company. Sunshine Desserts.

Posted by: Roger Murdock at October 11, 2015 11:14 AM (oVJmc)


That was the company Perrin worked for at the beginning of the series. Later on, he started his own company, Grot.

And are you watching the original 70s version with the incomparable Leonard Rossiter (R.I.P.) or the inferior reboot?

Posted by: OregonMuse at October 11, 2015 11:22 AM (XXDSi)

167 And Kindle editions of 'The Wind In The Willows' can be had for as low as 99 cents.

Posted by: OregonMuse at October 11, 2015 11:24 AM (XXDSi)

168 I sold Grit, and I vaguely recall it returning a decent amount of spending money for my age. I recall trying very hard to imaging it as an important paper, as being a model of what a newspaper should be like.

Posted by: TrumpForte at October 11, 2015 11:24 AM (6mmmz)

169 Greetings:

Sorry but the acclimation of Mr. Abdul-Jabbar, a prominent member of a supremacist cult and not noted reader of the Koran, that fount of hate strikes ,me as misplaced in this day and age.

Posted by: 11B40 at October 11, 2015 11:27 AM (abx5/)

170 Polliwog : Ci Xi

Posted by: boulder terlit hobo at October 11, 2015 11:33 AM (aLXXe)

171 The "Wind in the Willows" version illustrated by Michael Hague is a personal favorite, but the original illustrations have their charm. Can't recommend this book enough. There was another modern author who took up the mantle and did a good job I think continuing the adventures.

Like Lewis, he has a sense of what it's like to be a small creature in nature -- lazily drifting downstream you can smell the muck in the river banks, hear the breezes rustle through the rushes and the buzzing of bees in the lilacs. It's like an endless summer from childhood.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, bursting with genuine enthusiasm and unbridled perkiness! at October 11, 2015 11:34 AM (jR7Wy)

172 Good lust, but I cannot understand how Rachel Carson's Silent Spring only gets a mention under John Maynard Keynes, The General Theory of Employment, Interest, and Money (1936). She deserves a spot on the list because of the millions who have died thanks to her fraudulent work.

As for reading, I've been so busy lately, but I managed to finish Childhood's End and I have to say I was disappointed. The story didn't go anywhere. It just ended.

Currently reading Dome City Blues based on the recommendation here and I'm sitting at B&N right now reading Brandon Sanderson's new Mistborn nobel, Shadows of Self. I'd normally buy it, but I'm on a strike of ToR till they deal with the SJW's running too much of their business. It's too bad, I've bought many of Sanderson's works and feel he's one of the best fiction writers out there.

Posted by: NJRob at October 11, 2015 11:36 AM (IV4gM)

173 162 ... Wind in the Willows is one of the books I picked up recently, a good hard cover version from a 'Friends of the Library' sale. It's the annotated edition. Also got copies of Alice in Wonderland, Peter Pan, and the compete Narnia series. (These sales are always dangerous but seldom so productive for me.) With these and the Tolkien stories he wrote for his kids, like "Roverandum", I should be covered for a while. And with the news these days, the distraction they offer will be welcome and necessary.

Posted by: JTB at October 11, 2015 11:38 AM (FvdPb)

174 161 Bitter Clinger and All That

Van Vogt was an interesting writer. 'The World of Null-A', with an explicit statement of Alfred Korzybski's General Semantics, puts it its emphasis on the nature of our ingrained training determining our response cycles. The same concepts were used by Senator Hayakawa, though with completely the opposite intention and affect.

Another worthy read of his is 'The Violent Man'. You'll have to put up with 'racist' language like Chi-com, but tough through it. The man clearly knew his own mind.

His writing was never elegant but he did a nice job of conveying ideas that have stuck with me across four decades.

Posted by: Long Running Fool at October 11, 2015 11:42 AM (AVRWt)

175 Kareem is a notorious douche, though. Some LA sports guy, I forget whether broadcast or print, once said, "No man is an island, but Kareem comes pretty darn close."

Posted by: Oschisms at October 11, 2015 11:43 AM (ZsN9X)

176 TrumpForte....I also sold Grit back in the mid sixties (Missouri). I never had a customer that would not pay. I sold them for 3 years. Used some of the money to play pin ball....would rack up lots of games and then sell the games off to whomever wanted to play. My introduction to investment....

Posted by: Budahmon at October 11, 2015 11:46 AM (vcSri)

177
Anybody catch The Last Kingdom last nite? It's a BBC series based on books by Bernard Cornwell's Saxon Stories. Very The Vikings and therefore, very brutal. I believe there was some controversy over the BBC going so battle-axy. Deals a lot with conversion to Christianity, too.

Anyway, there are two episodes aired which can be found on the 'tubes:

https://goo.gl/x2MEJs

Posted by: Bruce With a Wang! at October 11, 2015 11:49 AM (iQIUe)

178 Budahmon that was also my experience in rural downstate Illinois, I recall appreciative customers. They seemed to like the paper, and I enjoyed reading it.

Posted by: TrumpForte at October 11, 2015 11:52 AM (6mmmz)

179 Last week some moron mentioned the Chet and Bernie stories. I read the first two this week and quite liked them. The mysteries aren't great but what makes the books is the relationship between Chet the dog and Bernie the P.I. and also Chet's stream of consciousness narration not quite understanding all he sees. These are great light books to read for enjoyment.

Posted by: The Great White Snark at October 11, 2015 11:54 AM (Nwg0u)

180 Posted by: boulder terlit hobo at October 11, 2015 10:17 AM (aLXXe)

It's funny to read user reviews by feminists on Goodreads that rave over it, read it every year and think it could happen in the U.S. at any time.

Listened to The Pickwick Papers by Dickens which I'd read many years ago. A comic, heart-felt masterpiece with great characters, as good as anything else he wrote.

Read The Mirror Of The Sea by Joseph Conrad, A series of autobiographical essays by Conrad, focusing on his life as a sailor and his fascination with the sea and ships. Beautifully written as always though my interest in the topics varied. Less involving than reading one of his stories, more for completionists.

Posted by: waelse1 at October 11, 2015 11:55 AM (CAWSd)

181 After 25 years buying zero comic books, I've bought 5 in the last few weeks. Just because there's a comic shop in a plaza where I often run errands. Mainly 2 or 4 dollar copies of covers I recognize from childhood. One is Sgt Fury and The Howling Commandos Issue 132. I remember that one like it was yesterday, the cover I mean. Seared.... seared, in my memory. Attempt at link to pic of cover in nic.

Posted by: Lincolntf at October 11, 2015 11:55 AM (2cS/G)

182 Bernard Cornwell's Waterloo is my newest audio book. Haven't gotten far yet, but there's already been stuff I hasn't known about.

Posted by: Polliwog the 'Ette at October 11, 2015 11:56 AM (GDulk)

183 175 Kareem is a notorious douche, though. Some LA sports guy, I forget whether broadcast or print, once said, "No man is an island, but Kareem comes pretty darn close."

Posted by: Oschisms at October 11, 2015 11:43 AM (ZsN9X)


Ha! That's a great quote.

Surprisingly, Kareem's wiki entry contains snippets from his interviews where he basically admits his douchebagginess and how it's hard for him to get coaching jobs because of it.

So, he's not a clueless douchebag. He's a self-aware douchebag. I guess that's better.

Posted by: OregonMuse at October 11, 2015 11:56 AM (XXDSi)

184 Next up for Steph Meyers: gay

Unlikely, she's Mormon. Although if pressures keep up I expect to see the church get another prophetic revelation that says homosexuality is perfectly fine. Parts of the Presbyterian and Anglican/Episcopalian church have already done so, why not Mormons?

Anybody catch The Last Kingdom last nite?

No, I saw ads and the guy playing Uhtred is too Leglolas. Everyone is way too pretty but that's typical of these sort of historical dramas (see the Tudors). I still want to see it but not great casting.

Posted by: Christopher Taylor at October 11, 2015 11:57 AM (39g3+)

185 Yeah Kareem is a jackwagon and a fool, but his books might be tolerable. I'm not exactly going to attempt to find any to read though. Too many books out there from people I like or care for to go find books from someone that hates me.

Posted by: Christopher Taylor at October 11, 2015 12:00 PM (39g3+)

186 Read The Autobiography of James T. Kirk by the greatest Starfleet captain of all with editing by David A. Goodman. A fun fun book. Definitely for fans of the original series and of Kirk. Fills in some gaps in some of the adventures of Kirk and his crew. A great non serious book that is well worth the read.

Posted by: RGallegos at October 11, 2015 12:01 PM (49Jfq)

187 So, he's not a clueless douchebag. He's a self-aware douchebag. I guess that's better.
Posted by: OregonMuse at October 11, 2015 11:56 AM (XXDSi)
---
Stealing this.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, self-aware douchebag at October 11, 2015 12:02 PM (jR7Wy)

188 Anybody catch The Last Kingdom last nite?

Posted by: Bruce With a Wang! at October 11, 2015 11:49 AM (iQIUe)

No, I didn't, but thanks mucho for the tip. I'm downloading the two aired episodes right now.

Posted by: OregonMuse at October 11, 2015 12:03 PM (XXDSi)

189 In the spirit of Denali and Barry Soetoro, I will second the motion of Lew Alcindor being a complete waste of time.

Posted by: GBruno at October 11, 2015 12:03 PM (u49WF)

190 Selling Grit was my first-ever "job". I sold the papers throughout my junior high years until my freshman year in high school. I only quit because my family was moving to another state.

In three years' time, my route covered three towns. My copies of the newspaper arrived each Wednesday in the mail. I'd go to one little town on Thursday, the second little town on Friday, and to the third (the county seat, a whopping 5,000 people) on Saturday mornings. I was making around 30 bucks a week profit, and in that time, that was a pretty good sum of money to have.

At that time, the tabloid was just as the publisher's goals described. I remember Paul Harvey's column was featured at that time, and many of the comics WeirdDave mentioned were still being ran.

Running that paper route taught me lessons about salesmanship, perseverance, and setting goals for yourself.

Posted by: Captain Whitebread at October 11, 2015 12:05 PM (rJUlF)

191 Recently I read Astoria, a book by Stark about the ill-fated attempt to build a West Coast republic by John Jacob Astor and Thomas Jefferson. All that remains of the attempt is the town of Astoria, Oregon, but the dream was huge. Tons of historical information I never knew about, including who found a better path through the Rockies (Lewis & Clark took almost the worst possible passage).

Astor ended up the richest man on earth, the first true industrialist billionaire in America. He was worth 1% of the entire nation's economy, over $20 billion of today's dollars.

Posted by: Christopher Taylor at October 11, 2015 12:08 PM (39g3+)

192 Posted by: waelse1 at October 11, 2015 11:55 AM (CAWSd)

Pickwick Papers is great!

I have never read The Mirror of The Sea, but just grabbed it on Kindle. Thanks!

By the way, both are free......

Posted by: CharlieBrown'sDildo at October 11, 2015 12:10 PM (Zu3d9)

193 Oh, and to whoever suggested "Blind Man's Bluff", thank you! I just completed the chapter on Benitez' reluctant decision to abandon the Cochino and transfer survivors to the Tusk after horrible fires broke out in the sub. All this while undertaking a top secret mission in the Barents Sea during horrible sea conditions.

The book reads like a thriller, very fast-paced.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, self-aware douchebag at October 11, 2015 12:11 PM (jR7Wy)

194 Grandmother used to get the Grit until the early 80's(?). I remember reading through it and I even tried selling it. I assume it was a bigger thing in MO where my grandmother was originally from but when I tried to sell subscriptions people had no idea what it was in MT.

Posted by: RS at October 11, 2015 12:16 PM (ThW3U)

195 I have a bit of a moral dilemma right now. I'm reading a book written by an acquaintance, a sci fi/fantasy mix of world-hopping heroes. I like the guy, and he's got talent but the book isn't very well written. It drags a bit because he spends an exorbitant amount of time telling rather than showing. For example, the scene of the fantasy world character eating a burger and fries in Portland Oregon was a full page of description and explanation. And people don't behave very plausibly, everyone is too trusting and accepting, and entirely too helpful and friendly.

Further, the story just isn't very engaging. I don't care. Its too clinical and detached, too cerebral in its approach.

But I don't want to write a review like that. Not only do I want him to keep writing and get better, but the guy's life since he wrote it in 2007 has been one continuous kick in the nuts. His wife died. He lost his job and home. His health has decayed. He's living in the YMCA and has to beg for help from friends just to buy a bus pass. I feel badly for the guy and don't want to take a crap all over his book in a review.

But at the same time I want the review to be honest and helpful to readers, and to push him in the right direction.

Posted by: Christopher Taylor at October 11, 2015 12:18 PM (39g3+)

196 Abdul-Jabar mentioned his favorite books as a kid so I'll mention mine. I loved The Secret Sea by Robb White. I then read a bunch of other Robb White books and that started a lifetime of reading. Too bad Robb White books aren't in print anymore.

Posted by: The Great White Snark at October 11, 2015 12:19 PM (Nwg0u)

197 Kareem's a smart dude, but wasn't a good father to his son out-of-wedlock.

Posted by: stace at October 11, 2015 12:22 PM (CoX6k)

198 There was a girl in our neighborhood named Molly who sold them and my father bought one every week! I think he liked the name of the magazine and everything he stood for. I was pretty young, so don't recall anything specific about it, but I'm sure i read it as well.

Posted by: Auntie Doodles at October 11, 2015 12:27 PM (+kW7A)

199 No, I didn't, but thanks mucho for the tip. I'm downloading the two aired episodes right now.
Posted by: OregonMuse at October 11, 2015 12:03 PM (XXDSi)

==========
So you're familiar with it? I feel asleep watching it but it was very late. So, I will try again. Got top ratings and the book are suppose to be very popular, too.

Posted by: Bruce With a Wang! at October 11, 2015 12:28 PM (iQIUe)

200 Atwood and Tepper did not talk about the ambiguity of their writing and I think they are dismissed too readily as fymynyst nuts because of their personal opinions. Their writing does not really reflect that.

Posted by: mustbequantum at October 11, 2015 10:28 AM (MIKMs)


Here in Canada, Margaret Atwood is well-known as a Progressive twat of the first order.

Posted by: Alberta Oil Peon at October 11, 2015 12:34 PM (0yhH4)

201 Posted by: Alberta Oil Peon at October 11, 2015 12:34 PM (0yhH4)

I read one of her books for a class. It was a long time ago, and I don't remember a thing about it except that it was agony.

Posted by: CharlieBrown'sDildo at October 11, 2015 12:37 PM (Zu3d9)

202 I see that Aldous Huxley's The Doors of Perception is on the 50 worst list. That book was the inspiration for the name of The Doors rock group. And Jim Morrison died at age 27.

Posted by: The Great White Snark at October 11, 2015 12:37 PM (Nwg0u)

203 But at the same time I want the review to be honest and helpful to readers, and to push him in the right direction.

Posted by: Christopher Taylor at October 11, 2015 12:18 PM (39g3+)


*****


That is a definite dilemma. Are you close enough friends that you can discuss your critique in person rather than in a public venue? If not, maybe not writing a review at all would be the best course.

Posted by: Muldoon at October 11, 2015 12:39 PM (NeFrd)

204
Posted by: Christopher Taylor at October 11, 2015 12:18 PM (39g3+)

***

Also, do you get the sense that he is writing because he likes telling a story, or is he writing because he thinks he will be the next undiscovered SciFi best-selling author?

Posted by: Muldoon at October 11, 2015 12:41 PM (NeFrd)

205 'point, counterpoint' has to be on the worst 50 list.

Took me almost a dozen attempts before I finally have up on finishing it.

Posted by: Garrett at October 11, 2015 12:47 PM (KY5o1)

206 Mrs. Snark is watching Okra. A guy with a priest collar on just said being ghey is a gift from God. Big applause.

Posted by: The Great White Snark at October 11, 2015 12:49 PM (Nwg0u)

207 Posted by: Muldoon at October 11, 2015 12:39 PM (NeFrd)


I second that. Avoid the public review if at all possible

Posted by: HH at October 11, 2015 12:49 PM (DrCtv)

208 Everybody published author writes because they hope they'll sell. That's why you publish, not out of ego or to share your gift, but to make money selling books and God knows he can use the cash.

Posted by: Christopher Taylor at October 11, 2015 12:53 PM (39g3+)

209 Read The Autobiography of James T. Kirk by the greatest Starfleet captain of all with editing by David A. Goodman. A fun fun book. Definitely for fans of the original series and of Kirk. Fills in some gaps in some of the adventures of Kirk and his crew. A great non serious book that is well worth the read.

Posted by: RGallegos at October 11, 2015 12:01 PM (49Jfq)


Speaking of James T. Kirk, I was in the hotel and their TV had a ball game on CBC. They did a promo for an upcoming episode of their series, "Murdoch Mysteries" with William Shatner playing the role of Mark Twain. The series is about a clever police detective in Toronto, circa 1905. His lady friend is a medical examiner and dissects murder victims as required. Kind of interesting, in that some buildings like the police station, are lit by electric light, and others by gas or oil lamps. Automobiles are rarely seen in the street scenes.


With the Shat in it, it could be a fun episode.

Posted by: Alberta Oil Peon at October 11, 2015 12:54 PM (0yhH4)

210 I watched one of the Murdoch Mysteries and it was pretty bad. Had Tesla and a representative from Edison battling it out for the format of Electricity but it was all SCIENCEY! and STRONG WOMAN CHARACTER DEFIES HER CULTURE! and on and on. Very modern, very not the times aside from the decorations.

Posted by: Christopher Taylor at October 11, 2015 12:59 PM (39g3+)

211 Everybody published author writes because they hope they'll sell. That's why you publish, not out of ego or to share your gift, but to make money selling books...


****

I do not think this is true. I write because I like telling stories. I am fortunate I suppose in that I am not dependent on writing to make a living. If I sell a few copies, great. I am realistic enough about the prospects of fame and fortune via my writing.

I certainly see people who self-identify as "writers" or "authors" who really don't seem to be very good at it.

Posted by: Muldoon at October 11, 2015 01:01 PM (NeFrd)

212 My family hails from still - (very) rural east central Alabama, and Grit was the only real national news most of them got, at least the ones who could read. One of my uncles served in the south Pacific during WWII, like most of his family, he could neither read nor write. He had been gone for nearly three years when a neighbor brought over his latest edition of Grit, which had a picture of him and his artillery battery on New Guinea. My mother told me once that picture, and the fact that no one had received a telegram from the War Department, were the only two ways they knew he was still alive.

Uncle Bynum told me the story surrounding that picture not long before he died, how that battery was overrun in a Japanese attack the night after the picture was taken, and most of the artillerymen pictured were KIA.

Posted by: John the Baptist at October 11, 2015 01:01 PM (MPH+3)

213 I feel the need to defend Stephenie Meyer. If you hate her books, that's fine. Everyone has different tastes and even though I enjoyed them, I have issues with them and completely understand the problems many people have with the books.

That being said, Oregonmuse seems to be under the impression Meyer is some kind of Progressive. She's not. Not at all. She is a relatively conservative mormon. Her work is a check in the column for conservative popular art.

You misunderstand what she's saying, when you think she's saying men and women are interchangeable. And I give you that she is very guilty of verbal diarrhea both when she writes and speaks, so she is often inarticulate. What she simply meant was that next to the super powerful vampires in her stories, a boy would have been just as helpless as a girl. She didn't really mean that he would approach the whole thing the same way and she reflects that in the new book. Yes I'm reading it #noshame.

Anyhow, I just think it's a mistake to attack her for that. Attack away on her writing style and story content if you don't care for it, though. This is still a free country. Sort of.

Posted by: PBJ5959 at October 11, 2015 01:04 PM (r1du+)

214 Posted by: Christopher Taylor at October 11, 2015 12:53 PM (39g3+)


But you have to be honest. For him, and for yourself.

Posted by: HH at October 11, 2015 01:06 PM (DrCtv)

215 I watched one of the Murdoch Mysteries and it was pretty bad. Had Tesla and a representative from Edison battling it out for the format of Electricity but it was all SCIENCEY! and STRONG WOMAN CHARACTER DEFIES HER CULTURE! and on and on. Very modern, very not the times aside from the decorations.

Posted by: Christopher Taylor at October 11, 2015 12:59 PM (39g3+)


Yeah, the CBC's proggy bias will out. I did happen to see one episode mostly through, in which a prison doctor had taken to doing illicit lobotomies in the name of "progress". So there is at least some sense there that "progress" can progress too far.


Still, it would be fun to see the Shatner episode.

Posted by: Alberta Oil Peon at October 11, 2015 01:07 PM (0yhH4)

216 I do not think this is true. I write because I like telling stories.

People write because they want to tell stories and like to write. They publish because they want to sell.

Still, it would be fun to see the Shatner episode.

Yeah, maybe. But it was like a litany of red flags for me watching the show, I could hear the bell going off every time they ticked off a personal pet peeve of historical writing.

Posted by: Christopher Taylor at October 11, 2015 01:09 PM (39g3+)

217 But at the same time I want the review to be honest and helpful to readers, and to push him in the right direction.

Posted by: Christopher Taylor at October 11, 2015 12:18 PM (39g3+)


Maybe you should tell your friend that you wanted to enjoy his book, and would have done so, but for lack of an editor. Try to give him the impression that you believe he has what it takes to write a best-seller, once he learns to winnow out the chaff.

Posted by: Alberta Oil Peon at October 11, 2015 01:11 PM (0yhH4)

218 Yeah, maybe. But it was like a litany of red flags for me watching the show, I could hear the bell going off every time they ticked off a personal pet peeve of historical writing.

Posted by: Christopher Taylor at October 11, 2015 01:09 PM (39g3+)


I hear you. When I watched the one I saw, I was in a bar (no TV at home, you know), and the sound was off, or so low I couldn't hear the whole dialog. Did you know TV is only half as stupid with the sound off?

Posted by: Alberta Oil Peon at October 11, 2015 01:14 PM (0yhH4)

219 ed by: Alberta Oil Peon at October 11, 2015 01:07 PM (0yhH4)

They also bring out that H.G. Wells, and progressives in general, wasn't a nice or good person. In general though, it is using a historical context for modern assumptions and by the end of the second season has the main character , originally portrayed sympathetically as a devout Catholic, acting very much against character "because love".

Posted by: Polliwog the 'Ette at October 11, 2015 01:18 PM (GDulk)

220 I think of Sheri S. Tepper as a weirdly anti-tech science fiction author. I've read a few of her stand-alone novels and enjoyed them for their world-building and crafts(wo)manship, but they can be off-putting in their pessimism. She is adamantly against humanity for having too big an impact on the environment (there is apparently an acceptable limit, not sure what it is), and she is anti-expansionist WRT economies. But please buy her books!

I think of her less as a feminist writer and more of an environmentalist writer.

Haven't read her in years. Human Wave for me these days.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, self-aware douchebag at October 11, 2015 01:24 PM (jR7Wy)

221 Posted by: CharlieBrown'sDildo at October 11, 2015 12:10 PM (Zu3d9)

It'll probably be awhile before I get Samuel Weller's voice out of my head.

Posted by: waelse1 at October 11, 2015 01:24 PM (ZZTn8)

222 She is adamantly against humanity for having too big an impact on the environment (there is apparently an acceptable limit, not sure what it is), and she is anti-expansionist WRT economies.

I fear that one of my characters might give the impression I'm anti-tech in my latest book because he argues that the more technology develops, the greater the horrors one man is capable of. But his point is that evil is evil and it uses the tools at hand. That we've always been awful but high tech makes the reach and extent of our expression of that evil become greater.

Posted by: Christopher Taylor at October 11, 2015 01:30 PM (39g3+)

223 That we've always been awful but high tech makes the reach and extent of our expression of that evil become greater.
Posted by: Christopher Taylor at October 11, 2015 01:30 PM (39g3+)
---
As well as the expressions of good. Different outlooks. Yours places the onus of responsibility on the individual and his or her choices; Tepper's, I feel, wants to place restrictions from above.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, self-aware douchebag at October 11, 2015 01:49 PM (jR7Wy)

224 Speaking of BBC shows and people thinking they are more clever than they are really are. Who caught the two part Doctor Who episode with a drowned town and ghosts? Tried to be too clever by far with the time paradox trope and once again it was because of the Sonic Sunglasses that everything was deus ex machina saved.

And an alien overlord who has died, is ferried to Earth, comes back to life with the loose linen wrappings, is sticking into people's minds a magic inscription to attract more followers, and is named the Fisher King. Really I say ol' bean, not very cricket in your hatred of Christianity eh wot?

Posted by: Anna Puma at October 11, 2015 02:09 PM (I6UVN)

225 Neighbors of mine got Grit. I'd flip through them when I visited, looking for the Two-Minute Mystery. The author of those gained greater fame with his boy detective, "Encyclopedia" Brown. He often recycled the plots. EB never dealt with homicide.

I also enjoyed the comic strip "Henry." Told a gag with no dialogue. That must have been hard.

And speaking of comics, I have the original run of Mad on CD-ROM. I'm a long way from getting through all of those.

Posted by: Weak Geek at October 11, 2015 02:21 PM (OBEYW)

226 Here in Canada, Margaret Atwood is well-known as a Progressive twat of the first order.
Posted by: Alberta Oil Peon at October 11, 2015 12:34 PM (0yhH4)
__________

Now I remember why Atwood/Tepper are conflated in my tiny mind. They appeared to me as romance genre writers using the 'futuristic' (dystopian) as their setting.

Posted by: mustbequantum at October 11, 2015 02:28 PM (MIKMs)

227 I'm reading "Suicide Med," a free Kindle download that's surprisingly good. The story tracks five first-years in a med school that has seen at least one suicide per year. Oddly, the suicides began when the new anatomy prof was hired.

The story is told from each student's POV, as each descends into paranoia and possibly madness. Hard to put down!

Posted by: RushBabe at October 11, 2015 02:43 PM (/NEnw)

228 I do miss some of those old comic strips: Henry, There Aughta Be a Law, Steve Canyon, Joe Palooka, The Phantom, even The Katzenjammer Kids. All long gone or 'revived' but not as good as the originals. I haven't taken a newspaper in many years and missed my daily dose of Calvin and Hobbes, so I bought the book collections.

Posted by: JTB at October 11, 2015 02:44 PM (FvdPb)

229 Christopher, the best I can suggest is a "Good Job" followed by a "tighten up the next one" with the explanation you gave.
Add that you learn by doing, and in nothing more than writing.

Posted by: Kindltot at October 11, 2015 03:00 PM (3pRHP)

230 There's another book about the 761st, called "Patton's Panthers", that is quite good.

Posted by: SDN at October 11, 2015 03:38 PM (Y+SJ+)

231 Posted by: Christopher Taylor at October 11, 2015 12:53 PM (39g3+)

If you know him, have a face to face conversation with him with very specific examples. If you can show him how other writers did the same thing better, you will help him immensely. And if all you can come up with is, "I would have done it this way," it's still more helpful than an amazon review saying it wasn't very good.

I have said more than once, thanks to Florence King, that the scene in Chapter 5 of Gone With The Wind, where Scarlett is picking a dress for the barbecue is a masterpiece of showing versus telling. The real point of the scene is that Scarlett is terribly anxious about seeing Melanie Hamilton that day and she is afraid her plot to steal Ashley away won't work. But all of this is conveyed by Scarlett going through dress after dress, not by Scarlett fretting out loud.

So if you can find a few more like that to give your friend as an example, you will be doing him a huge favor.

Posted by: Tonestaple at October 11, 2015 04:23 PM (dCTrv)

232 There is a scene in The Map of Time by Felix J. Palma in which the author hero, H.G. Wells, is brutally honest to a would-be author and . . . well, let's just say it didn't end well.

Posted by: The Great White Snark at October 11, 2015 04:43 PM (Nwg0u)

233 107 Old Sailor Poet's third Amy Lynn novel is now out in book format. Kindle conversion is still happening.

The Lady of Castle Dunn.
http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1516922255

Posted by: Anna Puma at October 11, 2015 10:26 AM (I6UVN)

Wonderful news! I'm definitely getting the Kindle version.

Also, next weekend the Kindle version of Amy Lynn book one will be FREE!

Posted by: BornLib at October 11, 2015 04:47 PM (zpNwC)

234 208:

Not exactly. Some of us write, even though we know what we write will never find a professional publisher, because we like telling stories. My Terran Empire space opera is on Gutenberg.com under a Common somethingorother license because I want readers. My Skyrim fanfic is on fanfiction.net because I want readers.

What I write isn't commercially viable, for whatever reason, but I can't help writing, and I want readers, so I put it on line for free.

Posted by: Empire1 at October 11, 2015 06:08 PM (z+zgk)

235 My first job somewhere around 1974 - 1975 was selling Grit newspapers. Western Kentucky is about as rural as you can get so I guess I fit the description.

Posted by: Russ Sanders at October 11, 2015 07:15 PM (zEmIA)

236 Had Kareem's profit won a few more battles, he would have been allowed to read any books other than the book of death and subjugation.

Posted by: Rob in Katy at October 11, 2015 07:18 PM (eYTQP)

237 I discovered Grit in the 60s. I was living in a town of 180 people in southern Michigan. I was in junior high and really enjoyed it. But I remember being made fun of for that. I didn't get the joke.

Posted by: MaxMBJ at October 11, 2015 08:34 PM (Uq9ly)

238 Reading Patrick Rothfuss's "Wise Man's Fear," the second in his trilogy, yet unfinished, called "The Kingkiller Chronicle." He's a lovely writer, and apparently his books are going to become movies/games/whatnot in the near future.

Of course, I'm reading "WMF" while anti-studiously avoiding real work.

Posted by: Smallish Bees at October 11, 2015 09:22 PM (yjhOG)

239 Grit! You bet! I read it and I delivered it. It was filled with good news, recipes, a weekly Sunday School lesson, inspirational and patriotic tidbits, advice on farming, canning etc. serial fiction, crazy little ads for things like "Sea Monkeys," bags of tiny plastic cars, and various cures and nostrums. I lived in a tiny Western Pennsylvania crossroads community (one store and couple of barking dogs). In the early to mid 50s I somehow inherited a Grit route. of, at tops, 15 customers spread out over a wide rural area. Every Friday (as I recall) I would get home from school, run up to the Post Office and get my bundle of Grits. It cost 10 cents and I got to keep 4 cents from each one! With tips I usually got to pocket up to $2 every week. A handsome sum. And around Christmas I got tips as a high as a dollar from some customers. I had to cover quite a few miles to get those Grit's delivered on my old bike, and I usually got home just before dinner and just around dark in the fall and winter time. Over the weekend I would read through our family copy of the Grit. It was as wholesome and "All-American" as you could get. Something, yes, like The Readers Digest (in its glory days). Funny thing. I retired as an Assistant Managing Editor of the Digest, covering national and international affairs from its Washington office.

Posted by: Ralph Kinney Bennett at October 12, 2015 08:24 AM (jEBfI)

240 Just had to chime in on this post. It's kind of funny, I've been a lurker at AOSPHQ for years and it took a post on Grit to get me to comment.

I sold Grit between the ages of 9 and 12. Each week, I would receive my allotted number of copies in the mail which I would then fold and put in my handy dandy canvas carrying bag with Grit printed on the side of it and I would head out going door to door selling the papers for I think a quarter. I would sell in my neighborhood until I couldn't sell any more and then I would head to the local Rose's store (a regional discount department store) where I would stand or sit in front of the entrance and sell what I had left. If I remember correctly, the papers cost me 15 cents and I sold them for 25 cents and I got to keep the difference. Any unsold papers came out of my profit. I also remember a point system where you got points for the papers you sold and could trade them in on great prizes but I was never patient enough to save up enough points to get anything more amazing than a four-color pen that I remember having Red, Green, Blue and Black inks.

Anyway, Grit was a great way for a kid who didn't get an allowance (other than for mowing the yard) to make a few bucks to spend on candy and comic books.

What is really weird is to now be 50 years old and have fond memories of doing something that is now unknown as a thing by many people. Times change and I suspect the chances of parents letting their kids roam the neighborhood, knocking on random doors selling Grit newspapers is about nil. However, I wouldn't trade that experience for anything because it taught me to be dependable, responsible and to be confident in myself. Sadly, evil the world destroys not only it's intended targets, but also creates collateral damage in ways we don't notice it until good things are gone forever.

Posted by: Paul Tarver at October 12, 2015 11:55 AM (cMlC1)

(Jump to top of page)






Processing 0.03, elapsed 0.0383 seconds.
15 queries taking 0.0139 seconds, 249 records returned.
Page size 170 kb.
Powered by Minx 0.8 beta.



MuNuvians
MeeNuvians
Polls! Polls! Polls!
Frequently Asked Questions
The (Almost) Complete Paul Anka Integrity Kick
Top Top Tens
Greatest Hitjobs

The Ace of Spades HQ Sex-for-Money Skankathon
A D&D Guide to the Democratic Candidates
Margaret Cho: Just Not Funny
More Margaret Cho Abuse
Margaret Cho: Still Not Funny
Iraqi Prisoner Claims He Was Raped... By Woman
Wonkette Announces "Morning Zoo" Format
John Kerry's "Plan" Causes Surrender of Moqtada al-Sadr's Militia
World Muslim Leaders Apologize for Nick Berg's Beheading
Michael Moore Goes on Lunchtime Manhattan Death-Spree
Milestone: Oliver Willis Posts 400th "Fake News Article" Referencing Britney Spears
Liberal Economists Rue a "New Decade of Greed"
Artificial Insouciance: Maureen Dowd's Word Processor Revolts Against Her Numbing Imbecility
Intelligence Officials Eye Blogs for Tips
They Done Found Us Out, Cletus: Intrepid Internet Detective Figures Out Our Master Plan
Shock: Josh Marshall Almost Mentions Sarin Discovery in Iraq
Leather-Clad Biker Freaks Terrorize Australian Town
When Clinton Was President, Torture Was Cool
What Wonkette Means When She Explains What Tina Brown Means
Wonkette's Stand-Up Act
Wankette HQ Gay-Rumors Du Jour
Here's What's Bugging Me: Goose and Slider
My Own Micah Wright Style Confession of Dishonesty
Outraged "Conservatives" React to the FMA
An On-Line Impression of Dennis Miller Having Sex with a Kodiak Bear
The Story the Rightwing Media Refuses to Report!
Our Lunch with David "Glengarry Glen Ross" Mamet
The House of Love: Paul Krugman
A Michael Moore Mystery (TM)
The Dowd-O-Matic!
Liberal Consistency and Other Myths
Kepler's Laws of Liberal Media Bias
John Kerry-- The Splunge! Candidate
"Divisive" Politics & "Attacks on Patriotism" (very long)
The Donkey ("The Raven" parody)
News/Chat