Saturday Gardening Thread, May Begins! [KT]

bluewybells.jpg

Our local Bluebells, blooming madly in NW Illinois. From Lizabth, a mostly morning reader of the Q.

Hello, Horde! Welcome to May! The photo above is in honor of our own Bluebell.

Foraging and Wildcrafting

From time to time, we include a piece on foraging here to remind Ace that he, too, could be a gardener. We have several foraging enthusiasts in The Horde, as well. Via Instapundit, wild, safe, non-organic greens.

So I hang out in several online groups intended to help people learn to identify plants. Some of those are tilted toward identification and determination of edibility. If there's one thing I've learned from my time lurking (and occasionally offering an ID) it's that people ought to be dead, a lot. Misidentification of wild edible plants is rampant. . . .

However, that being said, the thing that made me facepalm in the last little while was the cautionary addendum someone made when talking about eating backyard weeds 'did you use pesticides or fertilizers? It might not be safe to eat!'

Lady, not everything natural is safe and nutritious. Good on you for realizing that much. However, not everything organic is instantly safer and more nutritious than the green stuff you can pick in your own yard. Being available swaddled in Organic stickers at the high-dollar supermarket does nothing other than make your pocketbook slimmer. So yes, eat the dang weeds from your yard. Even if you did happen to use fertilizer and pesticides. Because if you used those according to the directions, and you wash what you pick, it's fine. Really.

Just make sure you know what it is.

teasell.jpg

Does this plant look edible?

Check out this study of urban weeds, some growing in heavily contaminated soils, which were found to be perfectly safe when washed with tap water. Your yard, I can almost guarantee, is cleaner than San Francisco is. Organic growers also use pesticides and fertilizer, and you should wash that expensive produce, too, because a lot of what they use is likely to be more harmful than the 'non-organic' synthetic chemicals traditional farming relies on. Organic farms use animal manure for fertilizer, and if they do so improperly, fecal bacteria is going to be on your produce - even if they use it properly, your contamination risk is higher than with conventional growing methods. Improper fertilizer and pesticide use is always a problem, in any method. . .

For those in the still partly frozen north, another piece by the same author on "wildcrafting" while waiting for spring. The rest of us can read it in preparation for next year. Sounds like fun, if you're the type, which I sort of fit into. And who knows, it could be good preparation for the Zombie Apocalypse.

Here in Southern Ohio the green things are beginning to burgeon. Trees are blooming, birds are singing... wild things are still thin on the ground if you are hungry, however. The early spring greens I talked about last week are definitely here. Now is the time to start watching for teasel leaves peeping through the detritus, and about the only time of the year I'd eat them. They have little spines that get harder and pokier as they mature. The tall seedheads make them easy to spot, though.

Now is the time of year to start eyeing the wild places around you and taking note of signs that there will be goodies here later. . . .

It features, along with things like Teasel and Service Berry, Violets and Spring Beauty. I have actually eaten Teasel stems, but not the leaves. I had just read about their use as a survival food. They weren't bad. Peeled them. Never got to the leaves as they were first poking out of the ground. A few weeks back, we featured photos from Le Vieux Garde of violets and some white flowers which turned out to be Spring Beauty. I knew that violets were edible. I didn't know that Spring Beauty, AKA Claytonia virginica, (among other species) was edible. The Eat the Weeds guy's summary is informative. The Iroquois believed that eating the roots raw permanently prevented conception. Other tribes ate them cooked.

It is closely related to Miner's Lettuce, famous from California history. Botanists have moved the Claytonia genus from the Portulaca family to the Montiaceae (Miner's Lettuce) family, which also includes the beautiful Lewisia.

Anyway, there are several closely related species of Claytonia which are called "Spring Beauty" and which all have edible tubers and leaves. They come in pink (generally striped over pink or white) and white. There is a yellow variant in New Jersey. There are species in the Far North. They grow more slowly than Miner's Lettuce, so you should be careful about harvesting unless there are a lot of them, which there sometimes are. Here's a thorough piece on how to harvest the tubers and leaves. More work for an edible return than with, say, potatoes.

spring-beaut.jpg

This piece from the Brooklyn Botanic Garden includes a fancy recipe with quail eggs.

Speaking of fancy, I don't remember which friend sent in this photo of morels. Have you ever foraged for morels? Cooked with them? Gathered other wild mushrooms? Caution is really, really in order.

morells.jpg

Critters and Photography

Illiniwek sent in some photos last month. We'll post some more when we have room:

A couple blue herons come around, but one chases off the other. Henbit is the purple backdrop, in soybean stubble. Cattails coming back to life also.

cranne.jpg

To me, here seems to be movement in that photo, somehow.

One way to take time-lapse photos of birds on the wing.

Keep the camera still (tripod), take a burst of shots, then use layers in photoshop to create the final image. As the bird slows down, the gap closes between each frame. Itís a lovely way to show the wings in flight.

On a larger scale, here are some of the wildflowers above Carrizo Plain:

carrizo plain.jpg

Azaleas and Rhododendrons

Last week, a lurker asked about some bushes in his neighbor's yard, saying he wanted some for his yard. We decided they were azaleas. We have had some great photos of azaleas in the past few weeks, as well as comments from members of The Horde who are fans of native azaleas. So this week, a few pointers for those who might like to grow an azalea or rhododendron.

The UGA Extension has a wonderful summary on selecting and growing azaleas and rhododendrons.

Botanically, azaleas are members of the Ericaceae (Heath) family, which includes blueberries and mountain laurel. All azaleas are rhododendrons, and both are in the genus Rhododendron. The term "rhododendron," however, is commonly used to refer to the group of plants usually with large, leathery, evergreen foliage, while "azalea" refers to those with smaller, thinner leaves. Generally, azaleas and rhododendrons have the same cultural requirements.

The first section makes sense of the many native azaleas plus groups of hybrid azaleas and rhododendrons. You can find similar information for types suited to the West in the Sunset Western Garden Book. Further down on the page is cultural information. Plant azaleas and rhododendrons a little higher than grade (there are diagrams) in acid soil, away from surface tree roots.

Check regional recommendations for the cultivar you like against those compiled by the American Rhododendron Society. Their "Plant Data" section includes lists of "good performers" by region. Gardenia.net has some fun information with photos, on companion plants, fragrance, bloom time, regional considerations, etc.

Callaway Gardens in Georgia even has an azalea watch. If you are planning a visit, here are some other things that bloom there during the year. Has anyone visited?

callway g.jpg

Flowering Trees

Gordon notes that the University of Minnesota is hosting bee-related events for home schoolers.

minnbees.jpg

Interesting that a U of M facility recognizes the market for this. Crabapple bloom day is about May 9 so I will journey out for that. They have 135 taxa of crabapple.

I once walked outside at about 3 a.m. when our crab had just sent out a huge pollen burst. The wind was calm. It was like a magenta fog.

The Invisible Hand send in this lovely photo. Know what this Southern California tree is?

yeltree.jpg

OK. This isn't a tree, but still:

Here is a wonderful wisteria. It is my favorite flower of all. I love the look and I have many good memories associated with it. This one vine is in an empty lot here in town (zone seven; northern Alabama)and has taken over two trees.
Le Garde Vieux

wistter1.jpeg

wisterr2.jpeg

More Tulips

Highlights from the comments last week included the weekly summary from Pat* (a good reason to check back on the comments on Sunday) and a tip from kallisto about a big, spectacular tulip farm in New Jersey.

philmag.jpg

This allows us to segue back into tulips. A few weeks ago, our favorite Swiss garden dog, Rocky, welcomed some American guests, two young women, into his garden.

rockythor.jpg

He had tulips.

rockytul.jpg

They visited Lugano, where the city had planted tulips along the lake.

luganotul.jpg

And here is a nice rhododendron in Lugano, too.

luganorhod.jpg

More tulips from Thanksgiving Point in Utah:

tulip23.jpg

We appreciate the great photos we have waiting for next week. If you would like to send information and/or photos for the Saturday Gardening Thread, the address is:

ktinthegarden
at g mail dot com

Include your nic unless you want to remain a lurker.

Posted by: Open Blogger at 01:02 PM




Comments

(Jump to bottom of page)

1
the corgis have been summoned

Posted by: AltonJackson (click here for MiMoMe details) at May 04, 2019 01:09 PM (KCxzN)

2 Hi. Haven't read the content or comments yet but wanted to get a question in before I get willowed. I have some planting beds that have been invaded by grass from the lawn. My hope is to use Roundup Weed Grass Killer on those patches, but I'm afraid it will kill the lawn as well, because of the way grass spreads through rhizomes. Is it safe to use on the planting beds if I keep it off the lawn, does anyone know? Thanks in advance! I love the garden thread by the way and appreciate it every week, though I am almost exclusively a lurker. Thanks for all you do, KT.

Posted by: Plum Duff (formerly lurker above) at May 04, 2019 01:09 PM (fRQuc)

3 Ok. Who snuck the dog into the gardening thread??? The Swiss garden dog? Hmmmm

Posted by: Diogenes at May 04, 2019 01:10 PM (TGayj)

4 Speaking of garden creatures, there's a Godzilla marathon on movies channel. First up mothra.

Posted by: Tinfoilbaby at May 04, 2019 01:11 PM (QJIRF)

5 Cut the grass in honor of the garden thread and managed to get WeaselDog poo all over one of the mower wheels.

Posted by: Weasel at May 04, 2019 01:11 PM (MVjcR)

6 This allows us to segue back into tulips. A few weeks ago, our favorite Swiss garden dog, Rocky, welcomed some American guests, two young women, into his garden.


And you gave the Horde pictures of the dog and flowers.

It's like you don't even know us.

Posted by: Where Da White Womenz At? at May 04, 2019 01:12 PM (LIKFr)

7 I'm proud to say I've lived my entire life and have eaten - almost exclusively - organic foods throughout. Even through the 70s, 80s, 90s, and early 2000s. Organic every time.

I'm especially proud to have only ever fed my children organic foods, too.

Posted by: Moron Robbie's Spirit Animal is Alfred D. Whintle at May 04, 2019 01:13 PM (uTPtJ)

8
Know what this Southern California tree is?

yellow?

Posted by: AltonJackson (click here for MiMoMe details) at May 04, 2019 01:13 PM (KCxzN)

9 Spent the morning trying to clean up mom's cottage garden.

Can you say overgrown mess?

No chance of moving anything, or re-organizing as mom is having a fit that I will kill her flowers.

Sigh.


Posted by: My life is insanity at May 04, 2019 01:14 PM (Z/jzm)

10 We have a tiny raised garden bed - really our daughter's handiwork. (I supervised, of course.)

Planted some Lowe's Marigold starts
Transplanted:
-wild garlic from the yard
-strawberries from runners that escaped their pots last year growing by the front porch.
-asparagus that survived in a shallow bed from last year.
-room for more

Got it set up before this week's monsoons hit. Handy.

Posted by: mindful webworker - morning glories and cantaloupes at May 04, 2019 01:15 PM (VQjKe)

11 I'm in the Great White North, and just can't wait for Spring to finally kick in! Our last frost date isn't for 2 weeks, but I was so desperate for something to grow I invested in some second-hand Lee Valley grow lights to start seeds. And they're really doing well!

I've got 4 kinds of tomatoes growing, some jalapeno peppers (they're very slow growers), and even 12 tiny strawberry plants, started from seed. I bought one of those $2.50 planting kits at the dollar store, with a pot, a packet of seeds and some soil, and lo and behold, 12 of them germinated!

Now I'm boosting my gardening to a whole new level, and have, for the first time, built a cold frame out in the garden to harden off the plants. Best of all, it was built entirely out of scrap materials! Some years ago I had built a long box-like platform to support the mattress for a day bed. We got rid of the day bed, but the long sides were too big to just toss in the garbage so I kept them in the garage. Now I've brought them out, built side pieces out of a piece of scrap board, and for the top I'm using a piece of tempered glass shower door taken from a bathroom renovation a few years ago.

I put some tomatoes out there a few days ago, and it's really working! They can stay out overnight even though the temperatures are down to 40. Today it's going to be sunny, so I might have to open the lid a crack so they don't wilt from the heat. But I figure this will gain me about 2 weeks on the usual gardening date, and my tomatoes may be ready to plant outside by Victoria Day.

Posted by: Dr. Mabuse at May 04, 2019 01:17 PM (qLdeh)

12 Looking forward to getting back to my roots on the land tomorrow!

Posted by: Weasel at May 04, 2019 01:18 PM (MVjcR)

13 Plum Duff (formerly lurker above) at May 04, 2019 01:09 PM

I don't know what is in that particular week killer or how specific it is for grass, even. Does the label say if the weed-killing effect persists after use? If so, it might make its way into the lawn through the soil.

If it only kills plants it hits and doesn't affect future growth, you might run a shovel along the border between the planting bed and the lawn to cut any connecting roots.

Posted by: KTbarthedoor at May 04, 2019 01:26 PM (BVQ+1)

14 Going to fill the 'deck planters' with flowers today.

Had to really hold myself back at the nursery yesterday-- all the brightly colored lovelies and healthy veggie seedlings were *so* tempting-- spent less than $60, for once!

Posted by: JQ at May 04, 2019 01:29 PM (gP/Z3)

15 My neighbor has a big stand of milkweed, but hasn't gotten any monarchs to come by. I have a stand of hummingbird bush. And I have a lot visit.

Posted by: Tinfoilbaby at May 04, 2019 01:31 PM (QJIRF)

16 Anybody hunt/forage wild mushrooms....would you?

Posted by: BignJames at May 04, 2019 01:34 PM (ykq7q)

17 I used to forage wild mushrooms, particularly morels, but also brains & shaggy mane.

The area I liked became a housing development over a decade ago.

Haven't gone since.

Posted by: JQ at May 04, 2019 01:39 PM (gP/Z3)

18 Mushrooms should be popping up now around here, or so I've heard. It has been so wet I haven't gone out ... still too wet to do anything in the garden, might try to spray in prep of putting out muskmelon that I have started inside. They are getting to run across the living room floor.

There seem to be super blooms in Arizona and CA from the rains ... beautiful.

Posted by: illiniwek at May 04, 2019 01:39 PM (Cus5s)

19 JUST ASSEMBLED MY DR CHIPPER SHREDDER!!!!

Posted by: Washington Nearsider: LOL, get fucked at May 04, 2019 01:40 PM (T8HPM)

20 KT, it's Glyphosate and the bottle says it doesn't affect the soil, just the plants, so you can plant new plants 1-3 days after use. It's just the fact that it says it kills "to the roots" that concerns me, because of the rhizome factor.

I did talk to a support person from Roundup and they said it would be safe if it didn't get on the actual lawn, but I was curious to see what the experience was of the horde, if any.

Posted by: Plum Duff (formerly lurker above) at May 04, 2019 01:40 PM (fRQuc)

21 Cursed is the ground because of you; through painful toil you will eat food from it all the days of your life. It will produce thorns and thistles for you, and you will eat the plants of the field. By the sweat of your brow you will eat your food until you return to the ground, since from it you were taken; for dust you are and to dust you will return. -- Genesis 3:17-19

Posted by: Insomniac at May 04, 2019 01:40 PM (Mzfcs)

22 16 Anybody hunt/forage wild mushrooms....would you?
Posted by: BignJames at May 04, 2019 01:34 PM (ykq7q)
-------
Years ago I knew a woman who thought it'd be a swell idear to go into the woods with her dad and pick mushrooms to have with dinner. As I recall, they had some friends over too. They all nearly died and spent a couple weeks in the hospital.

Posted by: Weasel at May 04, 2019 01:40 PM (MVjcR)

23 Magic mushrooms grow best in animals shit right?

Posted by: Tinfoilbaby at May 04, 2019 01:40 PM (QJIRF)

24 19 JUST ASSEMBLED MY DR CHIPPER SHREDDER!!!!
Posted by: Washington Nearsider: LOL, get fucked at May 04, 2019 01:40 PM (T8HPM)
-------
Nice! I gave the one I have at el farmo a tune up this spring. Runs like a champ.

Posted by: Weasel at May 04, 2019 01:42 PM (MVjcR)

25 It would be interesting to see a Venn diagram of people who use food thermometers when cooking chicken and people who forage for wild mushrooms to eat.

Posted by: Moron Robbie's Spirit Animal is Alfred D. Whintle at May 04, 2019 01:42 PM (uTPtJ)

26 Posted by: Weasel at May 04, 2019 01:42 PM (MVjcR)

I've got an acre of woods, and brush piles galore from the previous owners. It's time to fix ALLLLLL of that.

Posted by: Washington Nearsider: LOL, get fucked at May 04, 2019 01:44 PM (T8HPM)

27 Maybe I should start taking drugs.

Posted by: Insomniac at May 04, 2019 01:44 PM (Mzfcs)

28 26 Posted by: Weasel at May 04, 2019 01:42 PM (MVjcR)

I've got an acre of woods, and brush piles galore from the previous owners. It's time to fix ALLLLLL of that.
Posted by: Washington Nearsider: LOL, get fucked at May 04, 2019 01:44 PM (T8HPM)

Two words: cleansing fire.

Posted by: Insomniac at May 04, 2019 01:45 PM (Mzfcs)

29 26 Posted by: Weasel at May 04, 2019 01:42 PM (MVjcR)

I've got an acre of woods, and brush piles galore from the previous owners. It's time to fix ALLLLLL of that.
Posted by: Washington Nearsider: LOL, get fucked at May 04, 2019 01:44 PM (T8HPM)
------
The chipper does a great job. It's somehow very gratifying to shove a 4" limb in one end and have a cloud of sawdust shoot out the other.

Posted by: Weasel at May 04, 2019 01:47 PM (MVjcR)

30 Magic mushrooms are typically found in manure, yes, but like the same general conditions as any other 'shroom.

Perhaps they are simply *more visible* on, say, cow patties at the edge of a meadow, than slash piles in a forest?

Posted by: JQ at May 04, 2019 01:47 PM (gP/Z3)

31 Sunshine Daydream,, Walk you in the tall stream

Posted by: Cosmic Charliie at May 04, 2019 01:47 PM (PUmDY)

32 The chipper does a great job. It's somehow very gratifying to shove a 4" limb in one end and have a cloud of sawdust shoot out the other

Posted by: Weasel at May 04, 2019 01:47 PM (MVjcR)

I've got the 3" version. Maybe it's the one for white guy branches?

Posted by: Washington Nearsider: LOL, get fucked at May 04, 2019 01:48 PM (T8HPM)

33 glyphosate somehow "tricks" the plant into making food the plant can't use, so it dies. But they engineered the crop to be able to use the variant food. Seems safe even if it was on the edible part directly imo, but most would not want that.


The wild plants have adapted and now many are very resistant. The plants did that "naturally", so I don't really see glyphosate as a "poison". I get the concentrate on my skin at times, have breathed in some of the mist ... haven't noticed any side effects.

Posted by: illiniwek at May 04, 2019 01:48 PM (Cus5s)

34 Glyphosate got Alex Jones banned, another one of his conspiracy theories proven correct. Don't ban me.

Posted by: Tinfoilbaby at May 04, 2019 01:49 PM (QJIRF)

35 The chipper does a great job. It's somehow very gratifying to shove a 4" limb in one end and have a cloud of sawdust shoot out the other

Posted by: Weasel at May 04, 2019 01:47 PM (MVjcR)

I've got the 3" version. Maybe it's the one for white guy branches?
Posted by: Washington Nearsider: LOL, get fucked



Do you guys recommend bleach or something else to get rid of DNA?

Posted by: Bandersnatch at May 04, 2019 01:51 PM (fuK7c)

36 Tulip Time starts today in Holland, Michigan.

Posted by: Deplorable Ian Galt at May 04, 2019 01:51 PM (ufFY8)

37 32 The chipper does a great job. It's somehow very gratifying to shove a 4" limb in one end and have a cloud of sawdust shoot out the other

Posted by: Weasel at May 04, 2019 01:47 PM (MVjcR)

I've got the 3" version. Maybe it's the one for white guy branches?
Posted by: Washington Nearsider: LOL, get fucked at May 04, 2019 01:48 PM (T8HPM)
--------
I think mine says it'll handle up to 4 1/2". It will as long as it's a soft wood (like pine) but at that diameter I seem to spend as much time limbing the stuff flush with the trunk as I do chipping.

Posted by: Weasel at May 04, 2019 01:52 PM (MVjcR)

38 Anybody hunt/forage wild mushrooms....would you?
Posted by: BignJames at May 04, 2019 01:34 PM (ykq7q)

*****

A friend of mine runs a pizza place. They have standing orders to call the police if anyone brings in their own mushrooms. Several arrests over the years. Some people really miss the 60's.

Posted by: Diogenes at May 04, 2019 01:53 PM (TGayj)

39 Bander: I've had good luck with a 4:1 bleach to lime ratio.

I mean, what?

Posted by: Washington Nearsider: LOL, get fucked at May 04, 2019 01:53 PM (T8HPM)

40 oh, and glyphosate binds quickly with the soil ... even dirty water will make it ineffective. It needs to be sprayed on the green parts of the plant to work.

Posted by: illiniwek at May 04, 2019 01:53 PM (Cus5s)

41 ked


Do you guys recommend bleach or something else to get rid of DNA?
Posted by: Bandersnatch at May 04, 2019 01:51 PM (fuK7c)
-
Yes to bleach. Lots and lots of bleach.

Posted by: Weasel at May 04, 2019 01:54 PM (MVjcR)

42 All of us down at the Brattleboro Women's, Gay, Lesbian, and Tri-Gender Reproductive Clinic thinks that we be must do something now or in 10 yeers all of thas will be gone do to Globull Warming !!. We must eloect Burnie Sanders as Presdent, Repersentertive OCR as Vice Presdent and put Presdent Obama on that Supereme Cort thing so the chilfrin of color will has a future !!!

Posted by: Mary Clogginstien from Brattleboro (aka: Obamaboro), VT at May 04, 2019 01:54 PM (qM84C)

43 I've kept a small colony of native mason bees going for nearly twenty years, and this year am going to try native leafcutter bees. They don't make honey or build a hive so are pretty non-agressive. They die after laying their eggs, in the fall the cocoons are harvested and kept in the refrigerator til the next spring.

Posted by: Lirio100 at May 04, 2019 01:55 PM (JK7Jw)

44 The chipper does a great job. It's somehow very gratifying to shove a 4" limb in one end and have a cloud of sawdust shoot out the other

Posted by: Weasel at May 04, 2019 01:47 PM (MVjcR)

I've got the 3" version. Maybe it's the one for white guy branches?
Posted by: Washington Nearsider: LOL, get fucked at May 04, 2019 01:48 PM (T8HPM)
--------
I think mine says it'll handle up to 4 1/2". It will as long as it's a soft wood (like pine) but at that diameter I seem to spend as much time limbing the stuff flush with the trunk as I do chipping.
Posted by: Weasel at May 04, 2019

*****

There's obviously a size joke here but I'll let it slide.
My sis-in-law lives on 3 acres. She used a full Spring to clean up the area. Lots of trees. Looks like a park now.

Posted by: Diogenes at May 04, 2019 01:55 PM (TGayj)

45 19 JUST ASSEMBLED MY DR CHIPPER SHREDDER!!!!
Posted by: Washington Nearsider: LOL, get fucked at May 04, 2019 01:40 PM (T8HPM)
---
Pro tip: Break down femurs first.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at May 04, 2019 01:56 PM (kQs4Y)

46 Dr. Mabuse at May 04, 2019 01:17 PM

I am impressed that you started strawberries from seed!

And the cold frame sounds great.

Posted by: KTbarthedoor at May 04, 2019 01:57 PM (BVQ+1)

47 All Hail Eris, She-Wolf of the 'Ettes 'Ettes at May 04, 2019 01:56 PM (kQs4Y)

That's good gouge.

Posted by: Washington Nearsider: LOL, get fucked at May 04, 2019 01:57 PM (T8HPM)

48 Dumb but great lyrics in Sugar Mag

Posted by: Cosmic Charliie at May 04, 2019 01:57 PM (PUmDY)

49 mindful webworker - morning glories and cantaloupes at May 04, 2019 01:15 PM (VQjKe)

Fun that you're helping your daughter with that.

Posted by: KTbarthedoor at May 04, 2019 02:00 PM (BVQ+1)

50 Anybody know what that new Beyond Meat product is made from?

Posted by: Tinfoilbaby at May 04, 2019 02:01 PM (QJIRF)

51 ".. at that diameter I seem to spend as much time limbing the stuff flush with the trunk as I do chipping."Posted by: Weasel


you mentioned getting the kind with its own motor a few weeks back, which makes sense for convenience. But I'll probably go with the tractor power version ... just for that reason you mention. I want it to pull through the little branches ... like Tim the Toolman ... "more power".

The 8" one from these guys is the plan ... Canadian, so the dollar goes further.


woodlandmills.com/wood-chippers/

Posted by: illiniwek at May 04, 2019 02:01 PM (Cus5s)

52 She can wade in a drop of dew.

Posted by: Cosmic Charliie at May 04, 2019 02:01 PM (PUmDY)

53 Bluebell's are lovely. I don't see them much here in the NW.

Posted by: Diogenes at May 04, 2019 02:01 PM (TGayj)

54 50 Anybody know what that new Beyond Meat product is made from?
Posted by: Tinfoilbaby at May 04, 2019 02:01 PM (QJIRF)
---
How many times do I have to tell you people?!?

Posted by: Charlton Heston at May 04, 2019 02:03 PM (kQs4Y)

55 Comey a huge pos. How dare he call Trump amoral. Does he think he is invincible?

Posted by: Cosmic Charliie at May 04, 2019 02:07 PM (PUmDY)

56 Plum Duff (formerly lurker above) at May 04, 2019 01:40 PM

If it is glyphosate, it will kill plants besides grass if it gets on green parts or on new cuts. But as Illiniwek says, soil deactivates it. Still, I would use a shovel to sever connections between roots in the grass in your planting beds and in the lawn. Especially if you don't have a barrier in place. The grass in the lawn will grow back if some along the edges gets killed, though.

Posted by: KTbarthedoor at May 04, 2019 02:08 PM (BVQ+1)

57 On wild mushroom foraging:

Go along with an *experienced* person/group!

This can be tough, as some are extremely protective of their "secret places". (Around here, the knowledge of locations is passed down within families along with the identification tips.)

If you cannot positively identify it, don't even pick it.

If you've found a good spot, don't pick ALL -- leave the oldest 'shrooms to produce spores for the next crop!

... or so I've been told...

Posted by: JQ at May 04, 2019 02:08 PM (gP/Z3)

58


you mentioned getting the kind with its own motor a few weeks back, which makes sense for convenience. But I'll probably go with the tractor power version ... just for that reason you mention. I want it to pull through the little branches ... like Tim the Toolman ... "more power".

The 8" one from these guys is the plan ... Canadian, so the dollar goes further.


woodlandmills.com/wood-chippers/
Posted by: illiniwek at May 04, 2019 02:01 PM (Cus5s)
-------
I was tempted to go the PTO implement route, but I'm mostly just doing a few limbs here and there and rarely have a big marathon chipping session to make hooking it up worth the effort.

Posted by: Weasel at May 04, 2019 02:10 PM (MVjcR)

59 I think the "does this plant look edible?" plant may be an artichoke. If so, my answer is an enthusiastic yes! We had artichokes for dinner this past Tuesday.

Only reason I make this guess is the random knowledge that artichokes are in the thistle family.

On the mushroom front, last year at about this time we went to husband's family reunion in Indiana. As a Texas girl, morel hunting has always had an exotic allure to me. It's much too hot and dry for them to grow here.

Anyway, one of the guys there was a veteran morel hunter and took us hunting in a nearby wood. Highly successful trip and we cooked up our share the next day. I thought they tasted more like calamari than mushrooms, but in any event they were yummy.

Posted by: Art Rondolet of Malmsey at May 04, 2019 02:11 PM (S+f+m)

60 Mary Clogginstien from Brattleboro (aka: Obamaboro), VT at May 04, 2019

Have you tried offering your clients raw Spring Beauty tubers to see if the Iroquois were right? Or isn't Mr. Sanders into that "natural" kind of stuff?


Posted by: KTbarthedoor at May 04, 2019 02:12 PM (BVQ+1)

61 Plum Duff,
The glysophate won't hurt most (non-target) grasses. I don't know that anything slows bermuda, so why worry?
Great for bluegrass, fescues, rye. You won't notice it in zoysia.

Wild mushrooms. There's a group called the "fool-proof four". Can't really be confused with anything else.
I routinely eat chicken of the woods. (Laetiporous cincinnatus) but can't eat the more common L. suphureous. Go figger.
Also, we used to grow shiitakes (very easy) til wife got allergic.

Posted by: Marky at May 04, 2019 02:13 PM (Gl6GI)

62 Good afternoon Greentumbs
Was out on deck reading and watching hawk flying around.
Still didn't get garden plants but chives are already flowering.

Posted by: Skip at May 04, 2019 02:13 PM (BbGew)

63 I think it is funny that Mitt Romney uses words like amoral when talking about PDT

Posted by: Cosmic Charliie at May 04, 2019 02:13 PM (PUmDY)

64 Tinfoilbaby at May 04, 2019 01:31 PM

Just goes to show you that monarchs are a lot more fickle about where they lay their eggs than about where they get nectar.

Still, your neighbor might inspect carefully. They tend to lay eggs singly, in out of the way locations. Also, they prefer some species of milkweed over others for egg-laying.

Posted by: KTbarthedoor at May 04, 2019 02:14 PM (BVQ+1)

65 Does this plant look edible?
-------

I routinely take a nibble of Oxalis when I happen across a nice clump.

Posted by: Mike Hammer, etc., etc. at May 04, 2019 02:15 PM (CDGwz)

66 Mitt needs to check himself.

Posted by: Cosmic Charliie at May 04, 2019 02:16 PM (PUmDY)

67 Oh,
Serviceberry grows wild in the mid-west, but is a wonderful cultivated small tree, large bush.
We have some serviceberry jam in the cupboard, and I usually get a serviceberry pie or two each spring. First fruit to ripen here in western Mo.

Posted by: Marky at May 04, 2019 02:17 PM (Gl6GI)

68 Good afternoon Greentumbs
Was out on deck reading and watching hawk flying around.
Still didn't get garden plants but chives are already flowering.
Posted by: Skip at May 04, 2019 02:13

******

I have a family of eagles living in a nearby small stand of forest. Beautiful to watch them soar. It's a good break from weeding.

Posted by: Diogenes at May 04, 2019 02:19 PM (TGayj)

69 My purple iris are up and blooming, I also have light lavender/ yellow that bloom a little later.

Posted by: Skip at May 04, 2019 02:20 PM (BbGew)

70 Thanks KT, I was walking down to my neighbors last week and there were a few of those fuzzy catipillars on the blacktop. What are they if you know?

Posted by: Tinfoilbaby at May 04, 2019 02:22 PM (QJIRF)

71 Mitt apparently has no problem with lying to his constituents and acting holier than all of them. Thanks, Utah.

Posted by: Cosmic Charliie at May 04, 2019 02:23 PM (PUmDY)

72 Serviceberry grows wild in the mid-west, but is a wonderful cultivated small tree, large bush.
We have some serviceberry jam in the cupboard, and I usually get a serviceberry pie or two each spring. First fruit to ripen here in western Mo.
Posted by: Marky
--------

Here, W. NC, the Serviceberry trees have fruit just showing, and green.

Posted by: Mike Hammer, etc., etc. at May 04, 2019 02:24 PM (CDGwz)

73 Thanks for the information, everyone! I'll try separating with the shovel, but one reason I wanted to use the Roundup is that I'm somewhat weak and not a great hand at shoveling stubborn stuff.

Posted by: Plum Duff (formerly lurker above) at May 04, 2019 02:24 PM (fRQuc)

74 Is serviceberry for real? Where?

Posted by: Cosmic Charliie at May 04, 2019 02:28 PM (PUmDY)

75 I just bought my vegetable plants and a bunch flowas.

Posted by: JT at May 04, 2019 02:28 PM (Ia+Tb)

76 Could some Wisconsin Moron chase the Orioles and Grosbeaks back south.
We got 1-2 fleeting visits during the downpours and now they're gone.

Posted by: DaveA at May 04, 2019 02:30 PM (FhXTo)

77 Cursed is the ground because of you; through painful toil you will eat food from it all the days of your life. It will produce thorns and thistles for you, and you will eat the plants of the field. By the sweat of your brow you will eat your food until you return to the ground, since from it you were taken; for dust you are and to dust you will return. -- Genesis 3:17-19
Posted by: Insomniac

Ladies and Gents- how about a BIG round of applause for...

MR. SUNSHINE !

Posted by: JT at May 04, 2019 02:31 PM (Ia+Tb)

78 Not buying serviceberries

Posted by: Cosmic Charliie at May 04, 2019 02:31 PM (PUmDY)

79 Wood hyacinth is the closest thing to 'bluebells' I have here. (Scilla campanulata)

Pretty & spreads slowly. Good deep blue color and loves semi-shade; tolerant of poor, dry soil.

Posted by: JQ at May 04, 2019 02:33 PM (gP/Z3)

80 Service berries sounds like a yogurt shop in a posh LA location

Posted by: Tinfoilbaby at May 04, 2019 02:34 PM (QJIRF)

81 My investigations wooly caterpillars are ok, they are large moths and are fine, swallowtail caterpillars are colorfull and if you don't have a lot of use for your dill plants let them go too.
Pretty much anything else KILL.

Posted by: Skip at May 04, 2019 02:35 PM (BbGew)

82 Sounds like bullshit

Posted by: Cosmic Charliie at May 04, 2019 02:37 PM (PUmDY)

83 Got all the yard chemicals (pre-emergent, fertilizer, broad leaf herbicide) and tomatoes in before surgery. Decorative peppers are ready for transplanting, actually past ready and getting pot bound. Maybe next week when grandson is here. Still limited to nothing as far as bending, lifting, or twisting is concerned. Pansies have to be pulled up but look better now than they did all winter. They're where the peppers go.

Posted by: Agitator at May 04, 2019 02:38 PM (m9DnX)

84 Lol serviceberries-- they grow all over the place. Have walked on by them for decades but never picked, processed or even eaten one before.

Grandma may have used them Way Back When, but never passed down any recipes that called for them.

*shrugs*

Posted by: JQ at May 04, 2019 02:38 PM (gP/Z3)

85 Gorgeous flowers

Busy busting our butts with apple tree planting and other yard work

Last snow bank is almost gone

Posted by: Misanthropic Humanitarian at May 04, 2019 02:40 PM (aA3+G)

86 Cosmic,
Just call it shadblow, and it makes it all alright.
https://www.southernliving.com/plants/serviceberry-shadblow

Posted by: Marky at May 04, 2019 02:43 PM (Gl6GI)

87 My strawberries sent runners all over the raised bed. I didn't know they were self-multiplying.

Posted by: kallisto at May 04, 2019 02:45 PM (bZ5DM)

88 Yard chemicals? Isn't the idea of growing your own to avoid those?

Posted by: Tinfoilbaby at May 04, 2019 02:45 PM (QJIRF)

89 50 Anybody know what that new Beyond Meat product is made from?
Posted by: Tinfoilbaby at May 04, 2019 02:01 PM (QJIRF)
---------------
People.

Posted by: BunkerInTheBurbs, still needs a new Nic! at May 04, 2019 02:45 PM (9dQxE)

90 Yard chemicals? Isn't the idea of growing your own to avoid those?

Maybe for some folks.

I like growing my own so I can pick when *ripe and flavorful*, as opposed to store-bought (rock-hard and tasteless.)

Posted by: JQ at May 04, 2019 02:49 PM (gP/Z3)

91 Growing up we went to Callaway Gardens every year, from around 1970 - mid 1970's

Posted by: Evasiveboat42 at May 04, 2019 02:51 PM (Rz2Nc)

92 I wish one of you would go to the trouble of growing raspberries and send them to me.

Posted by: Weasel at May 04, 2019 02:52 PM (MVjcR)

93 There's a pond up the street where I go to nature watch. Redwing blackbirds, snapping turtles and Eastern painted, ducks and geese of course. Saw a dark blue-grey bird with tern like wings and a skinny long beak that points downward, I guess to spear the minnows in the shallows.

Posted by: kallisto at May 04, 2019 02:54 PM (bZ5DM)

94 Tinfoilbaby at May 04, 2019 02:22 PM

Fuzzy caterpillars usually grow into moths. There are several moths that grow from fuzzy caterpillars. A few kinds of those caterpillars sometimes migrate en masse.

Don't touch fuzzy caterpillars. Some are toxic. Certainly don't touch your eye after touching a fuzzy caterpillar without washing your hands. The little hairs can be bad news.

Posted by: KTbarthedoor at May 04, 2019 02:54 PM (BVQ+1)

95
92 I wish one of you would go to the trouble of growing raspberries and send them to me.
Posted by: Weasel at May 04, 2019 02

Ha the same could be said for reloading

Posted by: Misanthropic Humanitarian at May 04, 2019 02:56 PM (aA3+G)

96 Some chemicals are worse than others. I prefer biodegradable chemicals, when possible.

I like to know the mode of action. And I generally don't worry about chemical fertilizers. Then again, I am not near any bodies of water.

Posted by: KTbarthedoor at May 04, 2019 02:56 PM (BVQ+1)

97 Weasel at May 04, 2019 02:52 PM

You mean growing, picking and packing raspberries and sending them to you, right?

Posted by: KTbarthedoor at May 04, 2019 02:58 PM (BVQ+1)

98 Serviceberry is an outstanding 4-season tree, one of the very best specimen trees you could ever want. Autumn Brilliance is an especially nice variety for Fall color, but it's hard to go wrong with any of them. They're native to our area and I have one in our backwoods.

We had our yearly serving of poke sallet this week. It's officially Spring now!

Posted by: Red-headed 'ette at May 04, 2019 02:59 PM (lvY8+)

99 I already have tomatoes here, planting season is early

Posted by: Tinfoilbaby at May 04, 2019 03:00 PM (QJIRF)

100 Yard chemicals? Isn't the idea of growing your own to avoid those?

Oh, I forgot insecticide. Better living through chemistry. Can't have a yard here, coastal southern NC, without them. You can have a weed lot. Crab grass, goose grass, poa annua, henbit, oxyalis, dandelion, just to mention a few. And more insect varieties than you can count.

Posted by: Agitator at May 04, 2019 03:01 PM (m9DnX)

101 Bluebell's are lovely. I don't see them much here in the NW.
Posted by: Diogenes at May 04, 2019 02:01 PM (TGayj)
---------

Why thank you, Diogenes *bats eyelashes*. I don't get out there that often.

Posted by: bluebell at May 04, 2019 03:01 PM (aXucN)

102 Bluebells and spring beauties! I feel right at home, like I'm in my local park. Lizabth and KT, thanks for the bluebell pic especially.

Beautiful photos all. I especially love the wildflowers.

We are having a fine crop of pollen this year. Lovely if you like the color slime green/yellow. But on the positive side my herbs that I've planted are all doing well. My seedlings are up and I hope hope hope they don't drown this year like they did last year.

Posted by: bluebell at May 04, 2019 03:04 PM (aXucN)

103 A good read today. And spectacular photos. Thanks.

Posted by: Cumberland Astro at May 04, 2019 03:06 PM (d9Cw3)

104 "A time to be plantin'
a time for Ike Clanton
the green bees of summer are callin' me home

was so good to be young then
to be close to the oith..."

Posted by: JT at May 04, 2019 03:09 PM (Ia+Tb)

105 Nood pets

Posted by: Olddog in mo at May 04, 2019 03:13 PM (GsUre)

106 I only have wild strawberries, I guess you could eat them but they are tiny. But anyway they grow all over the place here.

Posted by: Skip at May 04, 2019 03:13 PM (BbGew)

107 Bryan Ferry is a complete bad ass.

Posted by: Cosmic Charliie at May 04, 2019 03:14 PM (PUmDY)

108 64 Tinfoilbaby at May 04, 2019 01:31 PM

Just goes to show you that monarchs are a lot more fickle about where they lay their eggs than about where they get nectar.

Still, your neighbor might inspect carefully. They tend to lay eggs singly, in out of the way locations. Also, they prefer some species of milkweed over others for egg-laying.
Posted by: KTbarthedoor at May 04, 2019 02:14 PM (BVQ+1)

Damn i just bought milkweed seeds to put in pots in the front yard. I'm gonna be pissed if all I end up with weeds spreading everywhere and no monarchs.

Posted by: bebe's boobs destroy at May 04, 2019 03:15 PM (tUOCc)

109 106. my aunt had so many she made jam from them one year. That took a lot of dedication.

Posted by: kallisto at May 04, 2019 03:20 PM (Fy1TT)

110 97 Weasel at May 04, 2019 02:52 PM

You mean growing, picking and packing raspberries and sending them to you, right?

Posted by: KTbarthedoor at May 04, 2019 02:58 PM (BVQ+1)
------
Yes! And overnight shipping would be greatly appreciated.

Posted by: Weasel at May 04, 2019 03:28 PM (MVjcR)

111 That 'edible' plant is teasel. It was used to tease yarn, I think, by the pioneers.

Posted by: Cicero Kaboom! Kid at May 04, 2019 03:29 PM (+7uO0)

112 Spring Beauty, eh? Who knew. And edible at that.

Thanks KT!

Posted by: Le Garde Vieux at May 04, 2019 03:30 PM (xTFXi)

113 92 Weasel
Check back with me in a week or so and I'll push some raspberrys theough the USB port to you.

Posted by: Le Garde Vieux at May 04, 2019 03:42 PM (xTFXi)

114 bebe's boobs destroy at May 04, 2019 03:15 PM

What kind of milkweed seeds did you buy?

Posted by: KTbarthedoor at May 04, 2019 04:00 PM (BVQ+1)

115 You're most welcome, Bluebell! The photo seemed apt.

Hubby's burning brush. A chipper might be an easy sell when he is done with this session of burning. It was a real hard winter on the trees.

I've hiked six miles this morning over hill and dale bird-watching. Good fun.
Now I am sitting by my opened window watching the Baltimore and Orchard Orioles fight over the grape jelly.....good wholesome fun for a Saturday afternoon.

Posted by: lizabth at May 04, 2019 04:11 PM (RFh5Y)

116 The monarch catipillars are big and ugly,

Posted by: Tinfoilbaby at May 04, 2019 04:22 PM (Vy3s7)

117 114 What kind of milkweed seeds did you buy?
Posted by: KTbarthedoor at May 04, 2019 04:00 PM (BVQ+1)

Showy Milkweed. Asclepias speciosa

"Irresistible Blend". Asclepias incarnata

I'm also going to put in the local lupine where the lavender died out front since the Monterey B.T. works at keeping caterpillars off it. I gave up growing it because caterpillars kept coming out of nowhere and destroying the plants. Chewed them completely to bits. This BT stuff is working great on the volunteers that came up in my next door neighbor's yard this year.

Posted by: bebe's boobs destroy at May 04, 2019 04:31 PM (tUOCc)

118 I just saw a magnificent bird at my backyard birdfeeder, they almost never come into the city. A bit too far to take a picture, plus as soon as I opened the back door even a little it spooked him. so I found a web picture for you.

indigo bunting:

https://tinyurl.com/y35uab7f

Posted by: Tom Servo at May 04, 2019 04:36 PM (k1TUh)

119 I wonder if the horde can give me some advice on this. I planted some perennials in a raised brick planter area last summer, and they died over the winter, maybe due to snow exposure. These were sort of a succulent, maybe too much water content compared to other perennials. What could I have done? Maybe cover in mulch over the winter to protect them?

Posted by: Next in line at May 04, 2019 04:37 PM (AIpka)

120 2 good sources on wild plant identification are Weeds of the West by Larry Burrill and identifying and harvesting edible medicinal plants in wild and not so wild places by Wildman Steve brill

Posted by: Sock monkey hexadecimal monkey living in a binary world at May 04, 2019 04:47 PM (X8vlu)

121 Next in line: I don't know how cold your winters are, but anything planted in a raised bed is going to be more exposed to the cold than a plant that's actually growing in the ground. The roots probably got too cold and that killed the plant. A lot of mulch might help. I've occasionally grown shrubs in pots as I didn't have a good place in the garden to put them. When winter came, I dug holes and planted them, pot and all, in the ground. It protected their roots from the cold and they survived; I just dug them up again in the spring.

Posted by: Dr. Mabuse at May 04, 2019 04:49 PM (qLdeh)

122 I'm jealous of all you Zone 3 and 4 gardening horde members I'm in what the map would say is is zone five in reality it's probably closer to zone 6 think Anchorage Alaska started some tomatoes and pickling cukes in those little mini greenhouses today planted my first crop of spinach chard and lettuce earlier in the week Monday morning it was 27 degrees on my porch

Posted by: Sock monkey hexadecimal monkey living in a binary world at May 04, 2019 04:53 PM (X8vlu)

123 I wish one of you would go to the trouble of growing raspberries and send them to me.
Posted by: Weasel

How many starts do you want. They're good hardy producers. Our original starts came from my mother's garden. She got her starts from my grandfather. Good producers. In a good year we harvest around 40 gallons and that doesn't include what our friends and family pick

Posted by: Sock monkey hexadecimal monkey living in a binary world at May 04, 2019 05:01 PM (X8vlu)

124 Thanks, Dr.

Posted by: Next in line at May 04, 2019 07:18 PM (AIpka)

125 bebe's boobs destroy at May 04, 2019 04:31 PM

Those should work OK. Tropical milkweed is their favorite for laying eggs. A. tuberosa (butterfly weed) is fine for nectar but not a favorite for egg laying.

Posted by: KTbarthedoor at May 04, 2019 08:13 PM (BVQ+1)

126 Posted by: Next in line at May 04, 2019 04:37 PM (AIpka)

Sounds like it may have been a sedum of some sort (Autumn Joy and Vera Jameson are very common cultivar), in which case it probably wasn't the cold that did it in, but poor drainage, even in a raised bed. If you grow it again, make sure the crown isn't gummed up by mulch; nugget-type mulch around the crown would be better than anything too fine. Don't remove any stalks/stems it may have going in to winter. Don't over water or over fertilize it, especially going in to winter.

Posted by: Red-headed 'ette at May 04, 2019 08:13 PM (lvY8+)

127 Sock monkey hexadecimal monkey living in a binary world at May 04, 2019


Snowed in Utah along the Wasatch Front on May Day, too. Has to be global warming. Good luck with your garden.

Posted by: KTbarthedoor at May 04, 2019 08:15 PM (BVQ+1)

128 Good lord, my apologies. I thought I had deleted the first paragraph!

Posted by: Red-headed 'ette at May 04, 2019 08:18 PM (0fAst)

129 Red-headed 'ette at May 04, 2019 08:18 PM

Oops. I deleted the second one. Any revisions?

Posted by: KTbarthedoor at May 04, 2019 08:21 PM (BVQ+1)

130 No, that's perfect, thank you, KT!

Posted by: Red-headed 'ette at May 04, 2019 09:41 PM (98L8v)

131 From Idaho's Treasure Valley: Yeah, anyone who follows my posts has to be patient - it's a rare Saturday that I can post while this thread is young.

Weasel, if you're anywhere near SW Idaho, show up in season and I can feed you red raspberries. We're propagating the ones we found on our property, and are giving root-starts to friends as well.

I do miss edible Miners Lettuce, which grew wild in my yard in CA. I notice Territorial Seed Co. sells its seed - I should put that in my order next year.

The neighborhood irrigation system is on, which meant a day of turning on every irrigation zone, and watching every single sprayer to be sure it was still rotating. Husband will have to replace a bunch this year - some are already done.

The 2 new trees we planted on the 13th (a white dogwood and a redbud, both 5-6 feet tall) are doing well. We'd put landscape cloth under that area; today we got coarse bark chips laid down over the landscape cloth.

The lilacs are flowering. Fabulous scent! I prune lower branches off those each spring so they don't block the sprayers.

Lilies of the valley are getting started as well - another fabulous scent! (Any 'ettes remember Muguet des Bois perfume? If so, ladies, we're dating ourselves...)

The tulips are starting to fade - but as consolation, the many clumps of purple Siberian Iris around the house are budding and will be glorious very soon. I'll probably post "free clumps" this fall on the local Nextdoor website, since some clumps are getting overgrown.

I remembered to harvest some oregano and thyme *before* it flowered, this year - I can probably harvest even more. After that and the sage leaves are all dried, I'm thinking of getting out my mortar and pestle, and making my own "poultry seasoning"-type blend. Not much else to say about the outdoor garden - early stuff is in; next good planting time isn't until mid to late May.

My current most urgent task is pulling dead leaves off the strawberries - they're already flowering, and I haven't done my spring cleanup yet!

34 Deplorable Ian Galt, et al, for your amusement, here is the story of My Official Holland Dump Tulips: My husband has a brother in Holland, MI (plus a wife and 3 girls). During the Festival, people are welcome to take notes as to what varieties they might like to take home. When the Festival is over, they have one day when you're welcome to come and take the named varieties of bulbs home (assuming nobody's taken all of your favorites before you get there). But, any unclaimed tulips go to the Holland Dump later. So if you missed the official "grab your favorite named varieties" day, or you don't care what you get, you grab the bulbs on Dump Day. So one year, our nieces grabbed us a pile of tulip bulbs from the dump. There was a family wedding we attended that summer, so they brought the bulbs to the wedding and gave them to us there. We brought them home to Idaho and planted them. They've grown and multiplied so well, that we'll need to dig and divide them this fall!

Posted by: Pat* at May 04, 2019 11:54 PM (2pX/F)

132 Pat* at May 04, 2019 11:54 PM

Do you cut the lower branches off the lilac so the sprinklers won't hit them, or is that just an excuse to bring some fragrant flowers indoors?

Posted by: KTbarthedoor at May 05, 2019 12:22 AM (BVQ+1)

133 Sock monkey hexadecimal monkey living in a binary world at May 04, 2019 05:01 PM

40 gallons is a lot of raspberries. Sounds wonderful.

Posted by: KTbarthedoor at May 05, 2019 12:29 AM (BVQ+1)

134 KT, the trimming is specifically so the lower branches of the lilacs will not block the sprayers. A small number of flowers brought indoors is just an accidental by-product. (Most of the flowering branches are higher up.)

Posted by: Pat* at May 05, 2019 11:28 PM (2pX/F)

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