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Saturday Gardening Thread: Lookin' a little seedy [KT]

rraccoon.jpg

Where did that corn go?

Hello, gardeners and friends of gardeners. Today's pre-Thanksgiving thread was partly inspired, appropriately, by last week's Food Thread. It featured some foods with seeds, like Avocados. If you have an avocado tree, you may want to check out the key to ripening avocados from The Deplorable Jay Guevara. Leave a piece of stem.

I have a question for the Food Thread: I'm still somewhat confused about whether or not refrigeration messes up further ripening of avocados. If so, at what temperature?

If you are thinking about growing an avocado tree, let us know. Not a frivolous undertaking.

Artisanal'ette presented recipes in the main post and also in a comment for pumpkin and sunflower seeds. She asked a question about the harvest season of those seeds. This set me off on the subjects of naked pumpkin seeds and seeds for little birds. More fun stuff below the fold.

Pumpkins with Naked Seeds

Artisanal'ette, some pumpkin seeds can be harvested now. Others may have already sprouted inside the pumpkins. There is a vast array of pumpkins in the world. They are basically squashes, from three different species, that someone decided to call "pumpkins".

All pumpkin and squash seeds are edible, but most have a tough hull. Some are meatier than others. Still, you can toast the seeds with hulls and either remove the hulls with your teeth or eat them hull and all. But the seeds Artisanal'ette bought probably came from a naked-seeded pumpkin.

Here is a nice summary on How to grow pepitas. Below, a photo of a traditional Styrian pumpkin with naked seeds.

pumpkint jpg.jpg

Territorial Seed now offers a naked-seeded pumpkin that looks like a "normal" orange pumpkin and that can be used in pies. Though their favorite in the pie category is 'Winter Luxury', which has netted skin. Going traditional this year at Thanksgiving? Here's how to make a Traditional 18th Century Pumpkin Pie from George Washington's Mount Vernon. No eggs?

Growing Sunflowers for Seeds

It may be a little late to harvest sunflower seeds for munching in much of the country unless you are a bird. Because the birds (or other critters) will already have stripped the seeds from the plants. But a lot of people leave some flowers to go to seed in the garden, like the
Maximilian Sunflowers
and other perennial types we have previously discussed. Note: Pollen-free varieties may not produce seeds.

If you want sunflower seeds for human consumption, start with a cultivar bred for that purpose. The traditional ones are very tall with huge heads. Really fun for kids. Make a fort. But this summer I saw vast fields of very short sunflowers in the Sacramento delta (where I expected to see rice). The petals were already falling off.

Here is a nice summary on growing and harvesting sunflowers for seed and on making suet cakes for birds.

harvesting-sunflowers-24.jpg

More flower seeds for little birds

When we did the post on Illiniwek's mystery pond flower, I don't think we noted that little birds pick over the seed heads in winter. You might like to review the post if you are thinking of planting some hybrid Heleniums in your garden. But don't comment on old threads.

We've seen photos of butterflies on Illiniwek's wild Helenium flowers. Now it's time for the little birds to show up.

The helenium have given me a second bloom. I'm guessing some seed fell and as the pond level dropped it found a new place, which then bloomed later. Here is the browned first bloom ... really brown already.

brown helenium.jpg

Then these came along, and are still blooming
the darker brown behind them are the old helenium. they ring most of the pond except where the cattails crowded them out.

cattail h.jpg

I see bird habitat there.

Safflower

JTB mentioned putting out safflower seed for little birds. It is a commercial crop around here, to make Safflower oil. There are apparently types high in monounsaturates and others high in polyunsaturates. I didn't know.

The plants that are grown around here aren't too tall, but are spiny and miserable. You can buy garden types with varying degrees of thorniness. 'Zanzibar' is supposed to be almost thornless. The Cherry Gal sells seed of a thorny type for seed (requires a long season). She notes that dye from the petals are the original source of the term, "red tape".

Thornless safflowers apparently produce fewer seeds than thorny types, though work is being done to develop the plant as a forage crop. It is also popular in Europe as a cut flower, exported from Africa

Carthamus_D03o.jpg

Here are some more fun facts about safflower.

Safflower petals are sometimes used as a substitute for saffron. But don't go too wild with this herb. Plant extracts have adverse effects on mouse testicular tissue. Human testing has not been done.

Photos by the Horde and Friends

This fascinating photo is from GeoffB:

We always have hordes of English sparrows at our bird feeder but in the summer of 2014 we had an unusual one. A full albino.

It was hard to get pictures as the feeder is right outside the sliding door and any movement inside causes the birds to fly away. This one best shows the albino sparrow. Taken through the vertical blinds and door glass.

dgiffdcimgingfof.png

The photo below is the last bouquet of the year from my cousin's miniature rose bush. She's the cousin with the geraniums in her basement for the winter.

merns rose.jpg

Don't forget to take a look a Don's new orchids. Or his other plant photos.

Tolumnia-1-768x469.jpg

Gardens of The Horde

I harvested a little watermelon this week that grew from a volunteer seed in our front yard. The plant was already dead. The fruit was not bad, surprisingly.

Anything going on in your garden?

Have a great Thanksgiving week.

If you would like to send information and/or photos for the Saturday Gardening Thread, the address is:

ktinthegarden
at g mail dot com

Include your nic unless you want to be a lurker.

Posted by: Open Blogger at 12:49 PM




Comments

(Jump to bottom of comments)

1 Good Afternoon greenthumbs

Posted by: Skip at November 18, 2017 12:48 PM (aC6Sd)

2 Cursed is the ground because of you; through painful toil you will eat food from it all the days of your life.
It will produce thorns and thistles for you, and you will eat the plants of the field. By the sweat of your brow you will eat your food until you return to the ground, since from it you were taken; for dust you are and to dust you will return.

Posted by: Insomniac - Nobody in Particular at November 18, 2017 12:49 PM (NWiLs)

3 Worked with many a guy who munched sunflower seeds while working.
Last week mentioned bringing in around 2 dozen Anaheim peppers that were green, many ripened already with more coming. Some are wilting though. Next year will start bring them in a few at a time by late September.

Posted by: Skip at November 18, 2017 12:52 PM (aC6Sd)

4 Come on, Chuck! Roll around in the dirt with me!

Posted by: Jimmy McGill at November 18, 2017 12:54 PM (NWiLs)

5 Thanks KT

I amazed at the albino sparrow.

Posted by: CaliGirl at November 18, 2017 12:55 PM (Ri/rl)

6 Avocados? Holy guacamole!

Posted by: Insomniac - Nobody in Particular at November 18, 2017 12:57 PM (NWiLs)

7 I agree, CaliGirl. The albino sparrow is really something.

Posted by: KT at November 18, 2017 12:58 PM (BVQ+1)

8 Thankful I don't have to make pumpkin pie the old-fashioned way.

Posted by: KT at November 18, 2017 01:02 PM (BVQ+1)

9 Okay, two gardening questions came up during the week for me.

A bored grandkid took the little balls a cactus (green stem reddish ball on top) and there were little red balls growing on the thing. The problem is that now I have fruit flies. Will the wounds heal up, or should I just dump the thing. I was so proud of myself that it has lasted this long, but I don't want the fruit flies from the sweetness in the cactus itself.

Second, anyone else get the 'folk wisdom' from a natural gardener that you plant stuff in prime numbers. My dad would plant anything and make it grow by stomping it in the ground. Nothing fancy as far as soil, etc., just 'grow dammit' -- and they did. He insisted on stuff being done by prime number, 1,5,7,11 for a hedge or annuals. Anybody else hear this folklore?

Posted by: mustbequantum at November 18, 2017 01:02 PM (MIKMs)

10 I need to clean out my compost bin of this year's compost as leaves are starting to pile up.
And I have no way to chop the new ones up as my tractor is down for the count. Without chopping them up I could fill a box car.

Posted by: Skip at November 18, 2017 01:08 PM (aC6Sd)

11 He insisted on stuff being done by prime number, 1,5,7,11 for a hedge or annuals. Anybody else hear this folklore?

Posted by: mustbequantum at November 18, 2017 01:02 PM (MIKMs)


I think artistically there's something to be said for growing in odd numbers. Two of something looks contrived, while three seems esthetically more natural and pleasing.

Posted by: Ace Tractor Seat Supply at November 18, 2017 01:10 PM (ajiE5)

12 mustbequantum at November 18, 2017 01:02 PM

The wounds should heal. Try increasing the air flow around the plant. Maybe put a fan on it. Check to see if the fruit flies laid eggs. If so, kill them.

About the prime numbers thing, it may be to make plantings more interesting to the eye.

Posted by: KT at November 18, 2017 01:10 PM (BVQ+1)

13 Skip at November 18, 2017 01:08 PM

Compost!

Posted by: KT at November 18, 2017 01:11 PM (BVQ+1)

14 I love the trash panda in the pot.

The orchids are so beautiful.

I had some blue pumpkins growing but I don't know what their name was. I feed them to the chickens after I use them for decorations.

Posted by: CaliGirl at November 18, 2017 01:11 PM (Ri/rl)

15 Sunflower fields used to be my favorite place to hunt doves. They really flocked to those fields but when you shot one it was hard to find them in all the plants. You really need a dog for that.

Posted by: Vic We Have No Party at November 18, 2017 01:12 PM (mpXpK)

16 I'm interested in buying some land that is planted in pine, so I guess it's a tree farm. Anybody know anything about growing pine trees?

Posted by: Weasel at November 18, 2017 01:13 PM (Sfs6o)

17
All gardening finished for year. Stuff put away. Down to my last home-grown tomato already. Just discovered I had no pizza sauce on hand so cut and smashed up that entire tomato for my sauce.

Different, and so so good.

Posted by: Ace Tractor Seat Supply at November 18, 2017 01:14 PM (ajiE5)

18 KT, your gardening threads are always full of interesting stuff. I learn something new and wonderful every week. Thank you.

That albino bird is remarkable. Thanks, geoffb, for sharing that.

CaliGirl, I though of you when I was in the grocery store and saw that pomegranates were $3 each. I cried when I remembered you fed them to your chickens because you had so many. Wah.

Posted by: bluebell at November 18, 2017 01:16 PM (UoSKV)

19 Weasel, I believe there is such a thing as the Christmas Tree Growers Association, or some name close to that. You might try there.

Posted by: bluebell at November 18, 2017 01:18 PM (UoSKV)

20 Thanks, Bluebell.

Posted by: KT at November 18, 2017 01:19 PM (BVQ+1)

21 Just remembered that I got my first seed catalog for next year. Pinetree.

It's that dreamy season.

Posted by: KT at November 18, 2017 01:20 PM (BVQ+1)

22
♪ Weasel has this dream about buying some land
he's gonna give up the booze and the one night stand
and then he'll settle down in this quiet little town
and forget about everything ♪

Posted by: Baker Street at November 18, 2017 01:20 PM (ajiE5)

23 CaliGirl, I though of you when I was in the grocery store and saw that pomegranates were $3 each. I cried when I remembered you fed them to your chickens because you had so many. Wah.

Posted by: bluebell at November 18, 2017 01:16 PM (UoSKV)

I still have a metric crapton of them left. Yes, I am still giving them to the chickens. I have 4 pomegranate bushes. This was a good year. I wonder if it's because we had lots of rain.

Posted by: CaliGirl at November 18, 2017 01:23 PM (Ri/rl)

24 @12: "About the prime numbers thing, it may be to make plantings more interesting to the eye."

Subconsciously, your mind tends to divide even numbered groups like four through twenty into halves, and imbalances and between those two subgroups become naggingly obvious.

Posted by: Walter Freeman at November 18, 2017 01:25 PM (I/iGu)

25 19 Weasel, I believe there is such a thing as the Christmas Tree Growers Association, or some name close to that. You might try there.

Posted by: bluebell at November 18, 2017 01:18 PM (UoSKV)
--------
These are the kind of trees you grind up and turn into toilet paper, not ornamental Christmas trees. Not sure if that makes a difference. I'm going to talk to the county extension agent, I think.

Posted by: Weasel at November 18, 2017 01:26 PM (Sfs6o)

26 CaliGirl, do you sell the pomegranates commercially? I'm thinking you don't if you have so many. This is prime pomegranate season around here.

For buying them, I mean. They're pretty much impossible to find any other time.

Posted by: bluebell at November 18, 2017 01:26 PM (UoSKV)

27 Weasel, you're buying a toilet paper farm? Wow.

I really do learn something new here every day. Wow.

Posted by: bluebell at November 18, 2017 01:27 PM (UoSKV)

28 It's time to trim some trees around here. We have some dead pine trees and a cypress tree that needs to be cut down.

We also need to trim the eucalyptus trees of some branches that may fall and clean up the redwood trees.

The leaves on the grapes have changed colors and it looks pretty.

I will get some pictures. The vineyards across the road are even prettier.

That's as fall as we get around here.

Posted by: CaliGirl at November 18, 2017 01:28 PM (Ri/rl)

29 If you are thinking about growing an avocado tree, let us know. Not a frivolous undertaking.

We weren't, but my daughter, who lived in a dark apartment in Boston at the time, decided to grow one from a pit. We christened it the Grandplant. It was a couple of years old when she moved back down to NoVa, and had the physique you'd expect given it's light-starved infancy. We put it on our deck, which gets lots of sun, and it shot up from 3' to 9' before we topped it and moved it inside into our sun room for the winter. It started putting out limbs last winter, expanded them this summer, and is now comfortably (for it) ensconced in the sun room again.

I've asked for a plan as to it's future, since it's outgrowing even the cathedral ceiling in the SR, but thus far, it's lots of handwaving and pleas for it's continued survival. Sigh.

Posted by: pep at November 18, 2017 01:28 PM (LAe3v)

30
I have next years landscaping project already pictured in my mind...

http://cdn.golfandcourse.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/03/hole-16_0-1024x64072.jpg?x36039

I may have to scale it down a little, however.

Posted by: Ace Tractor Seat Supply at November 18, 2017 01:29 PM (ajiE5)

31 Posted by: Baker Street at November 18, 2017 01:20 PM (ajiE5)
---------
It'll be quiet except for all the shooting! I'm pretty much doing this to have a private rifle range and the trees will provide a nice tax strategy.

Posted by: Weasel at November 18, 2017 01:29 PM (Sfs6o)

32 I have next years landscaping project already pictured in my mind...I may have to scale it down a little, however

I see the sniper in the rough.

Posted by: pep at November 18, 2017 01:30 PM (LAe3v)

33
27 Weasel, you're buying a toilet paper farm? Wow.

I really do learn something new here every day. Wow.
Posted by: bluebell at November 18, 2017 01:27 PM (UoSKV)
-----------
It's more of a TP Ranch.

Posted by: Weasel at November 18, 2017 01:30 PM (Sfs6o)

34 It's more of a TP Ranch.

Posted by: Weasel


He'll need to be near a railroad. Perhaps the Quilted Northern?

Posted by: pep at November 18, 2017 01:32 PM (LAe3v)

35 It's more of a TP Ranch.
Posted by: Weasel at November 18, 2017 01:30 PM (Sfs6o)
------------

And now I'm picturing dusty rolls of TP blowing by like tumbleweeds.

They've fallen from the branches of the TP trees which have so many rolls on them that you can't manage to harvest them all.

Eventually they will roll across the country, where CaliGirl will feed them to her chickens.

Posted by: bluebell at November 18, 2017 01:34 PM (UoSKV)

36

He'll need to be near a railroad. Perhaps the Quilted Northern?
Posted by: pep at November 18, 2017 01:32 PM (LAe3v)
--------
Too fancy. I'll be growing trees that make the terrible thin single ply stuff you get in prison.

Posted by: Weasel at November 18, 2017 01:34 PM (Sfs6o)

37 26 CaliGirl, do you sell the pomegranates commercially? I'm thinking you don't if you have so many. This is prime pomegranate season around here.

For buying them, I mean. They're pretty much impossible to find any other time.
Posted by: bluebell at November 18, 2017 01:26 PM (UoSKV)

No, the pomegranates are just in our small orchard area near the chicken coop. We planted a bunch a fruit trees 2 years ago. We have Asian pears, Granny Smith apples, cherry trees, peach, plum, nectarines and figs, pomegranates.

The things we grow commercially are head lettuce, red and green leaf, red and green cabbage, broccoli, cauliflower, napa/bok choy, cilantro, spinach, strawberries, blackberries, and during the summer,zucchini, yellow straight and crook neck squash, bell peppers, jalapenos, red fresno chilis, poblano, anaheim chilis. We also grow hay during the winter too. I think alfalfa. I could be wrong about the hay.

Posted by: CaliGirl at November 18, 2017 01:34 PM (Ri/rl)

38 I'm not a pumpkin eater, but a sugar pumpkin pie sounds delish, for some reason. They have those in the store, or do you have to grow your own? Or is that what a "pie" pumpkin is?

Posted by: Gem at November 18, 2017 01:36 PM (XoAz8)

39 Posted by: CaliGirl at November 18, 2017 01:34 PM (Ri/rl)
--------
Any tips for TP tree ranching?

Posted by: Weasel at November 18, 2017 01:36 PM (Sfs6o)

40 I see the sniper in the rough.

Posted by: pep at November 18, 2017 01:30 PM (LAe3v)


Ha! Maybe in the woods. Those roughs are pristine. It looks like they spread lime over them to get them that intense a white color. That's the 16th hole at Augusta National Golf Club, btw. Just to give a sense of scale, the flagpole on that green is seven foot tall.

Posted by: Ace Tractor Seat Supply at November 18, 2017 01:37 PM (ajiE5)

41 Wow, CaliGirl, that all sounds amazing. I"m grateful for people like you and your husband who grow all the food for the black-thumbed people like me. I'd be living on acorns if it weren't for you. Those, I know how to grow. Plus, they're easy to harvest - they just fall on the deck, making me jump. Or fall on the car, or my head.

Posted by: bluebell at November 18, 2017 01:38 PM (UoSKV)

42 39 Posted by: CaliGirl at November 18, 2017 01:34 PM (Ri/rl)
--------
Any tips for TP tree ranching?
Posted by: Weasel at November 18, 2017 01:36 PM (Sfs6o)

My husband is the farmer. Remember these words of wisdom. Farmers are the only people dumb enough to risk 10 million to make 1 million.

Posted by: CaliGirl at November 18, 2017 01:39 PM (Ri/rl)

43 Maybe I can use some of Weasel's TP in the garden to tie around blossoms while cross-pollinating.

Posted by: KT at November 18, 2017 01:39 PM (BVQ+1)

44 I can't wait to see the packaging for the Weasel Toilet Paper company. Maybe we can help design it? Make sure you sell to Costco, because that's where I buy all my toilet paper.

Okay, I'm supposed to be working. See you all later!

Posted by: bluebell at November 18, 2017 01:40 PM (UoSKV)

45 Gem at November 18, 2017 01:36 PM

'Sugar' is an old variety of pumpkin. It's not really very sugary. Probably more flavorful than many others of the time, though. Not very big.

Posted by: KT at November 18, 2017 01:41 PM (BVQ+1)

46 >>>And now I'm picturing dusty rolls of TP blowing by like tumbleweeds.



They've fallen from the branches of the TP trees which have so many rolls on them that you can't manage to harvest them all.



Eventually they will roll across the country, where CaliGirl will feed them to her chickens.


I'll have some of what you're drinking please.

Posted by: cfo mom at November 18, 2017 01:53 PM (RfzVr)

47 speaking of bird habitat, I'm thinkin' a lot of raccoon have to "go" to bring back more turkeys and doves and quail. We have way too many coons, and hunting has declined ... pelts not worth much. Just 10 years ago I'd hear groups of turkeys most mornings, rarely even catch a couple on the trail cams now. A few quail, haven't seen a pheasant in years.

Shotgun this weekend for deer ... my friend had some a few feet from him but was waiting for something bigger. A couple ten points have been around ... two separate shots next door may have gotten one or both. The three counties here are called "the golden triangle" since they "harvest" so many nice bucks here.

One little food plot has some dried up corn ... when I walk through I hear the little birds before I see them as they rattle the dry leaves. Just one of those quiet little joys of walks in the country.

Posted by: illiniwek at November 18, 2017 01:57 PM (/aIFg)

48 Cursed is the ground because of you; through painful toil you will eat food from it all the days of your life.
It will produce thorns and thistles for you, and you will eat the plants of the field. By the sweat of your brow you will eat your food until you return to the ground, since from it you were taken; for dust you are and to dust you will return.
Posted by: Insomniac - Nobody in Particular at November 18, 2017 12:49 PM (NWiLs)


I love ya Insomniac...you do not disappoint. I see this post and laugh. Every.single.time.

Posted by: Gumdrop Gorilla or morose moose mussed at November 18, 2017 01:57 PM (7UCSd)

49 Good afternoon gardeners. I love the photos. That albino sparrow is so unusual. And the raccoon at the top photo is beyond adorable. (I can always use more adorable.)

Thanks to KT and all the contributors. I always learn interesting stuff here.

Posted by: JTB at November 18, 2017 01:58 PM (V+03K)

50 This Weasel TP Ranch is intriguing. Is there a newsletter?

Posted by: Peaches at November 18, 2017 02:01 PM (14URa)

51 CaliGirl, do you sell the pomegranates commercially? I'm thinking you don't if you have so many. This is prime pomegranate season around here.

For buying them, I mean. They're pretty much impossible to find any other time.
Posted by: bluebell at November 18, 2017 01:26 PM (UoSKV)


True. I was at grocery store last night and they had little containers of pomegrante seeds. I wanted to by some, but wasn't sure what to do with them. Can you eat them like that...or do they need sugar. Yes, I'm clueless about food...yes, you can judge me.

But any help would be appreciated. I do like the pomegrante juice, but they usually mix with sweeter juices. So I imagine it is sour. Seeds I know nothing about.

Posted by: Gumdrop Gorilla or morose moose mussed at November 18, 2017 02:02 PM (7UCSd)

52 Question: Can sunflowers, appropriate for birds to eat from, be grown in containers? Even if it's one plant per container?

Also, should the stalks be supported, like tall tomato plants?

I mentioned we will only be container gardening next season but I like the idea of a few sunflower plants for the song birds.

Posted by: JTB at November 18, 2017 02:04 PM (V+03K)

53 That raccoon is adorable, but I think he is stuck. He must be standing on his tip toes in order to get his head even that far out. Maybe if they turn it upside down the gravity will help him get out. Or might have to break the jar.

Yes, I am weird, I think about these things.

Posted by: Gumdrop Gorilla or morose moose mussed at November 18, 2017 02:06 PM (7UCSd)

54 Another question. (Yeah, it's one of those days.) Our rosemary plants in an Earth Box are doing great right now. Can they usually do OK in northern Virginia winters if left out? Or should we harvest and dry them, cut back the stems and hope they come back next summer?

Posted by: JTB at November 18, 2017 02:09 PM (V+03K)

55 9 ... mustbequantum, I heard my share of folklore about gardening since I grew up in an old New England town. But I never heard about planting in prime numbers. Seems a little 'math-y' for an old wives tale.

Posted by: JTB at November 18, 2017 02:15 PM (V+03K)

56 Posted by: Gumdrop Gorilla or morose moose mussed at November 18, 2017 02:02 PM (7UCSd)

You can eat the seeds or spit them out.

I eat the pomegranates outside and spit the seeds out. I have eaten the seeds in salads or desserts.

Posted by: CaliGirl at November 18, 2017 02:23 PM (Ri/rl)

57 50 This Weasel TP Ranch is intriguing. Is there a newsletter?
Posted by: Peaches at November 18, 2017 02:01 PM (14URa)
------------
There probably will be! The main idea is to make a nice range and place for me to go to escape Northern Virginia on the weekends, and the tree farm thing will give me something to goof around with in my old age.

Posted by: Weasel at November 18, 2017 02:23 PM (Sfs6o)

58 Brattleboro would rather have the economy grow at 1% with a Presdent of Color rather then 4% with that H8ter Trump !!! If we hads a Presdent of coler again then the world would love us more. Let's get rid of Trump now so the world will love us again !!!! We call on Sinator Sanders and Nancy Pillosi to do something now befiore it is two late. We are proud that Present Obama punished the rich to help the poor people of the country that Bush created....

Posted by: Mary Clogginstien from Brattleboro at November 18, 2017 02:23 PM (u54O2)

59 >>>The helenium have given me a second bloom.


*hic* What's the half life of helenium? And how much would Putin or Khamenei be willing to pay me to sell them 20% of our helenium reserves?

Posted by: Hillary Clinton at November 18, 2017 02:24 PM (/qEW2)

60 Weasel - what kind of pine trees?

Posted by: grammie winger - maranatha at November 18, 2017 02:24 PM (lwiT4)

61 60 Weasel - what kind of pine trees?

Posted by: grammie winger - maranatha at November 18, 2017 02:24 PM (lwiT4)
------
Green ones?

Posted by: Weasel at November 18, 2017 02:25 PM (Sfs6o)

62 You can eat the seeds or spit them out.

I eat the pomegranates outside and spit the seeds out. I have eaten the seeds in salads or desserts.
Posted by: CaliGirl at November 18, 2017 02:23 PM (Ri/rl)


Thank you. For some reason they are not selling the actual pomegrantes, only the seeds. Go figure.

Posted by: Gumdrop Gorilla or morose moose mussed at November 18, 2017 02:26 PM (7UCSd)

63 The internet is a vast web of infinite diversity of topics. But I think it's safe to say that this is the ONLY site discussing the development of a toilet paper ranch. And I am privileged to witness it.

Posted by: JTB at November 18, 2017 02:27 PM (V+03K)

64 55 9 ... mustbequantum, I heard my share of folklore about gardening since I grew up in an old New England town. But I never heard about planting in prime numbers. Seems a little 'math-y' for an old wives tale.
Posted by: JTB at November 18, 2017 02:15 PM (V+03K)

I think maybe it looks prettier, like using an odd number of flowers in a vase.

Posted by: CaliGirl at November 18, 2017 02:28 PM (Ri/rl)

65 Thank you. For some reason they are not selling the actual pomegrantes, only the seeds. Go figure.
Posted by: Gumdrop Gorilla or morose moose mussed at November 18, 2017 02:26 PM (7UCSd)

I see those too. I've never bought them. They should be sweet. The fresh seeds are plenty sweet.

Posted by: CaliGirl at November 18, 2017 02:29 PM (Ri/rl)

66 Posted by: Weasel at November 18, 2017 02:25 PM (Sfs6o)
=======================


We had Jack Pine up by our cabin in the U.P. The forest service planted a lot of them after some pretty bad fires. I think they grow fast. In case you need some fast growing toilet paper.

Posted by: grammie winger - maranatha at November 18, 2017 02:30 PM (lwiT4)

67 We had Jack Pine up by our cabin in the U.P. The forest service planted a lot of them after some pretty bad fires. I think they grow fast. In case you need some fast growing toilet paper.

Posted by: grammie winger - maranatha at November 18, 2017 02:30 PM (lwiT4)
--------
Just teasing - I'm pretty sure these are loblolly pines, Pinus taeda

Posted by: Weasel at November 18, 2017 02:33 PM (Sfs6o)

68 I may have to scale it down a little, however.
Posted by: Ace Tractor Seat Supply at November 18, 2017 01:29 PM (ajiE5)

That's Augusta isn't it?

Posted by: CaliGirl at November 18, 2017 02:33 PM (Ri/rl)

69 Reading up thread about the TP trees and made me laugh, and think about people's homes being TP during Homecoming & Halloween.

I always forget TP has trees in it. B/c bark and wood & rough. Your mind just naturally goes to cotton. I wonder what the natural color is before they bleach it.

Posted by: Gumdrop Gorilla or morose moose mussed at November 18, 2017 02:34 PM (7UCSd)

70 Posted by: JTB at November 18, 2017 02:27 PM (V+03K)
-----------
Once I get things squared away, you and Mrs JTB will have to come down for some shootin'.

Posted by: Weasel at November 18, 2017 02:35 PM (Sfs6o)

71 I think maybe it looks prettier, like using an odd number of flowers in a vase.

Posted by: CaliGirl at November 18, 2017 02:28 PM (Ri/rl)


If I were to delve into artistic speak, say you put two candles on a dining room table. No one would notice. One would look just silly. Put three on the table and you create a certain tension that would make someone stop and ponder for a moment.

I always plant in odd numbers. A pair of something looks too formal. You want your landscape to be something that stops people in their tracks, so they can appreciate the natural appearing beauty. Not see two of this, two of that, as if your landscape was waiting to loaded aboard Noah's Ark. Odd numbers create that tension that says 'natural'.

Posted by: Ace Tractor Seat Supply at November 18, 2017 02:36 PM (ajiE5)

72 Just teasing - I'm pretty sure these are loblolly pines, Pinus taeda

Posted by: Weasel at November 18, 2017 02:33 PM (Sfs6o)
========================

I had never heard of those, so I looked them up. Not exactly ready for the Christmas display, eh?

Posted by: grammie winger - maranatha at November 18, 2017 02:36 PM (lwiT4)

73 61 60 Weasel - what kind of pine trees?

Posted by: grammie winger - maranatha at November 18, 2017 02:24 PM (lwiT4)
------
Green ones?
Posted by: Weasel at November 18, 2017 02:25 PM (Sfs6o)

In the south it's mostly (green) loblolly pine that's used for paper. Not sure if that applies in VA too.

Posted by: stace at November 18, 2017 02:38 PM (6HFDU)

74 Thanks, KT, for the info re sugar pumpkins. I think I might like to try making a pie from scratch.

Pomegranate seeds have this wonderful burst of sweetness followed by another sensation that's hard to describe. "Sour" doesn't quite capture it completely. Almost like anti -quenching, lol. Like a very dry wine.

Posted by: Gem at November 18, 2017 02:38 PM (XoAz8)

75 Now I'm picturing a feminist western, in which an association of evil TP ranchers conspire to kill Sheryl Crow because her message is bankrupting them.

Posted by: Steve and Cold Bear at November 18, 2017 02:39 PM (/qEW2)

76 Oops. Shoulda refreshed before I commented, weasel.

Posted by: stace at November 18, 2017 02:40 PM (6HFDU)

77 72 Just teasing - I'm pretty sure these are loblolly pines, Pinus taeda

Posted by: Weasel at November 18, 2017 02:33 PM (Sfs6o)
========================

I had never heard of those, so I looked them up. Not exactly ready for the Christmas display, eh?
Posted by: grammie winger - maranatha at November 18, 2017 02:36 PM (lwiT4)
-----------
These are planted pretty densely and make an excellent habitat for birds and other wildlife. They aren't the prettiest thing in the world, especially at their current age of about 7 or 8 years, but it's a perfect place to escape from civilization.

Posted by: Weasel at November 18, 2017 02:41 PM (Sfs6o)

78 TD Badgers



to stay on topic, sometimes badgers can get into your garden

Posted by: grammie winger - maranatha at November 18, 2017 02:42 PM (lwiT4)

79 In the south it's mostly (green) loblolly pine that's used for paper. Not sure if that applies in VA too.
Posted by: stace at November 18, 2017 02:38 PM (6HFDU)
--------
Yep, it sure does. Thanks Stace. I'm pretty sure that's what these are.

Posted by: Weasel at November 18, 2017 02:43 PM (Sfs6o)

80 That's Augusta isn't it?

Posted by: CaliGirl at November 18, 2017 02:33 PM (Ri/rl)


Yup. The most prestigious golf club on the planet, I reckon. Even Bill Gates had trouble becoming one of the limited number of members.

To me, the finest example of natural landscaping I've ever seen. It could take me an hour to count all of the red and white azalea in that photograph. At just one of the holes.

This site has the pictures of the other holes...

http://www.golfandcourse.com/augusta-national-golf-club-photos/

Posted by: Ace Tractor Seat Supply at November 18, 2017 02:43 PM (ajiE5)

81 70 ... "Once I get things squared away, you and Mrs JTB will have to come down for some shootin'."

Weasel, Oh Yes!!! Here's a phrase I haven't used since Mrs. JTB and I got married: 'It's a date!'

Posted by: JTB at November 18, 2017 02:43 PM (V+03K)

82 it's a perfect place to escape from civilization.
=============================


That does sound nice. Up north we had a lot of white pine, and all kinds of spruce.

Posted by: grammie winger - maranatha at November 18, 2017 02:43 PM (lwiT4)

83 Loblollies are very pretty actually. They're just not Christmas tree shape.

They're also the source of most US grown paper products.

What are really cool to me are longleaf pines, but they're not as suitable for mass production as loblollies.

Posted by: stace at November 18, 2017 02:47 PM (6HFDU)

84 My mom had to put heavy duty rubber bungee cords on our trash can lids to keep out those adorable raccoons.

Every now and then, they'd chew through the corners of the lids, get in there, and dig out a few scraps.

Other times, we'd wake up in the middle of the night to a loud "TWANG!" followed by the frightened or wounded cries of a raccoon that was brave enough to try chewing through the bungee cord.

Good times.

Posted by: Walter Freeman at November 18, 2017 02:47 PM (I/iGu)

85 Yup. The most prestigious golf club on the planet, I reckon. Even Bill
Gates had trouble becoming one of the limited number of members.

=========================


Last year Little Winger drove to Augusta for the Masters. He didn't have tickets - he just wanted to hang around and soak up the atmosphere. He got to drinking with some guys from Chicago. One of their group had to leave early and gave Little his ticket for the Sunday round.


That kid falls into more good luck than anyone I've ever seen. This stuff happens to him all the time.


Posted by: grammie winger - maranatha at November 18, 2017 02:48 PM (lwiT4)

86 I'm pretty sure these are loblolly pines

I keep reading this as Lollipop pines.

Do you know in England they call a school crossing guard a Lollipop Lady.





Posted by: Gumdrop Gorilla or morose moose mussed at November 18, 2017 02:48 PM (7UCSd)

87 Posted by: Weasel at November 18, 2017 02:33

Weasel, I hear there's good money in dental floss ranching too. Don't know if it will grow in your area, but it does well in MT.

Posted by: Farmer at November 18, 2017 02:51 PM (lfXAE)

88 @80: "To me, the finest example of natural landscaping I've ever seen."

Walking across the Augusta fairways during the Masters doesn't even feel real.

It's not lawn grass. It's more like a plush, carefully woven rug.

Posted by: Walter Freeman at November 18, 2017 02:51 PM (I/iGu)

89 Over the years I've tried growing a number of food plants in my yard, some more successful than others. Tomatoes and some squashes, yea! But could I feed myself & family on what grows on our not-even-quarter-acre plot that has a house & garage on it? Nope. So thank you CaliGirl and your husband for growing all the things we love to eat!!

Posted by: Boots at November 18, 2017 02:52 PM (EBwPV)

90 gave Little his ticket for the Sunday round.

That kid falls into more good luck than anyone I've ever seen. This stuff happens to him all the time.


Posted by: grammie winger - maranatha at November 18, 2017 02:48 PM (lwiT4)
That is so cool, grammie!

Posted by: Peaches at November 18, 2017 02:52 PM (14URa)

91 Other times, we'd wake up in the middle of the night to a loud "TWANG!" followed by the frightened or wounded cries of a raccoon that was brave enough to try chewing through the bungee cord.

Good times.

Posted by: Walter Freeman at November 18, 2017 02:47 PM (I/iGu)


Those suckers can mess up a good nights sleep. They've figured out how to open the 'buggies' that the trash services use in our area. Usually with a loud thud. Then the racket while they drop in, root around, then climb back out. I figured out that drilling a hole through the top and base then inserting a screwdriver through it would keep them out. Approach trash, pull out screwdriver, open lid, toss, push screwdriver back in. So far, so good for the past six months.

Posted by: Ace Tractor Seat Supply at November 18, 2017 02:53 PM (ajiE5)

92 Walking across the Augusta fairways during the Masters doesn't even feel real.

It's not lawn grass. It's more like a plush, carefully woven rug.

Posted by: Walter Freeman at November 18, 2017 02:51 PM (I/iGu)


Another lucky person who has been there.

I can tell you this, as I grow bentgrass, it is the penultimate grass that you can walk barefoot on. My 'velvet bentgrass' can achieve blade counts in the 50,000 blades per square inch territory. That's not a misprint. It grows left, it grows right, it stitches itself into this incredible mat.

It's like gravity no longer exists as you walk.

Posted by: Ace Tractor Seat Supply at November 18, 2017 03:00 PM (ajiE5)

93 Yep, it sure does. Thanks Stace. I'm pretty sure that's what these are.
Posted by: Weasel at November 18, 2017 02:43 PM (Sfs6o)

What a great place you have there with the shooting and the TP trees. That's gonna be a lot of fun.

We were just at the coast with some other couples, and one guy is a long range shooter. Each day he'd wear a politically incorrect t-shirt with some message like "Black Powder Matters". Good folks.

Posted by: stace at November 18, 2017 03:03 PM (6HFDU)

94 @91: "Those suckers can mess up a good nights sleep."

They are devilishly smart little creatures. I remember finding lots of little muddy footprints on the edge tiles of my parents swimming pool in the mornings. They weren't just drinking or cleaning themselves, but washing scavenged bits of food before eating too.

Posted by: Walter Freeman at November 18, 2017 03:04 PM (I/iGu)

95 Here's how to make a Traditional 18th Century Pumpkin Pie from George Washington's Mount Vernon. No eggs?

Is this a trick question? Pumpkins don't lay eggs.

Posted by: hogmartin at November 18, 2017 03:05 PM (y87Qq)

96 87 Posted by: Weasel at November 18, 2017 02:33

Weasel, I hear there's good money in dental floss ranching too. Don't know if it will grow in your area, but it does well in MT.
Posted by: Farmer at November 18, 2017 02:51 PM (lfXAE)
-----
Ha! I was listening to that song in the car earlier today.

Posted by: Weasel at November 18, 2017 03:08 PM (Sfs6o)

97 Been raking all month, but we're nearly done. Only the apple trees are still hanging on to their...

Leaves, leaves, and more leaves!

(At least we don't have 100s of pounds of apples to pick up as well--like last year. And no 'coons hanging around to eat them!)

It's sunny out, not too windy. Maybe better get off my butt and finish the yardwork, lol.

The indoor poblano has one pepper on it and a few more blooms coming on. I have a soft little paintbrush to dab the pollen around--looks like it's working!

Can't believe the Holidays are nearly upon us. Again. Already.

I need to dig out the lights. Been saying that to myself for a month, thinking to put them up while it's nice out instead of doing it in 30-40 degree temps. And so it goes.

Thanks for the threads, KT.

Happy gardening, everyone.

Posted by: JQ at November 18, 2017 03:10 PM (yD/Pf)

98
We were just at the coast with some other couples, and one guy is a long range shooter. Each day he'd wear a politically incorrect t-shirt with some message like "Black Powder Matters". Good folks.
Posted by: stace at November 18, 2017 03:03 PM


He must use one of those 50 caliber silenced muzzle loaders.

Posted by: Bertram Cabot, Jr. at November 18, 2017 03:12 PM (IqV8l)

99 Weasel, it is kind of important to know what sort of trees they are, and what you site index is--the suitability for trees your site has due to soil, water, and sun exposure. That you can get from the county extension agent.

At about 10 years or so, or when the trees start touching you want to look into "pre-commercial" thinning. If your trees get to closely packed for their size they get stunted and may never recover.
If you have fir or one of the wood type pines, you may want to look into limbing up the trees--it is called side pruning--so that keeps the knots really small in the main trunk and you get a better price for your logs when you sell them to the mill. It also lets you walk in among them without getting a face full of branch every other step.

When your trees get older and they close canopy a lot of the underbrush and the critters will go elsewhere, so you may be interested in being extra aggressive in thinning to make sure you have empty spaces for underbrush and critters.

Oh, and if you are shooting, make sure you don't shoot trees going to the mill. Some mills if they find one bit of metal, they don't pay you for that log and they start looking at your logs with suspicion since they can break a saw blade that way.

Posted by: Kindltot at November 18, 2017 03:15 PM (2K6fY)

100 Posted by: Kindltot at November 18, 2017 03:15 PM (2K6fY)
--------
Thanks Kindltot- these are loblolly pines at about year 7. I'm planning to meet with the county extension agent this winter. Good tip on the shooting, but I'm planning to clear a few acres for an actual range with a berm.

Posted by: Weasel at November 18, 2017 03:19 PM (Sfs6o)

101 Oh, they look like Ponderosas.

I don't think they will canopy over like Douglas Fir and Hemlock, so you will have better hunting in those groves.

Another thing to look into is what is called Special Forest products, and that is everything from pine straw to mushrooms to ginseng. It is a bit of extra cash while you are waiting for your trees to mature.

Posted by: Kindltot at November 18, 2017 03:25 PM (2K6fY)

102 Sunflowers in a garden here will grow over 7 foot high

Posted by: Skip at November 18, 2017 03:28 PM (aC6Sd)

103
Something else about the 'velvet bentgrass' I mentioned above. I've seen it labeled as an 'invasive species' by the EPA and I can no longer find a vendor selling it. I know that Trump uses it at his signature golf courses in New Jersey. So he's shit out of luck re-seeding with it.

So you have this grass with incredible characteristics, perfect for golf courses, or even home outside play areas, that the EPA has effectively banned.

It's grass, it grows, it spreads at maybe an inch a year, it's not creeping through someones window while they sleep at night, strangling them.

But this is how you get Trump.

There's probably a million stories of government overreach in the past two decades. This is just one.

Posted by: Ace Tractor Seat Supply at November 18, 2017 03:36 PM (ajiE5)

104 JTB at November 18, 2017 02:04 PM

I think you could plant most any kind of ornamental sunflower (except the pollen-free ones) to attract little birds. There are some dwarfs.

The big sunflowers are kind of ungainly for an earthbox. You might also consider some of the other flowers birds use for seed in winter. I can include a basic list for songbirds next week.

Sunflower seed hulls inhibit the growth of many other plants. Something to consider in the garden.

Posted by: KT at November 18, 2017 03:43 PM (BVQ+1)

105 JTB,

The survival of your rosemary over winter in Northern Virginia may depend on the cultivar.

Also, you will want to keep it on the dry side during the winter, maybe somewhere close to the house, to give it the best chance for survival.

Posted by: KT at November 18, 2017 03:45 PM (BVQ+1)

106 52,
"Question: Can sunflowers, appropriate for birds to eat from, be grown in containers? Even if it's one plant per container?


Also, should the stalks be supported, like tall tomato plants?


I mentioned we will only be container gardening next season but I like the idea of a few sunflower plants for the song birds.
"
Posted by: JTB at November 18, 2017 02:04 PM (V+03K)



I don't see why not as long as they can grow tall. We grow tomatoes, herbs, and flowers in containers and all do fine. Even have sunflowers that start from the birdseed that gets scattered but I pull them when I find them as they are not what was planted in the pot.

Posted by: geoffb at November 18, 2017 03:51 PM (zOpu5)

107 illiniwek at November 18, 2017 01:57 PM

On bird habitat, birds, racoons and hunting:

I haven't seen a pheasant for years out here, either. Never thought to connect that to less hunting of bird egg eaters. Here, that might be coyotes. Or protected kit foxes. Maybe rats. Eeew.

Posted by: KT at November 18, 2017 03:53 PM (BVQ+1)

108 I'm musing on what to say in my "Treasure Valley of Idaho report" other than : Leaves.

The last vegetable garden cleanup was last weekend, chopping down the asparagus forest. Now we're focused on mostly leaves. The 4 sweet gums have finished dropping; ditto Eric the Half-a-Maple, and the oak. I think the only trees still with leaves are Jupiter the Silver Maple, and the 4 Damned Sycamores. (If that's not their official name, it *should* be.) It's supposed to be dry tomorrow, so we'll see if we can't get more of the burnable oak and sycamore leaves collected up. Lots of rainy days predicted for Thanksgiving week.

I did trim all the flowers off our 3 new mums. I cut all the dead leaves off the 2 mini daylilies out front. And I pulled most of the dead leaves off the large daylily out back - it has some little green leaves down inside, so I wanted to leave some parts of the plant there to protect those. I can always pull more of the dead leaves off in spring.

Siberian Iris are supposed to be cut down to 1-2" after all their leaves die, so I did cut down the 3 clumps behind the kitchen. I think there are 5 clumps on the south side, and at least 8 out front, so this will be an ongoing project! The Calamagrostis bunchgrass clumps are supposed to be trimmed down in late winter, before the new shoots come up, so that can wait a few months.

(On a side note, are there Morons and 'ettes who know who Al Stewart is? We've been listening to his music - um, might be 30 or more years now... He did a concert last Sunday night in Boise, and husband ponied up extra so we could get "Meet and Greet" tickets - about 20 of us got to shake his hand, chat for a bit, and get his autograph, then sit front and center for the concert. A wonderful evening!!)

Happy Thanksgiving to all of you, and may you always have much to be thankful for!

Posted by: Pat* at November 18, 2017 04:37 PM (FtfVi)

109 CaliGirl, back when I lived in Moorhead MN a friend who farmed stopped by. It was harvest time. Michigan had a wet fall that ruined their edible dry bean crop. My friend also grew them. He had a farm truck full. He said, "I thought you would want to see a load of beans worth more than the truck." It was a newer truck, too.

Posted by: Gordon at November 18, 2017 04:51 PM (3zPj+)

110 yeah KT, some here blame the turkey reduction on increase in bobcats, which they now started hunting in limited numbers. But there are way more raccoons. We have some coyotes also ... I see them occasionally in the day. No rats fortunately. At least the raccoon are cute when they're little.

Posted by: illiniwek at November 18, 2017 04:55 PM (/aIFg)

111 For those wondering what to do with pomegranate seeds, called Aprils, I think: come back tonight. I will post my recipe for pomegranate salsa which is freaking fabulous. Simple, but oh so good.

Posted by: Gordon at November 18, 2017 04:56 PM (3zPj+)

112 Arils, not Aprils.

Posted by: Gordon at November 18, 2017 05:00 PM (3zPj+)

113 I have an avocado tree that I grew from a pit. It grew ceiling-fan high after a year or two. I cut the main shoot, and the side branches have taken its place. Now, a lot of its leaves are turning brown at the tips, but I think that has happened before, and new ones grow back.

Open blogger, it you have any ideas how to keep it healthy or how to make more avocados, please let me know. Thanks!

Posted by: RTW at November 18, 2017 05:22 PM (3frOv)

114 109 CaliGirl, back when I lived in Moorhead MN a friend who farmed stopped by. It was harvest time. Michigan had a wet fall that ruined their edible dry bean crop. My friend also grew them. He had a farm truck full. He said, "I thought you would want to see a load of beans worth more than the truck." It was a newer truck, too.
Posted by: Gordon at November 18, 2017 04:51 PM (3zPj+)

That was one happy farmer, your story made me smile.

Good for him.

Posted by: CaliGirl at November 18, 2017 06:12 PM (Ri/rl)

115 I think that one of the beauties of gardening is that it is so simple. In these troubled times your Saturday blog brought this house great joy and for that I want to thank you KT and all those who submitted tips on gardening along with photos. Saturday mornings here this past summer was coffee and KT and then chores.

Posted by: sherpa_k2 at November 18, 2017 06:27 PM (QAFyR)

116 As promised,
Pomegranate Salsa

Do not wear white when working with pomegranates!

Preparing the arils: Slice just deep enough to score the skin all the way around. Break it apart with your hands. Arils (the purple seed juicy things) go into one bowl, rind and white stuff in another. The brownish and/or clearish airls go away, they're not good. Fill the seed bowl with water, so the white bits can be gotten out. Drain them well. This does take some time, so allow for that.

Arils from four pomegranates
1 jalapeno, seeded, minced
1 small red onion, minced
Zest of 1/2 lime, juice of two limes
1/2 tsp salt
1/2 cup of chopped cilantro

Mix it up. Some people say add a bit of sugar, but they're silly. Don't omit the salt, really. It needs it.

It's better a day later. Stir it up before serving.

Serve with scoop tortilla chips. It's considered thoughtful to close your mouth before biting down.

Posted by: Gordon at November 18, 2017 09:31 PM (+En3w)

117 RTW at November 18, 2017 05:22 PM

If the leaves on your avocado tree turn brown just at the edges, it could be from salt build-up. If that is it, you could try flushing you soil with more water, or cutting back on fertilizer. But avocados normally lose leaves and make new ones.

It would be very unusual to get new avocados to grow indoors, at least without a greenhouse. For one thing, you would need to find a way to pollinate the flowers with pollen from a different tree. Even if fruit formed, the quality of the fruit might not be very good. I heard a talk by the guy who bred the 'Bacon' avocado. Once he planted a thousand seedlings of the Fuerte avocado. None had fruit as good as the parent.

Fuerte is a hybrid Mexican/Guatemalan avocado. Statistics for some other varieties might not be that grim.

Hope you enjoy your tree.

Posted by: KT at November 18, 2017 10:18 PM (BVQ+1)

118 sherpa_k2 at November 18, 2017 06:27 PM

Thanks.

Posted by: KT at November 18, 2017 10:19 PM (BVQ+1)

119 Gordon at November 18, 2017 09:31 PM

The recipe sounds fun. More onion than chile, I see.

Posted by: KT at November 18, 2017 10:21 PM (BVQ+1)

120 Pat* at November 18, 2017 04:37 PM

Thanks for the great report and the tip on Siberian Iris.

Hope you have a wonderful Thanksgiving, too.

Posted by: KT at November 18, 2017 10:24 PM (BVQ+1)

121 Thanks KT!

Posted by: RTW at November 18, 2017 11:57 PM (3frOv)

122 KT, it's very seasonally festive, red and green. And once you eat the first bite, you're gonna eat a lot of it. The crunch of the tortilla chip overcomes the oddness of the seed.

It is interesting how people who don't eat jalapenos or raw red onion will eat lots of this.

Posted by: Gordon at November 19, 2017 10:37 AM (+En3w)

123 Years ago I was having great difficulty sprouting avocado seeds. I tried various recommended techniques, but none worked.
In the process of remodeling my kitchen, a fresh avocado seed fell through the hole in the floor intended for the dryer exhaust.
Several weeks later I was in the dark, moldy, dirt-floored basement and found that the seed, resting on the plastic ground cover, had lushly sprouted and was thriving. Go figure!

Posted by: Robert Falk at November 19, 2017 12:47 PM (EDPp9)

124 Aha! Dryer lint and mold. If they let it get out that those are the secrets, well, anyone could.

Posted by: Gordon at November 19, 2017 01:59 PM (W8cD2)

125 All this time I thought that Texas grew 99% of pecans. I wouldn't consider them a nuisance tree, but most people here with pecan trees only pick up a few and leave the rest for squirrels. A mature pecan tree can easily produce 50 lbs of pecans.

Posted by: Michael the Texan at December 09, 2017 07:07 PM (nvMvs)

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