Support




Contact
Powered by
Movable Type





Saturday Gardening Thread: [KT]

A while ago, Dr_No sent in a lovely photo that kind of fits my mood this week:

Plumeria Obtusa_8325_06242017.jpg

I always look forward to the Garden Thread even tho' I no longer actively garden since I rent instead of own these days. I'm a photographer and graphic designer, and since I can't grow my own plants in this gated community, I photograph those in my area (outside the central city zone of Memphis, TN). The image [above] is of the Plumeria obtusa, a/k/a the 'Singapore Graveyard Flower' and 'Hawaiian Lei Flower' (among other nics).

I find the floral goodness at a local nursery, and have lurked there taking photos of their stock ever since moving to the area after H. Katrina in '05. Memphis isn't too bad for a native N'Awlins boy - they're both river cities, right ...? Country Gardens Nursery's a great place for imaging flowers, and its staff always helps with the floral identification, so there's that, too. . .

Right now, this flower reminds me of my uncle, a WWII Veteran who died on the Fourth of July. He got to do one of those Honor Flights a couple of years ago. He loved parties and looked really natural in a Hawaiian shirt and a lei. Though he would probably have looked pretty natural visiting a graveyard in Singapore, too. He had some acquaintance with graveyards. Though probably not with vampiric ghosts. Thanks for the floral remembrance, Dr_No.

I had a Plumeria for a while in Southern California. Got a few blooms. Sometimes got fallen leaves when I didn't think I should get fallen leaves. Anyone out there grow Plumarias? They are members of the Dogbane family, related to milkweed and natal plum. They are most fragrant at night, tricking sphinx moths into pollinating them without offering nectar in return.

According to Sunset, those short cuttings you buy in Hawaii on vacation are not a very good bet for survival on the mainland. Might want to go with an established plant. Buy it in summer. If you want to try growing this tropical plant in a temperate climate, wintering it indoors, there are now several dwarf selections.

plumeria-76.jpg

There are many species of Plumeria, all native to the tropical regions of the New World. Some are widely naturalized in Asia and Polynesia and have become part of the local cultures. The species in the photograph above is very tender. Plumeria rubra is hardy enough to grow in the low and intermediate desert with some protection.

Japanese Skinny House and Garden

This week, Ace posted a piece on the rather precipitous drop in the Japanese birthrate, partly because young people are abstaining from sex and avoiding romantic relationships. Whatever cultural forces are contributing to the reduction in family formation in Japan, the government does not seem to be helping with some of its public policies.

Even if there isn't much room for kids, Japanese people usually find a way to fit in some plants. One way the government discourages family formation:

Inheritance taxes on land in Japan means plots often get smaller as they are passed on. This "divide and sell" phenomenon in Tokyo translates into some very tiny home sites. When architects Masahiro and Mao Harada were tasked with creating a home on a lot only 2 meters (6.5 feet) wide at its narrowest point, they chose to interpret small as "near" and use the small scale to their advantage.

If you have height restrictions on your house, you can partially sink your lower level, so you can feel "like and insect" when you look out into the garden.

below bed.jpg

Sunken bedroom (to accommodate height restrictions)

In the widest part of the lot, a view of treetops really opens things up. This house was build without heavy equipment, with "impermanent" materials, partly because building codes change so fast that you never know when you will need to remodel.

lr kitch.jpg

Living room/kitchen combo

Insect Corner

Japanese people sometimes keep crickets as pets, for good luck.

Mr. Bar-the-Door has asked for advice on getting rid of ants and checking for termites. Anything new out there?

Gardens of The Horde (and their neighbors)

Weather continues to be a big factor in the garden here in the San Joaquin Valley. It has been very hot. Keeping some plants alive. But to our southeast, this is what threatens the ranch of one of CaliGirl's friends. We are getting smoke from this and other fires. Last I read, there were 40 wildfires across the western USA and Canada. Might be more now:

fire edit1.jpg

Meanwhile, a giant sinkhole has opened in a Florida neighborhood. It has swallowed two homes and gardens, and threatens more. And there seems to be a big storm system developing off the coast.

How's the weather treating you and your garden? You doing anything fun? Had a harvest?

If you would like to send information and/or photos for the Saturday Gardening Thread, the address is:

ktinthegarden
at g mail dot com

Include your nic unless you want to be a lurker.

Posted by: Open Blogger at 12:35 PM




Comments

(Jump to bottom of page)

1 I have a yard full of plumeria here in zone 9.

Give them lots of light, a little bonemeal, and a well-drained pot and they'll do quite well

Posted by: weew at July 15, 2017 12:33 PM (6EH85)

2 Posted by: weew at July 15, 2017 12:33 PM

They say that good drainage is key. Do you live where summers are hot?

Posted by: KT at July 15, 2017 12:34 PM (BVQ+1)

3 In my outdoor news, the black bears have returned (I live in NoVa, if you were wondering), and ripped the bottom off of my bird feeder to get at the seeds inside. Amazon wants $60 for a new one. I don't think so.

Posted by: pep at July 15, 2017 12:35 PM (LAe3v)

4 When I re-pot a plumeria cutting I usually put the pot itself into a hole in the ground. That way it'll get same irrigation, drainage, etc as everything else... but then I can easily yank it out of the ground before a hard frost can do any damage

Posted by: weew at July 15, 2017 12:36 PM (6EH85)

5 Yay garden thread. I have tree fever. I drive by what I think are Silver Maples that are volunteering like mad and I really want to plant a few in our farmyard this fall. The state university tree page recommends avoiding Silver Maples and Russian Olives and I suspect it is because they volunteer here. In our arid yard excessive volunteer trees will not be a problem.

OTOH just trying to keep the 2 tree surviving tree transplants from last fall and a few garden things watered feels like a major time sink so I have been relieved that only 2 of the 4 trees survived. But I resolve not to mess with planting taters next year so that will help.

Posted by: PaleRider at July 15, 2017 12:38 PM (8qFZP)

6 2

central Florida, and the summers are definitely hot. The plumeria thrive in it.

Yes drainage is important - plumeria are susceptible to root rot.

Posted by: weew at July 15, 2017 12:38 PM (6EH85)

7 Imagine having two kids in a home where some of the rooms can be reached only on ladders.

I have noticed that a lot of tiny home advocates (here in the USA, too) are into various forms of hammocks and rope webs. Saw one with a rope web/hammock overlooking a plant shelf and picture window.

Not very handicap-friendly.

Posted by: KT at July 15, 2017 12:39 PM (BVQ+1)

8 Weew, I didn't think zone 9 got hard frosts? I suppose you get a few per year?

Posted by: PaleRider at July 15, 2017 12:40 PM (8qFZP)

9 Posted by: pep at July 15, 2017 12:35 PM

Wow. Maybe you should think about a pet cricket.

Posted by: KT at July 15, 2017 12:40 PM (BVQ+1)

10 Posted by: weew at July 15, 2017 12:36 PM

Great idea. Probably keeps the roots from baking in the sun.

Posted by: KT at July 15, 2017 12:41 PM (BVQ+1)

11 Posted by: PaleRider at July 15, 2017 12:38 PM

Good luck on the tree front. Got any other kinds in mind? Lilacs, maybe?

Posted by: KT at July 15, 2017 12:43 PM (BVQ+1)

12 8

Every couple of years we'll get a hard frost that wreaks havoc on peoples' gardens and the local orange groves. It hasn't happened in a while, thankfully.

My largest plumeria has spread roots through its pot so it's in the ground for good, I think. But its also the tree from which I make all my cuttings, so by the winter time it's just a trunk that can be wrapped with a blanket.

Posted by: weew at July 15, 2017 12:46 PM (6EH85)

13 I had a plumeria in a pot on Hell Patio (at our previous house) for awhile. It did fine with almost no care but I think what killed it was the doggeh hiking his leg on it regularly. We have a better set up now for both pooches and plants.

Prayers for all of you in the vicinity of the fires.

Posted by: stace at July 15, 2017 12:53 PM (B7u3j)

14 KT,

wonderful thread as usual.

The Whittier fire near Cachuma, Goleta kicked up yesterday. More evacuations, smoke, ash. I hope they get these under control soon.

When the Whittier fire started last Saturday, there were 80 children trapped at their summer camp for hours. They were able to get the children out safely.

http://preview.tinyurl.com/ybgstyxa

The outdoor school burned down. Everyone in this valley went there for a week in 5th grade. We called it science camp. It's off the 154 across from lake Cachuma.

Posted by: CaliGirl at July 15, 2017 12:53 PM (Ri/rl)

15 Sno Pea ranching is for losers. Cucumbers are for the cool kids.

Posted by: Weasel at July 15, 2017 12:56 PM (Sfs6o)

16 I'm having a luncheon here in a bit. I'll check in later.

Thank you, KT

Posted by: CaliGirl at July 15, 2017 12:57 PM (Ri/rl)

17 #EatMoreVeggies.

Posted by: Black cow at July 15, 2017 12:58 PM (qdeLs)

18 Posted by: CaliGirl at July 15, 2017 12:53 PM

Terrible news about the camp. Glad everyone got out. Kids from around here go to a science camp out near the coast, too. Usually during the school year.

We have a friend who is a correctional officer at a fire camp. He has inmates out on a fire right now.

Posted by: KT at July 15, 2017 12:59 PM (BVQ+1)

19 is this open? Like inclusive or just for garden heads?

Posted by: Cannibal Robert 'evolving' at July 15, 2017 01:00 PM (qdeLs)

20 Posted by: Weasel at July 15, 2017 12:56 PM

Timing is everything with snow peas. Good luck with those cucumbers.

Posted by: KT at July 15, 2017 01:01 PM (BVQ+1)

21 Cannibal Robert 'evolving' at July 15, 2017 01:00 PM

You don't have to be a garden head to post here. But you have to like garden heads.

Heh.

Posted by: KT at July 15, 2017 01:03 PM (BVQ+1)

22 Mr. Bar-the-Door has asked for advice on getting rid of ants and checking for termites. Anything new out there?

I'm no indoor pest guy, but I know termites have to have soil within some proximity to wood to create their mud tunnels. The length is dependent on humidity, temps, etc.. In KCMo, I think it's 12"?
Ants are dependent on the type. Indoors, Terro makes them look like hogs at a trough. Outdoors, there are baits that work.

Posted by: MarkY at July 15, 2017 01:04 PM (KeVib)

23 Have to include a little information about my recently departed uncle, such a natural in a Hawaiian shirt and a lei. He had some serious challenges during his early adulthood, but was always fun to be around.

During his later years he was always surrounded by friends and family. Sang his signature song, Mack the Knife, at his 90th birthday party. Danced with his wife. We're gonna miss him.

We also lost my husband's mother this week, but it's a little too soon to talk about her favorite flower.

Posted by: KT at July 15, 2017 01:09 PM (BVQ+1)

24 On the gardens...
the cukes here are exploding. We're inviting relatives, acquaintances, and strangers at the cross-roads to come to the party. Last year, we couldn't get enough for pickles. Go figger.
Green beans are good. Zukes are going from perfect to baseball bats in a day or two. We're picking okra, maters (just now starting) and tomatillos.
A few cool days helps loads. Forecast is hot again next week (mid 90's and high humidity).
There's fungus amongus.

Posted by: MarkY at July 15, 2017 01:09 PM (KeVib)

25 Mr. Bar-the-Door has asked for advice on getting rid of ants and checking for termites. Anything new out there?
-----------
After paying for monthly pest services for years, I was surprised to find I could buy the exact same commercial pesticides by mail order - stuff you cannot find at the local garden center. Try: Do Your Own Pest Control dot com.

Posted by: Weasel at July 15, 2017 01:09 PM (Sfs6o)

26 Posted by: MarkY at July 15, 2017 01:04 PM

Thanks for the ant info.

Posted by: KT at July 15, 2017 01:10 PM (BVQ+1)

27 New Orleans to Memphis? I made the opposite journey some years ago, but in south Mississippi now. It was hard to adjust what little gardening I do to the hotter more humid climate down here. Don't get enough hard freezes down here some years, so bugs and mold are always a challenge. I wouldn't go back to either city, but on the plus side, you can grow lilacs and bearded iris in Memphis, and I miss those.

Posted by: Miss Sippi at July 15, 2017 01:12 PM (5fPhA)

28 25 Mr. Bar-the-Door has asked for advice on getting rid of ants and checking for termites. Anything new out there?
-----------
After paying for monthly pest services for years, I was surprised to find I could buy the exact same commercial pesticides by mail order - stuff you cannot find at the local garden center. Try: Do Your Own Pest Control dot com.
Posted by: Weasel at July 15, 2017 01:09 PM (Sfs6o)

I agree wholeheartedly. Then I would remind you to READ THE LABEL. And the corollary, FOLLOW THE LABEL.
Most pesticide problems are not caused by pro's.

Posted by: MarkY at July 15, 2017 01:12 PM (KeVib)

29 Incidentally, my uncle still had an active license as an insurance agent when he died at 94. Perhaps a precedent for WeirdDave to follow?

Posted by: KT at July 15, 2017 01:13 PM (BVQ+1)

30 Posted by: MarkY at July 15, 2017 01:09 PM

Fantastic. Except for the fungus.

Posted by: KT at July 15, 2017 01:15 PM (BVQ+1)

31 Posted by: Weasel at July 15, 2017 01:09 PM

Sound like information YOU would find. Thanks.

Posted by: KT at July 15, 2017 01:17 PM (BVQ+1)

32 I miss plumeria.

Loved making leis with them.

Posted by: SMFH at July 15, 2017 01:20 PM (s5Kql)

33 It's slow, so I'll talk shop a bit.
We have a real outbreak of "wilt" diseases here this year.
Dutch Elm Disease (yeah, it's still here), oak wilt and verticillium. I find it intriguing that a particular year's weather can bring on an outbreak of various fungi.
Like some years, powdery mildew can be on everything you see, and then for years, you don't see it.
Also, the Japanese beetles have been in our area for a coupla decades, but, after a mild winter, they're not just in the soybean fields, they're hammering the amenity trees... they like lindens a LOT!
What to do? Probably nothing, unless we have a few mild winters in a row, and the trees get defoliated a few years in a row.

Posted by: MarkY at July 15, 2017 01:21 PM (KeVib)

34 31 Posted by: Weasel at July 15, 2017 01:09 PM

Sound like information YOU would find. Thanks.
Posted by: KT at July 15, 2017 01:17 PM (BVQ+1
--------
I never actually built the explosive device for the ground bees last summer!

Posted by: Weasel at July 15, 2017 01:21 PM (Sfs6o)

35 Sorry for your losses, KT.
We've had so many, we need new funeral clothes. That's when you realize you're getting old?

Posted by: MarkY at July 15, 2017 01:23 PM (KeVib)

36 Posted by: Weasel at July 15, 2017 01:21 PM

You sound like a man who would like the plan for my brother's candy cannon, though. Powered by dry ice. Which might kill ground bees, too.

Posted by: KT at July 15, 2017 01:23 PM (BVQ+1)

37
I agree wholeheartedly. Then I would remind you to READ THE LABEL. And the corollary, FOLLOW THE LABEL.
Most pesticide problems are not caused by pro's.
....
Yep, some dude in Amarillo killed four of his children through misuse of aluminum phosphide earlier this year. Oops.

Posted by: stace at July 15, 2017 01:26 PM (B7u3j)

38 Posted by: Weasel at July 15, 2017 01:21 PM

Yes, it is strange how fungal diseases and insects invade in cycles. We had a fungus that kills stone fruit trees a few years ago. Took out some of our trees. CaliGirl said an arborist told her it was related to the drought.

Posted by: KT at July 15, 2017 01:27 PM (BVQ+1)

39 Posted by: MarkY at July 15, 2017 01:23 PM

Thanks. Some losses are worse than others. These were both lives well lived, so it doesn't see as tragic as some losses.

Posted by: KT at July 15, 2017 01:28 PM (BVQ+1)

40 SMFH at July 15, 2017 01:20 PM

You made leis? With fresh flowers?

Posted by: KT at July 15, 2017 01:30 PM (BVQ+1)

41 stace at July 15, 2017 01:26 PM

That's terrible. You really have to watch metal salts. People don't realize . .

Also true when welding.

Posted by: KT at July 15, 2017 01:32 PM (BVQ+1)

42 I have a cousin whose home was threatened by fire recently. She's the one who kept the geraniums in her basement during the winter.

Good to have an evacuation plan if you live where there is a chance of a wildfire.

Posted by: KT at July 15, 2017 01:34 PM (BVQ+1)

43 In Dallas area, with occasional winter freezing....All my Plumerias are in pots, which get moved into a corner area of the house at first frost. They lose all their leaves and I only water once a month in December, Jan, Feb and March. Roll the pots back outside in April. I started with one cutting off of the neighbor's Plumeria - now up to 8 Plumeria plants (one is 7 feet tall) from the cuttings off the neighbor's cutting...Hardy little plant if you bring it inside for the winter.

Posted by: Cathy at July 15, 2017 01:36 PM (p4JGx)

44 I bought a plumeria (in bud) this summer -- Xquisite. I was setting it outside whenever it was not too windy so it could get the recommended amount of sun.

I was noticing that the buds were becoming fewer and fewer.

Stupid grasshoppers!

I now have it in a south window, but still haven't seen any progress toward blooming.

Posted by: Emmie at July 15, 2017 01:36 PM (ZapPq)

45 The giant Florida sinkhole was apparently "re-mediated" twice previously (and ate a house back in 2007). I think the State should condemn the lot and refuse to allow new building on it.

Posted by: Rusty Nail at July 15, 2017 01:41 PM (toi7g)

46 Posted by: Rusty Nail at July 15, 2017 01:41 PM

Sounds right to me.

Posted by: KT at July 15, 2017 01:44 PM (BVQ+1)

47 Yes about those damn grasshoppers demolishing plants. Is there anything you can do about them? Guy at the plant store told me no. That wasn't the answer I'd hoped for. I grew some Bulgarian Hot Carrot Peppers from seed as I love the way they look and they are hot. Damn grasshopper mowed them down in no time!

Posted by: keena at July 15, 2017 01:45 PM (RiTnx)

48 mmie at July 15, 2017 01:36 PM

Do you live in an area with tall grass?

Posted by: KT at July 15, 2017 01:46 PM (BVQ+1)

49 Nolo bait for grasshoppers. $28 for a pound. Safe for everything except grasshoppers. Gives them a disease that gradually spreads throughout the population. Takes awhile to make a perceptible difference.

Posted by: Emmie at July 15, 2017 01:47 PM (ZapPq)

50 Who you callin' obtusa?

Posted by: Plumeria at July 15, 2017 01:48 PM (/qEW2)

51 KT, yes; tall grass. Because we are lazy about mowing and our lot is mostly grassy weeds.

Posted by: Emmie at July 15, 2017 01:48 PM (ZapPq)

52 I am trying to train a pike melon up a tomato cage this year. It is one of those things to try and save more melons than the last 5 years.

I planted three melons and thought I had dug volunteer squash out of the compost-heap to plant in among the corn, but I think I got volunteer melons instead. So I have about 6 melon plants going. I will be giving melons away this year, there are only so many I can eat.

My girlfriend bought some Korean melons (chamoe) which are a thin skinned melon that tastes sort of like a musk melon and looks like a sort of mature delicata squash, and I dumped the seeds and the skins in the compost heap, and the seeds sprouted almost immediately.
So I planted some of them too. I don't think they will do well this year because they were started so late, but I will be interested to see what they do.

(Chamoe are crunchy when ripe. I just found an ASMR video of a woman eating a chamoe melon)

Posted by: Kindltot at July 15, 2017 01:49 PM (mkDpn)

53 Posted by: keena at July 15, 2017 01:45 PM

Grasshoppers lay eggs underground, so tilling in winter disrupts their life cycle. There are also some disease organisms to spray on turf or ground which are supposed to attach the larval stages of grasshoppers. Don't know how effective they are. Other than that, hope that birds will eat the adults?

Posted by: KT at July 15, 2017 01:50 PM (BVQ+1)

54 Kindltot at July 15, 2017 01:49 PM

There are some interesting crispy Asian melons.

Posted by: KT at July 15, 2017 01:53 PM (BVQ+1)

55 So I thought Bambi and friends were decimating my flowerbeds and porch planters.
Nope it's Thumper and friends. Actually Thumper and siblings.
Earlier in the year I cut down an ornamental grass next to the house. Uncovered an area with 6 to 8 baby bunnies all curled up and sleeping. Ooh, ah I exclaimed, cute little bunnies. I hoped that I hadn't disturbed them too much and they would survive.
Should have drowned the lot! They're mowing through my annuals, perennials and my vegetable garden. That spray you buy to deter them is useless. Will add rabbit fencing to the chain link around the veggies to save what I can.
Told the hubby to load the 22. I'm gonna hunt some rabbit.

Posted by: never enough caffeine at July 15, 2017 01:53 PM (N3JsI)

56 Thanks. Some losses are worse than others. These were both lives well lived, so it doesn't see as tragic as some losses.
Posted by: KT at July 15, 2017 01:28 PM (BVQ+1)

It's like an end of an era when the matriarch or patriarch passes away. My condolences to your family.

Posted by: stace at July 15, 2017 01:55 PM (B7u3j)

57 40 SMFH at July 15, 2017 01:20 PM

You made leis? With fresh flowers?
Posted by: KT at July 15, 2017 01:30 PM (BVQ+1)

---

Yeah, when I was a kid in Hawai't, most for hula or for some school function, mostly with plumeria and pikake.

Plumeria is pretty easy to make leis with, but the sap is very sticky and can cause irritation.

Posted by: SMFH at July 15, 2017 01:56 PM (s5Kql)

58 never enough caffeine at July 15, 2017 01:53 PM

How can something so cute be so destructive? Every once in a while one of our garden kitties brings a baby bunny home.

Posted by: KT at July 15, 2017 01:57 PM (BVQ+1)

59 Hello gardeners. Ugh, pests...

Potted tomatoes are growing quickly, flowering well. Little green fruits abound.

This morning, as I stepped out to look around, noticed some kind of scat on the bricks. Looks like raccoon. (I've very carefully removed it and bleached the area.)

It was right next to the pot with two largest -still green- tomatoes. Also, about 3 feet from our front door! Ballsy critter.

Do raccoons eat mice? Have caught quite a few and then had a couple of traps *disappear* entirely. Dog wouldn't have been able to get to these, btw.

Posted by: JQ Flyover at July 15, 2017 02:03 PM (5muuD)

60 Watching the kudzu grow out on the deck. Just pulled a gelatinous plethora of dead baby mice out of my pool filter. Yuck! Oops, meant to save that for the food thread.

Posted by: Home Ownership = Overated at July 15, 2017 02:03 PM (bc2Lc)

61 Well, it is snowing in Santiago Chile.

It is nice to remember things like that when it is boiling outside

Posted by: Kindltot at July 15, 2017 02:04 PM (mkDpn)

62 stace at July 15, 2017 01:55 PM

Yes, it is like the end of an era. Though MIL's grandkids are putting together Youtube tributes and other projects.

I expect that there will still be regular contact with cousins. But it won't be the same.

Posted by: KT at July 15, 2017 02:05 PM (BVQ+1)

63 KT, just remember that googling "asian melons" is probably NSFW

Posted by: Kindltot at July 15, 2017 02:06 PM (mkDpn)

64 SMFH at July 15, 2017 01:56 PM

I had never thought about the milky sap of Plumeria with regard to leis.

I can really see the resemblance of the flowers to those of Natal Plum, though. They have a similar milky sap. They have wicked thorns (most varieties) and I don't think the flowers would last as long.

Posted by: KT at July 15, 2017 02:08 PM (BVQ+1)

65 Since this is our first summer in this house, this week I've been studying how to work our irrigation controller and make minor repairs to the sprinkler nozzles that our otherwise excellent mow, blow, and go guys keep damaging. Thanks, YouTube!

Then yesterday our city went on Stage One water restrictions, which means you can only water with sprinklers on your designated one day of the week. You can water by hand or with soaker hoses anytime, so this is when everyone is hitting the hardware stores for new hoses and soaker hoses. That's what I'll be doing whenever I get my lazy ass off the couch.

Posted by: stace at July 15, 2017 02:09 PM (B7u3j)

66 No, plumeria leis don't last all that long.

Once you collect the blossoms, string them together, and the leis are worn, it's just a matter of hours.

Posted by: SMFH at July 15, 2017 02:14 PM (s5Kql)

67
You know when you have to restrict the amount of water citizens use, but a Hawaiian judge can keep a steady stream of new and unfriendly and unproductive citizens flowing into the country... you might have a problem.

That's right, garden thread. Nevermind.

Yeah, I have a rabbit too. Hiding somewhere. Eating the new buds off the zucchini every day. I'll probably whack him once with the BB gun and he'll head to friendlier quarters.

Posted by: Slippery Slope Salesman at July 15, 2017 02:16 PM (EgwCt)

68 Posted by: Slippery Slope Salesman at July 15, 2017 02:16 PM (EgwCt)
---------
Can I borrow your BB gun? The in-laws are coming over this afternoon.

Posted by: Weasel at July 15, 2017 02:20 PM (Sfs6o)

69 A fat little groundhog just tried to get into my garden, so snuck out into my outbuilding and grabbed my BB pistol.

Posted by: Skip at July 15, 2017 02:23 PM (9g/6M)

70 Had 24 hrs of pretty heavy rain in last day but ever lant looks ok but have to stake up a dill plant. Had a couple of golf ball size onions, green peppers and tomatoes but nothing ripe yet.

Posted by: Skip at July 15, 2017 02:26 PM (9g/6M)

71 Can I borrow your BB gun? The in-laws are coming over this afternoon.

Posted by: Weasel at July 15, 2017 02:20 PM (Sfs6o)


Sure. But In-laws? You might want to consider a higher caliber.

OMG is that a sore topic with me right now. My father (re)married the worst woman on the planet. I could rip entire pages out of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders devoted to her afflictions. She's out of my life now, and the fact she cleaned out my father and he left nothing to his children I consider fair trade to be done with her.

But my son may have married her clone. Same afflictions.

BUT, gardening thread. My tomatoes are kinda scrawny.

Posted by: Slippery Slope Salesman at July 15, 2017 02:29 PM (EgwCt)

72 1
I have a yard full of plumeria here in zone 9.



Give them lots of light, a little bonemeal, and a well-drained pot and they'll do quite well

Posted by: weew at July 15, 2017 12:33 PM (6EH85)

I got the whole 9 yards of chlamydia and more "bone meal" won't help

Posted by: Rachael Dolezal at July 15, 2017 02:29 PM (n3hky)

73 JQ Flyover at July 15, 2017 02:03 PM

Why would you blame raccoons? They look so innocent?

Posted by: KT at July 15, 2017 02:31 PM (BVQ+1)

74 stace at July 15, 2017 02:09 PM

Water restrictions. Sounds familiar.

Posted by: KT at July 15, 2017 02:32 PM (BVQ+1)

75 I have quite a few silver maples, red maples and pine trees. Would not advise Silver maples. The large oak trees across the street keep sending over their immigrants and don't want them either.

Posted by: Skip at July 15, 2017 02:35 PM (9g/6M)

76 Kindltot at July 15, 2017 02:06 PM

Better just to start with an Asian online veggie seed company.

Heh.

Posted by: KT at July 15, 2017 02:36 PM (BVQ+1)

77 67. I have the entire family. Mom and multiple offspring.
Only bright spot is the coyote pack on our property must be far enough from the house that the bunnies are safe.
Hmmmm, maybe a bit of hamburger close to where the bunny horde is living might attract the coyotes. Bye, bye bunnies.

Posted by: never enough caffeine at July 15, 2017 02:36 PM (N3JsI)

78 Home Ownership = Overated at July 15, 2017 02:03 PM

Kudzu and baby mice: You're safer here than on the Food Thread.

Posted by: KT at July 15, 2017 02:37 PM (BVQ+1)

79 The chainsaw started right up. I was surprised. It hasn't been started for three years or more. Trimmed a couple of low hanging tree branches, and cut up a log.

Chopped weeds that were three feet high, and now I need to get the mower deck off and the blades sharpened. Probably need new blades 'cuz the ground is so rough. I'm going to try to fill in the sink holes this summer.

Still have clean up to do after the power company sent a crew down the right of way to cut trees. They really made a mess.

That is the extent of my gardening. It's nice to have sun shine and warm temperatures. I need the UV exposure.

Posted by: Skandia Recluse at July 15, 2017 02:38 PM (m9X4Y)

80 Slippery Slope Salesman at July 15, 2017 02:29 PM

Hoping your tomato plants show a little more vigor, at least.

Posted by: KT at July 15, 2017 02:38 PM (BVQ+1)

81 I got the whole 9 yards of chlamydia and more "bone meal" won't help

Posted by: Rachael Dolezal at July 15, 2017 02:29 PM (n3hky)


If you have an excess of chlamydia the best thing to do is share it with others. Men especially -- of your particular political persuasion will appreciate the gift and will boast of your generosity. Hopefully you will share with them a hardy strain viable in all growing zones.

Posted by: Slippery Slope Salesman at July 15, 2017 02:39 PM (EgwCt)

82 If you have an excess of chlamydia the best thing to
do is share it with others. Men especially -- of your particular
political persuasion will appreciate the gift and will boast of your
generosity. Hopefully you will share with them a hardy strain viable in
all growing zones.





Posted by: Slippery Slope Salesman at July 15, 2017 02:39 PM (EgwCt)

I'll give it try. Thanks! Do you know of any chlamydia based government programs that I could apply for that would help with the bills?

Posted by: Rachael Dolezal at July 15, 2017 02:42 PM (n3hky)

83 I have achieved....fountain!!

My son and I just finished installing a 4 ft fountain in our little garden. It's a whimsical one, but I also have gnomes and little gnome houses scattered around the plants. I LIKE THE TWEE. My Victorian grandmother lives on in my heart... She would love it. (My mom would have loved it, too.)

Now. To keep the water from getting scummy without poisoning any animals...

And some kind of lighting....

Posted by: Gem at July 15, 2017 02:45 PM (uaHyk)

84 Some of the ghostly legends associated with plumeria are downright bizarre. in case you're telling ghost stories in the near future. Don't leave any laundry on the line overnight.

Posted by: KT at July 15, 2017 02:47 PM (BVQ+1)

85 Posted by: Gem at July 15, 2017 02:45 PM (uaHyk)
---------
I'm jealous! I really want to have the fountain of the little peeing dude, but it would involve a bunch of work on my part.

Posted by: Weasel at July 15, 2017 02:48 PM (Sfs6o)

86 I had a bunny problem until I bought an air rifle. I take care of the grownups and my new cat takes care of the babies. A .410 shot gun works well too.

Posted by: Ronster at July 15, 2017 02:48 PM (4fjYU)

87 Congrats on the fountain! The Japanese lady in the video does lots of TWEE stuff, too. When not imagining that she is an insect.

Posted by: KT at July 15, 2017 02:49 PM (BVQ+1)

88 >>>a giant sinkhole has opened in a Florida neighborhood.

Between the epidemic of sinkholes due to fracking, and the rising sea levels from AGW, North America will be beneath sea level in less than 5 years, unless we act NOW!

Posted by: Al Gore at July 15, 2017 02:49 PM (/qEW2)

89
The Whittier fire near Cachuma, Goleta kicked up yesterday. More evacuations, smoke, ash. I hope they get these under control soon.

When the Whittier fire started last Saturday, there were 80 children trapped at their summer camp for hours. They were able to get the children out safely.

Whoa. Thankful to hear that, CaliGirl.

Posted by: Gem at July 15, 2017 02:49 PM (uaHyk)

90 Why would you blame raccoons? They look so innocent?

Lol! But... I dunno... We have rabbits and mice, hawks and owls, squirrels and one big dog. Fenced yard. Traps were placed in areas inaccessible to dog, not likely accessible to birds of prey.

Raccoons and skunks are 'in the neighborhood' regularly. Have (only once, years ago) seen: deer, porcupine.

Posted by: JQ Flyover at July 15, 2017 02:50 PM (5muuD)

91 Skip we are on a sandhill, well is 300 ft so I am not worried about getting invaded by Silver Maples. Even the nearly a weed type trees won''t take hold w/o some TLC for the first few years in our yard. And its not like I"d be introducing the problem. If I acquire some it will be by requesting neighbors to let me dig up a few of theirs.

Posted by: PaleRider at July 15, 2017 02:50 PM (8qFZP)

92 Lol - Weasel, the hardest work of this fountain was finding one I actually liked. (Never considered the pee fountain... what kind of 'ette am I? SMH.) We took it out of the box, screwed on a filial, inserted the pump, hose and water, plugged it in, and magic! I love the soft plashing sound of a fountain.

Posted by: Gem at July 15, 2017 03:02 PM (uaHyk)

93 Flowers indeed have strong memories attached. I'm on my grandparent's farm where 7 of their 8 kids were born ... right on the farm. I spent 16 years involved with, and/or directly caring for some of them as they passed on one by one. The war (WW2) was pivotal in their lives, with four uncles and an aunt in service (plus my Navy Dad in Hawaii) and others working on munitions and aircraft.

Sorry for your loss KT and the others here. It is important to maintain those flowers, and to maintain the culture and liberty for which our families fought. So I'll maintain the peonies and irises, and try to maintain their rural community spirit. Cramming people into small spaces is mostly antagonistic to my vision ... though I admire those city dweller's ability to maintain their own small space "sovereignty".

But I see more entrepreneurial endeavor futures in small acreage with well-managed horticultural projects. I even considered dividing my place up and making it a "housing project" for rural oriented veterans ... 100 small homes, work together to maintain a few cows and gardens, small lake ... but those are dreamy things that require a lot of fortitude. Time will tell. The American Spirit is still strong with many. God Bless you every one.

Posted by: illiniwek at July 15, 2017 03:05 PM (RWmbm)

94 And...here in the Shootcagoland area we can kill the shit out of each other, but nuisance animals are right out.

How do you get rid of groundhogs that are destroying your veggies and ornamentals when it's illegal to shoot (including bow and arrow) or poison them and would cost megabucks to set traps for them. Their burrow is on the next door neighbor's property, and since they don't garden or even take care of their property they give zero effs.

A friend of mine is in this situation. They even electrified a chicken wire fence around their vegetable garden, but somehow the groundhogs keep getting in.

Posted by: Gem at July 15, 2017 03:13 PM (uaHyk)

95 illiniwek at July 15, 2017 03:05 P

Thanks. Worth saving.

Posted by: KT at July 15, 2017 03:14 PM (BVQ+1)

96 illiniwek at July 15, 2017 03:05 PM

Peonies and irises are connected to Memorial Day for me. They become more than just personal favorites of loved ones.

I like that you are determined to cultivate those in particular.

Posted by: KT at July 15, 2017 03:17 PM (BVQ+1)

97 Al Gore at July 15, 2017 02:49 PM

First action item: Sell your seaside property.

Posted by: KT at July 15, 2017 03:19 PM (BVQ+1)

98 Gem at July 15, 2017 03:13 PM

Super-tough situation. Have to give it some thought.

Posted by: KT at July 15, 2017 03:26 PM (BVQ+1)

99 87 Congrats on the fountain! The Japanese lady in the video does lots of TWEE stuff, too. When not imagining that she is an insect.
Posted by: KT at July 15, 2017 02:49 PM (BVQ+1)

Yes, very twee! I have to admit the tiny house thing is beguiling. I wonder if I would go crazy after awhile.

Posted by: Gem at July 15, 2017 03:26 PM (uaHyk)

100 groundhogs are easy to trap ... I put vanilla extract on some corn and caught 4 in a row one afternoon. Why would it cost megabucks to set traps for them?

I'm not sure what you would do with them once trapped, if you can't kill them. Drive ten miles out of town and release them I guess.

Posted by: illiniwek at July 15, 2017 03:29 PM (RWmbm)

101 yeah KT ... they are very durable, even though the peonies don't bloom for very long. But they will have a place here due to tradition and memories. Irises are better ... while day lilies and other new perennials will be more dominant. It's all good.

My one aunt that served as a nurse is still around, and had specifically requested I put the peonies on the graves. I may just plant some out there in the plot where I may end up, but not for 40 years hopefully.

Posted by: illiniwek at July 15, 2017 03:40 PM (RWmbm)

102 Trees.

I have had incredible luck transplanting decorative (flowering) pear seedlings. They come in the flower beds from a Bradford pear. They don't seem to flower as freely as the parent tree, but they grow incredibly fast and shape themselves. Of course, you still need to trim lower brabches to form a trunk.

As well as making an attractive tree with dense, dark, shiny foliage, they are also the first trees to get their leaves and the last to drop them. In northern Ohio, I have had leaves up to Christmas, and certainly until t'giving. And the birds like the small fruits during late fall and winter (this is probably where all the seedlings come from.)

I will try to send some photos this week.

Posted by: bergerbilder at July 15, 2017 03:50 PM (lIZQs)

103 It's definitely summer now in Kansas. The sunflowers are flourishing -- the shortest ones are as tall as I am -- but the rest of the garden is enjoying the heat about as much as I am.

The local botanical garden has pots of yellow plumeria every summer on a patio where they get shade most of the day. I presume they spend winter in a greenhouse somewhere.

I spent the morning taking many pictures at the local cactus club's annual show and sale. I've uploaded a few here: https://www.flickr.com/photos/tancos/ . There will be more.

Posted by: Don at July 15, 2017 04:00 PM (0yuZ3)

104 I'm not sure what you would do with them once trapped, if you can't kill them. Drive ten miles out of town and release them I guess.
Posted by: illiniwek at July 15, 2017 03:29 PM (RWmbm)


My father-in-law liked to eat all sorts of game. He was a life-long farmer. I, myself, do not, but of the small amounts I have tasted, I think they taste better than rabbit. If you know some hunters or other game eaters they may be happy to take them off your hands.

Posted by: bergerbilder at July 15, 2017 04:05 PM (lIZQs)

105 Seems the snake that tried to get into my garage has decided the garden is a better spot, fine with me.

Posted by: Skip at July 15, 2017 04:39 PM (9g/6M)

106 Noticed I have lots of flowers on my cucumbers but nothing much growing from them. Wonder if this bee problem is the culprit

Posted by: Skip at July 15, 2017 04:41 PM (9g/6M)

107 Skip,

What kind of cucumbers do you have? The variety I grow produces only female blossoms. This way you get a lot of cucumbers in a smaller space. But they need a standard cucumber plant for pollination, and the seed supplier includes these. But if you bought your plants, you may not have what you need for pollination. I think muskmelons will also pollinate these all female cucumbers.

Posted by: bergerbilder at July 15, 2017 04:50 PM (lIZQs)

108 I shelled brown crowder peas and blanched them this morning. Got four stuffed quart freezer bags stashed away. That's a harvest, right?

Posted by: Dave at Buffalo Roam at July 15, 2017 04:55 PM (XOXvq)

109 Posted by: Skip at July 15, 2017 04:41 PM (9g/6M)

I had the same problem this spring, but my cukes were next to some salvia plants that are always swarming with bees. The problem may not be a lack of pollination. And depending on where you live, bees may be but only one of many other pollinators (butterflies, bats, hummingbirds, etc).

I just figured it was tough to grow cukes in zone 9 and left it at that.

Posted by: weew at July 15, 2017 04:57 PM (6EH85)

110 Paulo the Pollinater would be a good name for the standard cucumber plant.

Posted by: Dave at Buffalo Roam at July 15, 2017 04:59 PM (XOXvq)

111 So the problem was my cukes needed a little nookie?

Posted by: weew at July 15, 2017 05:03 PM (6EH85)

112 Japanese beetles have been a huge outbreak here this year ... soybeans are attacked and the aerial sprayers are busy (rarely used around here). I just went and sprayed my grapes yet again after seeing the beetles massing again. I worry a little about killing too many pollinators ... but I don't spray blooms, and it is just my backyard.

But with all the extra Sevin being sprayed, it will probably have some effect on pollinators this year. They say a warmer winter allowed large numbers of the Jap' beetles to overwinter. I have a bunch of melons that are six inches or so, but still a lot of cantaloupe, other melons, and tomato blooms waiting. Beehives are another intriguing project that I may never get around to.

Posted by: illiniwek at July 15, 2017 05:06 PM (RWmbm)

113 Japanese Beetles attack 1 of my 3 types of Rhododendron, I usually pick them off by knocking them into a can of paint thinner, but haven't really looked this year.
The Garden radio show on NPR advises not to use the traps as it attracts more than you would have otherwise.

Posted by: Skip at July 15, 2017 06:16 PM (9g/6M)

114 "The Garden radio show on NPR advises not to use the traps as it attracts more than you would have otherwise.
Posted by: Skip at July 15, 2017 06:16 PM (9g/6M)"


This is part of my comment on Japanese beetles from last week's garden thread:

64 A good way to keep your yard free of Japanese beetles is to give a beetle trap to each of your neighbors, but don't use one yourself. The traps will attract the beetlles away from your property, and the neighbors will think you are being nice.

Posted by: bergerbilder at July 15, 2017 08:03 PM (lIZQs)

115 Gardening sucks. (Views 6000 sf mudhole that started as a garden)

I stopped counting rainfall this year. Its just....horrible.

im picking some cucumbers and summer squash. the chilis have not grown one inch in 4 weeks....I have lost half of my beans and squash. gonna lose probably as many cabbages. Northern Indiana deluge since, I don't know.....march?

Posted by: Cicero Boom chicka boom Kaboom! Kid at July 15, 2017 09:10 PM (vFB1n)

116 Posted by: KT at July 15, 2017 01:09 PM (BVQ+1)

I'm so sorry for your loss KT.

Posted by: CaliGirl at July 15, 2017 09:15 PM (Ri/rl)

117 Cicero Boom chicka boom Kaboom! Kid at July 15, 2017 09:10 PM

Sorry about the rain and mud. It's so discouraging when a weather challenge goes on and on and on and on , , , , , ,

Rain or drought. Wish it were possible to share rainfall and dry weather between regions.

Posted by: KT at July 16, 2017 12:03 AM (BVQ+1)

118 CaliGirl at July 15, 2017 09:15 PM

Thanks.

All the best to you and your friends dealing with fire. Smoke at ground level even out here. Hurts my eyes. I can only imagine what it's like where you are.

Posted by: KT at July 16, 2017 12:06 AM (BVQ+1)

119 So, it looks like time to review cucumber nookie again.

Posted by: KT at July 16, 2017 12:07 AM (BVQ+1)

(Jump to top of page)






Processing 0.18, elapsed 0.1576 seconds.
14 queries taking 0.134 seconds, 127 records returned.
Page size 83 kb.
Powered by Minx 0.7 alpha.



MuNuvians
MeeNuvians
Polls! Polls! Polls!
Frequently Asked Questions
The (Almost) Complete Paul Anka Integrity Kick
Top Top Tens
Greatest Hitjobs

The Ace of Spades HQ Sex-for-Money Skankathon
A D&D Guide to the Democratic Candidates
Margaret Cho: Just Not Funny
More Margaret Cho Abuse
Margaret Cho: Still Not Funny
Iraqi Prisoner Claims He Was Raped... By Woman
Wonkette Announces "Morning Zoo" Format
John Kerry's "Plan" Causes Surrender of Moqtada al-Sadr's Militia
World Muslim Leaders Apologize for Nick Berg's Beheading
Michael Moore Goes on Lunchtime Manhattan Death-Spree
Milestone: Oliver Willis Posts 400th "Fake News Article" Referencing Britney Spears
Liberal Economists Rue a "New Decade of Greed"
Artificial Insouciance: Maureen Dowd's Word Processor Revolts Against Her Numbing Imbecility
Intelligence Officials Eye Blogs for Tips
They Done Found Us Out, Cletus: Intrepid Internet Detective Figures Out Our Master Plan
Shock: Josh Marshall Almost Mentions Sarin Discovery in Iraq
Leather-Clad Biker Freaks Terrorize Australian Town
When Clinton Was President, Torture Was Cool
What Wonkette Means When She Explains What Tina Brown Means
Wonkette's Stand-Up Act
Wankette HQ Gay-Rumors Du Jour
Here's What's Bugging Me: Goose and Slider
My Own Micah Wright Style Confession of Dishonesty
Outraged "Conservatives" React to the FMA
An On-Line Impression of Dennis Miller Having Sex with a Kodiak Bear
The Story the Rightwing Media Refuses to Report!
Our Lunch with David "Glengarry Glen Ross" Mamet
The House of Love: Paul Krugman
A Michael Moore Mystery (TM)
The Dowd-O-Matic!
Liberal Consistency and Other Myths
Kepler's Laws of Liberal Media Bias
John Kerry-- The Splunge! Candidate
"Divisive" Politics & "Attacks on Patriotism" (very long)
The Donkey ("The Raven" parody)
News/Chat