Sunday Morning Book Thread 07-13-2014: Kids and Money, What Could Go Wrong? [OregonMuse]


financial planning.jpg
Financial Planning


Good morning morons and moronettes and welcome to AoSHQ's stately, high class, and prestigious Sunday Morning Book Thread.

For non book-related discussion, please use NDH's open thread down below, thanks. You can grabba cuppa joe while you're there.


Restraint

I had this in the back of my mind based on a conversation I had with my #2 son, but Monty beat me to it earlier in the week. Basically, my son, who moved out to be on his own a few months back, related to me how appalled he is at many of his coworkers who spend all of their money as soon as it's in their hands (or even before) and then complain about never having any money. They do this all of the time, constantly. Son is astounded that none of them ever seem to learn to that they really should stop spending money in order to have money so they wouldn't be constantly complaining about not having money.

They have no reserves. As Monty pointed out, if their car breaks down, or their water heater goes out, or they're hit with any sudden but necessary expense, they're going to be in deep kimchi.

Son thinks they're crazy.

When our kids were little, we gave them an allowance, but had them hold back 10% for saving and 10% for church tithing. The remaining 80% was theirs to do with as they pleased. Son said it helped him understand money.

So here are some books that probably won't do these spendthrifts any good. Learning about money and economics is good, don't get me wrong, but something has to happen upstream of the education before the lessons can be properly absorbed.

I liked the title of this one, Money Doesn't Grow on Trees: A Parent's Guide to Raising Financially Responsible Children, Revised Edition

Dave Ramsey has a book for parents to use to teach their children about money, Smart Money Smart Kids: Raising the Next Generation to Win with Money.

When my kids were growing up, we had them all read Whatever Happened to Penny Candy? which was good for instilling a conservative outlook on life in general, not just money.

Of course, for a conservative outlook on life, nothing, in my view, beats the book of Proverbs. For example: Pro 25:28: A man without self-control is like a city broken into and left without walls. This is an excellent description of a life in ruins. My son gets so tired of hearing complaints about lack of money, I think he would like to grab one of these wastrels by the shoulders, get in his face and say: "Dude. Delayed gratification. Do you even know what this is?"

We elect officials who think nothing of spending like crazy, borrowing like crazy so they can continue to spend like crazy, and then kicking the can down the road for someone else to worry about. That's the way lots of Americans handle their own finances, so it'd be a miracle if our representatives were any different.

My own representative, Peter DeFazio (D-Liberal Hack), who never met a tax or government spending program he didn't like, save for those he thinks don't spend enough, has a retirement home set up for himself in New Zealand, far, far away from the America he's spent his entire career trying to ruin for everyone else.

And when our kids were old enough for high school, there was Henry Hazlitt's classic Economics in One Lesson: The Shortest and Surest Way to Understand Basic Economics. Recommended for everyone. I wonder if Paul Krugman has read it?

Son is in the same (bottom end) wage bracket as the complainers he works with, but he does not spend like crazy, has zero credit card debt, and has a reserve for emergencies. You'd think they'd notice this. You'd think they would be asking themselves "hey, why does OregonMuse's second-born son never complain about money and always seems to have enough for his needs, while I'm staggering from paycheck to paycheck and maxing out all of my cards? How does he do it?"

But they don't, and they never do.


The Smashwords Summer Sale Continues

And it lasts the entire month of July. Many authors of many genres are offering their eBooks at reduced prices, including free. Click here to browse the titles.


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Scarlett Johansson, Professional Twit


Yeah, This Makes Sense

European law is a joke. Like that Euro-twit who did something stupid so he was coming up on all the Google searches for first-class dumbass, he SUED Google to get them to stop being mean to him, and he WON, so now Google has to adjust its search engines so this Euro-twit's name doesn't keep coming up.

So this French guy, Gregoire Delacourt, wrote a novel that had Scarlett Johansson as one of the characters in it. And, actually, it wasn't really Scarlett Johansson at all:

In the book, a mechanic who doesn't have much luck with women is stunned to see Johansson stride into his garage. Turns out she's not actually Johansson -- she's a look-alike model. She laments being seen as a sex object, has two affairs, several adventures and comes to an unfortunate end.

Doesn't matter if it was or wasn't. The real-life Scarlett Johansson sued his ass:

The American actress claims that La Première Chose qu’On Regarde (The First Thing We Look At) violates her privacy and constitutes a “fraudulent and illicit use of her name, her fame and her image” for commercial gain – allegations the book’s publisher has dismissed as “crazy”.

I know what you're thinking: "Is she high? There's no way any judge is going to buy that load of crap!"

Well, a French judge bought it, or at least a part of it:

A French judge has agreed with Johansson (the real one) that the book is defamatory.

That's the bad news. Here is the good:

He dismissed a second claim that it fraudulently exploited her image, celebrity and name. Johansson was awarded about $3,400, a fraction of the almost $68,000 in damages she had claimed.

So it wasn't a big win for her:

Emmanuelle Allibert of the publishers J-C Lattes said they...were happy with the judgment. "All of Scarlett Johansson's demands were rejected except one thing that was seen to be an attack in her private life over two relations that she never had.

"All her other demands, including damages of $68,000, were rejected, notably that there should be a ban on the book being translated or made into a film. We just have to cut out the bit about the affairs, which is just four lines," Allibert told the Guardian.

Stupid French author. If he had just confined himself to writing a novel about assassinating President Bush, he'd have been just fine.


A Conversation

"Hi there, everybody, if you want to know how to run with the bulls in Pamplona, Spain, you should read my book."

"Bill Hillman, one of the co-authors of Fiesta: How To Survive The Bulls Of Pamplona?"

"That's right"

"So you ran with the bulls in Pamplona again this year?"

"Of course."

"So how'd you do?"

"Actually, not so good."


Now You See It, Now You Don't -- And Now You Do!

So Costco decided to yank Dinesh D'Souza's America: Imagine a World without Her, and when challenged as to the reason why, cited poor sales as the reason why.

Then they reversed their decision and ordered this poor-selling book to be restocked.

This was after Rush Limbaugh pointed out that Costco's owners, Jim Sinegal and Jeffrey Brotman, are big time Obama fanbois. I'm sure that had nothing to do with the decision to pull D'Souza's book.


An Army of Davids: Crime Solvers

In The Skeleton Crew: How Amateur Sleuths Are Solving America's Coldest Cases, author Deborah Halber describes how an army of unpaid, amateur volunteers are using the internet to solve missing person cases, some of them decades old:

They are often compelled by a personal hunt for their own missing family members or because they were involved the discovery of human remains. Take rural Kentuckian Todd Matthews, whose father-in-law discovered the badly decomposed body of a young woman dubbed "Tent Girl" in 1968. Matthews became obsessed with the girl's identity, sacrificing much of his time off from factory work to scour databases in his trailer's cramped computer room. In 1998, he finally matched Tent Girl with a missing woman, ending decades of uncertainty for her family.

It's DIY CSI.


On Beating Writers' Block

This article has some interesting advice. For example, thinking aloud:

If I am a verbal person it is expressed most readily in the spoken word. So when I am stuck on something I take out my voice recorder - key tool for the reporter class - and start explaining the tricky point or new argument, as though at a dinner party. When I've sounded it out a few different ways, I start to transcribe. And before I know it I have a rough paragraph or two. This has been my method for ages.

Or, just listening to music:

Sometimes when I'm trying not to not write, I listen to the Velvet Underground's "Sister Ray," over and over, for its propulsive churning pump, while clinging to Virginia Woolf's idea that achieving a style is simply a matter of catching a rhythm.

I think writers' block is kind of like impotence, where you have to deal not only with the failure, but with the dread of failure (oh crap, not again!). Even in this meager book thread, if I get stuck on something, I have to get up and do something else for awhile. This puts me in a zen-like situation where the most effective way to get something done is not to do it, and while my thoughts are occupied elsewhere, a little lateral vector inserts itself in my brain, and suddenly I see the solution to whatever predicament I had written myself into. I am surprised how often this works.


___________

So that's all for this week. As always, book thread tips, suggestions, rumors, threats, and insults may be sent to OregonMuse, Proprietor, AoSHQ Book Thread, at the book thread e-mail address: aoshqbookthread, followed by the 'at' sign, and then 'G' mail, and then dot cee oh emm.

What have you all been reading this week? Hopefully something good, because, as I keep saying, life is too short to be reading lousy books.

Posted by: Open Blogger at 10:03 AM




Comments

(Jump to bottom of page)

1 I finished Mists of Avalon this week and am now working on the second book in the series. If you give the first book a 10 (just for comparison) the second book would be a 3.



Now to read the post

Posted by: Vic at July 13, 2014 10:02 AM (T2V/1)

2 Son is astounded that none of them ever seem to learn to that they
really should stop spending money in order to have money so they
wouldn't be constantly complaining about not having money.




Did you ask him if they were Obama voters?

Posted by: Vic at July 13, 2014 10:03 AM (T2V/1)

3 "Monica Lewinsky's X-Boyfriend's Wife for President"

Posted by: Diane Sawyer at July 13, 2014 10:05 AM (e8kgV)

4 So Costco decided to yank Dinesh D'Souza's America: Imagine a World without Her, and when challenged as to the reason why, cited poor sales as the reason why.


And I'll bet the continued stocking Scankles book w/o fail and his book is doing better than hers. Her POS book is tanking big time.

Posted by: Vic at July 13, 2014 10:08 AM (T2V/1)

5 Money is a paper product.


Money DOES grow on trees!


Posted by: EC at July 13, 2014 10:09 AM (doBIb)

6 "So Costco decided to yank Dinesh D'Souza's America: Imagine a World without Her, and when challenged as to the reason why, cited poor sales as the reason why."



Checking Amazon, America is #1 on their best seller list. Another lie exposed

Posted by: fairweatherbill at July 13, 2014 10:13 AM (wynVa)

7 I am very much anticipating World of Trouble being released on Tuesday. It's the conclusion of the Last Policeman trilogy and I am most interested indeed as to how Winters is going to end it.


In other news, I reread Rainbow Six this week because happiest ending ever and we could all use some happy right now. That and reading through just the Iceland bits in Red Storm Rising are some of my go to comfort fic whenever everything becomes a wee bit too everythingy.

Posted by: alexthechick - Oh save us mighty SMOD at July 13, 2014 10:14 AM (dMSj2)

8 6 "So Costco decided to yank Dinesh D'Souza's America: Imagine a World without Her, and when challenged as to the reason why, cited poor sales as the reason why."

Has anyone seen it back in a Costco store yet?

Posted by: USA at July 13, 2014 10:16 AM (Sg02p)

9 The principal of the school, Asabe Kwambura, told me that 219 girls are still missing and lamented that the international campaign to help -- #BringBackOurGirls -- is faltering as the world moves on.

"Continue this campaign," she urged. "Our students are still living in the woods. We want the international community to talk to the government of Nigeria to do something, because they are doing nothing."

Posted by: #BringBackOurHumVees at July 13, 2014 10:16 AM (e8kgV)

10 That and reading through just the Iceland bits in Red Storm Rising are some of my go to comfort fic whenever everything becomes a wee bit too everythingy.


What parts?

Posted by: EC at July 13, 2014 10:16 AM (doBIb)

11 Just finishing Stephen Hunter's "Sniper's Honor." Highly recommended.

This is the ninth in the Bob Lee Swagger series. Hunter's books are much less formulaic than most other series books. I always expect surprises.

4.5 stars on Amazon, 4 on Goodreads.

Publisher's Weekly: "Bestseller Hunter's absorbing ninth Bob Lee Swagger novel (after 2013's The Third Bullet) finds Swagger retired and living on a farm in the Pacific Northwest with an emotionally unsatisfied wife and memories of his sniper glory days. Swagger finds renewed purpose in life after Washington Post reporter Kathy Reilly pulls him in on a story that she's writing from Moscow on Ludmilla Petrova, a beautiful and equally decorated sniper who served in the Soviet Army during WWII and mysteriously disappeared from all records seven decades ago. As Reilly and Swagger travel from the Russian capital to the Ukrainian countryside in search of a resolution to Petrova's story, Swagger develops a keen infatuation with the enigmatic and alluring "White Witch," even as his obsession arouses unwanted suspicion from both the German and Russian governments. You don't have to be a fan of military action fiction to enjoy this installment."

Posted by: doug at July 13, 2014 10:18 AM (mjfdB)

12 Started Marko Kloos' "Terms of Enlistment" as part of my ongoing effort to read already purchased books before I buy new volumes. Only a chapter or so in and enjoying it. In the meantime my chances of restraining my book buying impulse are slim to none.

Posted by: Tuna at July 13, 2014 10:19 AM (7KPIw)

13 I'll pedal Anna's book project for her
If you can spare a few $$ to help out a fellow 'ette....

(Take out the spaces)
http://www. gofundme. com/aqxyps

Posted by: lindafell at July 13, 2014 10:19 AM (nKVlf)

14 Posted by: EC at July 13, 2014 10:09 AM (doBIb)


Wish I had that tree! Fortunately, I have this card that I put in a machine and it prints money for me. So that's a plus...


So back on track. About to finish "Speaker for the Dead", the sequel to "Enders Game". It's okay, but has some flaws. Ender seems to know way more than any info provided him, and having this sort of super computer intelligence that only talks to him is sort of like having your own personal god or angel.



So I'll finish it, but happy to move onto something else.

Posted by: HH at July 13, 2014 10:19 AM (XXwdv)

15 I read The Night Circus by Erin Morganstern this week. It's an entertaining book that really wants to be a movie (and a quick check at imdb reveals that it is being made into a movie). The book drags somewhat in the middle, but the movie should be cool with lots of special effects.

I've started two big books - Sarum by Edward Rutherford and Citizens by Simon Schama. I'm rather daunted by the size of both books, but I vowed this year not to put off reading all the big books that are on my shelves. I'm enjoying Sarum and it should go fairly quickly. I suspect Citizens will take muuuuuccchhh longer and I may have to force myself to read at least ten pages a day if I want to finish before the end of the year.

426 books unread books on my bookshelves

Posted by: biancaneve at July 13, 2014 10:21 AM (6Turu)

16 I don't understand why schools teach history, math, english and a lot of junk, but don't push kids into taking a simple finance class. I'd think for them to be productive adults it's at least as important as anything else they could teach.

Tried to read 'The Lathe of Heaven' by Ursula Le Guin, but so much of it was based on the Al Gore fantasy of a world devastated by global warming (all the mountains are snow-less, NYC is drowning) that I choked on it less than a quarter in.

Listened to 'Hounded' by Kevin Hearne, first of the Iron Druid series. It was good, a flippant younger version of Harry Dresden, though I prefer Dresden since he is also a detective and I like mysteries. Will probably try book 2 at some point.

Finished Hobb's 'Assassin's Apprentice', first of a trilogy which I greatly enjoyed, look forward to reading book 2. A royal bastard is raised as an assassin in a world of political intrigue, he struggles to survive while helping the kingdom deal with mysterious enemies. Reminds me somewhat of GoT since the world-building is done so well and the magic is limited.

Posted by: waelse1 at July 13, 2014 10:22 AM (DCe6Z)

17 Couple of years ago checked out a Brad Thor book from the library based on moron comments about Thor. The protagonists were female kick ass smart mouths who constantly engaged in girl talk. It was the only one on the shelf. Underwhelmed.

Second try on Thor with the new Act of War. Third of the way through and I am enjoying it.

Finished Michael Lewis' Flash Boys last week. Enjoyed it too. And, no, I didn't think it was the Harry Reid bio.

Posted by: The Poster Formerly Known as Mr. Barky at July 13, 2014 10:23 AM (ndSrL)

18 Finished Hobb's 'Assassin's Apprentice', first of a trilogy which I greatly enjoyed...by: waelse1

I read that years ago and really enjoyed it too.

Posted by: lindafell at July 13, 2014 10:25 AM (nKVlf)

19 Writers' block ... I deal with it by having a couple of different writing projects going at once. When I get stuck with one, I just work on another one for a while.

Speaking of projects - this week I got to a place in the picaresque Gold Rush adventure where it is all coming together and 'jelling' - the characters, the plot, all of it. Up to that point it was feeling like a chore, and I was only writing it because I said that I would, and had a half-a**ed outline and some ideas for characters and incidents. Now - on track, and convinced that it will be a fun read, when done!

As for books on the bedside table - advance copy of The Victorian City - Everyday Life in Dicken's London, by Judith Flanders. A nice thick brick of a book, and very readable and interesting so far.

Posted by: Sgt. Mom at July 13, 2014 10:25 AM (Asjr7)

20 I was at Costco yesterday and didn't see D'Sousa's book. Lots of copies of Hard Choices that nobody was interested in. One guy picked up Blood Feud, then put it down.

Somebody remind me what the Amazon/Hachette feud is about? WaPo had an article the other day about it, but I'm sure whatever they say is the opposite of the truth.

Posted by: biancaneve at July 13, 2014 10:26 AM (6Turu)

21 I used to listen to Dave Ramsey on XM radio to hear to different kinds of stories:

1. The caller that can't figure out why they're broke and are unwilling to face up to all the bad decisions they make every day, large and small, that contributed to the dire situation that they find themselves in.

2. People that have just got themselves out of debt through hard work and perseverance. Those calls give hope that maybe the country isn't going down the shitt*r.

Some people (a lot of people) need the instant gratification of spending money. Teaching them to save is no easy task.

Posted by: fairweatherbill at July 13, 2014 10:28 AM (wynVa)

22 After a few months of not reading I picked up Brad Thor's new book yesterday afternoon. I didn't put it down until I had read over 50%. Yikes!! It kind of frightening some of the stuff he has in it that could really happen based on what Obama has been up to over the last few years.

..........

The allowance thing....funny, my sister and I had a conversation about this just the other day. She also does the 10% tithe and the 10% saving. The other 80% is her sons to spend. I thought that was way off base I thought she should make him save 50%.

Posted by: Molly k. at July 13, 2014 10:29 AM (EFsqh)

23 I was pretty dumb about money in my 20's, although I always managed to make rent. It took a lot of ramen noodle eating 4 or 5 days before payday before it finally dawned on me that blowing much of your paycheck on partying and clothes and shoes the weekend after payday was really, really stupid.

This isn't a brag, because it was such a dumb way to live but I became an expert in the art of check kiting. Living in DC, I figured out that checks written in Northern Virginia and Maryland took a few days longer to clear than checks written in DC - so I'd drive out to stores in Arlington and Alexandra to shop if I was broke before payday. It worked - except one or two times when it didn't and the checks bounced and I got hit with $25 overdraw fees.

I didn't ask my parents for money, because I knew I wouldn't get it. Once I did, and my father sent me Sylvia Porter's Money Book instead and I took the hint and started being a responsible adult. That book was a godsend to me.

Becoming more responsible with money also coincided with my politics shifting from liberal to conservative. In other words, I finally grew up.



Posted by: Donna and V. at July 13, 2014 10:30 AM (+XMAD)

24 I think Gore read UKlG and was deeply scarred by the experience. God knows I was.
I'm going through the Science Fiction bookshelf on Gutenberg.org
50's and 60's shorts that were published in Analog and If and the other mags. Heaven, pure Heaven.

Posted by: Kindletot at July 13, 2014 10:33 AM (t//F+)

25 I forgot Brad Thor (aka yummy mcdreamboat) had a new book out. Looking forward to my birthday and hopefully receiving an amazon gift card so I can buy it.


I read "A Night to Remember" while on vacation and learned some facts about the Titanic disaster I hadn't known before.

Posted by: ParanoidGirlinSeattle at July 13, 2014 10:33 AM (+0txR)

26 Posted by: Sgt. Mom at July 13, 2014 10:25 AM (Asjr7)


Hey, I have a question for you that I've been meaning to post for a while.


When you're doing research for your books, do you go out and visit the areas where the book takes place? Like take a look around and get a feel for the ground and surroundings?



Just wondering.

Posted by: HH at July 13, 2014 10:34 AM (XXwdv)

27 Frankly Scarlett could write an endorsement to the Communist Manifesto, and I'd prob still crawl after her....

Posted by: goatexchange at July 13, 2014 10:35 AM (sYUHT)

28 In The Skeleton Crew: How Amateur Sleuths Are Solving America's Coldest Cases, author Deborah Halber describes how an army of unpaid, amateur volunteers are using the internet to solve missing person cases, some of them decades old:

***

Thanks for this link OM. Has direct personal relevance for me and my family. Will definitely check it out.

Posted by: Seamus M. at July 13, 2014 10:37 AM (NeFrd)

29 While in England visited Hatchard's, the oldest bookseller in London (established 1797). I wanted pretty much the entire contents of the bookstore to follow me home. Alas, only could afford (and pack) a few British mysteries.


My son picked up a fascinating book "If England were Invaded". Originally published in the late 1800s it apparently anticipated a lot of World War 1 , though the book is fiction. He got it at the Bodlien Library bookshop at Oxford. I think they came out with a new edition because of the 100th anniversary of the start of WW1.

Posted by: ParanoidGirlinSeattle at July 13, 2014 10:39 AM (+0txR)

30 Can anyone explain why I'm on the Costco board?

Posted by: Dr. Ben Carson at July 13, 2014 10:39 AM (PLOLb)

31 Hi, HH - yes, I do - if it is within driving distance. And sometimes I have to draw on memories of places that I visited a while back; the Mojave desert, Lake Tahoe, Isle of Capri, various California missions and all that.

For one episode in Quivera Trail, though - I had to go to google street view, and "walk" through London from Waterloo Station to Belgrave Square. I've been to London several times ... but that was one walking jaunt I had not done.

Posted by: Sgt. Mom at July 13, 2014 10:39 AM (Asjr7)

32 Seamus -- actually, when I first stumbled upon that book this week, you were the first person I thought of.

Posted by: OregonMuse at July 13, 2014 10:42 AM (+ahS9)

33 When I was little we had three jars. One was for tithing (10%) and the other two were for college (savings) and spending. I don't recall that there was a specific breakdown for spending and saving, but I'm pretty sure that we put at least as much into savings as we did into spending.

I think one mistake parents make is that they don't give their kids a big enough allowance so that they have money to manage and they also don't make the kids responsible for some of their own personal expenditures. When I was very little we kids got a weekly allowance of a nickel for each year of our age. Even back in the '60's that was such a small allowance that we spent it and had to ask our parents to pay for school lunches, brownie/cub scout dues, birthday presents when invited to friends' parties, etc. After much strenuous campaigning, my older brother and sister and I persuaded our parents to give us a much larger monthly allowance and to make us responsible for a lot more. So at the age of seven I went from 35 cents/week to $5/month and had to start budgeting for brownie dues, etc. Our parents still gave us money each week to buy one school lunch and milk every day, but if we were too lazy to make a lunch and wanted to buy the school lunch a second or third time in the week, we paid for it ourselves. We paid our own brownie dues. We no longer expected our parents to get out the wallet whenever we wanted something after that. We pretty much learned to save up to buy whatever we needed after that. I loved my new-found financial freedom, but the downside was that with the old system we got an automatic raise at every birthday. With the new system we never got a raise and I was still getting $5/month when I was in high school. Of course, by then I was earning money babysitting, etc.

And by the time I went off to college in 1979, I had saved over $1000. How much could kids today save if they really worked at it?

Posted by: biancaneve at July 13, 2014 10:42 AM (6Turu)

34 What parts? 

Posted by: EC at July 13, 2014 10:16 AM (doBIb)


The whole storyline where they escape from the initial attack and then walk across most of Iceland spying along they way.

There's something about that that I find immensely brave.

Posted by: alexthechick - Here SMOD SMOD SMOD at July 13, 2014 10:44 AM (Y6FiP)

35 Seamus -- actually, when I first stumbled upon that book this week, you were the first person I thought of.


Posted by: OregonMuse at July 13, 2014 10:42 AM (+ahS9)


***

I appreciate that. Just from the blurb and the Amazon site, it sounds like the flip side of our mystery. They are working with remains that have not been identified and linking them with missing persons. Ours involves a missing person with no remains. But will read it nonetheless. I'll try to report back in a couple weeks.

Posted by: Seamus M. at July 13, 2014 10:44 AM (NeFrd)

36 Not book related, but AtC mentioned Iceland in her comment and I have just one thing to say, anyone who has the means and ability to visit Iceland, go. It is awesome. Hugely awesome.


OK, I will make it slightly book related, the price of books in Iceland is breathtakingly high. At least the books I looked at. Also, waaaay too many copies of Hillary's new book there. It was weird seeing it prominently displayed in numerous bookshops. But I didn't see anyone buying it, or reading it.

Posted by: ParanoidGirlinSeattle at July 13, 2014 10:45 AM (+0txR)

37 Started John LeCarre's A Delicate Truth last night.

He's an old leftie but I really enjoy his writing.

Posted by: the littl shyning man at July 13, 2014 10:46 AM (fAMNc)

38 As anybody here read The Day of the Jackal? (I never saw the movie.) I've heard from a few it's the best thriller ever and a few who said "meh."

Posted by: Donna and V. at July 13, 2014 10:49 AM (+XMAD)

39 Writing on Sluggor's exploits. Courtesy to Pixy's has generator, the ambassador from Alextopia is Poe Li. The chief healer is named Gee, a towering mountain of Mongolian shaman. And one of the other warriors is Polli, her real name is longer but no one seems able to pronounce it so Polli.

Posted by: Anna Puma (+SmuD) at July 13, 2014 10:49 AM (9tnUZ)

40 Just finished Baldacci's "The Whole Truth" and his comments on Perception Management (arranging a fake but "accurate" approved story on behalf of a client) seem to line up very well with what I see going on daily in the press! Pretty good read overall.

Also finished Michael Connolly's "The Gods of Guilt". AS usual, he writes a very good fast-paced book.

Working on the Heinlein authorized biography, very interesting, but not a fast read. It provides a lot of insight into a time long since gone by although it was really only decades ago.

Sort of off topic, does anyone know of a good online Latin-English translator?

Posted by: Hrothgar at July 13, 2014 10:51 AM (o3MSL)

41 I've written since before grade school- yeah, mom and dad taught me reading and writing and simple math before Da Gooberment had a hand in it.

After the Dead Miss Emily and I moved away from the Back River in 1987 I could not write a thing- I attributed it to being "off the moving waters" since I had always been before such things when I wrote.

Then she died in 2010- suddenly I could not quit writing- on the web, some good, some awful and maudlin.

Life's a funny and odd thing....

I did always find in various incarnations of writing if I got stuck? Read somebody else's words and re-phrase them. Worked fer me....

Posted by: backhoe at July 13, 2014 10:51 AM (ULH4o)

42 @38 I loved the "Day of the Jackal" book.

Posted by: doug at July 13, 2014 10:52 AM (mjfdB)

43 I thought she should make him save 50%

----

Interesting. Do you mind me asking why?

Posted by: Jenny Hates Her Phone at July 13, 2014 10:53 AM (GmTxn)

44 One advantage of being a Gen-Xer with Depression-era parents is that I never even considered going into debt. The ONLY time I ever had a loan out was for my first house (because even then I figured mortgage payments were better than rent since you're building equity).

It helps that my most extravagant habit is going out to dinner once a week, and buying books. A while back I was at a conference (tax deductible!) and watched people in the bar doing shots at $10 an ounce. How the hell can you blow a upwards of three hundred bucks getting drunk on Friday night, do it again Saturday, and come back the following week?

Posted by: Trimegistus at July 13, 2014 10:55 AM (4cNOC)

45 As anybody here read The Day of the Jackal? (I never saw the movie.) I've heard from a few it's the best thriller ever and a few who said "meh."

I read it years ago and thought it was very good, very suspenseful. The 1970s movie version is very faithful to the book.

Detailed instructions on how to make a fake ID as an added bonus.

Posted by: OregonMuse at July 13, 2014 10:55 AM (+ahS9)

46 The parable about son #2 and the people he works with reminds me of my own experience. I've caught all kinds of flak telling the story of coworkers who always complained about being short on rent, etc. and couldn't figure out why, but would drop thousands on body kits, spoilers, radios, spinning rims and so on for their cars. Always get called racist for it (and lol, all of the people I was talking about where white).

These were also the same people who were upset about not having health insurance after skipping 2 enrollment periods.
"BUT I DIDN'T KNOW!!!"
"Dude, they start telling us like 2 months before it opens, then you have a month to do it"
"NOBODY EVER TOLD ME!"
"I did, like 4 times, because you were whining about medical costs out of pocket like 6 months ago; I've seen each manager mention it to you or at the weekly meeting at least twice each, it's posted on the door to the break room, it's posted on the bulletain board in the break room, there's a goddamn 15 foot long banner that gets posted in the break room, and the computer asks you to do it, if you haven't already -it keeps track-, every time you log in to punch the time card. The only way they could get more obvious when it is is to drug you, tie you up in front of a 60 inch monitor and keyboard with HEALTH INSURANCE ENROLLMENT flashing on the screen and not let you go until you do it..."
"BUT I DIDN'T KNOW!!!"

Posted by: Ranba Ral at July 13, 2014 10:55 AM (3x55d)

47 I used to be an avid reader as a young pup. Secondary education, college, and law school pretty well beat my love of reading right out of me.

Posted by: Insomniac at July 13, 2014 10:55 AM (mx5oN)

48 Posted by: Sgt. Mom at July 13, 2014 10:39 AM (Asjr7)


I figured you probably did, but I was just wondering. Most authors of historical fiction that I've seen giving talks mention that..


Oh, and just an FYI. Where I live, I have 2 main streets running north and south.


To my east, it's Antioch.


To my west, Quivira.

Posted by: HH at July 13, 2014 10:56 AM (XXwdv)

49 Just from memory on Red Storm Rising when the Marines and the USAF met officer welcome the Brits... their Leftenant has a snapped neck for landing on a rock wrong and Sgt Nichols a twisted ankle. "Welcome to Iceland."

Posted by: Anna Puma (+SmuD) at July 13, 2014 10:57 AM (9tnUZ)

50 "I've caught all kinds of flak telling the story of coworkers who always complained about being short on rent, etc. and couldn't figure out why, but would drop thousands on body kits, spoilers, radios, spinning rims and so on for their cars."

A friend was bitching to me about her son. The dude has dropped $900 at the tattoo parlor! She bitches - but continues to help him make rent.

Posted by: Donna and V. at July 13, 2014 10:58 AM (+XMAD)

51 Posted by: alexthechick - Here SMOD SMOD SMOD at July 13, 2014 10:44 AM (Y6FiP)

Killing the Russian rapists was pretty cool.

That is a solid book, and perhaps his best one.

Posted by: CharlieBrown'sDildo at July 13, 2014 10:59 AM (QFxY5)

52 Thanks for the shout out Linda Fell.

Night Circus IIRC is one of those books that NaNoWriMo holds out and says 'see this book started as a thirty day challenge right here!'

Posted by: Anna Puma (+SmuD) at July 13, 2014 11:00 AM (9tnUZ)

53 Good morning,

This week, I finished a book called "Nothing to Envy: Ordinary Lives in North Korea" which was interesting and sad.

Current reads are "Mr. Mercedes" by Stephen King which I'm finding to be a slog.

"The Life and Times of Jesus" by Michael J. Ruszala which I just started.

Still working on "An Army At Dawn:The War in North Africa 1942-1943"

Posted by: DangerGirl and her 1.21 gigawatt Sanity Prod (tm) at July 13, 2014 11:00 AM (GrtrJ)

54 Orbital/Cygnus launch to ISS. See Open Thread #227

Posted by: doug at July 13, 2014 11:00 AM (mjfdB)

55 50 "I've caught all kinds of flak telling the story of coworkers who always complained about being short on rent, etc. and couldn't figure out why, but would drop thousands on body kits, spoilers, radios, spinning rims and so on for their cars."

A friend was bitching to me about her son. The dude has dropped $900 at the tattoo parlor! She bitches - but continues to help him make rent.
Posted by: Donna and V. at July 13, 2014 10:58 AM (+XMAD)

He's never going to learn.

Posted by: Insomniac at July 13, 2014 11:01 AM (mx5oN)

56
Started John LeCarre's A Delicate Truth last night.



He's an old leftie but I really enjoy his writing.

Posted by: the littl shyning man at July 13, 2014 10:46 AM (fAMNc)


There's probably no way I'll ever pick his stuff up with everything else I have queued up to read, but I wonder if I'd find his writing enjoyable now. I remember being bored by it as a yute but that's when my garbage tastes were more in line with Ian Flaming and Ludlum before I made a pledge while reading the latter's sensationalistic crap to never read trash again.

Posted by: Captain Hate at July 13, 2014 11:02 AM (rEi46)

57 As to writers' block, four suggestions:

1. Switch to a different project for a while. If you're stuck on your novel, write a short story, or do that review you promised someone, or even a blog post.

2. If you're having trouble with the text, work on the outline. Go into more detail, and try to figure out what events and scenes NEED to happen to move the story along. (You may find out you can cut the part you're blocked on.)

3. In a work of fiction, a block may suggest you don't understand the characters well enough. Try to get into their heads. What would that person do in this situation? (And if the answer isn't what you need for the larger plot, then ask yourself what it would take to make that person do what you need.)

4. Finally, there's always research. You may well come across something that helps get you out of the hole you're in, or give you an idea for use elsewhere.

Posted by: Trimegistus at July 13, 2014 11:02 AM (4cNOC)

58 errr Fleming although I kind of like the mistake

Posted by: Captain Hate at July 13, 2014 11:03 AM (rEi46)

59 Also still reading "Quartered Safe Out Here" by G F Fraser based on a book thread reco. Excellent read and he has some pointed comments about how society has devolved since WW II.

I will be looking for some Flashman novels when I get a chance!

Posted by: Hrothgar at July 13, 2014 11:04 AM (o3MSL)

60 Posted by: Captain Hate at July 13, 2014 11:02 AM (rEi46)

I read "The Bourne Identity" after seeing the movie (which wasn't bad), and I was shocked at how tedious it was.

Posted by: CharlieBrown'sDildo at July 13, 2014 11:04 AM (QFxY5)

61 Whenever I talk about saving, I like to ask, "what could you do with $10,000?" That gives a list of things to do with money. Then I ask, "Do you know how to get $10,000?" You can guess at the answers.
then I tell them, "put $833.33 a month away. In 12 months you will have $10K."
Some people look very thoughtful, and others start telling me why they can't do that.

I like Dave Ramsey, he has a good approach. I have gone on to reading some of his sources he gets information from too. His program get to be much of a muchness because he is a common-sense guy who has boiled it all down to "don't spend all your money".

Posted by: Kindletot at July 13, 2014 11:05 AM (t//F+)

62 47?
Insomniac?

You sound like my Dad. People were always astounded that such a smart and well-educated man read only westerns, so like the little twit I was when I was little, I asked him "Daddy, why do you only read westerns?"

"Son, when I was in engineering school I read every technical book you can name- most in the original German.
I never want to read another...."

Posted by: backhoe at July 13, 2014 11:05 AM (ULH4o)

63 43 I thought she should make him save 50%

----

Interesting. Do you mind me asking why?

Posted by: Jenny Hates Her Phone at July 13, 2014 10:53 AM (GmTxn)


........

Mainly because I'm a tight ass She is pretty good at paying her kids for doing thing and it amounts to a significant amount of money. History has shown this son would spend 10 dollars on a ball of lint if that is what struck his fancy that day. It's ridiculous. The thrill of a saving account is watch it grow and realizing "hey, the more I put in the faster it grows" That's just me though.

Posted by: Molly k. at July 13, 2014 11:06 AM (EFsqh)

64 I'm reading "Thrilling Adventures in the Arctic Regions" from the Youth's Library, dated maybe mid-19th century-ish. Imagine living in a time when there were huge swathes of the earth that were still incompletely charted. How that must have fired the imagination!

"When speaking of the bodily derangements to which arctic voyagers are liable, the treatment ... is to coax back by degrees the vitality of the part. This is best done with friction." IYKWIMAITYD.

I'm using the phrase "bodily derangements" the next time I take a sick day. Friction and Val-u-Rite are the only cure.

Posted by: All Hail Eris at July 13, 2014 11:07 AM (QBm1P)

65 Tammy, I will make sure there is a redhead on the loose.

Posted by: Anna Puma (+SmuD) at July 13, 2014 11:08 AM (9tnUZ)

66
I just heard Cokie Roberts on ABC clearly assert "We helped create ISIS."

Cokie said they weren't ISIS when we [obama] were trying to help them take Syria, but now they are.

Posted by: Soothsayer of The Righteous And Harmonious Fists (-442 days left) at July 13, 2014 11:08 AM (1frQp)

67 "A friend was bitching to me about her son. The dude has dropped $900 at the tattoo parlor! She bitches - but continues to help him make rent. "

Speaking of tattoos...yesterday I saw a woman with a silver dollar sized mole on her arm. No big deal right? Wrong! On the mole was a tiny tattoo of the Virgin Mary.

Posted by: Lauren at July 13, 2014 11:08 AM (BPMYx)

68 BTW Folks, for Sword of Truth fans Terry Goodkind has a new book out now. Problem is it is too pricey for the Kindle for me. I'll wait.


http://tinyurl.com/qajex9s

Posted by: Vic at July 13, 2014 11:09 AM (T2V/1)

69
Also on ABC: One year later, the transformation of a Crayon Martin trial witness.

Jenteel is not stupid anymore! Look at the difference! It takes a village!

There was no difference. She is as stupid as before. What's worse, she's even more confident in her stupidity, thanks to others.

Posted by: Soothsayer of The Righteous And Harmonious Fists (-442 days left) at July 13, 2014 11:10 AM (1frQp)

70 Posted by: fairweatherbill at July 13, 2014 10:13 AM (wynVa

Experience tellms me many Costco shoppers are left (or at least left center) so I could see this being true for *Costco*.

(Even Costco's marketing is a sort of leftist wet dream "we pay our employees more" "we don't mark anything up over 15% cost." The latter is especially stupid since margins in most grocery stores are around 4%, IIRC. Now granted that varies wildly per item, but still.)

Posted by: tsrblke, PhD(c) And father to be in 6 months! at July 13, 2014 11:11 AM (HDwDg)

71 62 47?
Insomniac?

You sound like my Dad. People were always astounded that such a smart and well-educated man read only westerns, so like the little twit I was when I was little, I asked him "Daddy, why do you only read westerns?"

"Son, when I was in engineering school I read every technical book you can name- most in the original German.
I never want to read another...."
Posted by: backhoe at July 13, 2014 11:05 AM (ULH4o)

That's about right. When you're reading all the G-D time in school and for your profession, the last thing you want to do for entertainment is read.

Posted by: Insomniac at July 13, 2014 11:11 AM (mx5oN)

72 I haven't read a damn thing in weeks, and I don't know why. Just general ennui, I reckon. Harry Potter is calling my name, though. I always revert to YA when I'm feeling a little blue.

The last book of Diana Harkness's All Souls Trilogy is due out Tuesday, I think, and I'm excited about that, at least! Definitely chick-lit, but those chicks who like urban fantasy will probably enjoy the series.

backhoe, so good to see you!

Posted by: Tammy al-Thor at July 13, 2014 11:13 AM (kwDTQ)

73 History has shown this son would spend 10 dollars on a ball of lint if that is what struck his fancy that day.

Upstream of all of this excellent 'how to handle your money' advice is the concept of delayed gratification. If this is not instilled first, any and all financial advice is a waste of time, as the kid will just blow all of his dough first chance he gets.

How do you instill delayed gratification? Well, it's tough. Having a generally conservative household (traditional family, dad works, everybody goes to church on Sunday, etc.) is a good foundation, but even then, it isn't 100% certain. I'm starting to think it's basically God-breathed.

Posted by: OregonMuse at July 13, 2014 11:14 AM (+ahS9)

74 On the mole was a tiny tattoo of the Virgin Mary.

Posted by: Lauren at July 13, 2014 11:08 AM (BPMYx)



****


It's a MIRACLE!! Build a shrine around that arm! We could charge admission, sell trinkets/mementos. We're gonna be rich! French toast Elvis is nothing compared to this!

Posted by: Seamus M. at July 13, 2014 11:14 AM (NeFrd)

75 Hrothgar, GM Fraser has a trilogy based on his time in service as a LT in the Highland Division at the end of WWII in N. Africa and such parts, The General Danced at Dawn, McAusland in the Rough and The Sheik and the Dustbin.
All of them worth reading and they come with a much needed glossary of British military and Scots slang.

Posted by: Kindletot at July 13, 2014 11:16 AM (t//F+)

76 Look out, a mouse is plotting ... and its not The Brain

http://tinyurl.com/pk3wjy6

Posted by: Anna Puma (+SmuD) at July 13, 2014 11:17 AM (9tnUZ)

77 67 "A friend was bitching to me about her son. The dude has dropped $900 at the tattoo parlor! She bitches - but continues to help him make rent. "

Speaking of tattoos...yesterday I saw a woman with a silver dollar sized mole on her arm. No big deal right? Wrong! On the mole was a tiny tattoo of the Virgin Mary.
Posted by: Lauren at July 13, 2014 11:08 AM (BPMYx)

You sure you didn't just have a vision, like seeing Jesus in a piece of toast?

Posted by: Insomniac at July 13, 2014 11:17 AM (mx5oN)

78
Now the TV is telling me that the violence between Israel and the Palestinians (Hamas) is because "there's no dialogue, no conversation."

Posted by: Soothsayer of The Righteous And Harmonious Fists (-442 days left) at July 13, 2014 11:18 AM (1frQp)

79 71?
Insomniac?

Later, when I had more sense Dad further explained that he read what he did for light entertainment and that made sense to me. He was the smartest person I have ever known- my late wife being pretty close, but he was scary-smart.

He also didn't give a hoot what other people said or thought of him outside of close circle of family and friends. Sure miss the old guy....

Posted by: backhoe at July 13, 2014 11:18 AM (ULH4o)

80 All of my kids got jobs around age 12. My husband and I allowed them to keep 10% then 10% for church and the remaining 80% we made them save. What does a 12 year old need anyhow that we weren't providing?

When they had their license for a year, we allowed them to buy a car on their own. All four paid cash for their first car and so far the oldest three have traded up to another nicer car as they continued to save. We promoted paying cash for everything and lived by this example.

Posted by: Jennifer at July 13, 2014 11:19 AM (lCC2I)

81 Haha, perhaps, insomniac. I stared at it the whole time she was in line though. I couldn't look away. At first I thought "oh man, that's some advanced skin cancer!" But nope. Upon closer inspection it was definitely Mary. So many, many questions.

Posted by: Lauren at July 13, 2014 11:19 AM (BPMYx)

82 Soothsayer, why are you watching that crap? You know all it does is drive you crazy.

It would drive me crazy if I watched it.

Posted by: OregonMuse at July 13, 2014 11:20 AM (+ahS9)

83 A judge in Australia ruled that incest is OK because it's just like homosexuality, and also you can abort any one-eyed kids if that's a problem.

I could've sworn progtards said there was no slippery slope.

Posted by: Ian S. at July 13, 2014 11:21 AM (8chxv)

84 How do you install delayed gratification?

Beat the shit out of your kids every time they want something. That way they stop asking and associate wanting anything out of life with pain, so they'll just give up altogether.

Posted by: Insomniac at July 13, 2014 11:21 AM (mx5oN)

85 "78
Now the TV is telling me that the violence between Israel and the Palestinians (Hamas) is because "there's no dialogue, no conversation."
"

We thought "wipe Israel off the face of the Earth" was pretty clear.

Posted by: Hamas, Hezbollah, and every Muslim ever. at July 13, 2014 11:21 AM (BPMYx)

86 Reading the book "Six Days of War" by Michael Oren, regarding the 6-day war in 1967, when the Israeli's pre-emptively cleaned the clocks of the Syrians an Egyptians.

The prologue to the war sets the table, in terms of the events, years in the making, leading up to the 6-Day War.

Some things have really not changed. The hatred of the Jews fomented by the Arabs was fresh then, and continues today, to cover up for their collective failures as societies, their inability to govern themselves. It amuses me in a very dark way to look at the "civil war" in Syria.
And prior to the 1967 war, Egypt was fighting in Yemen, and using chemical weapons against their "brother" Arabs.

Posted by: Bossy Conservative riding the comfy chair at July 13, 2014 11:21 AM (+1T7c)

87
Because this is what the Dumb People are watching.
And why I'm never surprised at the results of the elections.

Posted by: Soothsayer of The Righteous And Harmonious Fists (-442 days left) at July 13, 2014 11:22 AM (1frQp)

88 @45 - Frederick Forsyth has done some of my favorite stories, Day Of The Jackal is highly recommended.

I once went on a Fourth Protocol binge about the time the Soviet Union collapsed, I think I reread it once a month for a year.

Unlike Day Of The Jackal, the movie of the Fourth Protocol stinks despite Michael Caine's presence.

It's a fairly early example of the one thing I hate above all in moviemaking: turning every protagonist into an action-adventure character. Whether it's the this book's John Preston or George Smiley or Clancy's Jack Ryan or some of the more egregious Bond films or, for God' sake, Mr Peabody, it completely ruins the movie for me.

Posted by: JEM at July 13, 2014 11:22 AM (o+SC1)

89 Now the TV is telling me that the violence between Israel and the Palestinians (Hamas) is because "there's no dialogue, no conversation."


This is the same problem people have with bears.

Posted by: Zombie Tim Treadwell at July 13, 2014 11:23 AM (4ZPi4)

90
And there's the first promo for the pro-hillary campaign TV series on CBS -- "Madame Secretary" this Fall.

Posted by: Soothsayer of The Righteous And Harmonious Fists (-442 days left) at July 13, 2014 11:23 AM (1frQp)

91 hey come with a much needed glossary of British military and Scots slang.

Posted by: Kindletot at July 13, 2014 11:16 AM (t//F+)

Thanks for the Fraser book tips. I have found that Kindle sucks for footnoted books, or at least my Kindle-fu is inadequate to maneuver back and forth between the current page and the footnote section.

Posted by: Hrothgar at July 13, 2014 11:24 AM (o3MSL)

92 79 71?
Insomniac?

Later, when I had more sense Dad further explained that he read what he did for light entertainment and that made sense to me. He was the smartest person I have ever known- my late wife being pretty close, but he was scary-smart.

He also didn't give a hoot what other people said or thought of him outside of close circle of family and friends. Sure miss the old guy....
Posted by: backhoe at July 13, 2014 11:18 AM (ULH4o)

Your dad sounds like he was a pretty cool guy.

Posted by: Insomniac at July 13, 2014 11:25 AM (mx5oN)

93 I'm finishing up "The Dirt on Clean: An Unsanitized History" which I found out about on a Sunday book thread. Interesting to note that the European fear of soap and water has its' roots in the Black Death. There were bathhouses throughout Europe during medieval times (it was very difficult for people to keep themselves clean at home in the days before indoor plumbing) but when the plague broke out, the "experts" drew exactly the wrong conclusion - they thought the bathhouses were spreading the plague and decided it was better to keep the pores sealed up with dirt so bad "vapors" which spread disease couldn't get in. So Europeans stopped bathing up until the 19th century. (And in the 1950's only 1 house in 10 in France had a private tub or shower. )

It's occurred to me before that if you could magically transport many great figures from the past into your living room to have a chat with them - Shakespeare, Mozart, Beethoven, the Founding Fathers - you'd have a tough time sitting in the same room with them without holding your nose.

Posted by: Donna and V. at July 13, 2014 11:25 AM (+XMAD)

94 My kids are pretty young, 1-9, but we have a star system economy. They have a daily checklist. If they get all the checks, they get a star. Stars can be cashed out in increments of 10. 1 star equals 1 dollar. It works pretty well. It takes them about 2 weeks to earn 10 stars. They like having the cash to make purchases they want, and they save to buy big things. We haven't made them officially save in the past, but it might be good to start that soon too.

Posted by: Lauren at July 13, 2014 11:27 AM (BPMYx)

95 traditional family, dad works, everybody goes to church on Sunday, etc.

I"m not so sure about that. I have several friends who are agnostic at best, and both parents have always worked, who have taught their kids to save and be responsible. And I have no plenty of traditional, church going folks who cannot get their own finances in shape, let alone teach their children how to.

I think it's a matter of basic common sense, which seems to be on the verge of distinction.


Thor and I were Costco members, as were most of our very Conservative friends in SoCal. (And our Lib friends) I never felt any particular vibe from the store or those shopping in it ( Though I dropped our membership after he gave that speech at the Dem Convention)

Whole Foods is where the holier-than-thou smug lefties tended to shop in our area, so I avoided that. But to be fair, I also knew plenty of folks who shooped there who were not Libs or hipsters.

Posted by: Tammy al-Thor at July 13, 2014 11:27 AM (kwDTQ)

96 (And in the 1950's only 1 house in 10 in France had a private tub or shower. )


They never properly recovered, either. Smelly bastards.

Posted by: garrett at July 13, 2014 11:28 AM (4ZPi4)

97 Goodkind PMO with the way he finished off SOT. Go dress in black some place else and take your Steven King templates for making money with crappy books (after you did such a great job with the earlier books, common theme much?) with you.

BTW Terry how'd that selling the media rights to SOT work for you? Let's see, Harry Potter, LOTR and GOT and NOT SOT. Man your butt has got to hurt.

Posted by: Fewenuff at July 13, 2014 11:28 AM (zPNX5)

98 But long ago I came to the conclusion that if I continued to watch what Dumb People were watching, I'd become a Dumb Person myself, and I didn't want that.

That, and I couldn't stand that mindless twit Cokie Roberts. I swear that woman's goal in life is to be the most ignorant woman on TV news. That's not something that comes naturally, She has to work at it.

Posted by: OregonMuse at July 13, 2014 11:28 AM (+ahS9)

99 From the opening of Red Storm Rising

"From time immemorial, the purpose of a navy has been to influence, and sometimes decide, issues on land. This was so with the Greeks of antiquity; the Romans, who created a navy to defeat Carthage; the Spanish, who's armada tried and failed to conquer England; and, most eminently, in the Atlantic and Pacific during two world wars. The sea has always given man inexpensive transport and ease of communication over long distances. It also provided concealment, because being over the horizon meant being out of sight and effectively beyond reach. The sea has supplied mobility. capability, and support throughout Western history, and those failing in the seapower test - notably Alexander, Napoleon, and Hitler - also failed the longevity one.

--- Edward L. Beach in Keepers of the Sea.

Posted by: Anna Puma (+SmuD) at July 13, 2014 11:28 AM (9tnUZ)

100
And now CNN's headline news is pushing the "Astonish Turnaround Of Rachel Jenteal."

I shit you not. She is even more stupid today.

Posted by: Soothsayer of The Righteous And Harmonious Fists (-442 days left) at July 13, 2014 11:30 AM (1frQp)

101 92?
Insomniac?

Yeah, he was cool before the word was coined. Mom too- Master Sarge in the old WAAC in WWII. I was very lucky to have them- they never steered me wrong. Miss the Hell out of both of them.

Posted by: backhoe at July 13, 2014 11:30 AM (ULH4o)

102 Actually EC, /asshole pedantic on, money in the US is made out of linen, not paper. In many other countries it is made out of various plastics./asshole pedantic off.

If anyone has actually used a money book for their kids I would love to hear a review.

Nobody ever taught me crap about $ and I have made every mistake possible with it. Now I'm playing catch-up. Oh well, I just would have bought a brothel or brewery with it...

Posted by: OG Celtic - American at July 13, 2014 11:31 AM (9TkYo)

103 And now CNN's headline news is pushing the "Astonish Turnaround Of Rachel Jenteal."

In all fairness, it would take an astonishing amount of time for that fat ho to turn around.

Posted by: garrett at July 13, 2014 11:32 AM (4ZPi4)

104 Delayed gratification. Challenged the kids to deny themselves some little thing every day and see if they can live without it. It's something I do: do I really need this or am I simply indulging myself. Broke one kid's daily $5+ Starbuck habit. That one coffee a week tasted better than one every day. Saw self-discipline become more important to them. They had more money too.

Posted by: The Poster Formerly Known as Mr. Barky at July 13, 2014 11:32 AM (ndSrL)

105
One of the reasons Rachel sounds stupid, the TV tells me, is because she was born prematurely.

Posted by: Soothsayer of The Righteous And Harmonious Fists (-442 days left) at July 13, 2014 11:32 AM (1frQp)

106 The thrill of a saving account is watch it grow and realizing "hey, the more I put in the faster it grows" That's just me though.
Posted by: Molly k. at July 13, 2014 11:06 AM (EFsqh)

That was true back in the days of 6 percent interest. Now it's like "Wow, my account earned 35 cents in interest last month!"

Posted by: Donna and V. at July 13, 2014 11:32 AM (+XMAD)

107 @85 "We thought "wipe Israel off the face of the Earth" was pretty clear."

College housemates in '67 -- one Egyptian and one staunch pro-Israel. Some *very* spirited discussions.

The Egyptian was a smart, cultured guy -- until Israel was mentioned. He immediately went Hulk. Israel must be destroyed; no alternative.

Posted by: doug at July 13, 2014 11:32 AM (mjfdB)

108 Anna, I wouldn't presume to write your book for you! (Although a redhead on the loose would probably provide great opportunity for plot development and disaster in general, at least is has in my life!)

Posted by: Tammy al-Thor at July 13, 2014 11:32 AM (kwDTQ)

109 I am curious how many buy books at Costco.
Ours has a book section which consists of a few large tables upon which are stacked books in no apparent order.

I have glanced a few times and they seem to be mostly childrens books. I still buy real books at real bookstores, but I have never once bought a book at Costco, nor have I ever srsly browsed there. And I have never seen a book anyone elses checkiut in line. Not once in three years.

Just b/c a book sells online or at B&N does not mean ut sells well at Costco.

What irks me about this Costco incident is that it was not their customers who complained. It was the author who whined that one vendor wanted to drop his product claiming, without evidence, some sort of bias as the sole reason. And his fan base picking up the charge like sheep and in some cases extending it to accusations on 1st Amdt violations etc.

Costco is a club. If you don't like the owners, don't join. If you are a member and have feedback, provide it. But this incident wasn't emerging from members. It stemmed from an author's temper tantrum.

Posted by: Y-not at July 13, 2014 11:34 AM (zDsvJ)

110 Best way I can think of teaching kids all of the important money lessons is to introduce them to collecting.

Antiques, books, whatever...they will learn all of the lessons above, AND they will learn to care for the things they purchase.

Bonus: in 20 years, they will have items of value rather than clutter.

Posted by: garrett at July 13, 2014 11:34 AM (4ZPi4)

111 That, and I couldn't stand that mindless twit Cokie Roberts. I swear that woman's goal in life is to be the most ignorant woman on TV news. That's not something that comes naturally, She has to work at it.
Posted by: OregonMuse


Cokie Roberts father was (Thomas) Hale Boggs, who was the Democrat Majority leader many years ago, before he died in a plane crash.
Cokie's brother is Thomas Hale Boggs Jr., perhaps one of the most connected lobbyists in Washington, who is (or was) the top partner in his law firm, Patton Boggs.

Cokie may appear to be stupid, but I think it is something of an act, as she cavorts with the masses and conceals much of what she really thinks. That does not mean she is not a repellant and loathsome person, though. And still a twit.

Posted by: Bossy Conservative riding the comfy chair at July 13, 2014 11:35 AM (+1T7c)

112 I finished "Blood Feud" and it was entertaining enough. I did find myself sympathizing with the Clintons a bit, but that's only because in a battle between Clinton and Obama, Bill Clinton is going to look a bit tolerable compared to everyone else. I still denounce myself though.

And I read a pretty good mystery called "The Edge of Normal." The author's name is Carla Norton. It definitely held my interest: a race to rescue, and who is going to win? I read it in one day.

I'm bouncing around a few books right now and I got some interesting stuff at the library yesterday but for the life of me, I can't remember what besides a cook book (stuff that freezes well) and some gardening books so I can plan now for what I will do when the weather goes back to decent and rainy.

Posted by: Tonestaple at July 13, 2014 11:35 AM (B7YN4)

113 101 92?
Insomniac?

Yeah, he was cool before the word was coined. Mom too- Master Sarge in the old WAAC in WWII. I was very lucky to have them- they never steered me wrong. Miss the Hell out of both of them.
Posted by: backhoe at July 13, 2014 11:30 AM (ULH4o)

That's great. Having good parents is a real blessing that a lot of people don't receive.

Posted by: Insomniac at July 13, 2014 11:35 AM (mx5oN)

114 OK, I will make it slightly book related, the price of books in Iceland is breathtakingly high. At least the books I looked at. Also, waaaay too many copies of Hillary's new book there. It was weird seeing it prominently displayed in numerous bookshops. But I didn't see anyone buying it, or reading it

I'll bet a lot of the high price is due to transportation costs. Just getting merchandise to Iceland probably costs a fortune.

I think bookstores all over the world have waaay overbought on Hillary!'s book, and they're all soon going to be stuck with a bunch of copies nobody wants.

If I were interested in reading it, I'd simply wait a few months, when it will be cheaper than toilet paper. It'll be priced to "move" (har har).

Posted by: OregonMuse at July 13, 2014 11:36 AM (+ahS9)

115 Thanks, Molly.

Jennifer, so how did your kids practice making decisions about their money, if they weren't allowed to decide how to spend/save any of the money they earned? If you don't mind me asking, where/when did your kids grow up that they could get a job at 12?

The whole kids and money thing is fascinating to me. My parents and grandparents gave me a pretty huge allowance my whole childhood, and didn't require that I save a certain percentage, but did require that I use my allowance for a lot of stuff that my peers' parents just paid for as a matter of course. They loaned me money with interest, too. I feel like it worked pretty well for me, as I've never had the money/debt issues other people I know have had, even through some pretty lean years with a ton of kids----but using the same approach with my kids has had some mixed results.

Posted by: Jenny Hates Her Phone at July 13, 2014 11:36 AM (GmTxn)

116
When our kids were little, we gave them an allowance, but had them hold back 10% for saving and 10% for church tithing. The remaining 80% was theirs to do with as they pleased. Son said it helped him understand money.

We had our son and daughter split their allowance 10 / 15 / 75 for savings / "big ticket" items (gifts for friends' BDs, etc.) / their choice. We also paid them 5% interest, compounded quarterly, on the savings component (believe me, we weren't earning that ourselves). The primary idea behind the savings component was that they would be able to draw upon that for spending money when in college.

Son did just fine: no complaints, kept his nose to the savings grindstone and came out of college with just short of $2,500, which we closed out to him via a check.

Daughter bitched, bitched, bitched about everything: "I don't see why 'big ticket' is necessary"; "Why can't I get a job to buy a car?" (answer: "If you can buy a car, then you can pay all your college expenses."); "Why do I have to wait until Sunday to get my college spending money - can't I get an advance?" (answer: "No."). Long story short, she came out of college with not a sou to her name. A fine arts major, with nearly zero planning and organizational skills, she compounded the problem after a couple of years in the workplace by "earning" her MFA and racking up in excess of $50K in student loan debt. Three years later: with no discernable employment, she lives a life of wanderlust, drifting from one locale and attendant worthless hipster boyfriend after another. O-bot to the core, of course.

Posted by: Krebs v Carnot: Epic Battle of the Cycling Stars(TM) at July 13, 2014 11:38 AM (Pk0vQ)

117
Well, I HEARD that Rachel Jenteel was born at a very early age, and started out as a child.

Tough way to begin life, I guess.

Posted by: Bossy Conservative riding the comfy chair at July 13, 2014 11:38 AM (+1T7c)

118 Oh well, I just would have bought a brothel or brewery with it...

Posted by: OG Celtic - American at July 13, 2014 11:31 AM (9TkYo)

Instead, you wasted all that money, is that what you're saying?

Posted by: Hrothgar at July 13, 2014 11:38 AM (o3MSL)

119 But to be fair, I also knew plenty of folks who shooped there who were not Libs or hipsters.
Posted by: Tammy al-Thor at July 13, 2014 11:27 AM (kwDTQ)

WF is 2 blocks away from my place. It's much easier and more practical to run over there if I need a few things rather than driving to a supermarket. But I don't do the bulk of my shopping there.

Speaking of waste, I once saw a woman speak $300 there - just on herbal supplements and vitamins. I mentioned that to a doctor I know and he rolled his eyes and said "Money. down. toilet."

Posted by: Donna and V. at July 13, 2014 11:39 AM (+XMAD)

120 Tammy I have a huge canvas to paint on, creating a whole world. Pretty sure I can squeeze a redhead that would make Red Sonja slink away in there.

OregonMuse, I would bet in about six months those Hillary books will be returned to Simon and Schuster as unsaleable to be pulped. It never really was about selling books but buying influence.

Posted by: Anna Puma (+SmuD) at July 13, 2014 11:39 AM (9tnUZ)

121 No problem Anna!

Lauren speaking go OMG tattoo's. I went to the Def Leppard/ KISS concert last night. Yeah, some of it was that bad, like, the eighty's called and you are NOT in your teens, twenty's, or even thirty's anymore so put some more clothes on, change your hair style and what the hell were you think when you got those tats. Women with tats all over their legs, in their fifty's, BAD tats!!! Yuck!

Posted by: lindafell at July 13, 2014 11:39 AM (nKVlf)

122 118 Oh well, I just would have bought a brothel or brewery with it...

Posted by: OG Celtic - American at July 13, 2014 11:31 AM (9TkYo)

Instead, you wasted all that money, is that what you're saying?
Posted by: Hrothgar at July 13, 2014 11:38 AM (o3MSL)

Who was the guy who said he spent most of his money on booze, fast cars and fast women, and the rest he just wasted?

Posted by: Insomniac at July 13, 2014 11:39 AM (mx5oN)

123 "Cokie Roberts father was (Thomas) Hale Boggs, who was the Democrat Majority leader many years ago, before he died in a plane crash. "

And he was utterly opposed to the findings of the Warren Commission and was going to fight it out in public and had started to do so.

Care to guess who was the aide that put him on the private plane flight that crashed?
.
.
.
Bill Clinton.

Just sayin...

Posted by: OG Celtic - American at July 13, 2014 11:40 AM (9TkYo)

124 Nood

Posted by: Village Idiot's Apprentice at July 13, 2014 11:40 AM (bXQ+N)

125 Y-not, I agree with you, although I think it came from someone other than Souza, because the only comment I saw him make was that he was somewhat reluctant to believe it, since he and his publishing company always had a good relationship. (I cold totally be wrong!) I also think they may be telling the truth about poor sales; it may be doing well on Amazon, but that doesn't mean it's doing well in Costco.

Honest to God, let a private company sell whatever the hell they want to sell. Let them leave Hillary's book out there til the moths eat it if they want to...it's their company.

Posted by: Tammy al-Thor at July 13, 2014 11:40 AM (kwDTQ)

126 113?
Insomniac?

Yep- my folks were fine people and so were almost all my relatives and family friends. I was very blessed with a good start to life.

Posted by: backhoe at July 13, 2014 11:40 AM (ULH4o)

127 The principal of the school, Asabe Kwambura, told me that 219 girls are still missing and lamented that the international campaign to help -- #BringBackOurGirls -- is faltering as the world moves on.

"Continue this campaign," she urged. "Our students are still living in the woods. We want the international community to talk to the government of Nigeria to do something, because they are doing nothing."

-
Tweet! Tweet until your fingertips bleed!

Posted by: The Great White Snark at July 13, 2014 11:40 AM (Mogjf)

128 Women with tats all over their legs, in their fifty's, BAD tats!!! Yuck!



There are no good tats.

Posted by: garrett at July 13, 2014 11:41 AM (4ZPi4)

129 God I cannot type today. I mean that Dinesh and his publisher had always had a good relationship with Costco.

Posted by: Tammy al-Thor at July 13, 2014 11:41 AM (kwDTQ)

130 It's finally here! And I'm late to the party.

Anyway, I "read" Like a Mighty Army, the latest in David Weber's Safehold series. And by "read" I mean I skipped whole pages and chapters at a glance. From a comment some Moron made on this thread that his scifi actually used the word jihad rather than crusades to describe a holy war and from the descriptions of the reemergence of technology in the world, I picked the series up and have been slogging through it.

It's so bad, it's just really really bad fiction. The whole series is mostly just accounts of meetings. That's it. People just talk, they talk at the table, they talk in the bedroom, they talk over the comm channels, they monologue to themselves. And all of it theorizing about what might happen, or dissecting what did happen.

I read the series for the descriptions of technological innovation and the battles, which are basically just destruction porn because one side completely outclasses the other technologically. This latest book hardly had any of that in it. The main characters from the last six books do *literally* nothing. And this book takes the the land war from dug in defenders are ready for invaders, to dug in defenders repelled invaders, but much of this we don't see happen.

So, so bad. I went online after finishing to see if I could find other people ragging on it but didn't find enough to satisfy me, so I had to vent here. Anyone else read this?

Posted by: .87c at July 13, 2014 11:43 AM (qZPXs)

131 Cokie Roberts -- daughter of a Democrat Congresswoman and a Democrat Congressman. Perfect foil for George Stephanopoulos, former Democrat political adviser.

See, ABC News really does support diversity.

Posted by: doug at July 13, 2014 11:44 AM (mjfdB)

132 Who was the guy who said he spent most of his money on booze, fast cars and fast women, and the rest he just wasted?

I thought you were talking about St. Augustine until I thought about the "fast car" part.

Posted by: The Poster Formerly Known as Mr. Barky at July 13, 2014 11:44 AM (ndSrL)

133 Go to a nursing home and see all the burned out drug hoes with silicon tits at their knees and discolored ink bleeds running together across their jaundiced skin... so gross... especially when they are sitting next to ladies of the same age that are healthy and often still quite lovely...

Posted by: OG Celtic - American at July 13, 2014 11:45 AM (9TkYo)

134 Bill Clinton.

Just sayin...
Posted by: OG Celtic - American

It's always more than a little bit fascinating to find out how connected disparate political events seem to be.

If there was more transparency to all this, the people would not feel so bamboozled all the time. Such as electing that sociopath Clinton (twice) and almost electing that lying corrupt weasel Gore, the cowardly traitor Kerry, and now elected (twice) the narcissistic man-child Obama.

Posted by: Bossy Conservative riding the comfy chair at July 13, 2014 11:45 AM (+1T7c)

135 Yeah, I totally agree Y-Not. I don't shop at Costco, but I was under the impression it was a lot like Sam's which really isn't a place you go to buy a current best seller. I think if lefties were shrieking about Sam's not stocking a current left-leaning best seller, we'd probably see this a little more clearly.

Posted by: Jenny Hates Her Phone at July 13, 2014 11:45 AM (GmTxn)

136 I like that question.
Why no bomb shelters?


The answer is pretty damn ugly.

Dead Palestinian babies inflame antisemitic assholes.

So.......we gotta have some dead babies.


If there were no actual casualties, I suspect that the Palestinians would be creating them.

Posted by: Village Idiot's Apprentice at July 13, 2014 11:46 AM (bXQ+N)

137 124 Nood

No! No! Say it ain't so!

Posted by: OregonMuse at July 13, 2014 11:46 AM (+ahS9)

138 Vox Day, "The Last Witchking". This is a collection of three short-stories.

The titular story concerns a young man who inherits sorcerous power, grows up in some village and then succeeds to his inheritance. He's led along by various advisors giving bad advice until a succubus eats him. It has some Vathek-esque charm but otherwise I couldn't help thinking it was just a big Shaggy Dog Story. Some googling has turned up that, yes, this is just a footnote explaining the origins of evil monsters dealt with in other books.

Another story is "The Hoblets of Wiccam Fensboro". This is a Holocaust parable: the hoblets are the Jews, the orcs are Nazis, their enemy the Troll King is Stalin and the goblins are local European populations under Nazi occupation. There's an author's appendix to this one explaining that it's inspired by Italy.

Then there's "Opera Vita Aeterna" which deals with an elf who enters a monastery. The elf may or may not be *able* to accept the monks' faith, and the story doesn't answer that, but the elf does know right from wrong. More digging around uncovers that this one, also, links into other Vox Day work (which answers the question). Although this one stands on its own, in my opinion, which the first one didn't.

If there's a theme linking them all, it's the question of innate nature within free-willed sentient beings, in a Western Catholic matrix. (The second and third stories touch on race in particular.) The moral is that yes, you do have free will, and you need to exercise it.

I got the collection for free during a promotion. The titular story is worth pretty much exactly that. The second one is best where it handles orc dialogue and thought-procress; they steal the story. The third is the best of the bunch. I'd probably have posted the first story as a supplement on the Internet and saved the other two for a separate collection.

Posted by: boulder t'hobo at July 13, 2014 11:46 AM (3kZUM)

139
5 Money is a paper product.


Money DOES grow on trees!


Posted by: EC at July 13, 2014 10:09 AM (doBIb)






Actually, cash isn't paper, it's printed on cotton

Posted by: IllTemperedCur at July 13, 2014 11:46 AM (8v9fw)

140 Who was the guy who said he spent most of his money on booze, fast cars and fast women, and the rest he just wasted?

Posted by: Insomniac at July 13, 2014 11:39 AM (mx5oN)

I would swear it was W C Fields, but I couldn't find a link!

Posted by: Hrothgar at July 13, 2014 11:46 AM (o3MSL)

141 I walked away from the Safehold series after the first book. The main character is literally a digital ghost. And the bare bones of the story is akin to Weber's earlier trilogy that started with Mutineer's Moon.

Posted by: Anna Puma (+SmuD) at July 13, 2014 11:46 AM (9tnUZ)

142 Ignore my #136.
Wrong thread

Posted by: Village Idiot's Apprentice at July 13, 2014 11:47 AM (bXQ+N)

143 Actually, cash isn't paper, it's printed on cotton



Posted by: IllTemperedCur at July 13, 2014 11:46 AM (8v9fw)


***


Which grows on trees.







Little, stubby trees.

Posted by: Seamus M. at July 13, 2014 11:47 AM (NeFrd)

144 2 recommendations for those who enjoy the fairly recent Zombie genre craze.

Zombie Fallout: Mark Tofu - The main character Michael has got to be modeled after the prototypical Moron. Many of the characters map well to the moron lifestyle. Morons for everyone!

Dead Mech: Jake Bible - A Drabble novel, look it up. The structuring of the story is what I find most interesting here. 100 words, no more, no less.

Many other good ones out there. Mucho crap too. Reader beware...



Posted by: Fewenuff at July 13, 2014 11:48 AM (zPNX5)

145 One of the reasons Rachel sounds stupid, the TV tells me, is because she was born prematurely.

Posted by: Soothsayer of The Righteous And Harmonious Fists (-442 days left) at July 13, 2014 11:32 AM (1frQp)

Well, so was I. Now I have an great excuse to fall back on every time I say something stupid (which is frequently).

Posted by: Donna and V. at July 13, 2014 11:48 AM (+XMAD)

146 You did the right thing, Anna Puma. I really like tech development though, and particularly of the era to which this tech belongs, so it strung me along for a while.

Is Mutineer's Moon any good? I have March to the Sea, also mentioned here, but I'm hesitant to try any Weber books right now

Posted by: .87c at July 13, 2014 11:50 AM (qZPXs)

147 111
That, and I couldn't stand that mindless twit Cokie Roberts Eleanor Clift. I swear that woman's goal in life is to be the most ignorant woman on TV news. That's not something that comes naturally, She has to work at it.

Posted by: OregonMuse

Fixed it for my own self. Actually, come to think of it, either one will work. Take your pick.

Posted by: OregonMuse at July 13, 2014 11:53 AM (+ahS9)

148 @139 Our currency is cotton and linen

Posted by: .87c at July 13, 2014 11:53 AM (qZPXs)

149 122 118 Oh well, I just would have bought a brothel or brewery with it...

Posted by: OG Celtic - American at July 13, 2014 11:31 AM (9TkYo)

Instead, you wasted all that money, is that what you're saying?
Posted by: Hrothgar at July 13, 2014 11:38 AM (o3MSL)

Who was the guy who said he spent most of his money on booze, fast cars and fast women, and the rest he just wasted?
Posted by: Insomniac at July 13, 2014 11:39 AM (mx5oN)





George Best

Posted by: IllTemperedCur at July 13, 2014 11:53 AM (8v9fw)

150 141
I walked away from the Safehold series after the first book. The main
character is literally a digital ghost. And the bare bones of the story
is akin to Weber's earlier trilogy that started with Mutineer's Moon.


Posted by: Anna Puma (+SmuD) at July 13, 2014 11:46 AM (9tnUZ)


I thought the series was OK in the beginning, although I didn't like them turning a woman into a male robot. But it has sure as hell bogged down now.

Posted by: Vic at July 13, 2014 11:54 AM (T2V/1)

151 There is a new thread up for all the O/T political stuff.

Posted by: Vic at July 13, 2014 11:55 AM (T2V/1)

152 Fixed it for my own self. Actually, come to think of it, either one will work. Take your pick.
Posted by: OregonMuse at July 13, 2014 11:53 AM (+ahS9)

Both are dumber than sticks of gum; however, Clift has a slight edge when you factor in smugness.

Posted by: Donna and V. at July 13, 2014 11:57 AM (+XMAD)

153 Vic, yeah, that was weird--I still don't like it.

And I don't know if you can spoil something that has no plot, but they also turned the woman into a female robot in this book. So, that's progress right there I suppose.

Oh, and it gave the opportunity for this ridiculous fight scene and pushing this feminist notion that woman are equal to men--not morally or legally or mentally, but physically too, and in hand to hand combat. The self-righteousness of it is soooo bad and annoying, not to mention out of place for the culture. And it pisses me off because not only does the fight prove nothing, because it's fictional, but it doesn't prove anything in the world either because it wasn't a woman, it was an invincible android (or gynoid I suppose).

Ugh. Which brings up another problem, the main character is invincible. There's one battle scene with him and he gets shot in the chest. But so what? It can't hurt him.

And the church gets some technological secrets and I think, uh oh, there goes their mechanical advantage--except they can just advance to the next phase of industrial technology. The enemy can't compete and will never regardless of how they advance. The characters are flat and boring, and the action is fleeting.

Basically, there's nothing here. It's now a terrible series.

Posted by: .87c at July 13, 2014 12:02 PM (qZPXs)

154 Reread Brute Force by John Ellis. Always insightful. I contrasted that with

Next up is Bullard of the Space Patrol by Jameson and The Sharp End also by John Ellis.

Posted by: NaCly Dog at July 13, 2014 12:03 PM (u82oZ)

155 I have purchased books at Costco, if I know they are cheaper than amazon which sometimes they are. Also purchased a few on impulse there and found out later they would have been cheaper on amazon. So I am mostly cautious around the book table. They also, here at least, often have local area books--histories, cookbooks, things to do, hiking books etc. and those are always cheaper at Costco than amazon. But that could be because this is the corporate HQ for Costco and they have a good deal with local presses.

Posted by: ParanoidGirlinSeattle at July 13, 2014 12:08 PM (+0txR)

156 153 Posted by: .87c at July 13, 2014 12:02 PM (qZPXs)


That all correct, except the turn the female into a male robot, or cyborg depending on how you classify it.

Posted by: Vic at July 13, 2014 12:08 PM (T2V/1)

157 155 Posted by: ParanoidGirlinSeattle at July 13, 2014 12:08 PM (+0txR)


If you have a "smart" phone use it to check Amazon while at Costco. Or an android. Mine has both wifi and 3G capability so it would work there.

Posted by: Vic at July 13, 2014 12:10 PM (T2V/1)

158 156 Posted by: Vic at July 13, 2014 12:08 PM (T2V/1)

There's also a female robot now.

I'm actually talking to Vic, this is great! Thanks for all the work you do gathering and posting news, I always look for and enjoy your selection of articles.

Posted by: .87c at July 13, 2014 12:12 PM (qZPXs)

159 Finished Greg Gutfeld's Not Cool: The Hipster Elite and Their War on You. It's an HQ-like mix of good insight with dick and fart jokes that's pretty fun to read, and his central premise (that trying to be "cool" is the root of all evil) hangs together a million times better than I was expecting.

It does bog down a little when he tries to defend gay marriage on the basis that marriage isn't cool; I'd counter argue that the media/Left have done their damnedest to make it the only cool form of marriage. And his argument that marriage leads to responsibility and stability is a rough sell even for PIV marriage these days.

Posted by: Ian S. at July 13, 2014 12:12 PM (8chxv)

160 Drabbling as a way to break writers block? Chunking your way past it? Regaining focus tool?

Spoke with an edjumakated English prof/writer and Drabbling is just so much crap to the in crowd. Mmmmmm...

Posted by: Fewenuff at July 13, 2014 12:12 PM (zPNX5)

161 #70

Megan McArdle explain why it is dumb to compare Walmart and Costco as if they are the same sort of businesses:

http://tinyurl.com/k6awrvu

Posted by: Epobirs at July 13, 2014 12:12 PM (NLEgK)

162 158 There's also a female robot now.



I'm actually talking to Vic, this is great! Thanks for all the work
you do gathering and posting news, I always look for and enjoy your
selection of articles.

Posted by: .87c at July 13, 2014 12:12 PM (qZPXs)

Thank back. So they have a female now too. Damn, was it a man first? I quit getting any new ones in this series several years ago. Like you said, it has turned to shit.


You know what I think the biggest problem is? Not stopping after three books in which they wrap the whole thing up. WOT suffered from that malady as well.

Posted by: Vic at July 13, 2014 12:19 PM (T2V/1)

163 And I would have responded sooner but cat walked across my power supply, which APC stupidly designed with a push-button switch on the top. She turned off my power while I was typing.

Posted by: Vic at July 13, 2014 12:20 PM (T2V/1)

164 #105

That is true. She was supposed to be born 500 years later, when 'Idiocracy' is set and she can pass for average.

Posted by: Epobirs at July 13, 2014 12:23 PM (NLEgK)

165 Probably too late for anyone to see it, but D'Souza's book was on the shelf at Costco as of last Tuesday.

Posted by: AngelEm at July 13, 2014 12:26 PM (9nDaK)

166 That is a lousy design.

I agree with the series diagnosis, everything needs to be a series now. It seems like it's the default assumption in books and in movies, singular stories are almost the exception--at least as far as big-ticket projects go.

But because of that everything is padded out with a thousand things unnecessary to the plot just to increase the total page count.

And SPOILERS
The female robot is inhabited by another instance of Nimue, a backup copy of the digital ghost. One character is now two, so it's getting weirder. Also, if a girl touched my arm and looked into my eyes and sympathized with my struggles as much as the female robot does to the "male" robot, I'd think she was into me. So the story might get even weirder here in the next book.

Posted by: .87c at July 13, 2014 12:29 PM (qZPXs)

167 Here I am blogging with Aether Morons on my personal computer while I watch live coverage of the Cygnus spacecraft launch at a local (sort of) launch pad.

So not everything about modern life sucks.

Posted by: All Hail Eris at July 13, 2014 12:30 PM (QBm1P)

168 6
I don't understand why schools teach history, math, english and a lot of
junk, but don't push kids into taking a simple finance class. I'd think
for them to be productive adults it's at least as important as anything
else they could teach.

I teach in the College of Business at a regional university and suggested a few years ago when we revised curriculum that the Personal Finance course that is an elective for Finance majors should be required of all College of Business majors. I was in the minority (we do have a Corporate Finance class that is required of all majors, but I think one of the reasons many students struggle in that class is that they do not understand how finance impacts them) and there are very few people outside the College of Business who like the idea as well.


Posted by: Charlotte at July 13, 2014 12:33 PM (8o1wc)

169 166 The female robot is inhabited by another instance of
Nimue, a backup copy of the digital ghost. One character is now two, so
it's getting weirder. Also, if a girl touched my arm and looked into my
eyes and sympathized with my struggles as much as the female robot does
to the "male" robot, I'd think she was into me. So the story might get
even weirder here in the next book.

Posted by: .87c at July 13, 2014 12:29 PM (qZPXs)


Ewww, Weber is losing it. It least Heinlein had a brain tumor as an excuse for some of the stuff in his later years.

Posted by: Vic at July 13, 2014 12:34 PM (T2V/1)

170 it = At

Posted by: Vic at July 13, 2014 12:39 PM (T2V/1)

171 T-7 minutes!

Posted by: All Hail Eris at July 13, 2014 12:42 PM (QBm1P)

172 Mutineer's Moon starts with a NASA astronaut being kidnapped on the far side of the Moon, out of radio contact with near-side. And he finds out the Moon is actually a planetoid that has been marooned in the Sol System for over 50,000 years. It was marooned because some of the crew mutinied, they mutinied because they resented the regimentation imposed upon them by the fear of an alien race that periodically sweeps through the Milky Way scouring it clean of other intelligent species. The planetoid finds itself in a dilemma, trapped between directives to suppress the mutiny and the killer aliens are closing in; so the computer dragoons the NASA astronaut to be its new captain and to finally put down the mutiny.

Posted by: Anna Puma (+SmuD) at July 13, 2014 12:42 PM (9tnUZ)

173 #109

The fact is, Costco owns a major chunk of brick and mortar book sales, and can do significant damage to a title by denying it visibility. A big chunk of the book buying public NEVER sets foot in a book store and gets all of their books in the places where they buy necessities like groceries. Getting into the rack at the supermarket can be a huge boost for a mid-list author.

Costco generally stocks whatever is on the NYT Bestseller list and whatever the publishers are expecting to make the list shortly after release. The titles on the list are known weeks in advance and Costco knew full well that the book was going to be there two weeks later when they pulled the title. This was not normal procedure for them.

Posted by: Epobirs at July 13, 2014 12:42 PM (NLEgK)

174
169
166 The female robot is inhabited by another instance of Nimue, a backup copy of the digital ghost. One character is now two, so it's getting weirder. Also, if a girl touched my arm and looked into my eyes and sympathized with my struggles as much as the female robot does to the "male" robot, I'd think she was into me. So the story might get even weirder here in the next book.


Posted by: .87c at July 13, 2014 12:29 PM (qZPXs)

Sounds like the series is turning into a colossal waste of time. You oughta just punt it and find something better to read. None of us is getting any younger, you know.

Posted by: OregonMuse at July 13, 2014 12:43 PM (+ahS9)

175 172 Posted by: Anna Puma (+SmuD) at July 13, 2014 12:42 PM (9tnUZ)


I actually liked that series. And you will note Weber wrapped it up at the 3rd book.

Posted by: Vic at July 13, 2014 12:48 PM (T2V/1)

176 #169

Not a brain tumor. The problem was a blocked carotid, which made it like living in a state of perpetual sleep deprivation.

Posted by: Epobirs at July 13, 2014 12:48 PM (NLEgK)

177 99
From the opening of Red Storm Rising

"From time
immemorial, the purpose of a navy has been to influence, and sometimes
decide, issues on land. This was so with the Greeks of antiquity; the
Romans, who created a navy to defeat Carthage; the Spanish, who's armada
tried and failed to conquer England; and, most eminently, in the
Atlantic and Pacific during two world wars. The sea has always given man
inexpensive transport and ease of communication over long distances. It
also provided concealment, because being over the horizon meant being
out of sight and effectively beyond reach. The sea has supplied
mobility. capability, and support throughout Western history, and those
failing in the seapower test - notably Alexander, Napoleon, and Hitler -
also failed the longevity one.

--- Edward L. Beach in Keepers of the Sea.
And I was wondering what I might re-read. Issue solved!

Posted by: Charlotte at July 13, 2014 12:49 PM (8o1wc)

178 176
#169

Not a brain tumor. The problem was a blocked carotid, which made it like living in a state of perpetual sleep deprivation.


Posted by: Epobirs at July 13, 2014 12:48 PM (NLEgK)

I thought he had a brain tumor. Oh well.

Posted by: Vic at July 13, 2014 12:50 PM (T2V/1)

179 OK here is what Wiki says:


A transient ischemic attack (TIA) is a transient episode of neurologic dysfunction caused by ischemia (loss of blood flow) - either focal brain, spinal cord or retinal - without acute infarction (tissue death).


And it was caused by a blocked carotid artery from heavy smoking.

Posted by: Vic at July 13, 2014 12:55 PM (T2V/1)

180 Vic, oh yes that trilogy is pretty good. I was just describing it to note similarities. And the characters in it you care about, from Collin to Jiltanith.. and even Dahak himself.

One of the other similarities is, keeping the planet primitive so the killer aliens don't find the mutineers and blow up their hidey-hole.

Posted by: Anna Puma (+SmuD) at July 13, 2014 01:02 PM (9tnUZ)

181 180 Posted by: Anna Puma (+SmuD) at July 13, 2014 01:02 PM (9tnUZ)


Yeah ripping off himself.

Posted by: Vic at July 13, 2014 01:03 PM (T2V/1)

182 Posted by: Charlotte at July 13, 2014 12:33 PM (8o1wc)

Charlotte, try proposing it as a "basics of personal finance counseling" course.

"...as your continue on as a finance professional you will be in the position of having to explain techniques, tactics and outcomes of various financial choices. This includes computation of opportunity costs v...." And you can take the bumpf from there.

Teaching someone to not be an idiot is seen as mere mechanical instruction and below the dignity of professionals, teaching people to teach people not to be idiots is seen to be noble. Dunno why.

Posted by: Kindltot at July 13, 2014 01:04 PM (t//F+)

183 BTW, I have read every book he has written and have all of them on my bookshelf. And I am slowly getting e-book versions as they become available cheap.


Same for Heinline

Posted by: Vic at July 13, 2014 01:06 PM (T2V/1)

184 182
Posted by: Charlotte at July 13, 2014 12:33 PM (8o1wc)



Charlotte, try proposing it as a "basics of personal finance counseling" course.



"...as your continue on as a finance professional you will be in the
position of having to explain techniques, tactics and outcomes of
various financial choices. This includes computation of opportunity
costs v...." And you can take the bumpf from there.



Teaching someone to not be an idiot is seen as mere mechanical
instruction and below the dignity of professionals, teaching people to
teach people not to be idiots is seen to be noble. Dunno why.

Thank for the idea... will have to contemplate that some. Could use one of Ramsey's books for the class as well. Although I have to admit Personal Finance for Dummies was pretty good.

Posted by: Charlotte at July 13, 2014 01:16 PM (8o1wc)

185 The numbers D'Sousa reports for books sold by Costco really... aren't that good. It seems plausible to me that it was a pure numbers decision. I don't know what was "won" by the public "OMG censorship" fit other than forcing Costco to continue to stock books that everyone is buying on Amazon, *and* to get it all in the news at exactly the right time for the movie release.

(The numbers I saw, which may well be wrong, accounted for approximately 8 books sold per Costco store in the US in a month. The numbers for "just this last week!" were 1.5-ish book sales per store. Fox News reported that the book was a "Best Seller on Amazon" as if that was relevant to Costco.)

He also tried to get the "OMG censorship" offense brigade to shame the US military into *not banning his movie* on overseas bases. I find this pretty much equivalent to lying and it bugs me. Someone decides which movies get distributed overseas to military bases and which are shown in-theater (so to speak) in war zones. Not getting on that list is not being *censored* or *banned*. It's... not getting on that list because someone thought that soldiers would rather see Guardians of the Galaxy or Captain America.

Someone will have to tell me if the movie is any good. I'm not hearing anything about how good this movie is, I'm just hearing how it's being "banned" and "censored" and how everyone is oppressing D'Souza.

Posted by: Synova at July 13, 2014 01:25 PM (aez/F)

186 185 I don't know about Costco specifically but it book has sold well all over. In fact, it has sold better than Scankles' book.

Posted by: Vic at July 13, 2014 01:31 PM (T2V/1)

187 D'Souza, unless there has been a change in sentencing, is going to jail for an FEC violation that would have been ignored if he had just donated instead to Rahm Emanuel or ANY Dem Pol. The chance that someone on the board of Costco has done the exact same thing is pretty high, but they never put out a movie denigrating a powerful politician, they just sell jumbo packs of toilet paper.

I think he might have a reason to be touchy right now, Federal prison makes you more sensitive to discrimination of any sort, or so I gather.

Posted by: Kindltot at July 13, 2014 01:38 PM (t//F+)

188 BUT IS THE MOVIE ANY GOOD?

Posted by: Synova at July 13, 2014 01:39 PM (aez/F)

189 Ain't seen it. Plan to when it gets to the cheap house in town. Have you seen it?

Posted by: Kindltot at July 13, 2014 01:42 PM (t//F+)

190 Sorry, not thinking, clearly you haven't. I'm too cheap to see first run movies, but his last one was pretty tame. It was very well done, but pretty tame.

Posted by: Kindltot at July 13, 2014 01:44 PM (t//F+)

191 Seriously... saying that D'Souza has cause to feel persecuted is playing the victim card... the one where the biggest victim wins. Nor do his feelings, justified or otherwise, change whatever really prompted a stocking decision.

Also, do you know why minority (in particular) politicians seem to be constantly in trouble for graft and kickbacks and whatever else? Because they honestly believe that this is how politics is supposed to work, and their excuse is that if it was a *white* politician, they'd get away with it. Bottom line is, you can't cheat an honest man. That someone else gets away with cheating does not make you less of a cheater.

People can make honest mistakes and often do, but "they get away with dirty politics, so I should get away with dirty politics" is not... appealing.

Posted by: Synova at July 13, 2014 01:47 PM (aez/F)

192 187 Posted by: Kindltot at July 13, 2014 01:38 PM (t//F+)


I posted a link on the morning news thread that went to a site that says the Obama regime goes after anyone that is critical of them, and they go after them hard.


Nixon may have had an enemies list that was never used, but Obama has turned it into a routine way of doing buisness and you get diddlysquat from the MFM.

Posted by: Vic at July 13, 2014 01:49 PM (T2V/1)

193 191 The problem is those kind of campaign violations are routine, especially for Democrats. It is odd that he is the one of the rare few prosecuted for it. It is even more odd that he will go to jail.


Normally, the only time they do that is when you convert contributions to "personal" use. But Democrat routinely do this too by giving their wives, sons, relatives, etc jobs of some sort in campaign related staff.

Posted by: Vic at July 13, 2014 01:53 PM (T2V/1)

194 Finished The Tome of Bill Compendium (the first four books) yesterday evening, and spent the whole time chuckling and wondering what Rick Gualtieri calls himself on the ONT. It's astonishing just how much of the books sounds like the ONT with a plot and fewer topic changes! (Good thing I've read the ONT for quite a while now, otherwise the language and such would have spoiled the stories for me.)

Next up is The Gift of Fear. I must say, Sundays around here can get pricey, but I always find something new in the book thread to enjoy and/or learn from.

Many, many thanks to all who post or comment here.

Posted by: Empire1 at July 13, 2014 02:10 PM (peixv)

195 Monster Hunter Nemesis.


That is all.

Posted by: GGE of the Moron Horde, NC Chapter at July 13, 2014 02:22 PM (6fyGz)

196 "Tried to read 'The Lathe of Heaven' by Ursula Le Guin, but so much of it was based on the Al Gore fantasy of a world devastated by global warming (all the mountains are snow-less, NYC is drowning) that I choked on it less than a quarter in."

Posted by: waelse1 at July 13, 2014 10:22 AM (DCe6Z)

IMHO it was still a net gain to have read this as the story is basically about how an elitist intellectual gets too much power and ruins everything ever.

Posted by: BornLib at July 13, 2014 02:59 PM (zpNwC)

197 I'm currently reading Three Parts Dead by Max Gladstone. He's a new name in fantasy fiction but INHO he's off to a good start with his debut novel. Funny thing is my girlfriend used to babysit him back when he was a kid.

Posted by: BornLib at July 13, 2014 03:10 PM (zpNwC)

198 IMHO it was still a net gain to have read this as the story is basically about how an elitist intellectual gets too much power and ruins everything ever.

Posted by: BornLib at July 13, 2014 02:59 PM (zpNwC)

Someone tried to convince I should have held my nose and continued, but any book tempting me to throw my kindle across the room isn't worth the risk. Extremely allergic to BS.

Posted by: waelse1 at July 13, 2014 05:40 PM (cm4Tf)

199 Yeah, I know I am late, late, late.

I finished "The Stranger."

What a thoroughly wretched book. A wretched protagonist. A wretched story.

The "hero" of the story kills a man for stupid reasons. The "hero" is an atheist. He is the patron saint of all atheists. What a dummy. He is condemned to die by the court via guillotine. That is pretty cool, really. But not enough to redeem this story.

Did I mention the book is wretched? You have been warned.


Posted by: Grampa Jimbo at July 13, 2014 05:58 PM (V70Uh)

200 I have been trying to read all the "classics" that I didn't read in my youth. "The Stranger" mystifies me. Why was it ever considered any good?


Posted by: Grampa Jimbo at July 13, 2014 06:02 PM (V70Uh)

201 Also, do you know why minority (in particular) politicians seem to be constantly in trouble for graft and kickbacks and whatever else? Because they honestly believe that this is how politics is supposed to work, and their excuse is that if it was a *white* politician, they'd get away with it.

I think it's more that the Alcee Hastings'es of the world are evil and think they can get away with it. They use the race card not because they believe in it, but because they think it works.

When it doesn't work, they'll be out on their fat asses again.

Posted by: boulder t'hobo at July 13, 2014 06:16 PM (3kZUM)

202 BUT IS THE MOVIE ANY GOOD?

Probably not. The reviewers generally called it conservative comfort-food. And the title was a bait-and-switch, since it really *wasn't* an alt-history of the world without America (I'd watch such a movie, btw).

I did see "2016" though, and do recommend (re)watching that.

Posted by: boulder t'hobo at July 13, 2014 06:20 PM (3kZUM)

203 If it helps any, The Lathe of Heaven was written long before Algore decided to hitch his wagon to global warming - in fact, back when the Scare of the Month was global cooling - so it wasn't some sort of attempt to align herself with the warmening fad. I read it back in the 80s and enjoyed it.

Posted by: jaed at July 13, 2014 06:29 PM (o9BrI)

204 Unexpected find in chapter 7 of Three Parts Dead by Max Gladstone:

"Exasperated, she dropped the line of discussion. She would have time to explain the problems of a command economy to Abelard after Kos's return."

Posted by: BornLib at July 13, 2014 06:42 PM (zpNwC)

205 @ Grampa Jimbo,
If you want a classic book about an atheist who considers himself above everyone else and murders a person for no real reason, but which is surprisingly uplifting and legimately good, I recommend Crime and Punishment

Posted by: .87c at July 13, 2014 08:48 PM (qZPXs)

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