Saturday Gardening Thread: Looking Forward, Looking Back [KT]

horseplow.jpg

"Maintaining heritage is a good thing" - Illiniwek

Planting corn, horses must have liked this better than plowing.

Hello, Gardeners and Friends of Gardeners. A while back, Illiniwek had a good idea: Why not, during the gardening off-season, reflect a little on the farm and garden developments that got us to where we are today? He has sent in some heritage photos of the garden, yard, structures and farm of his family from years gone by. Do you have any photos like that? Sent some in for next week.

This is also the time of year in much of the country where gardening involves work in hopes of future rewards. The RHS suggested garden activities for February are heavy on work, light on immediate rewards.

Our photos today from The Horde show a few rewards, but also reflect work.

Cumberland Astro sends the following:

Here are a couple of pictures I took in the past week at my bird feeder (black oil sunflower seed.) One picture is of a Red Bellied Woodpecker and the other is of Bluebirds. Both are very common in the woods behind my house, but I had never before seen them at the feeder.

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The first half of winter here on Tennessee's Cumberland Plateau was brutally cold, with the temperature often in single digits, and extended periods of below-freezing temperatures. I'm guessing that bugs and other preferred foods are pretty scarce, so these guys are now having to hang out with the seed feeders to get a good meal.

IMG_3679.jpg

Nice to get a little action at the feeders when you invite birds. Any new bird signtings in your yard or neighborhood?

A reminder that sunflower seeds inhibit the growth of some plants. Don't put a feeder by precious, delicate garden plants.

Sherpa_K2 has some Winter Bamboo that looks full grown

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and a lot of plants emerging. Here are a few:

Artichoke. Looks kind weedy when young, I think. Impressive plant when larger.

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Bluebells. I'm guessing that you would have to know where you planted these to know what they were.

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Bearded Iris. Can't wait to see these in bloom.

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Gardens of The Horde

We didn't have much in the way of cold weather here in the San Joaquin Valley during the fall and early winter, but we are getting some hard frosts now. Kind of late for that around here. Has to be Global Warming.

Flowers near the house seem to be OK. I'll have to check the fruit trees in a few days.

Anything going on in your garden, yard or outdoor nieghborhood?

If you would like to send information and/or photos for the Saturday Gardening Thread, the address is:

ktinthegarden
at g mail dot com

Include your nic unless you want to be a lurker.

Got any strawberry questions or experiences? Favorite varieties? Non-standard types?

justadd.jpg

Just Add Cream


Posted by: Open Blogger at 12:55 PM




Comments

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1 Those strawberries look sort of odd.

Posted by: HH at February 24, 2018 12:54 PM (mIJBI)

2 Yes, HH. They are not a standard variety. They are more like wild strawberries. Note the pink flowers.

Posted by: KTbarthedoor at February 24, 2018 12:56 PM (BVQ+1)

3 Rocks and Beauty were those two horses, iirc. They had like six others. Amazing they could get 250 acres planted like that, and plowed, and harvested by hand. Big families were common, as were big gardens. But they found time to grow flowers too.

Posted by: illiniwek at February 24, 2018 12:58 PM (bT8Z4)

4 HI KT!!

Posted by: Weasel at February 24, 2018 12:59 PM (Sfs6o)

5 i used to love strawberries, but they seem more sour and tasteless than the sweet berries i recall in my youth. may be it's me. maybe it's the imports of some generic large but tasteless varieties.

Posted by: musical jolly chimp at February 24, 2018 01:01 PM (Pg+x7)

6 illiniwek at February 24, 2018 12:58 PM

Beautiful horses. My mother grew up on a farm with both work horses and tractors. My aunt was once brushed off the back of a horse rushing back to the barn and knocked out cold. When she came to, she couldn't remember what peanuts were.

Posted by: KTbarthedoor at February 24, 2018 01:01 PM (BVQ+1)

7
Thanks for the Garden Thread, KT.

Lawn is greening up, growing... and sodden for the last three months. More rain forecast too. I fear for the future.

Posted by: Hadrian the Seventh at February 24, 2018 01:02 PM (oHfF3)

8 Used to pick wild strawberries when I was a kid in upstate NY. Man those things were small.

Posted by: HH at February 24, 2018 01:02 PM (mIJBI)

9 Some years ago, I bought a little pot that came
with strawberry seeds for $1.00 at Target. The strawberries were tiny,
but delicious. I divided repotted the plants every year and they
kept producing berries. We'd eat them by the
handful like candy. I don't know the variety, but they were incredibly
sweet. Not a bad return on my investment!

Posted by: Hoplite Housewife at February 24, 2018 01:03 PM (akSgU)

10 Jethro Tull!!!

Posted by: Gentlemen, this is democracy manifest at February 24, 2018 01:03 PM (LWu6U)

11 Short post today. I'm going to be away from the internet for much of the day, but I will check back later.

Really love the heritage idea, Illiniwek. I think I can access some old farm structure photos from my family, but I don't think the quality of the photos is real good.

Posted by: KTbarthedoor at February 24, 2018 01:03 PM (BVQ+1)

12 im thinking about a blackberry/raspberry patch for WeaselAcres.

Posted by: Weasel at February 24, 2018 01:04 PM (Sfs6o)

13 They're too big and uniform to be wild strawberries.

Posted by: Surfperch at February 24, 2018 01:04 PM (BwJGV)

14 Hi, Weasel!

Posted by: KTbarthedoor at February 24, 2018 01:04 PM (BVQ+1)

15 Re: Bird sightings...

Was sitting on the back porch of Casa Backwardio one morning last week drinking a cup of coffee (my morning constitutional, as it were).

Woodpeckers are common and the ones I usually see are pretty noisy. Occasionally, I'll see a red-headed one since they're pretty big (about the size of a crow) and easy to spot. That morning I saw a whole red-headed woodpecker family out for breakfast in two trees; Papa, Momma and Baby.

That was pretty kewl.

Posted by: BackwardsBoy likes lobster at February 24, 2018 01:05 PM (tRaq7)

16 The Traditional Farming Year, by Paul Heiney. It's described as outlining the farming practices that great grandparents would have followed, although it describes traditional British farms. After reading it I understand why some of my great grandparents left the farm!

Posted by: Lirio100 at February 24, 2018 01:06 PM (JK7Jw)

17 Hoplite Housewife at February 24, 2018 01:03 PM

There are several species of wild strawberries, and even more garden cultivars developed from them. We can discuss them here, maybe next week.

Posted by: KTbarthedoor at February 24, 2018 01:06 PM (BVQ+1)

18 There is an old documentary from BBC. I think it was called "victorian kitchen garden." which is amazing if you are interested in old gardening techniques. highly recommended.

Posted by: Gentlemen, this is democracy manifest at February 24, 2018 01:06 PM (LWu6U)

19 I gotta go no. Taking people to an event today. I'll check back later.

Posted by: KTbarthedoor at February 24, 2018 01:07 PM (BVQ+1)

20 Rocks and Beauty were those two horses, iirc. They
had like six others. Amazing they could get 250 acres planted like that,
and plowed, and harvested by hand. Big families were common, as were
big gardens. But they found time to grow flowers too. Posted by: illiniwek at February 24, 2018 12:58 PM (bT8Z4)
=====
I always enjoy seeing the plowhorses like that. Hard working, good natured and from the descriptions, easy keepers. Don't eat a lot and very much a valuable part of the family.

Of course you all know my descriptor of our family members as Clydesdales.

Posted by: mustbequantum at February 24, 2018 01:08 PM (MIKMs)

21 Rocks and Beauty were those two horses, iirc.

They look like draft horses, as opposed to the canned ones.

Posted by: BackwardsBoy likes lobster at February 24, 2018 01:09 PM (tRaq7)

22 That first pic looks like a variegated woodpecker. We have a lot of those around here as well as the red headed woodpecker.


http://tinyurl.com/ydfdny9d

Posted by: Vic We Have No Party at February 24, 2018 01:09 PM (mpXpK)

23 We also have a lot of bluebirds due to me putting up three houses.

Posted by: Vic We Have No Party at February 24, 2018 01:10 PM (mpXpK)

24 17
Hoplite Housewife at February 24, 2018 01:03 PM



There are several species of wild strawberries, and even more garden
cultivars developed from them. We can discuss them here, maybe next
week.

Posted by: KTbarthedoor at February 24, 2018 01:06 PM (BVQ+1)
---------------Thank you - any information on growing strawberries would be much appreciated. Although your gardening expertise and that of the horde is always appreciated!

Posted by: Hoplite Housewife at February 24, 2018 01:10 PM (akSgU)

25 I can see the lawn!!

It is so warm here right now I worry about a false spring. The trees are looking to bud.

On a positive note, I got a big earth box order this week. YAY!!

Posted by: Ann at February 24, 2018 01:11 PM (jtHQy)

26
Used to pick wild strawberries when I was a kid in upstate NY. Man those things were small.
Posted by: HH at February 24, 2018 01:02 PM (mIJBI)

My family spent a summer in a rural area of upper Michigan when I was a kid. We loved picking blackberries and something called "thimble berries". My mother would make blackberry cobbler--the thimble berries we just ate off the bushes till we got stomach aches. Wonderful.

Posted by: girldog at February 24, 2018 01:12 PM (g5YYQ)

27 I've been contemplating put up a large hollow gourd or two in the hopes of attracting some purple martins. Those guys love to eat mosquitos.

Have to do some reading up on them.

Posted by: BackwardsBoy likes lobster at February 24, 2018 01:12 PM (tRaq7)

28 "When she came to, she couldn't remember what peanuts were.
"
Posted by: KT

that's pretty funny ...

yeah the heritage ideas seem important not just for nostalgia, but to help build our awareness of who we are, how we got here, what's it all about, Alfie? Lots of important "grounding" in the basics, then we can grow from there, maybe. Hopefully others have some good heritage pics ...

Posted by: illiniwek at February 24, 2018 01:13 PM (bT8Z4)

29
I can see the lawn!!
=====

Yeah, so can I. There is no way to clean up the layers of dog dirt after a snowmelt. Guess I'll just wait until April when most of it is composted in the lawn.

Posted by: mustbequantum at February 24, 2018 01:14 PM (MIKMs)

30 Yesterday evening, before the sun went down, I put out weed and feed for the lawn and Osmocote for the flowering plants in the yard. March should be a period of dramatic growth with April bursting forth in flowers. I hope my mondevilla is blooming by April.

Posted by: Bonecrusher at February 24, 2018 01:14 PM (r+mGZ)

31 They look like draft horses, as opposed to the canned ones.
=====

Or bottled.

Posted by: mustbequantum at February 24, 2018 01:16 PM (MIKMs)

32 Used to pick wild strawberries when I was a kid in upstate NY. Man those things were small.

Posted by: HH at February 24, 2018 01:02 PM (mIJBI)

In Sweden, my ex taught me to thread them onto a straw (they were pea-sized). When the straw was full, pop them right into your mouth. Wonderful flavor!

Posted by: Miley, the Duchess at February 24, 2018 01:16 PM (cu8/f)

33 Yeah, so can I. There is no way to clean up the layers of dog dirt after a snowmelt. Guess I'll just wait until April when most of it is composted in the lawn.
Posted by: mustbequantum at February 24, 2018 01:14 PM (MIKMs)

Agreed.

At least there is no snow mold this year.

Posted by: Ann at February 24, 2018 01:17 PM (jtHQy)

34 Anyone have experience buying plants and trees from seed catalog places (like Burpee)? I've only ever bought seeds. I'm wondering if I'd be better going this route for plants and trees or a local garden place.

Posted by: Weasel at February 24, 2018 01:19 PM (Sfs6o)

35 I've been contemplating put up a large hollow gourd
or two in the hopes of attracting some purple martins. Those guys love
to eat mosquitos.



Have to do some reading up on them.

Posted by: BackwardsBoy likes lobster at February 24, 2018 01:12 PM (tRaq7)

Our neighbors had a purple martin house. Looked like a freaking condo.

Posted by: Miley, the Duchess at February 24, 2018 01:20 PM (cu8/f)

36 I wuz corn fed ..i will not lie...the corn burnt the roof of my arse...why do Iowans DO THIS to neighbours?

Posted by: saf at February 24, 2018 01:22 PM (cS/ge)

37 my rosemary keep dying. this year I plan to put four in various locations to see which ones survive.

Posted by: Gentlemen, this is democracy manifest at February 24, 2018 01:22 PM (LWu6U)

38
At my last house I planted a couple strawberry plants at one end of a twenty foot long stretch of mulched area next to the swimming pool. Years later they had filled the area. My kids still remember picking fresh strawberries, eating them, and diving back into the pool.

Highly recommended ground cover. Plus real food.

Posted by: Acme Trucking Enterprises, White Truck Division at February 24, 2018 01:23 PM (2FqvZ)

39 What zone am I in? Does it matter? I want to ignore the one from 2012, cause, well.

7a according to new 2012 map
6a according to the pre 1990 map

Posted by: Infidel at February 24, 2018 01:26 PM (a3OL0)

40 Anyone have experience buying plants and trees from seed catalog places (like Burpee)? I've only ever bought seeds. I'm wondering if I'd be better going this route for plants and trees or a local garden place.

Posted by: Weasel at February 24, 2018 01:19 PM


Yup. They're fine. But you expect a certain size in your mind and what ships is a very small percentage of what you imagine. Picture 'butterfly bush' and when it arrives it's maybe six inches long.

Same thing with trees. Tiny. Maybe a foot long. If you're only 29 years old you have plenty of time.

Posted by: Acme Trucking Enterprises, White Truck Division at February 24, 2018 01:26 PM (2FqvZ)

41 I was looking through the sculpture collection at Frederik Meijer Gardens and Sculpture Park in Grand Rapids MI and I think I've found the perfect addition for a Wicker Man-themed garden:

http://www.meijergardens.org/attractions/sculpture-collection/

Scroll down to "Espaliered Girl".

Posted by: All Hail Eris, Literate Savage at February 24, 2018 01:26 PM (qJtVm)

42 my rosemary keep dying. this year I plan to put four in various locations to see which ones survive.
Posted by: Gentlemen, this is democracy manifest at February 24, 2018 01:22 PM (LWu6U)

I grow rosemary in a pot on my porch. Nothing seems to kill it. But I can't keep cilantro alive for more than a week or two, and I love it in salsa.

Posted by: girldog at February 24, 2018 01:28 PM (g5YYQ)

43 Just checking in as there's not much to report at the stately Blake manor.

March 10, which is planting day, cannot get here soon enough!

Posted by: Blake at February 24, 2018 01:29 PM (WEBkv)

44 Posted by: Acme Trucking Enterprises, White Truck Division at February 24, 2018 01:26 PM (2FqvZ)
-------
Good point. I hate when that happens. Maybe I will stick with local nurseries or the co-op.

Posted by: Weasel at February 24, 2018 01:30 PM (Sfs6o)

45 There is no way to clean up the layers of dog dirt
after a snowmelt. Guess I'll just wait until April when most of it is
composted in the lawn.


Posted by: mustbequantum at February 24, 2018 01:14 PM (MIKMs)

A wet mess for sure. Our dog used to poop on the snow piles next to the carport. It was a real archeological treasure come spring. Especially the ones with tinsel mixed in from the Christmas tree...

Posted by: Miley, the Duchess at February 24, 2018 01:30 PM (cu8/f)

46 Hi Miley!

Posted by: Weasel at February 24, 2018 01:31 PM (Sfs6o)

47 The photos for the thread are always great. Love the hirses as long as I don't have to take care of them. :-)

Gardening thread and a Nationals spring training game onthe radio. Ahhhh! Life is good!

Posted by: JTB at February 24, 2018 01:31 PM (V+03K)

48 Any tips for growing cilantro in South Florida?

They sell the plants at the local Home Depot, so someone must have good luck with them. Just not me.

Posted by: girldog at February 24, 2018 01:32 PM (g5YYQ)

49 The bluebirds, how precious!

Posted by: kallisto at February 24, 2018 01:32 PM (Iz8Py)

50 What zone am I in? Does it matter? I want to ignore the one from 2012, cause, well.



7a according to new 2012 map

6a according to the pre 1990 map

Posted by: Infidel at February 24, 2018 01:26 PM (a3OL0)

Different areas of your yard can be more sheltered, so it's always worth experimenting.

Posted by: Miley, the Duchess at February 24, 2018 01:33 PM (cu8/f)

51
They look like draft horses, as opposed to the canned ones.

Hell no, we won't go!

Posted by: Draft dodging horses at February 24, 2018 01:33 PM (IqV8l)

52
Posted by: Gentlemen, this is democracy manifest at February 24, 2018 01:22 PM (LWu6U)

Some of the oldtimers around here cover them in the winter.

Posted by: kallisto at February 24, 2018 01:33 PM (Iz8Py)

53 Weasel! Congratulations on your recent land acquisition! You'll have your own place to have rifle clinics.

I imagine you'll be a big Youtuber in the future, to rival Hickok45

Posted by: Miley, the Duchess at February 24, 2018 01:36 PM (cu8/f)

54 Any tips for growing cilantro in South Florida?



They sell the plants at the local Home Depot, so someone must have good luck with them. Just not me.

Posted by: girldog at February 24, 2018 01:32 PM (g5YYQ)

Easy to grow from seed - keep sowing every 2-3 weeks. And you'll get seed for the next year. Bountiful.

Posted by: Miley, the Duchess at February 24, 2018 01:37 PM (cu8/f)

55 "Rocks and Beauty were those two horses, iirc.
They look like draft horses, as opposed to the canned ones.

Posted by:backwardsboy

ha, yes, one uncle later wondered why people would want to own horses once we have these big tractors, since he remembered they required a lot of care. "Good pullers" was a phrase I recall, not good jumpers. But I think they really liked their horses and became friends, spent a lot of time working together, dependent on each other.


Posted by: illiniwek at February 24, 2018 01:39 PM (bT8Z4)

56 34. Anyone have experience buying plants and trees from seed catalog places (like Burpee)? I've only ever bought seeds. I'm wondering if I'd be better going this route for plants and trees or a local garden place.
Posted by: Weasel at February 24, 2018 01:19 PM (Sfs6o)

------------

I've had so-so luck buying live plants from catalogs. It's worth a few extra bucks to go to a local garden center so you can see what you're getting. If you're still in NoVa, we love Betty's Azalea Ranch. Merrifield Garden Center is fine, but Betty's prices seem to be better.

Posted by: Hoplite Housewife at February 24, 2018 01:39 PM (akSgU)

57 >>>Love the hirses as long as I don't have to take care of them. :-)<<<

The is nothing as mischievous, scheming and mean as a horse that doesn't work.

Posted by: Fritz at February 24, 2018 01:39 PM (bJ0w+)

58 {{{Heritage farming}}}

I love the combination of old time charm, with the convenience of running water

Posted by: Miley, the Duchess at February 24, 2018 01:39 PM (cu8/f)

59 slugs like the cilantro

Posted by: quint at February 24, 2018 01:40 PM (n13/j)

60 I mentioned last week that the chives were coming around. Well, they are officially back (I am the official). They look really good and some will be used on potatoes tomorrow. Also, the pansies and thyme are showing green under the dead stuff from last year. The lilac is full of buds and some leaves are starting to open. I have hopes for a fragrant spring this year.

We had an unusually cold winter but little snow, almost drought conditions. I'm surprised anything made it through the winter.

Posted by: JTB at February 24, 2018 01:41 PM (V+03K)

61 Years ago I used to purchase bare root bushes and trees from Gurneys. Has pretty good luck with them.

Posted by: Ronster at February 24, 2018 01:42 PM (c74nn)

62 True Story: I called the county Agricultural department once to ask for information on something. They told me that the person whose job it was to put the pamphlet into a mailing envelope wasn't there that day, so they couldn't do anything.


But I did get a useful pamphlet on xeriscaping from them.

Posted by: girldog at February 24, 2018 01:43 PM (g5YYQ)

63 Greetings from zone 7a. Chives are flourishing. Pansy shoots have appeared. The lilacs are covered in buds with some leafing. The rosemary that we thought was dead is now covered with what might be tiny buds.

Posted by: Mrs. JTB at February 24, 2018 01:43 PM (V+03K)

64 My great grandfather had a pretty big farm down in N.C., and my father and uncles went down there in the summers to help with crops.
Later in life, my father told me one of his regrets was that he didn't take his grandfather up on the offer to take over the farm. Seems like all the children and grandchildren left the farm for jobs in town in the shipyard or went to sea!

Posted by: Hrothgar at February 24, 2018 01:44 PM (gwPgz)

65 slugs like the cilantro
Posted by: quint at February 24, 2018 01:40 PM (n13/j)

aaahhh. So what do I do about the slugs? Do I have to use pesticide?

Posted by: girldog at February 24, 2018 01:45 PM (g5YYQ)

66
slugs like the cilantro


Posted by: quint at February 24, 2018 01:40 PM (n13/j)

Slugs love the beer. Put it in shallow bowls around the plants.

Posted by: Miley, the Duchess at February 24, 2018 01:49 PM (cu8/f)

67 Miley, Thanks! I'll try that with my next cilantro plant/victim.

Posted by: girldog at February 24, 2018 01:52 PM (g5YYQ)

68 posted by: girldog at February 24, 2018 01:45 PM (g5YYQ)

Louisville Slugocide works pretty well!

Posted by: Hrothgar at February 24, 2018 01:53 PM (gwPgz)

69 Slugs love the beer. Put it in shallow bowls around the plants.
Posted by: Miley, the Duchess at February 24, 2018 01:49 PM (cu8/f)
---
Was at a friend's barbeque and we all watched fascinated as a slug slo-o-o-owly crawled over to a dish full of beer.

"I will never worry about whether I'm entertaining you idiots again" he said.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, Literate Savage at February 24, 2018 01:53 PM (qJtVm)

70 I don't have any photos but enjoy history for the colonial and early American periods, especially on the frontier. And gardening practices are definitely part of that. It isn't just old wives tales and phases of the moon. Did the pioneers have seeds or plants? How did they work the soil? What did they learn from local tribes? What did they grow for fresh eating and for preservation? How did they preserve their crops? It is fun discovering the answers.

Posted by: JTB at February 24, 2018 01:57 PM (V+03K)

71 Anyone have any experience with boysenberries? We had a patch of them when I was a kid and I always liked them. I think they are a cross between a blackberry and a loganberry. They look like extra large blackberries. I've never tried to grow them and I never seem to see them mentioned anywhere.

Posted by: Suds 46 at February 24, 2018 02:01 PM (3booC)

72 Cursed is the ground because of you; through painful toil you will eat food from it all the days of your life. It will produce thorns and thistles for you, and you will eat the plants of the field. By the sweat of your brow you will eat your food until you return to the ground, since from it you were taken; for dust you are and to dust you will return.

Posted by: Insomniac at February 24, 2018 02:03 PM (NWiLs)

73 Well, the robins came the other day. Hundreds, maybe thousands of them. Like a swarm of locusts, they stripped my holly of the gazillion berries it had within an hour or two.

I'm told that when the robins first migrate north again, there are slim pickins in the way of insects, so they go after whatever is available.

Posted by: IrishEi at February 24, 2018 02:03 PM (HiDrR)

74 Eris - http://bit.ly/2FkMYra

Posted by: boulder terlit hobo at February 24, 2018 02:04 PM (6FqZa)

75 1 Those strawberries look sort of odd.
Posted by: HH at February 24, 2018 12:54 PM (mIJBI)

It's the geometric logic.

Posted by: Insomniac at February 24, 2018 02:04 PM (NWiLs)

76 "I will never worry about whether I'm entertaining you idiots again" he said.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, Literate Savage at February 24, 2018 01:53 PM (qJtVm)

LMFAO!

Posted by: Miley, the Duchess at February 24, 2018 02:05 PM (cu8/f)

77 We have had some hard frosts here as well. We used the frost protection sprinklers in the grapes and there were icicles hanging from the trellis wire.

It's been really windy and cold. I'm not sure if it's even reaching 60 during the day.

Posted by: CaliGirl at February 24, 2018 02:05 PM (Ri/rl)

78 "My great grandfather had a pretty big farm down in
N.C., ...

Later in life, my father told me one of his regrets was that he
didn't take his grandfather up on the offer to take over the farm.

Posted by: Hrothgar

yeah, I came back and bought part of the old farm and did elder care for my Mom and a few uncles, but in hindsight skipping college and farming with an uncle that basically made the offer would have been pretty awesome.

Now the concern is all the funny money trillionaires will push people off their land, and move in foreigners as laborers. Talk of selling off public lands sound reasonable, but then I wonder if it wouldn't just be globalists and maybe China buying it all up off their fake money profits. For now "working the land" is still mostly hard work, but kids tend to move to the big city lights.

Posted by: illiniwek at February 24, 2018 02:07 PM (bT8Z4)

79 >>>Cursed is the ground because of you

Hi Insomniac! I can always count on you to provide leavening

Posted by: Miley, the Duchess at February 24, 2018 02:07 PM (cu8/f)

80 48 Any tips for growing cilantro in South Florida?

They sell the plants at the local Home Depot, so someone must have good luck with them. Just not me.
Posted by: girldog at February 24, 2018 01:32 PM (g5YYQ)

Here in South TX it's strictly a winter plant, unless you want to grow it inside during the summer.

Posted by: stace at February 24, 2018 02:08 PM (6HFDU)

81 Parsley and cilantro will interbreed and produce a leaf that smells spicy but has no "virtue" in cookery. So some people try to plant them far apart.

Posted by: Stringer Davis at February 24, 2018 02:08 PM (H5rtT)

82 Posted by: Insomniac at February 24, 2018 02:03 PM (NWiLs)

And that sums up my gardening experiences.

Posted by: girldog at February 24, 2018 02:10 PM (g5YYQ)

83 74 Eris - http://bit.ly/2FkMYra
Posted by: boulder terlit hobo at February 24, 2018 02:04 PM (6FqZa)
----

D'aaawwwww! Everything is cute when it's pink!

Posted by: All Hail Eris, Literate Savage at February 24, 2018 02:10 PM (qJtVm)

84 OT - Weasel, if you're still around, have you tried the new Sig P365? You know I'm hot for Sigs. This one looks like it would be perfect for concealed carry. Only $600. Hickok45 think it really will be a game-changer in terms of the magazine design, if they don't fail. Time will tell.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n29qgsP9B-E


Posted by: Miley, the Duchess at February 24, 2018 02:12 PM (cu8/f)

85 79 >>>Cursed is the ground because of you

Hi Insomniac! I can always count on you to provide leavening
Posted by: Miley, the Duchess at February 24, 2018 02:07 PM (cu8/f)

Hey Miley! That's me - leavening, but sometimes levity too.

Posted by: Insomniac at February 24, 2018 02:15 PM (NWiLs)

86 D'aaawwwww! Everything is cute when it's pink!
Posted by: All Hail Eris, Literate Savage at February 24, 2018 02:10 PM (qJtVm)

*types*
*deletes*

Posted by: Insomniac at February 24, 2018 02:16 PM (NWiLs)

87 Here in South TX it's strictly a winter plant, unless you want to grow it inside during the summer.
Posted by: stace at February 24, 2018 02:08 PM (6HFDU)

I kill 'em in both winter and summer, but they do seem to die faster in the summer.
------------------------------------------------------------
Parsley and cilantro will interbreed and produce a leaf that smells spicy but has no "virtue" in cookery. So some people try to plant them far apart.

Posted by: Stringer Davis at February 24, 2018 02:08 PM (H5rtT)

I've been doing everything wrong!

Posted by: girldog at February 24, 2018 02:17 PM (g5YYQ)

88 As an apartment dweller I really shouldn't even be on the gardening thread, but I still love to live vicariously through the gardens of others.

When I retire my dream is to have a garden devoted to black flowers. I was inspired by Paul Bonine's book "Black Flowers".

Here are some pictures from Goth inkstress Kat von D's black flower garden:

https://tinyurl.com/y7gwhfhf

Posted by: All Hail Eris, Literate Savage at February 24, 2018 02:17 PM (qJtVm)

89 Cleaned out my garden of dead plants, no sign of my chives and Greek oregano is dead to the ground but some years thats how it is but will grow back. It has spread a lot since I put in in.

Posted by: Skip at February 24, 2018 02:25 PM (aC6Sd)

90 Apropos: https://youtu.be/SnLg4rhvCS4

Posted by: Average Guy at February 24, 2018 02:25 PM (5HEUr)

91 All Hail Eris, I live in a condo now, but I still manage to grow a few herbs on the screened porch and in a little area right outside my front door.

I'm thinking of buying a grow light to expand my horizons.

Posted by: girldog at February 24, 2018 02:26 PM (g5YYQ)

92 I'll also need this:

https://www.thisiswhyimbroke.com/garden-gnomezilla/

Posted by: All Hail Eris, Literate Savage at February 24, 2018 02:27 PM (qJtVm)

93 Posted by: girldog at February 24, 2018 02:26 PM (g5YYQ)
---
I don't even have a decent window for plants!

Posted by: All Hail Eris, Literate Savage at February 24, 2018 02:29 PM (qJtVm)

94 Now that's just sad. You need to move.

Posted by: girldog at February 24, 2018 02:32 PM (g5YYQ)

95 Looks like I've managed to kill almost everything on the balcony this winter, through neglect.

Oh well - less to get rid of when I move.

Posted by: Miley, the Duchess at February 24, 2018 02:33 PM (cu8/f)

96 Gonna dig out the big box of ancestral pictures and see if any were of actual farming - lot of farmers on my fathers side of the family, the rest were Lake Michigan fishermen.

Lot of Amish around this area who are still using the old horse-drawn implements; as spring gets going I'll ask if they mind if I take a few pictures of them in action.

Posted by: sock_rat_eez, they are gaslighting us 24/365 at February 24, 2018 02:35 PM (H0hPC)

97 "I will never worry about whether I'm entertaining you idiots again" he said.


That was funny. And speaking of slug racing...

IIRC, the modern-day sport of tractor pulling has its roots in the days when farmers would pit their pulling horses against each other with weights on a sled. Whichever team pulled it the farthest won, just like today.

OK, I gotta go do stuff. Y'all have fun and try to behave.

Posted by: BackwardsBoy likes lobster at February 24, 2018 02:38 PM (tRaq7)

98 When I retire my dream is to have a garden devoted to black flowers.


Posted by: All Hail Eris, Literate Savage at February 24, 2018 02:17 PM (qJtVm)

I highly recommend black hollyhocks. Single. Deep blood-red when viewed through sunlight.

Posted by: Miley, the Duchess at February 24, 2018 02:39 PM (cu8/f)

99 I love fresh herbs in my salads, oregano, chives, 2 types of basel, parsley

Posted by: Skip at February 24, 2018 02:41 PM (aC6Sd)

100 Eris, A garden of nothing but black flowers. And a gnomzilla. O.K.

Posted by: girldog at February 24, 2018 02:41 PM (g5YYQ)

101 Skip, try adding nasturtiums to those salads. Beautiful addition, peppery flavor.

Posted by: Miley, the Duchess at February 24, 2018 02:42 PM (cu8/f)

102 I highly recommend black hollyhocks. Single. Deep blood-red when viewed through sunlight.
Posted by: Miley, the Duchess at February 24, 2018 02:39 PM (cu8/f)
---
That's what started my dream years ago! I saw a combo packet of seeds for black hollyhocks, pansies, and violas and thought no way!.

And now they have all manner of black flowers.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, Literate Savage at February 24, 2018 02:43 PM (qJtVm)

103 Borage flowers (blue, starlike) are another great flower to add to salad.

Posted by: Miley, the Duchess at February 24, 2018 02:43 PM (cu8/f)

104 100 Eris, A garden of nothing but black flowers. And a gnomzilla. O.K.
Posted by: girldog at February 24, 2018 02:41 PM (g5YYQ)
--
And hot pink slugs!

Posted by: All Hail Eris, Literate Savage at February 24, 2018 02:43 PM (qJtVm)

105 53 Weasel! Congratulations on your recent land acquisition! You'll have your own place to have rifle clinics.

I imagine you'll be a big Youtuber in the future, to rival Hickok45
Posted by: Miley, the Duchess at February 24, 2018 01:36 PM (cu8/f)
---------
Thanks Miley! Just as soon as I can get some of these damn trees mowed down for a rifle range I plan to do just that!

Posted by: Weasel at February 24, 2018 02:51 PM (Sfs6o)

106 My grandmother was the last generation of Quebec farmers going back to the 1630s. I wish I had asked her about it but there is no one left to ask. All I know is they grew buckwheat.

Posted by: JTB at February 24, 2018 02:51 PM (V+03K)

107 Pet thread is up.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, Literate Savage at February 24, 2018 02:55 PM (qJtVm)

108 And hot pink slugs!
Posted by: All Hail Eris, Literate Savage at February 24, 2018 02:43 PM (qJtVm)

I spent a long time bedridden and my elderly Aunt would sometimes call and entertain me by telling me stories about her childhood and extended family. Some amazing stories that otherwise would have died with her.

Posted by: girldog at February 24, 2018 02:57 PM (g5YYQ)

109 Miley!! Another Hickok45 fan! His videos and Duelist 1954 for black powder are my favorites.

Posted by: JTB at February 24, 2018 02:57 PM (V+03K)

110 Oops I meant to respond to JTB.

Posted by: girldog at February 24, 2018 02:58 PM (g5YYQ)

111 Where is the section about growing Hungarian paprika at home, or items that can be fermented and turned into booze? For Hungarians, this includes rocks.

Posted by: Miklos Molnar, the Merry Magyar at February 24, 2018 03:03 PM (zCyNd)

112 nasturtiums have to look that up, no idea what it is

Posted by: Skip at February 24, 2018 03:06 PM (aC6Sd)

113 STRAWBERRIES: I planted a patch of Tribute STRAWBERRIES in Spring of 2017. They were very productive all summer and fall, but not very large. I lost more than half of them to rot and bugs, but still had enough to have a few berries with my yogurt each day. I covered the patch in pine needles this winter. We're going through a warm spell now and the plants are starting to grow through the straw. I hope that's not a problem because more freezes are coming.

Posted by: Cumberland Astro at February 24, 2018 03:07 PM (cEKqm)

114 I do like pepper taste, my favorite wine is Petite Syrah which has a peppery after taste

Posted by: Skip at February 24, 2018 03:09 PM (aC6Sd)

115 Miley!! Another Hickok45 fan! His videos and Duelist 1954 for black powder are my favorites.

Posted by: JTB at February 24, 2018 02:57 PM (V+03K)

I love that guy - I'd love to meet him!

Posted by: Miley, the Duchess at February 24, 2018 03:23 PM (cu8/f)

116 Mother Nature did indeed have a sucker-punch ready for Idaho's Treasure Valley (Boise area)... I've made a note on my gardening calendar, not to be fooled by early Feb. thaws, ever again! (I have an old calendar that I write garden notes on - things like when to fertilize strawberries, and when to expect bulb sprouts, that sort of stuff.)

The sucker-punch arrived in the form of some small hail last Sunday at dusk - a low of +6 F between Monday and Tuesday - the inch of snow I found outside on Thursday morning - and the snow that started falling this morning (1 to 3 inches predicted).

Birds - of course I'm keeping the seed feeder stocked while Winter remains. I've seen the flicker there several times; I'll have to download my camera and see if the photos came out, from the one time I managed to get a camera on him. Today, I think I've identified a male House Finch - and there are apparently multiple types of streaked sparrows, so I haven't ID'd the species, but I see those often - it's possible some of the birds with neat wing bars and some yellow to them are vireos, but I'm not sure - the Dark-Eyed Juncoes (Oregon type) tend to stay on the ground with the Mourning Doves.

We've continued to hear the Great Horned Owl at dusk, which has surprised me. These must be territorial calls, since they normally mate by the end of the year and should have chicks by now (if I remember rightly).

Our California Quail will probably not come around as often, now that the quail block is gone. We'll probably still see them from time to time - they like using the red raspberry patch as cover.

Bulbs - the first snow did blow in close to the back of my house and covered the hyacinths, but it melted off and they took no damage. They're close enough to the back of the house that I'm pretty sure they'll be OK even if more snow hits there. The bulbs out front, and the other bulbs in back, weren't that far sprouted, so they should be OK too.

My poor strawberries, though....... I'm still worried that I've killed them by uncovering them during our 60 degree weather. Nothing to be done now, but see what happens when spring does come. Husband reassures me that we can buy more locally, but that's still money that didn't need to be spent. Live and learn... That's really all of gardening/farming, isn't it? - live and learn.

Oh, my own experience with buying plants from a national catalog. We bought bare-root strawberries from Park. They sent them in March. We thought they knew what they were doing, so we planted them. They froze and died. (We replaced them from what Home Depot sells.) So I would suggest only buying from a national catalog that is based in a similar climate to where you live.

Posted by: Pat* at February 24, 2018 03:33 PM (FtfVi)

117 On the woodpeckers at the seed feeder front, all fall and winter we had small, medium, and large birds: a downy, a ladderback, and a golden-fronted.

After years of condo living with only container gardening, we are finishing our first year of having an actual yard and garden. Thanks to the gardening thread for all of the inspiration and ideas. We'll see how well our off season maintenance works out soon. (Forsythia, japonica, and early fruit trees are blooming here in central Texas.)

Posted by: Art Rondolet of Malmsey at February 24, 2018 03:36 PM (S+f+m)

118 I've been doing everything wrong!

Posted by: girldog at February 24, 2018 02:17 PM (g5YYQ)

Join the club. Oh, you just mean gardening? Never mind.

Posted by: Insomniac at February 24, 2018 03:37 PM (NWiLs)

119 I know your Weasel acres is VA but blackberries especially need to be controlled. Goats work well on them. They will take over the world if you let them. Western WA is over run in places by them. Great berries but the thorns make a good substitute for barbed wire.

Posted by: Winston at February 24, 2018 03:52 PM (wgCUV)

120 Anyone have experience buying plants and trees from seed catalog places (like Burpee)? I've only ever bought seeds. I'm wondering if I'd be better going this route for plants and trees or a local garden place.

Posted by: Weasel at February

I've bought plants from Home Depot, but ya gotta watch for the sales.

If there's a nursery nearby... check 'em out.

Last year I bought my plants at a flea market, and I'll go back there this year.

Posted by: JT at February 24, 2018 03:53 PM (B4vfZ)

121 Cursed is the ground because of you; through painful toil you will eat food from it all the days of your life. It will produce thorns and thistles for you, and you will eat the plants of the field. By the sweat of your brow you will eat your food until you return to the ground, since from it you were taken; for dust you are and to dust you will return.

Posted by: Insomniac


LINKYPOO !

Posted by: JT at February 24, 2018 03:54 PM (B4vfZ)

122 I do like pepper taste, my favorite wine is Petite Syrah which has a peppery after taste

Posted by: Skip at February 24, 2018 03:09 PM (aC6Sd)

I've got a Petite Syrah in the cupboard. Thanks for the reminder! Gonna crack that open tonight.

Posted by: Miley, the Duchess at February 24, 2018 03:55 PM (cu8/f)

123 Strawberries are tough. They can handle a false spring. The reason that grocery strawberries dont taste like what you remember is that they are bred to look pretty and travel well. There is a variety that one vendor at our farmer's market has--just amazing flavor. They don't look good compared to the store bought, but even the ugly ones taste amazing. Stupid me forgot to set some aside for seed last fall but I won't forget this year.

Posted by: Gordon at February 24, 2018 03:56 PM (p0NYI)

124 I live over a double garage that sits behind the house.
There's a long driveway to get back here with a little strip of dirt between the blacktop and the neighbor's fence.
I've lived here for 27 years.

One year I'd bought some strawberry seeds through the mail with the idea of planting strawberries all along the driveway.

Posted by: JT at February 24, 2018 04:07 PM (B4vfZ)

125 119 See Weasel, another vote you need goats

Posted by: Skip at February 24, 2018 04:19 PM (aC6Sd)

126 The seeds came. I went out to the driveway, opened the package.....

and the SMALLEST ! plastic bag was in there with the TINIEST seeds I'd ever seen.

I had paid Ten Bucks for the seeds.

So, okay, I'm gonna plant ,I'm sitting on the ground, I've got all the seeds in the palm of my hand......and I'm concentrating......trying to figure out how I'm gonna separate these TINY seeds.... and here comes a GIANT BEE flying around my head....and I'm triyng to swat at him
with my non-seed hand .....and long story short(er) ALL of the seeds went to ONE spot on the ground.

Posted by: JT at February 24, 2018 04:21 PM (B4vfZ)

127 So slugs like beer & cilantro but can't discriminate? Feed them bud lite and lady bugs.that should fuck em both up.

Cilantro is fer shit the worst "ERB " er HERB

Posted by: saf at February 24, 2018 04:25 PM (cS/ge)

128 So, I've had the GIANT strawberry plant for a number of years now.

I've gotten quite a few strawberries over the years.

It all depends on the rabbits.

Posted by: JT at February 24, 2018 04:33 PM (B4vfZ)

129 127 - I get ya, one of those Cilantro haters. Tastes like soap right? I love Cilantro, but I know about the haters, and they really really hate it! They say there is a scientific reason for that.

Posted by: quint at February 24, 2018 04:35 PM (n13/j)

130 I'm thinking of buying a grow light to expand my horizons.

Posted by: girldog at


Don't fall asleep under it.

Remember the movie "Attack of the 50 Foot Woman" ?

Posted by: JT at February 24, 2018 04:43 PM (B4vfZ)

131 aaahhh. So what do I do about the slugs? Do I have to use pesticide?

Can't you just salt them ?

Think of the Wicked Witch at the end of the movie when they threw water on her( I can't think of the name )

"AAAAAAhhhhhhh I'm MELTING ! Oh what a world"

Posted by: JT at February 24, 2018 04:52 PM (B4vfZ)

132 Salt around what you want to save

Chess Dress Nood

Posted by: Skip at February 24, 2018 04:56 PM (aC6Sd)

133 >>> the SMALLEST ! plastic bag was in there with the TINIEST seeds I'd ever seen.

JT. a tip from a friend who ran a nursery - you can mix those seeds with fine sand. Helps to spread over a wider range.

She used the sand to tamp over flats that she was using for cuttings as well. Helps to keep moisture in.

Posted by: Miley, the Duchess at February 24, 2018 05:05 PM (cu8/f)

134 Put out bird-feeders for the first time about three weeks ago. We already had birds visit our waterbath, so natives would come by regularly. But the food brought things to a whole 'nother level. Now they come by like clockwork:

White-Winged Doves
Blue Jays
Cardinals
Cow Birds
House (or possibly Purple) Finches
Carolina Chickadees
Tufted Titmouse
Pine Siskins
Dark-eyed Juncoes
Sparrows (can't really tell what species)
Red-Shouldered Hawks
An occasional Red-Bellied Woodpecker
Mockingbirds

And after the rain, Robins and Crows.

And Squirrels to keep it all chaotic.

Certain times it's busier than an airport.

It's nice to escape TV and the news to glance out at the circus. The different personalities are fascinating.

Posted by: AnonyBotymousDrivel at February 24, 2018 07:16 PM (H8S+R)

135 girldog: "aaahhh. So what do I do about the slugs? Do I have to use pesticide?"

Sluggo (Iron Phosphate)
Sluggo Plus (Iron Phosphate and Spinosad)

Iron Phosphate is for the slugs, Spinosad for various other nuisance pests. They're OMNI listed, so they're safe for gardens, pets, and organic programs.

It does work and it's easy to disperse, moreso than beer traps, diatomaceous earth.

Posted by: AnonyBotymousDrivel at February 24, 2018 07:37 PM (H8S+R)

136 KT, right along the edge of our yard, in the spring and summer, I find little plants that look exactly strawberries. Are they actually some kind of wild strawberry? They don't smell like strawberries.

Posted by: Gem at February 25, 2018 06:07 AM (XoAz8)

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