Sunday Morning Book Thread 06-26-2016: Corruptions [OregonMuse]


Baldwins Book Barn West Chester PA 525.jpg
Baldwin's Book Barn, West Chester, Pennsylvania

Good morning to all of you [redacted] and bar[omitted]ers everywhere and all the s[removed]ea. Welcome to AoSHQ's stately, pres[deleted], internationally [censored] and high-[deleted] Sunday Morning Book Thread, now conforming to the new Department of Justice content standards. The Book Thread is where men are [omitted] all the 'ettes [redacted], safe spaces are where we [deleted], and if you've seen one sn[redacted]ake, you've seen [omitted]. Unlike other AoSHQ comment threads, the Sunday Morning Book Thread is so ho[deleted]ty, pants are req[omitted]d. Especially those cargo pants with lots of pockets for extra [censored], because you'll never know when you'll need them. And because it's better to [redacted] and not [omitted], then [whole thing entirely redacted to save time].


Attack of the Clintons

So the Hillary! campaign is reported to be in damage control mode because of this book, Crisis of Character: A White House Secret Service Officer Discloses His Firsthand Experience with Hillary, Bill, and How They Operate by Gary Byrne, which actually won't be released until the 28th.

But haven't we heard all of this 'Clintonia' before, all of the screaming hissy fits, the non-stop horndoggery, the throwing of weighty objects, the dissing of the military and also of the Secret Service assigned to protect them? I'm thinking of Partners in Power: The Clintons and Their America by Roger Morris, which came out in 1999:

The author pulls no punches, dealing openly with allegations of cocaine use in the Governor's Mansion during the Clinton years, screaming and profane fights between the two Clintons, and a compromise on Hillary's part to live with Bill's hundreds of one-night stands in order to attain her goal of First Lady.

There's also On the Make: The Rise of Bill Clinton by Meredith Oakley that covers his Arkansas governorship, and whichever editor came up with that title really should've been fired.

Unlimited Access : An FBI Agent Inside the Clinton White House by Gary Aldrich, which came out in 1998. Aldrich, who spent 30 years with the FBI, the last five as an agent responsible for background checks on White House staff. His primary concern was the lax security in the Clinton White House, but also, I think this is the book that described how one of the Christmas trees inside the White House was decorated with drug paraphernalia.

But...

The point is, none of these books did any real damage to the Clinton Sleaze Machine, which just keeps rolling along. Priapus survived impeachment and his loathsome wife has been an ambulatory canker sore on the body politic ever since. There's just no getting rid of her. But considering the track record of these tell-all books, the best response by team Hillary! to this new one would've been to simply ignore it, and have faith that the MSM would have their backs. That's the way it's always worked out in the past, so why not now? The fact that her team is now desperately trying to smear the author just gives credence to his charges.

You know who's also got a new book coming out? Dinesh D'Souza. His latest, Hillary's America: The Secret History of the Democratic Party will be available on July 18th, probably to coincide with the release of his documentary of the same name.

From her Alinskyite past to her hopes for America's progressive future, the presumptive Democratic nominee is revealed to be little more than a political gangster intent on controlling the nation's wealth. D'Souza chronicles the sleazy ascent of the Clintons and makes clear what some voters have long suspected: that Hillary is far more dangerous and corrupt than Bill ever was.

After watching the trailer, it's obvious that they put a lot of money into it. Also, D'Souza is trying to bring to debate the sleazy history of the Democratic Party, which there has never really been a public discussion about. Because the gatekeepers would rather prefer not. Don't know if D'Souza will be able to force the issue, my guess, probably not, but God bless him for trying.

The question is, is D'Souza's book and movie about the Clintons specifically, or the Democratic Party in general?

And I think the answer is yes.

Dickens Was A Crappy Writer

We know this because the science is settled:

I report the results of the test, where the takers had to tell the prose of Charles Dickens from that of Edward Bulwer-Lytton, who is considered by many to be the worst writer in history of letters. The average score is about 50%, which is on the level of random guessing. This suggests that the quality of Dickens's prose is the same as of that of Bulwer-Lytton.

This article, entitled "Scientific Evaluation of Charles Dickens" and appearing in the periodical Journal of Quantitative Linguistics, has to be a joke:

Edward Bulwer-Lytton is the worst writer in history of letters. An annual wretched writing contest (http://www.bulwer-lytton.com/) was established in his honour. In contrast, Charles Dickens is one of the best writers ever. Can one tell the difference between their prose? To check this I wrote the “Great prose or not?” quiz (Simkin, 2004). It consists of a dozen of representative literary passages, written either by Bulwer-Lytton or by Dickens. The takers are to choose the author of each quote. They face a formidable task and are often surprised to learn the correct answers. “What mindless boob would write such tripe? Dickens, one would know now.” – wrote me one of respondents.

Does that sound like something that belongs in a "scientific" journal? Guy basically had some quotes from both authors and asked a bunch of people to guess which of the two authors wrote each quote, and apparently the total number of correct answers was not appreciably higher than the results you would get from simply guessing at each answer (50%)

If you're interested, you can read the rest of it here


Publishing Opportunity?

It used to be the kiss of death in publishing to submit an unsolicited manuscript.

Maybe not so much now:

As ebook readers have grown more popular, the publishing market has changed significantly. This has had a huge impact on the self-publishing industry. The media talks about this shift all the time. However, they often neglect to mention the huge impact it has had on the romance publishing industry. There are so many more romance and erotica novels published these days, that it seems like every few days a new romance publisher sprouts out of the woodwork.

If you write in the "romance" genre, the article goes on to list 31 Romance publishes that accept submissions without an agent.

The market for all the various genres and sub-genres of "romance" is just UUUGE.

I'll bet you anything there's even some sort of "SJW" romance sub-genre. Don't laugh. For all we know, "The Secret Diaries of Trigglypuff" might be a big seller.

H/T to Anna Puma.


Now I Feel Bad

Hey, does anybody else remember that smug little twerp Michael Kinsley? He used to be a staple on the talking-head shows in the 90s and early 00s, and there was something just insufferably annoying about him. I'm not sure if it was the way he looked, or his demeanor, or what, but of all the left-of-center talking heads on TV back then, he was the one, I swear, I just wanted to pop him a good one right in the puss.

And then sometime in the early 00s, he just disappeared. Not that I missed him, but I would wonder from time to time what happened to him.

And then this week I saw that he has written a book, Old Age: A Beginner's Guide. I didn't think he was that old, so I'm not sure why he thought he be qualified to be dispensing such advice. I have no idea if the book is any good or not.

In this series of essays, Michael Kinsley uses his own battle with Parkinson's disease to unearth answers to questions we are all at some time forced to confront.

Ouch. OK, that would explain why I haven't been seeing him on TV much lately. I have friends in various stages of Parkinson's, and it's not a disease I would wish on anyone. So I wish Mr. Kinsley well, and I hope his doctors can find a treatment regimen for him that will stave off the symptoms for a good long time.


Moron Recommendations

I've never done much on Twitter, and less even now that it has turned into just another progressive hive, but occasionally I'll get passed a tip. Like a few days ago when Chad recommended Disrupted: My Misadventure in the Start-Up Bubble by Dan Lyon, his account of what happened when he joined a start-up company called "HubSpot", which tried to make money selling... e-mail spam. To be fair, HubSpot's wiki page says "HubSpot provides tools for social media marketing, content management, web analytics, landing pages and search engine optimization."

Mixed in with Lyons's uproarious tale of his rise and fall at Hubspot is a trenchant analysis of the start-up world, a de facto conspiracy between those who start companies and those who fund them, a world where bad ideas are rewarded with hefty investments, where companies blow money lavishing perks on their post-collegiate workforces, and where everybody is trying to hang on just long enough to reach an IPO and cash out.

I thought this item on the wiki page was amusing:

In July 2015, Hubspot's CMO Mike Volpe was dismissed for violating HubSpot's code of business conduct. The company's board of directors found that Volpe tried to obtain a draft copy of Disrupted: My Misadventure in the Start-Up Bubble, by Daniel Lyons. The book is a satirical look at HubSpot, its company culture, and its business practices.

Hee hee.


Books By Morons

I never knew that longtime moron commenter naturalfake was a published author, and perhaps he wasn't in the past, but he is now. His comic novel Wearing the Cat: Part One: Flaming Hoops is now available on Kindle. This is the first of a projected quartet of novels featuring

Lt. Nick McGill, dentist in the United States Navy Dental Corps.

If you're thinking, what could be at all interesting about a naval dentist, Lt. McGill might agree with you:

He joined the Navy as a way to add excitement to his life only to discover a distinct lack of wine, women, and adventure in the day to day drill and fill of the Williamsville Naval Dental Clinic. Tooth decay? Oh, yeah. Plenty of that. Bad breath? Goes with the territory. The three little words? If only he didn't have to hear those three little words ever again.

Since he's a dentist, I'm thinking that those three little words he's referring to are "rinse and spit."

Worst of all, in his boredom and loneliness, McGill finds himself questioning past decisions, and feeling nostalgic about past girlfriends.

And because he's a guy, the typical guy solution, the product of generations of guy thinking, immediately presents itself:

Perhaps all he needs to do is to get laid.

Yes, that's right. Because doing what the "little man" tells you always works out well, doesn't it?

Naturalfake would like all the morons to know that he's

...pricing the book at the Moron-Friendly price of $0.99 for the first two weeks to encourage readers to take a chance and, hopefully, write positive reviews.

Speaking of Moron-Friendly, "Wearing the Cat" is 100% Moron Friendly and loaded with humor both high and low...really, really low.

Elsewhere in his e-mail to me, he uses the words "ribald" and "Rabelaisian" to describe the comic humor in this, his first, novel. So I guess that's a trigger warning of sorts.


___________

Francis W. Porretto is another moron author whom I haven't mentioned in a while. He's written many books, the latest one, just released this week is Love In The Time Of Cinema:

At 28 Jana Tyrell is already the foremost actress in the world. But she wants the love of a good man, and they’re not so common in Hollywood. She finds it in a most unexpected place: Onteora County, NY, a land that produces geniuses and heroes as if they’d been sown there by God. Her target, engineer and Web writer Tim Beaufort, will be rocked by the changes Jana brings to his life.

Mr. Porretto describes his new novel as "an unusual, highly optimistic romance." Available on Kindle for $2.99.

His other books:

Realm of Essences series: Chosen One, On Broken Wings, Shadow of a Sword, Polymath.
Spooner Federation series: Which Art In Hope, Freedom's Scion, Freedom's Fury.

Stand-alone titles: Priestesses, The Sledgehammer Concerto, Romance A La Mode, A Dash of Spice.

All of these you can access on his Amazon page.

He also has a blog.


___________

The author of A Net of Dawn and Bones e-mailed me earlier this week recommending her own humorous fantasy books that, she says, "skewers a lot of monster tropes."

The author has only looked at AoSHQ "a few times" but was referred to me by "Aliens in This World" which I believe is a conservative Roman Catholic blog.

But the referral was dead on accurate, as I can see from the Amazon blurb for her book, which contains the author's manifesto:

This book was written because I couldn’t find anything like it on the shelves.

...No, seriously. After the umpteenth time picking up yet another urban fantasy that looked promising but on closer skimming had the Designated Protagonist choosing the Sexier Evil, I kind of snapped.

Part of the fun of any story is putting yourself in the character’s shoes. But these shoes I not only didn’t want to slip into, I wanted to set them on fire. Where were the good guys? The honest cops? The ordinary people choosing to do the Right Thing, no matter how hard it was? Where was the belief that there is a Right Thing; that there is Good, and Evil, and you pick the side you’re going to fight for, even if the heavens fall?

In short - where were the heroes?

Yeah, this author is definitely a Moron, like the rest of us. She may not know it yet, but she is. I invited her to drop by the book thread and say hi, so hopefully she will.

She's also written another comic fantasy, Count Taka and the Vampire Brides.


___________

Anna Puma e-mailed me this week, too:

To kick off my plan to write the Alexandria story during the July Camp NaNoWriMo, Golden Isis will be free from the 26th to 28th of this month.

Link to Golden Isis here.


___________

Moronette 'votermom' is putting together a list of moron authors over on the Goodreads site which is intended to be accessible to non-members. Here is the list she has compiled so far. Let her know if there's an author she's missing.

http://www.bookhorde.org/p/aoshq-authors.html

___________

Don't forget the AoSHQ reading group on Goodreads. It's meant to support horde writers and to talk about the great books that come up on the book thread. It's called AoSHQ Moron Horde and the link to it is here: https://www.goodreads.com/group/show/175335-aoshq-moron-horde.

___________

So that's all for this week. As always, book thread tips, suggestions, bribes, rumors, threats, and insults may be sent to OregonMuse, Proprietor, AoSHQ Book Thread, at the book thread e-mail address: aoshqbookthread, followed by the 'at' sign, and then 'G' mail, and then dot cee oh emm.

What have you all been reading this week? Hopefully something good, because, as you all know, life is too short to be reading lousy books.

Posted by: Open Blogger at 09:02 AM




Comments

(Jump to bottom of page)

1 Good morning bookworms

Posted by: Skip at June 26, 2016 08:56 AM (d9qXV)

2 Cats and books go together like dogs and trucks.

Posted by: HistEris, Literate Savage at June 26, 2016 09:00 AM (jR7Wy)

3 Ah the book thread and I have my pants on.


Well I have been continually re-reading old SF stuff this week up until today. So I have been scouring the pages looking for something that I haven't read in a long time. I thought about Andromeda Strain which I read when I was in Chicago 40 years ago. When I looked it up for the Kindle I found they wanted $10 for it. $10 for a book I read in paperback 40 years ago! Didn't Obama sue these people for gouging a few years ago?


But I found that they had finally marked down A Time To Kill to $8 so I got that.

Posted by: Vic We Have No Party at June 26, 2016 09:01 AM (mpXpK)

4 And I see we are still making a fool out of that outstanding AG we have.

Posted by: Vic We Have No Party at June 26, 2016 09:02 AM (mpXpK)

5 I loved the Bulwer-Lytton contest.

"Her bosoms heaved like twin boiling suet puddings at Epsomtide".

Posted by: HistEris, Literate Savage at June 26, 2016 09:02 AM (jR7Wy)

6 cats?!?

fuck that place

Posted by: Bigby's Knuckle Sandwich at June 26, 2016 09:05 AM (Cq0oW)

7 Almost getting to end of The Burning of Moscow, Napoleon's Trial by Fire by Alexander Mikberdze. Just getting to his analysis of was it on the order of Rostopchin.
If this chapter of Napoleon's campaigns if fascinating to you this is a very detailed read on it. The misery caused by the French invasion is unbelievable. But Alexander does point out Moscow was largely destoyed by Fire 7 times in the previous century alone, London and other cities including New Orleans have succumbed to devastating fires with a stable civilian population not one who evacuated their city to a invading force.

Posted by: Skip at June 26, 2016 09:05 AM (d9qXV)

8 Bulwer-Lytton is hardly the worst writer in the English writer. He's actually one of the better ones; he's one of the founders of SF, for a start. His curse was to be writing according to Victorian-era conventions, to which he contributed, which conventions later went out of fashion.

Posted by: boulder terlit hobo at June 26, 2016 09:06 AM (6FqZa)

9 From her Alinskyite past to her hopes for America's progressive future,
the presumptive Democratic nominee is revealed to be little more than a
political gangster intent on controlling the nation's wealth. D'Souza
chronicles the sleazy ascent of the Clintons and makes clear what some
voters have long suspected: that Hillary is far more dangerous and
corrupt than Bill ever was.



I am not sure I agree with that. And for two reasons. (10Bill was not as able to do as much because the window had not shifted as far left then as it has now. He moved it to the left, but it started nearer to the center than what we have now. And (2) Gingrich and the Republicans took control of congress and hamstrug a LOT of his crap.


But if you go back and look at the first 2 Clinton years you will find that he did indeed get a LOT of leftest crap through when the Dems had control.

Posted by: Vic We Have No Party at June 26, 2016 09:06 AM (mpXpK)

10 "in the English LANGUAGE".

I need food.

Posted by: boulder terlit hobo at June 26, 2016 09:06 AM (6FqZa)

11 Edward Bulwer-Lytton is the worst writer in history of letters.

Yet wasn't he a best selling author?

Telling.

Posted by: The Political Hat at June 26, 2016 09:07 AM (vBeA5)

12 My cats always want to be nudges when I'm reading.

Posted by: Skip at June 26, 2016 09:07 AM (d9qXV)

13 To kick off my plan to write the Alexandria story during the July Camp NaNoWriMo, Golden Isis will be free from the 26th to 28th of this month.

I enjoyed Golden Isis, and will be looking forward to the sequel.

Posted by: The Literary Hat at June 26, 2016 09:08 AM (vBeA5)

14 If a dentist is doing the job of a dental hygienist, he is being overpaid.


Posted by: Grampa Jimbo at June 26, 2016 09:09 AM (1ijHg)

15 Revisionists now going after Dickens eh. I didn't much care for some of Dickens' stuff when I was force fed it in school but at the time he was publishing those books he was probably the most popular novelist of that era. He was selling books like mad on both sides of the Atlantic.


These people are FOS.

Posted by: Vic We Have No Party at June 26, 2016 09:09 AM (mpXpK)

16 And...... willowed! lol. my first of the week, surely not my last. Ont the topic of German/Hun/kraut/gerry atrocities.

Posted by: goatexchange at June 26, 2016 09:10 AM (p63/L)

17 For my money, Dan Brown is the worst popular author. I tried to get through Angels and Demons but only made it through two chapters before flinging the book against the wall in disgust.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, Literate Savage at June 26, 2016 09:10 AM (jR7Wy)

18 Life is too lousy to be reading short books.

Posted by: Insomniac at June 26, 2016 09:10 AM (0mRoj)

19 I just finished "Anatomy of a Soldier" by Harry Parker. It tells the story of a British captain stationed in Afghanistan, his misstep onto an IED, and his convalescence.
The hook is that the story is told through the "eyes" of 45 different inanimate objects that have some contact with the captain. Surprisingly,it works most of the time, although it is a little uneven. Parker himself was a British army officer who lost both his legs to an IED in Afghanistan.

Posted by: dginnorcal at June 26, 2016 09:11 AM (3OTR8)

20 My cunning plan is to ignore all the references to, and recommendations for, interesting books on today's Book Thread and not order a single book until after July 4th.

I might just renew my library card however.

Posted by: Hrothgar at June 26, 2016 09:12 AM (wYnyS)

21 Yay book thread! On a mild Gerard Manley Hopkins kick at the moment, mainly because I'm planning to do up a few of his poems to sell as prints in my new CafePress shop (link in sock). Not a lot else to report here, except that I have started Loyal Valley: Diversion but had to put it on the back burner until I can get enough work to get the summer. So I may be looking at a September or October release rather than August as I'd hoped.

Posted by: Elisabeth G. Wolfe at June 26, 2016 09:13 AM (m2sZd)

22 For my money, Dan Brown is the worst popular author. I tried to get through Angels and Demons but only made it through two chapters before flinging the book against the wall in disgust.

=/===

not a book to be put down lightly, eh?

Posted by: Bigby's Knuckle Sandwich at June 26, 2016 09:14 AM (Cq0oW)

23 The point is, none of these books did any real damage to the Clinton Sleaze Machine, which just keeps rolling along. Priapus survived impeachment and his loathsome wife has been an ambulatory canker sore on the body politic ever since.




As noted above the MFM has covered for them and lied for them so nothing will ever reach the great unwashed masses about how scummy the Clintons are

Posted by: TheQuietMan at June 26, 2016 09:14 AM (GILMl)

24 Maybe it's just me, but I always rather thought that Bulwer-Lytton's prose was just several shades purpler than Dickens, and that Dickens just created more memorable and eccentric characters. Eh - whatever. As high Victorian-era writers go, Bulwer-Lytton was about the norm.

For my own bedside reading - from a Teeny Specialty Press in California called Volcano Press which sent it to me by overnight - John Doble's Journal and Letters from the Mines. Research materiel for the WIP, tentatively called "The Golden Road" - a Gold Rush adventure and set for release in about November. I've also started on the third book of the Luna City series - so maybe out at the same time.

As for the horrible Hillary - the original blogger for the Daily Brief was an AF mechanic stationed at Andrews AFB during the Clinton administration, and assigned to one of the aircraft dedicated to hauling around the President, family and friends. He had to sign a non-disclosure agreement -- but he did allow once, in a mellow moment that the only people in the Clinton administration who came off as nice, polite and appreciative people were - Tipper Gore and Louis Freeh, of the FBI. So - the intelligence that Hillary was hell on the little people who had the misfortune to work in the White House at the time - old news.

Still amazed that little of the dirt on her has managed to stick very well, though.

Posted by: Sgt. Mom at June 26, 2016 09:14 AM (xnmPy)

25 Reading "Kennedy & Nixon".....

JFK was a fraud and a phony who only became President because his Daddy wanted it. Nixon was a pretty solid guy who worked his way up and took it on the chin at all levels.

JFK was responsible for the deaths of many men in Cuba and for allowing the assassination of President Diem in S. Vietnam who was the only man the commies in the North were afraid of and who had the VC and Uncle Ho on the run in 1963.

Much blood on JFK's hands but the media has painted old Dick Nixon to be the "bad" guy.

Posted by: Hairyback Guy at June 26, 2016 09:14 AM (ej1L0)

26 Two weeks ago when OM posted his review of American Betrayal: The Secret Assault on Our Nation's Character by Diana West, I was about 30 pages into it. I have nothing to add to OM's excellent review; but make no mistake, the communists, except for Van Jones, are still seeded throughout the government. In addition, beginning with the Bush administration and continuing exponentially under Obama's watch members of the Muslim Brotherhood have been brought into our highest levels of government, even Homeland Security. These two have joined to work for the downfall of our Constitution and our republic.

In the 30's and 40's the big lie was, "Uncle Joe is our friend and can be trusted." Now the big lie is "Islam is a religion of peace and almost all Muslims are our friends." Back in the 30's and 40's people who tried to sound the warning versus communism were labeled "Red Baiters." Today people who sound the warning versus Islam are labeled "Islamophobes."

I'm thankful that there are people like Diana West, Mark Levin, Robert Spencer, and Glenn Beck who will speak the truth regardless of the consequences. What we need now is someone of importance and courage to say that Islamic violence does not come from "radical Islam," but rather it comes from reading the Koran or from listening to an Imam preaching the Koran.

Posted by: Zoltan at June 26, 2016 09:14 AM (JYer2)

27 Finally finished Richard Overy's 'Russia's War'.

Excellent recounting of Russia's engagement, beginning with the revolution, up through post Stalin era. Extremely well documented.

Did/has anyone watched the series 'Russia's War: Blood Upon the Snow'?
http://preview.tinyurl.com/hfk5gtd

Off to church

Posted by: Mike Hammer, etc., etc. at June 26, 2016 09:15 AM (9mTYi)

28 While doing the post-new roof and pre-move cleaning and purging of the attic at Fortress VIA, we donated another 80ish hard bound previous Best Sellers to the local donation center.

Did keep the autographed copy of Every Man a Tiger, but went deep into the collection to lighten the number of possessions.

Posted by: Village Idiot's Apprentice at June 26, 2016 09:15 AM (ptqRm)

29 Much blood on JFK's hands but the media has painted old Dick Nixon to be the "bad" guy.
Posted by: Hairyback Guy at June 26, 2016 09:14 AM (ej1L0)


JFK may have been the original President Boyfriend. He was just so dreeeeeamy! *barf*

Posted by: Insomniac at June 26, 2016 09:16 AM (0mRoj)

30 Woo, reading Bulwer-Lytton's wiki page. He might not have been a terrible author but he was a first-class @#$% to his wife. He cheated on her and when she complained, he had her committed to a loony bin.

Posted by: boulder terlit hobo at June 26, 2016 09:16 AM (6FqZa)

31 Did/has anyone watched the series 'Russia's War: Blood Upon the Snow'?
http://preview.tinyurl.com/hfk5gtd

Off to church
Posted by: Mike Hammer, etc., etc. at June 26, 2016 09:15 AM (9mTYi)

Say a prayer for my soul, would ya?

Posted by: Insomniac at June 26, 2016 09:16 AM (0mRoj)

32 17
For my money, Dan Brown is the worst popular author. I tried to get through Angels and Demons but only made it through two chapters before flinging the book against the wall in disgust.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, Literate Savage at June 26, 2016 09:10 AM (jR7Wy)

I actually liked Dan Brown's books. However, you have to ignore that stupid statement he puts in the inside flap about the contents being true. They are fiction just like most other novels.

Posted by: Vic We Have No Party at June 26, 2016 09:17 AM (mpXpK)

33 i make it a point to only read 60s era service manuals and advertisements on tea packets.

Posted by: Bigby's Knuckle Sandwich at June 26, 2016 09:17 AM (Cq0oW)

34 30 Woo, reading Bulwer-Lytton's wiki page. He might not have been a terrible author but he was a first-class @#$% to his wife. He cheated on her and when she complained, he had her committed to a loony bin.
Posted by: boulder terlit hobo at June 26, 2016 09:16 AM (6FqZa)

You sure he wasn't a Kennedy?

Posted by: Insomniac at June 26, 2016 09:17 AM (0mRoj)

35 I loved reading when I was young, but hated reading Dickens.

I was top tracked in 'language arts' back then and I noticed that some of my smarter classmates had the Cliff Notes version of the required book. I suspect now, to get the 'A' on the test while avoiding the tedious reading.

Posted by: Jiminy Cricket - let your conscience be your guide at June 26, 2016 09:18 AM (ZnIt3)

36 And...... willowed! lol. my first of the week, surely not my last. Ont the topic of German/Hun/kraut/gerry atrocities.


Posted by: goatexchange at June 26, 2016 09:10 AM (p63/L)

Been reading "Bailout over Normandy" (Ted Fahrenwald) Kindle....written by the airman, he kind of makes the time he spent in France avoiding the "Jerries" kind of a lark. Not sure what to make of it, Maybe its just his style of writing since he is writing it from memories. It couldn't have been that much fun, as he describes it...not with all the death and destruction going on around him...

Posted by: Colin at June 26, 2016 09:19 AM (HQP2c)

37 how many of you have run into bibliomaniacs? I'm talking people who have a real mental illness and horde books exclusively. I've come across 2 that i can recall offhand.

Posted by: Bigby's Knuckle Sandwich at June 26, 2016 09:20 AM (Cq0oW)

38 OregonMuse,

Thanks for using your awesome Book Touting Skillz to pimp "Wearing the Cat - Part One: Flaming Hoops"'s fine, fine ass on the mean streets of the Book Thread.

In recognition of your fine efforts, here is a Royal Purple Velvet Fedora with Tiger-Stripe Hat Band and Ostrich Feather Plume.

And complimentary Grill with encrusted with genuine Cubic Zirconia.

*shoves hat and grill through USB port*

Posted by: H D Woodard - "Wearing the Cat - Part One: Flaming Hoops" at June 26, 2016 09:21 AM (HGtd0)

39 Colin- I read all but exclusively military history and in reading has been pointed out especially when talking of past the worst parts are forgotten or since the person survived made light of.

Posted by: Skip at June 26, 2016 09:22 AM (d9qXV)

40 I happen to like Dickens. But I'm well aware that I'm weird.

Also, the only time I ever read the Cliffs Notes instead of the book for a class assignment was for Tristram Shandy (and that only after having actually tried to read the blasted thing). The Cliffs Notes were far better than the book.

Posted by: Elisabeth G. Wolfe at June 26, 2016 09:24 AM (m2sZd)

41
I love Dickens. I read A Christmas Story every year and the richness of his prose never fails to delight.

Posted by: iforgot at June 26, 2016 09:26 AM (5o5ek)

42 I'm another one who couldn't get the appeal of Dan Brown. My daughter loved the DaVinci Code - but I gave up after two chapters, when I kept tripping and falling over sentences that read like entries in the Bulwer-Lytton Bad Writing Contest.

Posted by: Sgt. Mom at June 26, 2016 09:27 AM (xnmPy)

43
YOUR BOOK-RELATED SOFTWARE TIP OF THE DAY

I've gone back to analog, so I was strolling around in Barnes & Noble the other day. Saw some biogs I was curious about but there are some really awful books on the shelves. I whipped out my phone to see what Amazon and professional reviewers had to say and I noticed that my Amazon app has a little thingie where I just hold the phone in front of a book cover and ZING -- Amazon finds it. Didn't have to type anything in.

Maybe you all knew about that, but I didn't. It's great.

Posted by: iforgot at June 26, 2016 09:29 AM (5o5ek)

44 I thought Mr. Pip was an idiot.

"Protect the portable property!"

Posted by: Grampa Jimbo at June 26, 2016 09:29 AM (1ijHg)

45 fly-by post

This was all very interesting to me. I had no idea you could trick Amazon's page/pay assessment.

Self-publishers, take notice if you haven't seen this:

Amazon Takes Aim At Scammers But Hits Authors
http://bit.ly/292pnhj

One of those that got hit by the "mistake"

Amazon-- May They Choke on My Vomit
http://www.walterjonwilliams.net/2016/03/amazon-may-they-choke-on-my-vomit/

and more on the topic...

KDP account closed without warning: Amazon says my KU borrows are suspicious
http://bit.ly/28WfkGU


another link on formatting, for self-publishers

Take pride in your eBook formatting
http://guidohenkel.com/2010/12/take-pride-in-your-ebook-formatting/


( Back to deciding whether to travel to Jersey to see the match at MetLife! impromptu! Big match there today - tickets are in$ane though. )

Posted by: artisanal 'ette at June 26, 2016 09:30 AM (qCMvj)

46 I have to admit that the Cliff Notes of Atlas Shrugged makes a good, light read.

Posted by: Kindltot at June 26, 2016 09:31 AM (ry34m)

47
Also, the only time I ever read the Cliffs Notes instead of the book for a class assignment was for Tristram Shandy (and that only after having actually tried to read the blasted thing). The Cliffs Notes were far better than the book.
Posted by: Elisabeth G. Wolfe at June 26, 2016 09:24 AM (m2sZd)
----------------------

I'm weirder than you. I loved Tristram Shandy. The threads all through the book of how the guy got a smashed penis and a smashed nose ("It's as flat as the ace of spades, sir") were funny as hell to me.

Posted by: iforgot at June 26, 2016 09:32 AM (5o5ek)

48 I've a complete set of dickens from 1880s in a box somewhere

i should sell em

Posted by: Bigby's Knuckle Sandwich at June 26, 2016 09:34 AM (Cq0oW)

49 For you all that like fantasy, I highly recommend A Darker Shade of Magic by VE Schwab. Picked it up in London and seemed appropriate reading on the flight back to the states. I tells the story of Kell, one of the last magicians that can travel between parallel worlds, in this case different versions of London (each version of London has its own personality based on how much magic it does and does not have). Great prose and it has been a while since I ran across a book I liked this much. Supposedly start of a series, so I will have to look for the other books here in the states.

Posted by: Charlotte at June 26, 2016 09:35 AM (wT7dO)

50 is there a better site than eBay for that?

Posted by: Bigby's Knuckle Sandwich at June 26, 2016 09:37 AM (Cq0oW)

51 i should sell em

Posted by: Bigby's Knuckle Sandwich at June 26, 2016 09:34 AM (Cq0oW)

Preferably before the Burning Times!

Posted by: Hrothgar at June 26, 2016 09:38 AM (wYnyS)

52 Does nevergiveup know that naturalfake has written his biography? Did he cooperate, or is this a kitty Kelly situation?

Posted by: bebe's boobs destroy at June 26, 2016 09:39 AM (jZ0kz)

53 I wondered why Kinsley was always shaking his head no non-stop when discussing conservatives.

Posted by: Joe Hallenbeck at June 26, 2016 09:39 AM (MNgU2)

54 Some of Dickens books were put out in serial form. I read that when a clipper ships bringing the latest installment to America was late, there was a riot on the pier where thousands had gathered to buy it.

Posted by: Bruce With a Wang! at June 26, 2016 09:40 AM (iQIUe)

55 Back to the classics this week - Nikolenka's Childhood.

Posted by: Skookumchuk at June 26, 2016 09:41 AM (/WPPJ)

56
Finished P.G. Wodehouse's Joy in the Morning so now it's back to non-fiction.

I didn't want to tackle another 600-page doorstop having recently finished Massie's Catherine the Great (not a great book btw), so I got this 330-page biog of Stalin by Oleg Khlevniuk. I'll wind up reading The Unknown Stalin at some point.

Thank God wiki has little mp3s of many proper names. Sometimes I find it hard to keep track of characters just because I can't "hear" their names in my head. Grigory Konstantinovich Ordzhonikidze -- okay on first and middle names, but then, fuuu

Posted by: iforgot at June 26, 2016 09:41 AM (5o5ek)

57
Do those two cats do any shelving? Dusting? Are they familiar with the Dewey Decimal System?

Posted by: Bruce With a Wang! at June 26, 2016 09:42 AM (iQIUe)

58 This is the best of threads and the worst of threads.

Posted by: Joe Hallenbeck at June 26, 2016 09:42 AM (MNgU2)

59 is there a better site than eBay for that?

Posted by: Bigby's Knuckle Sandwich at June 26, 2016 09:37 AM (Cq0oW)

*muffled scream*No, no, donate those to a college library. If you don't have a trustworthy one close to home, contact the Armstrong Browning Library at Baylor.

Posted by: Elisabeth G. Wolfe at June 26, 2016 09:42 AM (m2sZd)

60 I love Dickens. I read A Christmas Story every year and the richness of his prose never fails to delight.
Posted by: iforgot at June 26, 2016 09:26 AM (5o5ek)

Yup...and "Great Expectations" was always one of my favorites.

Posted by: Hairyback Guy at June 26, 2016 09:43 AM (ej1L0)

61 I'm currently reading The Boy Who Played With Fusion, a recommendation from last week's thread. I love how Taylor Wilson's parents let him pursue his passions full throttle, without forcing him to temper his enthusiasm or proceed at an "acceptable" tempo or level for his age.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, Literate Savage at June 26, 2016 09:44 AM (jR7Wy)

62 O/T but do you say "didn't" or "didunt?"

If you learn "didunt" as a baby from your mom and dad, are you stuck with it for the rest of your life?

Channel 7 which my wife wants on all day long is running an ad for an ambulance chaser lawyer, with one of his clients speaking about how much the lawyer got her.

She says "didunt" twice in the ad and it is like someone running their fingernails across a chalkboard for me.

Do I need diversity training?

Posted by: the littl shyning man at June 26, 2016 09:45 AM (U6f54)

63 I've read a few of those books about the Clintons. Even if a reader discounted half the content because, partisan, but was halfway objective would shudder in disgust and anger and never vote for her.

Anyone, and I mean anyone, who read one of them and was not either a (1) total leftist Democrat hack, (2) complete LIV with no desire to change that status, or (3) one of the leeches of the Democrats who will simply pull the D lever to keep the free stuff at someone else's expense flowing could never vote for her. However, (1), (2), and (3) represent a likely majority of the country now; and absolutely nuttin' you would say or show them would make the slightest difference.



However, anyone likely to read any of them is not

Posted by: RM at June 26, 2016 09:45 AM (U3LtS)

64 donate?!

its like i don't know you people

Posted by: Bigby's Knuckle Sandwich at June 26, 2016 09:46 AM (Cq0oW)

65 My favorite author who is considered by the 'elite' writers to be just above a dime novelist is Stephen Hunter. He of the protagonist, Bob Lee Swagger.

Posted by: Joe Hallenbeck at June 26, 2016 09:46 AM (MNgU2)

66 If Dickens was such a crappy writer, why does the ending paragraph of "A Tale of Two Cities" stick with me forever after reading it so long ago?

Posted by: the littl shyning man at June 26, 2016 09:47 AM (U6f54)

67 However, anyone likely to read any of them is not

Posted by: RM at June 26, 2016 09:45 AM (U3LtS)


Exactly.

Posted by: OregonMuse at June 26, 2016 09:47 AM (XrN31)

68 WARNING! Anybody thinking of sending unsolicited manuscripts to romance publishers (or any publishers, really). There is NO POINT any more. The contracts are getting even more horrific, with the romance publishers being the most egregious. They can do nothing for you that you can't do for yourself, and they expect most of the money while telling you to do all the promotion you thought you would get from them. Really, it's bad. I expect it to get worse with time, as most of the good midlist writers aren't even bothering to submit to the legacy publishers any more, and I think they are hurting for content. Naturally, because they think like the major political parties, the publishers think the answer is to demand all rights, both kidneys, and your reproductive organs for the privilege of getting taken to the cleaners. (In some cases they never bother doing a print edition).

Anyway. Sore point. Also tired, as Thing 1 and Thing 2, the new kittehs (still unnamed), decided 2am was the perfect time to explore the new digs. Ordinarily this would not be a problem, but they had to *discuss* their findings with each other, at length. "Hey, I found a nice comfy sofa!" "Yeah, I found a spider and a milk bottle cap!" I did get many purrs and head butts like a battering ram, though.

Posted by: Sabrina Chase at June 26, 2016 09:47 AM (GG9V6)

69 Wow, a MP has lost her marbles. First she is urging that people sign a petition requiring that Parliament enact a rule that a vote of less than 60% with a voter turn out of less than 75%, shall be a do over.

Her own constituency, by the way, which is overwhelmingly Asian voted for Leave.

Someone told her it wouldnt work and then provided proof that there was fraud being conducted by those who put out the petition, asking for non citizens to sign and give a false address, the MP goes nuts and blocks her.

Posted by: Bruce With a Wang! at June 26, 2016 09:48 AM (iQIUe)

70 No, seriously, if you sell those books on eBay, you risk their ending up in the hands of someone who think their best use is being cut up and turned into "art." At ABL, they would at least be in safe hands.

If you *must* sell them, though, try Abebooks.com.

Posted by: Elisabeth G. Wolfe at June 26, 2016 09:48 AM (m2sZd)

71 "He of the protagonist, Bob Lee Swagger."

And every one of that series resides in my Nook.

Enjoyable reads.

Posted by: Village Idiot's Apprentice at June 26, 2016 09:48 AM (ptqRm)

72
O/T but do you say "didn't" or "didunt?"
------------------------

I spell that abomination as "diddint." It offends my ears. It's wrong and unnatural. People who say it need to be reprogrammed. Most of the time they're so deep in they literally cannot hear the difference, or at least they claim not to. When you try to get them to pronounce it correctly, even going super-slow, they blow it at the last second. "Did . . . . int." NOOOOOO. No no NO!

Posted by: iforgot at June 26, 2016 09:49 AM (5o5ek)

73 (just back with breakfast, catching up) Re the lighter side of WWII... from my perspective....

It was a big war, and I think it's OK to have a wide variety of approaches to perspective. Sometime the only sane way to handle insanity is with humor. The OSS book, "You're Stepping on My Cloak and Dagger" is a good example, as is "Quartered Safe Out Here." So long as the main body of work is appropriately respectful, its OK to have a few light-hearted efforts.

Posted by: goatexchange at June 26, 2016 09:49 AM (p63/L)

74 >>>>>> how many of you have run into bibliomaniacs? I'm talking people who have a real mental illness and horde books exclusively. I've come across 2 that i can recall offhand.
Posted by: Bigby's Knuckle Sandwich at June 26, 2016 09:20
-------
I used to work with a guy like that. He used to disappear from work at least twice a day to go to the Half Priced books nearby and spend his lunch hour doing the same thing. It eventually was discovered and he got fired. I think it was some form of OCD. He never read the books. He just liked collecting them and talk incessantly about his book collection.

Posted by: L, Elle at June 26, 2016 09:50 AM (6IPEM)

75 Her own district just gave her a vote of no confidence; she should quit now.

Posted by: Jean at June 26, 2016 09:50 AM (Doh4+)

76 Posted by: Village Idiot's Apprentice at June 26, 2016 09:48 AM (ptqRm)

Dirty White Boys and Hot Dprings are two of my favorite. Of course besides his best one, Point of Impact. Man did Hollywood ruin that book.

Posted by: Joe Hallenbeck at June 26, 2016 09:52 AM (MNgU2)

77 Did anyone else on here get an Amazon gift card out of that lawsuit for overcharging for e-books? I ended up with 170.00.

Posted by: Molly k. at June 26, 2016 09:53 AM (YUgLc)

78
We'll see about Gary Byrne's book. Trump has already mentioned it once. Politico rounded up some counterpoint that seemed credible, but I'm sure the back-and-forth ain't over. Maybe a few other people Who Were There will confirm some of the details or the gist of it.

Posted by: iforgot at June 26, 2016 09:54 AM (5o5ek)

79 Anyone likely to read any of them (the Clinton books) is not likely someone seeking information that may provide insight and help in their decision process. It's probably someone like most of us who has a pretty good feel for what and who they are already.

It is still a good thing, though. Perhaps about 50 years from now, someone will be able to sift through the leftist rewriting of history and be able to get a glimpse of how things got so FUBAR.

All the best to D'Souza, though. BTW, I tried to compare what landed him in jail with what Hilary has done, and had to quit for my own sanity. Could not even wrap my mind around it and did not want to ruin a beautiful, sunny, summer Sunday.

Posted by: RM at June 26, 2016 09:54 AM (U3LtS)

80 You're Stepping On My Cloak and Dagger -- very funny look at an overtrained and underutilized OSS agent in WWII.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, Literate Savage at June 26, 2016 09:55 AM (jR7Wy)

81 I hate hate HATE Dan Brown's writing. Once I was stuck on a plane with nothing to read, and the guy next to me was reading Angels & Demons. I let my eyes stray to the page and was shocked at how bad it was. Plus the historical inaccuracy made my hair hurt.

As to Bulwer-Lytton, I think he has unfairly suffered from the whole "Bulwer-Lytton Contest" and the notoriety of his famous "Dark and stormy night . . . " sentence. I've read a couple of his other works and he's not bad. A bit stuffy-Victorian, but no more so than Victor Hugo. What puts Dickens in a class of his own out of that era's writers is his effortless ability to sketch memorable characters.

No one in B-L's novels are memorable. Even the egregious Mary Sue title character of Zanoni is memorable only for being an egregious Mary Sue. With Dickens, even the spear-carriers are vivid.

Posted by: Trimegistus at June 26, 2016 09:56 AM (Ycd4o)

82 62 O/T but do you say "didn't" or "didunt?"
Posted by: the littl shyning man at June 26, 2016 09:45 AM (U6f54)


Somebody once linked a great website where researchers had compiled a list of different words and pronunciations that varied by region, complete with color-coded maps. It was interactive, so you could pick which word or pronunciation you use.

Posted by: rickl at June 26, 2016 09:57 AM (sdi6R)

83 Posted by: the littl shyning man at June 26, 2016 09:45 AM (U6f54)

Ooh, ooh, is this where I can complain about people who pronounce "sentence" as "sennence?"

Posted by: April, who says "didn't" at June 26, 2016 09:57 AM (e8PP1)

84 Finished "North American Indigenous Warfare and Ritual Violence" this week, a collection of papers dealing with pre-Columbian warfare and warfare waged between Indian groups in the historic period. One theme the various authors keep returning to is that the driver for violence was cultural as well as material - i.e, the Indians fought because their cultures demanded it as part of their religion or because it was the accepted way for a young man to rise in the tribe, not just because they wanted something the other side had. The chapter on the Iroquois-Huron conflicts even argued that the primary driver for the Beaver Wars was not the fur trade at all, but as a reaction to losses from epidemics (the Iroquois didn't believe in accidental death, so smallpox was obviously a result of witchcraft by the Hurons, plus they needed captives to replace the dead, IIRC).

Also, there is a ton of archaeological evidence to prove that scalping was not a European introduction, as some claim. I am astonished that any serious historian would claim this, but it was apparently a subject of contention as late as the 90s.

Posted by: Grey Fox at June 26, 2016 09:57 AM (bZ7mE)

85 I wondered why Kinsley was always shaking his head no non-stop when discussing conservatives.


Posted by: Joe Hallenbeck

Kinsley is actually getting pretty old. He was a young man in his (late) 20's in the late 60's, early 70's, working for Bill Buckley on "Firing Line", late of PBS.

Posted by: Bossy Conservative...pondering the future at June 26, 2016 09:58 AM (+1T7c)

86 Ugh.

Got work this morning.


I also wanted to thank all of the morons and 'ettes who bought WTC - PO: FH this week.

Y'all rock!

Posted by: H D Woodard - "Wearing the Cat: Part One: Flaming Hoops" at June 26, 2016 09:59 AM (0cMkb)

87 Michael Kinsley is immortalized in the term 'Kinsley Gaffe'.

"It used to be, there was truth and there was falsehood. Now there is spin and there are gaffes. Spin is often thought to be synonymous with falsehood or lying, but more accurately it is indifference to the truth. A politician engaged in spin is saying what he or she wishes were true, and sometimes, by coincidence, it is. Meanwhile, a gaffe, it has been said, is when a politician tells the truth--or more precisely, when he or she accidentally reveals something truthful about what is going on in his or her head. A gaffe is what happens when the spin breaks down."

Posted by: Grump928(C) says Free Soothie! at June 26, 2016 10:00 AM (rwI+c)

88 37 how many of you have run into bibliomaniacs? I'm talking people who have a real mental illness and horde books exclusively. I've come across 2 that i can recall offhand.
Posted by: Bigby's Knuckle Sandwich at June 26, 2016 09:20 AM (Cq0oW)




*looks at piles of unread books EVERYWHERE*

Let's just say that if they ever shut down the internet, I'm good.

Posted by: rickl at June 26, 2016 10:01 AM (sdi6R)

89 If Dickens was such a crappy writer, why does the
ending paragraph of "A Tale of Two Cities" stick with me forever after
reading it so long ago?
Posted by: the littl shyning man at June 26, 2016 09:47 AM (U6f54)[i/]

The person presenting the study doesn't like Dickens.

If, for example, the study was to see if anyone could tell the difference between (OMG!) Ken Kesey and Lacewigs, the conclusion would have been that academia has failed the world of letters deeply and it needs more funding.

But dead white guys, not so much.

Posted by: Kindltot at June 26, 2016 10:01 AM (ry34m)

90 [i/]

Posted by: Kindltot at June 26, 2016 10:01 AM (ry34m)

91 Trump down in new poll ---double digits to 'I Am With HER' --according to Wash Post article this am.

Methinks the Dems are desperate and are having early ejaculation push poll release.....

Posted by: malignantly aggrieved and economically useless at June 26, 2016 10:02 AM (iHtNO)

92 I like the Bob Lee Swagger novels and related works as well. Dirty White Boys is my favorite. Lamar Pye was one crazy, mean, larger than life s.o.b. and Bud Pewtie was a great, flawed yet heroic, pursuer.

Not sure if Swagger was a part of that particular one, but they all have common threads and characters.

Posted by: RM at June 26, 2016 10:03 AM (U3LtS)

93 Bossy Conservative...pondering the future at June 26, 2016 09:58 AM (+1T7c)

I think he's only in his mid sixties. Anyway I was just making a crude joke. Actually I was stealing a derivative joke from Jay Mohr about Michael J Fox.

Posted by: Joe Hallenbeck at June 26, 2016 10:06 AM (MNgU2)

94 Posted by: RM at June 26, 2016 10:03 AM (U3LtS)

You're right . It had a totally separate law enforcement character as the protagonist. It was one and done for him.

Posted by: Joe Hallenbeck at June 26, 2016 10:08 AM (MNgU2)

95 Who ever said that Dickens was a lousy writer is nuts. He wrote beautiful, memorable, and inspiring prose. Told a good yarn, too.

Posted by: Bruce With a Wang! at June 26, 2016 10:09 AM (iQIUe)

96
Did anyone else on here get an Amazon gift card out of that lawsuit for overcharging for e-books? I ended up with 170.00.
Posted by: Molly k. at June 26, 2016 09:53 AM (YUgLc)
--------------------

There's something in my email but I haven't bothered yet.

Posted by: iforgot at June 26, 2016 10:09 AM (5o5ek)

97 I loved AnnaPuma and Allen G's book, will get Nevergiveup's book too. Is there a print edition? I'm old school and still prefer the romance of turning a physical page. Lol.
Re Brexit, the Labor ministers can whine for a recount all they like but EU's chancellor has basically told Caeron to file Article 50 on Tuesday during some meeting they are having and start the two year clock ticking. Basically a get the f**k out statement. Haha.

Posted by: IC at June 26, 2016 10:10 AM (KTFfX)

98 I remember someone in HS telling me he'd had to read Tale of Two Cities and hated Dickens, which is too bad. If they wanted to get people to like Dickens they should've given them something lighter in tone, like Pickwick Papers. Some of his works are grim and others overstuffed with words, and aren't for everyone.

Read Tree and Leaf by Tolkien, the Moron book-of-the-month. Varied short pieces including a discussion of what constitutes Faerie stories (not to include Swift's Gulliver's tales) and my favorite Leaf By Niggle. A bit academic and confusing but liked it overall.

Listened to 14 by Peter Clines, a mystery-horror story where a young man moves into a strange tenement building. Enjoyed the characters as they dig into the bizarre stuff going on there, fun book.

Read Shakespeare's Richard II, the story of a ruler taxing rich and poor alike including a death tax to pay for his spending. He exiles Henry Bolingbroke for threatening to duel someone and confiscates all his wealth, a decision that ends badly for Richard. Terrific characters, at times hilarious and sad, one of his best plays.

Posted by: waelse1 at June 26, 2016 10:10 AM (Ai7Vd)

99 Gah, meant to say naturalflake, not NGU in 97.

Posted by: IC at June 26, 2016 10:11 AM (KTFfX)

100 Plus the historical inaccuracy made my hair hurt.

Posted by: Trimegistus at June 26, 2016 09:56 AM (Ycd4o)


OK. I LOLed.

Posted by: OregonMuse at June 26, 2016 10:11 AM (XrN31)

101 Years ago someone told me that Kinsley was sick but I thought he had MS.

Posted by: Bruce With a Wang! at June 26, 2016 10:11 AM (iQIUe)

102 Did anyone else on here get an Amazon gift card out of that lawsuit for overcharging for e-books? I ended up with 170.00.
Posted by: Molly k. at June 26, 2016 09:53 AM (YUgLc)
--------------------
There's something in my email but I haven't bothered yet.
Posted by: iforgot at June 26, 2016 10:09 AM (5o5ek)


Amazon? I got something this week from *Barnes and Noble*, could that be the one you're thinking of?

Anyway, the settlement is supposedly based on your purchases, and so I got $4.71. Molly, if you received $170, you must have been doing some serious book buying.

Posted by: OregonMuse at June 26, 2016 10:13 AM (XrN31)

103 "Did anyone else on here get an Amazon gift card out of that lawsuit for overcharging for e-books? I ended up with 170.00. "

$4.60 fro Barnes and Nobel from the same suit.

Imagonna try not to spend it all at once.

Posted by: Village Idiot's Apprentice at June 26, 2016 10:13 AM (ptqRm)

104 My, my.
I was looking up Bulwer-Lytton's Vril, The Power of the Coming Race and wound up finding this gem of a Galaxy cover

http://tinyurl.com/zqs6t35

Sci-Fi used to be stories of what we might be able to do.


Posted by: Kindltot at June 26, 2016 10:14 AM (ry34m)

105 Posted by: Molly k. at June 26, 2016 09:53 AM (YUgLc)

I was credited about $137, so have one year to spend that on e-books. Piece of cake.

Posted by: waelse1 at June 26, 2016 10:14 AM (Ai7Vd)

106 When I was a kid we had a cheap set of encyclopedias which had summaries of great works of literature. I read them on the throne and there earned an undeserved reputation for being far more well read than I actually was. But anyway, one of the great books summarized was The Last Days of Pompeii by Edward Bulwer-Lytton so someone thought he had written at least one great book. I subsequently read that book in full and it was OK if somewhat stilted. In truth, both he and Dickens were creatures of their time and wrote in that Victorian style that many find inaccessible these days. Bulwer-Lytton, in addition to having a funny name, has suffered unfairly because Charles Schultz made fun of him in the Peanuts comic strip by having Snoopy plagarize him.

Having said that, there was a great Bulwer-Lytton contest submission which read something like, "As a scientist, Dr. Brown knew that if he broke wind in the echo chamber he'd never hear the end of it."

Incidentally, The Last Days of Pompeii had been made into movies at least twice and there was a TV miniseries in the 1980s.

Posted by: Anonosaurus Wrecks, Racist for Dinosaurs at June 26, 2016 10:15 AM (Nwg0u)

107 I want in on the children's book scam. if you can just figure out what those little boogers will latch onto you can make a fortune. I think we all can write on a level good enough for seven to nine year olds .

Posted by: Joe Hallenbeck at June 26, 2016 10:15 AM (MNgU2)

108 96


Did anyone else on here get an Amazon gift card out of that lawsuit for overcharging for e-books? I ended up with 170.00.

Posted by: Molly k. at June 26, 2016 09:53 AM (YUgLc)

--------------------



There's something in my email but I haven't bothered yet.

Posted by: iforgot at June 26, 2016 10:09 AM (5o5ek)

Yeah, I got a credit. And I just downloaded a 9.99 book which will eat all of it up and then some.

Posted by: Vic We Have No Party at June 26, 2016 10:17 AM (mpXpK)

109 Yeah, I got a credit. And I just downloaded a 9.99 book which will eat all of it up and then some.

Posted by: Vic We Have No Party at June 26, 2016 10:17 AM (mpXpK)


Still not going over your $10 limit, I see.

Posted by: OregonMuse at June 26, 2016 10:18 AM (XrN31)

110 Anyway, the settlement is supposedly based on your purchases, and so I got $4.71. Molly, if you received $170, you must have been doing some serious book buying.


.....................

I just went and rechecked the email. It says the credit is funded by Apple. I do buy a lot of books and they really must have been overcharging me! And to be exact the amount was 169.08.

Posted by: Molly k. at June 26, 2016 10:19 AM (YUgLc)

111
The best Pompeii movie:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dY_3ggKg0Bc

Read that they just excavated a store with a couple of bodies and gold coins outside the city of Pompeii.

Posted by: Bruce With a Wang! at June 26, 2016 10:19 AM (iQIUe)

112 I have to admit that I have never been a huge fan of Dickens. He never passed the "would I read this if it was not required by this class" test. A lot of great literature falls into that category for me.

Posted by: Aetius451AD at June 26, 2016 10:19 AM (3ZoRf)

113 including New Orleans have succumbed to devastating fires

-
There were 25,000 dead, bodies floatings by the hotels, and they resorted to cannibalism.

Posted by: Anonosaurus Wrecks, Racist for Dinosaurs at June 26, 2016 10:20 AM (Nwg0u)

114 109 Still not going over your $10 limit, I see.


Posted by: OregonMuse at June 26, 2016 10:18 AM (XrN31)

Nope and that was a mistake above, it was only $7.99 for A Time To Kill. Which was about 50 cents more than the credit.

Posted by: Vic We Have No Party at June 26, 2016 10:21 AM (mpXpK)

115 There were 25,000 dead, bodies floatings by the hotels, and they resorted to cannibalism.

Posted by: Anonosaurus Wrecks, Racist for Dinosaurs at June 26, 2016 10:20 AM (Nwg0u)


Shep, is that you?

Posted by: OregonMuse at June 26, 2016 10:22 AM (XrN31)

116 Incidentally, The Last Days of Pompeii had been made into movies at least twice and there was a TV miniseries in the 1980s.
Posted by: Anonosaurus Wrecks, Racist for Dinosaurs at June 26, 2016 10:15 AM (Nwg0u)

I have that on VHS somewhere around here. It was during the 80's phase of christian themed, big budget mini series during the 80's (AD was another. Masada was another (although fittingly more Jewish than Christian.) Brian Blessed, Sir Laurence Olivier, Olivia Hussey, Ned Beatty, Ernest Borgnine, Duncan Regehr.

I liked the mini series when I saw it as a kid, when I read the book it was... not so good.

Posted by: Aetius451AD at June 26, 2016 10:24 AM (3ZoRf)

117 Masada was another (although fittingly more Jewish than Christian.) Brian Blessed, Sir Laurence Olivier, Olivia Hussey, Ned Beatty, Ernest Borgnine, Duncan Regehr.

Posted by: Aetius451AD at June 26, 2016 10:24 AM (3ZoRf)


Oh yeah, I remember that one. Mt. Moriah was played by Brian Dennehy, as I recall.

Posted by: OregonMuse at June 26, 2016 10:30 AM (XrN31)

118 What, did the thread just die?

Posted by: OregonMuse at June 26, 2016 10:32 AM (XrN31)

119 Posted by: Aetius451AD at June 26, 2016 10:19 AM (3ZoRf)

I am rereading "A Tale of Two Cities," and while I appreciate the historical insights, it is a bit tedious. "Great Expectations" was much better....

Posted by: CharlieBrown'sDildo -- Am Yisrael Chai at June 26, 2016 10:32 AM (Zu3d9)

120 Hello?

Posted by: OregonMuse at June 26, 2016 10:32 AM (XrN31)

121 Nurse, bring in the fibrillator, stat!

Posted by: OregonMuse at June 26, 2016 10:33 AM (XrN31)

122 Has anyone gotten the new Monster Hunters Memoirs: Grunge book by John Ringo?

Also, what do you all think of the eARC thing in general? I like the idea of getting books early, but the prices usually seem to be set in the $12-15 range for a book that they are telling you will have editing and other mistakes.

Posted by: Aetius451AD at June 26, 2016 10:33 AM (3ZoRf)

123 Clear!

( *thump!* )

Posted by: OregonMuse at June 26, 2016 10:33 AM (XrN31)

124 Thank you Oregon Muse.

Got a bit of an early jump on Camp and the story this week, once scene just said 'write me now' and it starts on a street in Alexandria. Diana hears for the first time in her life the call to prayer of the faithful. To her it sounds like someone gargling while being strangled.

Hope everyone who is picking up Golden Isis during this promotion likes it. Thank you Horde.

Posted by: Anna Puma at June 26, 2016 10:34 AM (zf/7c)

125 >>But haven't we heard all of this 'Clintonia' before, all of the
screaming hissy fits, the non-stop horndoggery, the throwing of weighty
objects, the dissing of the military and also of the Secret Service
assigned to protect them?

Ye, *we* have, but there's a whole generation who have been raised on the myth of Hillary Clinton being the smartest, most competent woman evah. I bet mot women in their 20's never heard any of the sleazy stuff except for the Lewinsky affair.

Posted by: Lizzy at June 26, 2016 10:34 AM (NOIQH)

126 Not every sentence by every "great" writer will be good, and not every sentence by every "bad" writer will be awful. Just pulling sentences from their works & seeing who can name the author is hardly scientific. You could pull a 10 second clip from a Hitchcock movie & one from a B-movie & get the same result.

Posted by: josephistan at June 26, 2016 10:35 AM (7qAYi)

127 Also, what do you all think of the eARC thing in general? I like the idea of getting books early, but the prices usually seem to be set in the $12-15 range for a book that they are telling you will have editing and other mistakes.
Posted by: Aetius451AD at June 26, 2016 10:33 AM (3ZoRf)


Wait, they want to sell eARCs for full price? Seriously?

Doesn't seem worth it to me.

Posted by: OregonMuse at June 26, 2016 10:36 AM (XrN31)

128 Defibrillators won't resuscitate Victorian prose. Truth: I have never finished a Dickens novel and probably never will.

Posted by: mustbequantum at June 26, 2016 10:36 AM (MIKMs)

129 this gem of a Galaxy cover

http://tinyurl.com/zqs6t35

-
I read a couple of weeks ago that they are building the world's biggest plane which will be used to carry space shuttles into the upper atmosphere where they will be launched thereby saving on fuel costs. Everything old is new again.

Posted by: Anonosaurus Wrecks, Racist for Dinosaurs at June 26, 2016 10:37 AM (Nwg0u)

130 122
Has anyone gotten the new Monster Hunters Memoirs: Grunge book by John Ringo?



Also, what do you all think of the eARC thing in general? I like the
idea of getting books early, but the prices usually seem to be set in
the $12-15 range for a book that they are telling you will have editing
and other mistakes.

Posted by: Aetius451AD at June 26, 2016 10:33 AM (3ZoRf)

I haven't even seen ads for that new Ringo book. I usually get all of his (once they get below $10).
As for the eARC books I have got a few of those and the editing errors I saw were usually no more than what you occasionally see in the finished product.

Posted by: Vic We Have No Party at June 26, 2016 10:38 AM (mpXpK)

131 126 Not every sentence by every "great" writer will be good, and not every sentence by every "bad" writer will be awful. Just pulling sentences from their works & seeing who can name the author is hardly scientific. You could pull a 10 second clip from a Hitchcock movie & one from a B-movie & get the same result.
Posted by: josephistan at June 26, 2016 10:35 AM (7qAYi)

And it also depends on the reader. You can read something when you are in your teens and think it is great. You can then go back and read it in your 30's and find it tedious or poorly written. The converse is also true.

Posted by: Aetius451AD at June 26, 2016 10:38 AM (3ZoRf)

132 104 My, my.
I was looking up Bulwer-Lytton's Vril, The Power of the Coming Race and wound up finding this gem of a Galaxy cover

http://tinyurl.com/zqs6t35

Sci-Fi used to be stories of what we might be able to do.


Posted by: Kindltot at June 26, 2016 10:14 AM (ry34m)



They're still talking about doing that.

http://www.nasaspaceflight.com/2013/05/stratolaunch-orbital-air-launch/

The proposed aircraft is far larger than the flying wing of the 1950s.

Posted by: rickl at June 26, 2016 10:38 AM (sdi6R)

133 Bane has always sold eARCs at a higher price. For book addicts who have to read the latest from their favorite authors, raises guilty hand for Hodgell, then it is worth it.

However as Aetius says, there can by typos and misspellings galore. Which is common with a David Weber eARC.

Posted by: Anna Puma at June 26, 2016 10:39 AM (zf/7c)

134 is anyone else having problems with ad blocker today?

Posted by: phoenixgirl at June 26, 2016 10:40 AM (0O7c5)

135 Posted by: Aetius451AD at June 26, 2016 10:33 AM (3ZoRf)

Amazon lists two Monster Hunter books coming out this year, in August and December, collaborations of Ringo and Correia. Should be good.

Posted by: waelse1 at June 26, 2016 10:41 AM (Ai7Vd)

136 Oh, I forgot. Hi, Elisabeth G, I read and enjoyed Tristram Shandy, btw. Wouldn't reread it, but didn't have a problem. Of course, all I could think about was Garp and some Latin poet who was writing about from egg to death.

Posted by: mustbequantum at June 26, 2016 10:41 AM (MIKMs)

137 I haven't even seen ads for that new Ringo book. I usually get all of his (once they get below $10).
As for the eARC books I have got a few of those and the editing errors I saw were usually no more than what you occasionally see in the finished product.
Posted by: Vic We Have No Party at June 26, 2016 10:38 AM (mpXpK)

Yeah, he wrote two books in Larry Corriea's Monster Hunters Universe. He set them during the 80's and in New Orleans. Evidently he had read Corriea's series, liked it, ripped out these two books and then asked Corriea what he thought of them. Corriea read over them, collaborated on getting them to mesh with the universe, and they are being published.

Posted by: Aetius451AD at June 26, 2016 10:41 AM (3ZoRf)

138 129
I read a couple of weeks ago that they are building the world's biggest plane which will be used to carry space shuttles into the upper atmosphere where they will be launched thereby saving on fuel costs. Everything old is new again.
Posted by: Anonosaurus Wrecks, Racist for Dinosaurs at June 26, 2016 10:37 AM (Nwg0u)


Ha! You beat me by a minute, but I got the link.

Posted by: rickl at June 26, 2016 10:42 AM (sdi6R)

139 eerr Baen...

Posted by: Anna Puma at June 26, 2016 10:43 AM (zf/7c)

140 >>Yeah, he wrote two books in Larry Corriea's Monster Hunters Universe.

Excellent news - just finished "Monster Hunters Nemisis".

Posted by: Lizzy at June 26, 2016 10:44 AM (NOIQH)

141 I admit that I haven't read any of Francis W. Porretto's books, but I do check out his blog now and then, and I highly recommend it.

Posted by: rickl at June 26, 2016 10:45 AM (sdi6R)

142 I see the Amazon e-mail for that book I just downloaded and they did apply the credit to it.

Posted by: Vic We Have No Party at June 26, 2016 10:45 AM (mpXpK)

143 I read a couple of weeks ago that they are building the world's biggest plane which will be used to carry space shuttles into the upper atmosphere where they will be launched thereby saving on fuel costs. Everything old is new again.Posted by: Anonosaurus Wrecks, Racist for Dinosaurs 



Apparently someone has finally realized the gravity of the situation and is acting accordingly.

Posted by: Jiminy Cricket - let your conscience be your guide at June 26, 2016 10:45 AM (ZnIt3)

144 For those who have this nifty concept to explore and have a story built around it, seems someone is looking for your science fiction.

http://compellingsciencefiction.com/submit.html

Posted by: Anna Puma at June 26, 2016 10:46 AM (zf/7c)

145 Dan Brown is certainly a hack and is guilty of what my friend calls "As You Know Bob" syndrome, a method of imparting information to the reader. Hack, Hack, Hack.

Posted by: Jaclyn at June 26, 2016 10:49 AM (PfJ3B)

146 63 I've read a few of those books about the Clintons. Even if a reader discounted half the content because, partisan, but was halfway objective would shudder in disgust and anger and never vote for her.


Posted by: RM at June 26, 2016 09:45 AM (U3LtS)

It really is true that Democrats are allowed to get away with literally anything. I wish I knew what to do about it.

I have the Byrne book on pre-order. I've read Dereliction of Duty and both of those Secret Service books.

The books correlate with things that individuals like Sgt Mom report.

As you say, even if only half the stuff in those is true, no decent person should ever want that band of sleazoids back in our White House.

If Slick weren't looking so decrepit, I'd be warning the WH housekeepers to re-stock on whatever is best for cleaning up the semen he leaves all over the place.

Posted by: stace...TEXIT at June 26, 2016 10:54 AM (ozZau)

147 OK, I just can't stop laughing at this:

http://monsterhunternation.com/2016/06/16/ask-kuntzman/

Excerpt:

Join us as Gersh Kuntzman gives valuable life advice. Send us your questions, from lifestyle choices to product reviews, and together we may peer deep into his earth mother-like wisdom. From his lilac scented crying pillow to you, rejoice as Gersh Kuntzman lets you know what's really going on in the world.

Now that's some damn funny sh*t right there.

Posted by: OregonMuse at June 26, 2016 10:57 AM (XrN31)

148 Sure, that Hillary's got some warts, BUT HAVE YOU SEEN DONALD TRUMP??? ZOMG!!!!!

Posted by: George Will at June 26, 2016 11:02 AM (sl+zA)

149 At my kids karate tournament, just peeking in.

FYI today is the anniversary of JFK's Ich Bin Ein Berliner speech, did a short blog post on it

(Link in nic)

Posted by: @votermom's phone at June 26, 2016 11:02 AM (8GDYF)

150 145 Dan Brown is certainly a hack and is guilty of what my friend calls "As You Know Bob" syndrome, a method of imparting information to the reader. Hack, Hack, Hack.
Posted by: Jaclyn at June 26, 2016 10:49 AM (PfJ3B)

It is a question I have seen a lot of authors struggle with: how to impart information on the world to new readers. A lot of authors get around it by having their main character (and hence the reader) be new to the world that they are entering. This requires them to ask what the hell is going on, and hence the reader finds out too.

One author I can think of who went the exact opposite way. Steven Erikson's Malazan Book of the Fallen seemed to be written with the idea that the reader would only find out about anything in context, and he was not going to go out of his way to offer it either. It made for an interesting series to read. I like his books, even if they go a little too far to the character torture/rapey side of things ala George Martin.

However, I never found his instances of character torture to be as bad as Martin in that, at least it seemed to serve some point he was trying to make. Not to mention, he seemd to be much more fixated on tragedy and nobility as a function of that.

Posted by: Aetius451AD at June 26, 2016 11:02 AM (3ZoRf)

151 I've been reading The Hardest Day by Alfred Price. It is about August 18, 1940, the day that both the British and the Germans lost more aircraft than on any other day of the Battle of Britain. I am amazed that the author frequently managed to find first person accounts from both sides of a dogfight between anonymous airgrunts who meet in the chaos of the chance of war. Something I think we've always known but I never really thought about is the pilots on their first combat flight who fall before the enemy. What a tragic waste. Similarly, the civilian collateral damage casualties. (At this point, the Germans were attacking only military targets. Within a few weeks, that would change.) This book gives you the nuts and bolts of how they actually did things and is full of the stories of individuals caught up in battle. There's a heaping helping of the fog of war as well. For example, the Germans launched an extreme low level attack on Kenley airfield and ran into a Brit secret weapon. The Brits launched cables by rocket which were then suspended by parachute. People saw the parachutes, interpreted them to be German paratroopers, and called out the army. Rumor had it tha German paratroopers would be disguised as vicars or medics or whatever. The army stopped traffic to find the nonexistent disguised paratroopers thereby delaying emergency and medical help to the casualties when time was of the essence.

Recommended.

Posted by: Anonosaurus Wrecks, Racist for Dinosaurs at June 26, 2016 11:05 AM (Nwg0u)

152 Dan Brown reminds me of Dale Brown.

Flight of the Old Dog was an amazing read.

Unfortunately, I now have him right along side reading a Cussler book.


Not anytime soon.

Posted by: Village Idiot's Apprentice at June 26, 2016 11:06 AM (ptqRm)

153 Village Idiot's Apprentice, what did you think of Dale Brown's Hammerheads?

Dale suffered the same fate as Clancy and Anne McCaffrey on my bookshelves, write something new. Since they kept plowing the same ground again, found other writers to read.

Posted by: Anna Puma at June 26, 2016 11:10 AM (zf/7c)

154 151
Something I think we've always known but I never really thought about is the pilots on their first combat flight who fall before the enemy. What a tragic waste.
Posted by: Anonosaurus Wrecks, Racist for Dinosaurs at June 26, 2016 11:05 AM (Nwg0u)


I remember reading somewhere that the average life expectancy of a WWI fighter pilot in 1917 was two weeks. Dogfighting was very Darwinian. The good pilots prospered and the bad ones didn't last long. The great aces we hear about chewed up the newbies.

Posted by: rickl at June 26, 2016 11:12 AM (sdi6R)

155 OT, but on MarineTraffic, I'm "watching" the first ship go through the new locks in the Panama Canal. It's name is Cosco Shipping Panama.

I don't know how long the transit is supposed to take, but it's been in the first lock most of the morning. It looks likes it's moving into the second section finally.

Posted by: stace...TEXIT at June 26, 2016 11:12 AM (ozZau)

156 FYI today is the anniversary of JFK's Ich Bin Ein Berliner speech, did a short blog post on it

(Link in nic)

Posted by: @votermom's phone at June 26, 2016 11:02 AM (8GDYF)


Heh:

Two thousand years ago the proudest boast was 'civis Romanus sum.' Today, in the world of freedom, the proudest boast is "I am a jelly doughnut!"

Posted by: OregonMuse at June 26, 2016 11:14 AM (XrN31)

157 "what did you think of Dale Brown's Hammerheads?"

I wish I could give you an honest answer to that.

But at some point, they all just sort of merged into a single impression of "Meh"

With the exception of Old Dog.

Posted by: Village Idiot's Apprentice at June 26, 2016 11:15 AM (ptqRm)

158 . The great aces we hear about chewed up the newbies.
Posted by: rickl at June 26, 2016 11:12 AM (sdi6R)

I follow Chuck Yeager on twitter. Just this morning or last night he answered the question, what's the most import quality in a pilot? "Experience"

So I guess you have to first survive your own screw ups as well as enemies with more experience.

Posted by: stace...TEXIT at June 26, 2016 11:15 AM (ozZau)

159 152
Dan Brown reminds me of Dale Brown.



Flight of the Old Dog was an amazing read.



Unfortunately, I now have him right along side reading a Cussler book.





Not anytime soon.

Posted by: Village Idiot's Apprentice at June 26, 2016 11:06 AM (ptqRm)

I don't think Dan Brown is like Dale Brown. Anyway, Flight of the Old Dog was a good book I loved it. As he followed that one up they gradually decreased until the last one I got by him was just bad. I quit buying his books after that. Most of the ones I have by him are in paperback and the only one I would even consider getting for the Kindle is Flight of the Old Dog.

Posted by: Vic We Have No Party at June 26, 2016 11:16 AM (mpXpK)

160 @156 actually a bunch of sites claim that JFK's translator had it right

Posted by: @votermom's phone at June 26, 2016 11:16 AM (8GDYF)

161 Posted by: Aetius451AD at June 26, 2016 11:02 AM (3ZoRf)

Butcher and Sanderson have been taking the "You'll find out about the details if they come up" approach as well. It seems to work rather well, although can be a little frustrating if I want to know something specific about the world that never gets addressed. I guess that's where there's room for fan-fic if I were so inclined.

Posted by: Polliwog the 'Ette at June 26, 2016 11:18 AM (GDulk)

162 Oregon, your paragraph of redacted reminds me of a book I reviewed recently - Left of Boom

Posted by: @votermom's phone at June 26, 2016 11:19 AM (8GDYF)

163 "WARNING! Anybody thinking of sending unsolicited manuscripts to romance publishers (or any publishers, really). There is NO POINT any more."

Agreed!

Everybody here probably knows more about this than me, I'm still stumbling through finding conservative book-discussing blogs. But just in case... for more in this line, you might check out According to Hoyt

https://accordingtohoyt.com/

She has quite a few articles on how the publishing companies these days are getting closer to a death spiral of ever-increasing liberalism. Rather daunting, eep.

The Passive Voice blog also has a bunch of interesting articles and links on how the profits work out between indie and trad.

http://www.thepassivevoice.com/

Posted by: crossoverChaos at June 26, 2016 11:19 AM (h/8t5)

164 This week I also read 1894 by Hugh Ashton. Conan-Doyle mentioned several of Sherlock Holmes adventures which he had passed over in favor of others. The author here has faken those names and added stories to them. The good news and the bad news is that I was able to deduce the mystery in almost all cases which means they are not the ridiculous nonsense to which some contemporary Holmsian authors resort but they are not the shocking denoument we seek in mysteries.

Posted by: Anonosaurus Wrecks, Racist for Dinosaurs at June 26, 2016 11:19 AM (Nwg0u)

165 Butcher and Sanderson have been taking the "You'll find out about the details if they come up" approach as well. It seems to work rather well, although can be a little frustrating if I want to know something specific about the world that never gets addressed. I guess that's where there's room for fan-fic if I were so inclined.
Posted by: Polliwog the 'Ette at June 26, 2016 11:18 AM (GDulk)

I find I like the approach better than the buffet method from the get go. It does two things, it engages the reader more because they want to find out what something is or what happened there, instead of spooning it to them. It also eliminates the need for the author to insert situations by which things can be explained and lets the situations flow more from the story.

The downside of this is that, yes you can run into areas where they either explain way down the road questions you had from the get go or never do at all.

Posted by: Aetius451AD at June 26, 2016 11:23 AM (3ZoRf)

166 To help with that experience thing Yeager talks about, VIII Air Force Fighter Command established the 495th and 496th Fighter Training Groups to take pilots fresh from Stateside training and give them more seasoning as it were before they posted to operational units.

http://www.littlefriends.co.uk/gallery/495g/lj-b.jpg

Posted by: Anna Puma at June 26, 2016 11:23 AM (zf/7c)

167 What annoys me about Tristram Shandy, apart from my constitutional disinclination toward certain types of low humor, are the endless digressions. There's a way to make that sort of joke work--it is, after all, basically the entire plot of Monty Python and the Holy Grail--but in TS it just doesn't. To be fair to Sterne, though, I have the same problem with Jean de Meun's continuation of The Romance of the Rose and a lot of other works inspired by Boethius; but at least in the better ones, like Chaucer's Troilus and Crisseyde, the digressions can be skipped because the book has an actual plot and the philosophy is incidental. (And then there's the Nun's Priest's Tale, where Chaucer gives that trope a royal skewering that's absolutely hilarious.)

JMO, of course.

Posted by: Elisabeth G. Wolfe at June 26, 2016 11:23 AM (m2sZd)

168 I remember reading somewhere that the average life expectancy of a WWI fighter pilot in 1917 was two weeks.

Their planes were flimsy wood and fabric contraptions which sometimes came apart in mid-air during hard maneuvers. They didn't have parachutes for the most part. The engine and fuel tank were right in front of the pilot, and if the plane caught on fire, the pilot frequently jumped to his death rather than burn.

Yet the WWI air services had no shortage of volunteers. Anything was preferable to the trenches.

Posted by: rickl at June 26, 2016 11:24 AM (sdi6R)

169 I haven't been able to read books of any length for a long time because I have a touch of ADHD. I'm making my first attempt and reading Heart of Darkness. My best friend pushed me into doing this bc we started talking about movies when I was looking for something to watch and saw Apocolypse Now was playing. I hated the movie and he convinced me to read this book. I hope I won't hate it. It would be awful to finally get through a book and decide I hate it.

Posted by: L, Elle at June 26, 2016 11:25 AM (6IPEM)

170 Say what you will about Dickens' prose but he did create some of the most memorable fictional characters in English literature.

Posted by: Tuna at June 26, 2016 11:26 AM (JSovD)

171 37 how many of you have run into bibliomaniacs? I'm talking people who have a real mental illness and horde books exclusively. I've come across 2 that i can recall offhand.
Posted by: Bigby's Knuckle Sandwich at June 26, 2016 09:20 AM (Cq0oW)

The fact that I've always lived in NYC apartments has always limited that aspect of my mental illness; if I lived in the country I'd have multiple book-filled barns.

As weird as it is for a bibliophile to be happy about the passing of bookstores, first Amazon, then ebooks has been very effective in limiting the amount of money I spend on my habit.

Posted by: Oschisms at June 26, 2016 11:27 AM (ZsN9X)

172 My romance novel is Round, Flat, and Hot: The Story of a Man and His Pizza.

Posted by: Anonosaurus Wrecks, Racist for Dinosaurs at June 26, 2016 11:27 AM (Nwg0u)

173 I've never read Bulwer-Lytton, so I can't defend his prose, but I seriously doubt that he is the "worst writer of all time." James Fenimore Cooper is a much better candidate for the honor. I had to read one of his novels once for a class. It took me a month to force my way through that drivel, and I am not a slow reader. For anyone who's missed it, here's Mark Twain on Cooper: http://twain.lib.virginia.edu/projects/rissetto/offense.html.

And then there's Amanda McKittrick Ros: https://litreactor.com/news/now-you-can-read-the-worst-novel-ever-written-for-free.

Posted by: Don at June 26, 2016 11:28 AM (IJe0X)

174 In short - where were the heroes?

People rarely write about heroes these days because the entire concept of heroism and good is rejected -- if its even understood. Good guys aren't actually good, they're just up against guys who are declared bad. People aren't heroic, they're just doing things to achieve the plot's goals. Characters in books are not shaped or driven by absolute ethical standards, because too many authors believe there are no absolutes and the entire idea of absolutes is disturbingly fascist.

"Only a Sith deals in absolutes," he quipped absolutely.

Posted by: Christopher Taylor at June 26, 2016 11:31 AM (39g3+)

175 155 OT, but on MarineTraffic, I'm "watching" the first ship go through the new locks in the Panama Canal. It's name is Cosco Shipping Panama.

I don't know how long the transit is supposed to take, but it's been in the first lock most of the morning. It looks likes it's moving into the second section finally.

Posted by: stace...TEXIT at June 26, 2016 11:12 AM (ozZau)

*****

It looks like it's moving across dry land on the version of MarineTraffic I was able to get to load. I tried to find a live stream, but even the Miraflores and Gatun locks cameras at Panacanal.com seem to be down.

Posted by: Elinor, Who Usually Looks Lurkily at June 26, 2016 11:31 AM (NqQAS)

176 Just to add to the overall discussion: I make audiobooks, which are available for sale on audible.com.

But I am not here to sell.

Every time I complete an audio book, the company (ACX--Audiobook Club Exchange) gives me codes that allow to market my audio books.

The only requirements are to have an account at audible.com.

Email me at chiquito.crasto@gmail.com for free codes.

Thanks

Posted by: Chiquito Crasto at June 26, 2016 11:32 AM (aS2Dc)

177 167
Ever see the English movie, "A Cock and Bull Story" about a the making of the movie version of "Tristram Shandy". It's fairly recent so it shouldn't be hard to find. I thought it was quite funny.

Posted by: Tuna at June 26, 2016 11:33 AM (JSovD)

178 Their planes were flimsy wood and fabric contraptions which sometimes came apart in mid-air during hard maneuvers. They didn't have parachutes for the most part. The engine and fuel tank were right in front of the pilot, and if the plane caught on fire, the pilot frequently jumped to his death rather than burn.

Few people had any experience flying, they didn't really know how to train pilots, the planes were essentially all experimental because they were just learning how airplanes and aerodynamics worked, the engines were too weak to be effective, on and on. Still; flying is a tremendous attraction.

Posted by: Christopher Taylor at June 26, 2016 11:33 AM (39g3+)

179 "Fenimore Cooper's Literary Offenses" is a GEM. So is "The Awful German Language," which (I say as a German major and professional translator) is funny because it's true.

Posted by: Elisabeth G. Wolfe at June 26, 2016 11:33 AM (m2sZd)

180 But even when pilots reached their operational units, learning time was not over. Each fighter group had what was colloquially called a Clobber College to bring the fledgling pilots up to their standards and aircraft type. Since the best planes were required for missions, this meant these new pilots flew planes no longer fit for combat, aka War Weary.

From the 479th Fighter Group, one such hack belonging to their Clobber College. A P-51B Mustang that has obviously seen better days.

http://www.littlefriends.co.uk/gallery/479g/l2-3.jpg

Posted by: Anna Puma at June 26, 2016 11:33 AM (zf/7c)

181 174 In short - where were the heroes?

People rarely write about heroes these days because the entire concept of heroism and good is rejected -- if its even understood. Good guys aren't actually good, they're just up against guys who are declared bad. People aren't heroic, they're just doing things to achieve the plot's goals. Characters in books are not shaped or driven by absolute ethical standards, because too many authors believe there are no absolutes and the entire idea of absolutes is disturbingly fascist.

"Only a Sith deals in absolutes," he quipped absolutely.
Posted by: Christopher Taylor at June 26, 2016 11:31 AM (39g3+)

A buddy and I have been having a discussion on this for close to 20 years- that most authors these days can write evil (and hence good villians) far better than they can write compelling heroes.

I think you are right in that they do not believe in absolute good anymore than they believe in absolute evil, but I think they truly believe decency and honor is boring, so they muddle their characters to make them interesting. They much prefer the Clint Eastwood anti-hero to the John Wayne hero-hero.

It is odd when you think about how much liberals want to invest power into the state and bureaucracy (all people) and then contrast that with how they portray people in their literature: TWD, GoT. They believe that people are essentially evil when it comes right down to it- which makes it odd that they want to invest them with more and more power.

Posted by: Aetius451AD at June 26, 2016 11:36 AM (3ZoRf)

182 Expositions are difficult because they are frequently clumsy and boring. "Let me introduce you to Miss Abagail, whose husband is missing in the south Pacific and is thought to have been eaten by cannibals. Are you enjoying the party, Miss Abigail?" A well written or shot exposition is a thing of beauty. One of my favorites is the first minutes of Hitchcock's Rear Window. Without a word, the camera shows us who the Jimmy Stewart character is and how he got there.

Posted by: Anonosaurus Wrecks, Racist for Dinosaurs at June 26, 2016 11:37 AM (Nwg0u)

183 For crossoverChaos and others looking for good fiction: Try the Conservative Libertarian Fiction Alliance. It has a Facebook page, and quite a number of "Freedom-friendly" writers are members. The conversation there is pretty lively.

Posted by: Francis Porretto at June 26, 2016 11:38 AM (Juo2u)

184 From the 479th Fighter Group, one such hack belonging to their Clobber College. A P-51B Mustang that has obviously seen better days.

http://www.littlefriends.co.uk/gallery/479g/l2-3.jpg
Posted by: Anna Puma at June 26, 2016 11:33 AM (zf/7c)

You should see the other guy.

Posted by: Aetius451AD at June 26, 2016 11:39 AM (3ZoRf)

185 I haven't been able to read books of any length for a long time because I have a touch of ADHD. I'm making my first attempt and reading Heart of Darkness. My best friend pushed me into doing this bc we started talking about movies when I was looking for something to watch and saw Apocolypse Now was playing. I hated the movie and he convinced me to read this book. I hope I won't hate it. It would be awful to finally get through a book and decide I hate it.
Posted by: L, Elle at June 26, 2016 11:25 AM (6IPEM)

You will hate it...Conrad is slow, boring and full of hate for his fellow European colonialists. I slugged through that crap many years ago and said to myself when I finally finished, "Well that sucked." Absolute drek.

Posted by: Hairyback Guy at June 26, 2016 11:40 AM (ej1L0)

186 Posted by: Don at June 26, 2016 11:28 AM (IJe0X)

Twain link is broken!

Posted by: CharlieBrown'sDildo -- Am Yisrael Chai at June 26, 2016 11:40 AM (Zu3d9)

187 182 Expositions are difficult because they are frequently clumsy and boring. "Let me introduce you to Miss Abagail, whose husband is missing in the south Pacific and is thought to have been eaten by cannibals. Are you enjoying the party, Miss Abigail?" A well written or shot exposition is a thing of beauty. One of my favorites is the first minutes of Hitchcock's Rear Window. Without a word, the camera shows us who the Jimmy Stewart character is and how he got there.
Posted by: Anonosaurus Wrecks, Racist for Dinosaurs at June 26, 2016 11:37 AM (Nwg0u)

Another good example of this in a movie is the first 5 mins or so of Rio Bravo.

Posted by: Aetius451AD at June 26, 2016 11:40 AM (3ZoRf)

188 AP, I thought of you last night because "Friday's Child" was on Star Trek. A few months ago you had made what I thought was a remarkably obscure reference to it...but I forget the details.

Posted by: San Franpsycho at June 26, 2016 11:42 AM (EZebt)

189 You should see the other guy.

We can't because he's a smoking crater in Holland or Germany.

Posted by: Anna Puma at June 26, 2016 11:42 AM (zf/7c)

190 We can't because he's a smoking crater in Holland or Germany.

Posted by: Anna Puma at June 26, 2016 11:42 AM (zf/7c)

Exactly! That old hack is looking pretty good now, eh? :p

Posted by: Aetius451AD at June 26, 2016 11:43 AM (3ZoRf)

191 Posted by: Elinor, Who Usually Looks Lurkily at June 26, 2016 11:31 AM (NqQAS)

Good idea to check the webcams. Yeah, I can't get anything to load. Maybe they're getting slammed by viewers, or maybe they've just screwed up.

Posted by: stace...TEXIT at June 26, 2016 11:43 AM (ozZau)

192 They much prefer the Clint Eastwood anti-hero to the John Wayne hero-hero.

-
I happened to catch The Commancheros last night and thought, "Why don't they make movies like this anymore?"

Posted by: Anonosaurus Wrecks, Racist for Dinosaurs at June 26, 2016 11:44 AM (Nwg0u)

193
When I think of WW1 aeroplanes, I always remember Ivor Novello. He wrote the immensely popular song, Keep the Home Fires Burning in 1914. As a trainee, he crashed 2 planes and then was re-assigned to a desk. Now every year, the British Academy of Song writers gives out the Ivor Novello Awards for songwriting. It's a big deal over there. I think the movie actor in Godsford Park was suppose to be Novello.

Anyway, the 100th anniversary for the Battle of the Somme is coming up and there will be lots of memorials. Hope that Canadian Sgt of Arms is over there to keep people in line.

Posted by: Bruce With a Wang! at June 26, 2016 11:46 AM (iQIUe)

194 I happened to catch The Commancheros last night and thought, "Why don't they make movies like this anymore?"
Posted by: Anonosaurus Wrecks, Racist for Dinosaurs at June 26, 2016 11:44 AM (Nwg0u)

This is kind of the same question as to why you cannot redo the Searchers (aside from the racial component.) Who would you have with as the lead? What actor exudes the kind of solidity and essential goodness that John Wayne did?

The closest I can think of is Chris Evans, who I think has done a great job in the Captain America movies. However this has only been one set of movies. John Wayne built his entire career playing these types of characters.

Posted by: Aetius451AD at June 26, 2016 11:47 AM (3ZoRf)

195 >>>>>Read Shakespeare's Richard II,<<<<<

There is someone else who has been reading the history plays and mentioning them on the book thread but I can't think of who it is. Anyway, I just watched the first part of the Hollow Crown series--I have made it through Richard II (very well done) and both Henry IV's (Jeremy Irons' aging Henry steals the show).

If you haven't seen them I highly recommend giving it a watch.

.


Posted by: the guy that moves pianos for a living at June 26, 2016 11:50 AM (tEDMc)

196 Maybe CBD should save this one for an art thread

http://www.littlefriends.co.uk/gallery/479g/harper.jpg
P-38J assigned to the 434th FS/479thFG. Assigned pilot Lt. Flamm D. Harper. Name is a concatenation of Harper's wife - Mary and his daughter - Dee Anna.
----

Aesitus, yeah perspective is a wonderful thing
----

A reference to 'Friday's Child' did I? I can't recall. Wow.

Posted by: Anna Puma at June 26, 2016 11:50 AM (zf/7c)

197 ABC Poll: Hildabeast +10
NBC Poll: Hildabeast +1

OK then.

Posted by: Monsieur Moo Moo at June 26, 2016 11:51 AM (0LHZx)

198 Part of the problem is that Wayne never played a villain. The closest he came is guys like in The Searchers, but he was almost always essentially a heroic, good character. A regular guy, but a hero.

Modern actors believe they have to have huge range and are terrified of being typecast. Jiim Carrey can't just do goofy comedies, he has to do "serious" parts. Its like Julius (Groucho) Marx insisting he do Shakespeare to demonstrate his skill.

Posted by: Christopher Taylor at June 26, 2016 11:52 AM (39g3+)

199 What annoys me about Tristram Shandy, apart from my
constitutional disinclination toward certain types of low humor, are the
endless digressions. There's a way to make that sort of joke work--it
is, after all, basically the entire plot of Monty Python and the Holy Grail--but in TS it just doesn't.
=====

I liked them and it kept it from being 'Tom Jones' -- which I couldn't finish.

Posted by: mustbequantum at June 26, 2016 11:53 AM (MIKMs)

200 160 @156 actually a bunch of sites claim that JFK's translator had it right

Posted by: @votermom's phone at June 26, 2016 11:16 AM (8GDYF)


I know, and I think they're probably right, but it sure sounds funny.

Posted by: OregonMuse at June 26, 2016 11:54 AM (XrN31)

201 NOOD thread about Venezuela.

Bring a sammich.

Posted by: Y-not (@moxiemom) at June 26, 2016 11:56 AM (t5zYU)

202 Venezuela?

Don't forget the toilet paper.

Posted by: Anna Puma at June 26, 2016 11:57 AM (zf/7c)

203 For anyone who's missed it, here's Mark Twain on Cooper:

http://twain.lib.virginia.edu/projects/rissetto/offense.html.


Heh. I've never read this before. But now I see that Twain has been a uuge influence on P J O'Rourke.

Posted by: OregonMuse at June 26, 2016 11:59 AM (XrN31)

204 171. bibliophile =/= bibliomaniac

Posted by: Bigby's Knuckle Sandwich at June 26, 2016 12:01 PM (Cq0oW)

205 195
Love the scene where Henry IV is berating young Prince Hal while the younger brothers stand nervously by. Hal gives his father a flip, smart ass answer and gets a slap across the face for his reward. Jeremy Irons was so pitch perfect I thought I was eavesdropping on a real father-son argument.

Posted by: Tuna at June 26, 2016 12:01 PM (JSovD)

206 Posted by: stace...TEXIT at June 26, 2016 11:43 AM (ozZau)

If you like watching ships come and go, check out duluthharborcam dot com. It's a wonderful site with lots of live cameras to watch the container ships that come in and out of Duluth Harbor via the great lakes. A couple of the cameras even have audio feeds.

Posted by: Elinor, Who Usually Looks Lurkily at June 26, 2016 12:03 PM (NqQAS)

207 For my money, Dan Brown is the worst popular author. I tried to get through Angels and Demons but only made it through two chapters before flinging the book against the wall in disgust.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, Literate Savage at June 26, 2016 09:10 AM (jR7Wy)


I concur with that. Several years ago, I read (as in skimmed rapidly) the novel he wrote about Freemason (full disclosure, I am one) and found it the stupidest dreck I ever had the displeasure to read. The murderer's motivation was beyond stupid (he wanted the "real" secret of the Freemason in order to become god-like).

Posted by: Retired Buckeye Cop is now an engineer at June 26, 2016 12:05 PM (5Yee7)

208 PJ O'Rourke is less bitter and spiteful toward everyone than Twain though. Twain seemed to genuinely hate everyone and everything, O'Rourke just sees humor in it all.

Posted by: Christopher Taylor at June 26, 2016 12:06 PM (39g3+)

209 Dale suffered the same fate as Clancy and Anne McCaffrey on my bookshelves, write something new. Since they kept plowing the same ground again, found other writers to read.
Posted by: Anna Puma at June 26, 2016 11:10 AM (zf/7c)
----
I was a big McCaffrey fan years ago, especially enjoying the Planet Pirates books she wrote with Elizabeth Moon. But I learned as a kid, with ERB, that if you do a deep-dive with an author you'll see a lot of self-cribbing.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, Literate Savage at June 26, 2016 12:07 PM (jR7Wy)

210 Tuna,

Another standout scene is when Worcester makes Henry so mad he pukes.

Most productions Of Henry IV are all about Falstaff and Hal, when watching the Hollow Crown you can't wait to get back to raging Jeremy Irons.

Posted by: the guy that moves pianos for a living at June 26, 2016 12:08 PM (tEDMc)

211 186 Twain link is broken!

Don't include the final period.

http://twain.lib.virginia.edu/projects/rissetto/offense.html

Bonus Twain: "The Awful German Language"

https://www.cs.utah.edu/~gback/awfgrmlg.html

Posted by: Don at June 26, 2016 12:09 PM (IJe0X)

212 Thanks, Elinor!

Posted by: stace...TEXIT at June 26, 2016 12:10 PM (ozZau)

213 Posted by: L, Elle at June 26, 2016 11:25 AM (6IPEM)

I read all of Conrad last year and liked Lord Jim the best. Heart of Darkness is good though the protagonist takes a long time getting his boat ready for travel, and his time with Kurtz is all too brief.

Posted by: waelse1 at June 26, 2016 12:11 PM (Ai7Vd)

214 Dan Brown's problem isn't so much that he writes ridiculously ignorant books about outrageously stupid conspiracies. They're just fantasy.

Its that not only do people buy into his books as if they're telling some dark secrets hitherto suppressed by sinister powers... but also he tends to rip off his plots and ideas from other writers.

Posted by: Christopher Taylor at June 26, 2016 12:11 PM (39g3+)

215 The discussion of "writers worth their salt" brought to mind Joe R. Lansdale. His series featuring "Hap Collins" and "Leonard Pine is epic." Total moron material. Fun, funny and with a decent story. The dialogue is right up there with Harlan Coban's "Myron Bolitar" and partner in (solving) crime "Windsor 'Win' Horne Lockwood, III." You'll think you're eavesdropping.

One of the best Lansdale books to start with is "Bad Chili." "Hap" is a big ol' Southern redneck and his best friend, "Leonard" is a tiny, black and gay. They're stalwart conservatives. Hilarity ensues.

Harlan Coben started out writing books about a former basketball star who becomes a sports rep to the pros. One of my favorites in that series is "Drop Shot."

These make great summer reading choices for the 'ron community. Funny. As. All. Hell.

Posted by: RushBabe at June 26, 2016 12:14 PM (OJKE+)

216 210
Agreed. It was a magnificent performance. Oh, and for any Tom Hiddleston fans out there, he plays Prince Hal.

Posted by: Tuna at June 26, 2016 12:16 PM (JSovD)

217 I want in on the children's book scam. if you can just figure out what those little boogers will latch onto you can make a fortune. I think we all can write on a level good enough for seven to nine year olds .

Posted by: Joe Hallenbeck at June 26, 2016 10:15 AM (MNgU2)

I've been thinking about that too and have a good idea for one. Youngest spawn is an aspiring graphic artist and could provide illustrations.

Posted by: RushBabe at June 26, 2016 12:16 PM (OJKE+)

218 All Hail Eris, McCaffrey I think is the pinnacle on how an author can totally ruin their own work.

The Lady in the Tower series was several short stories in Get Off the Unicorn that she then turned into a whole series of books. Next from the same book comes 'The Thorns of Baravi' which she frankly admits to writing as an attempt to sell into the '60s soft pron market that she turned into yet another series of books starting with Freedom's Landing.

I think worse of all is how she tried to link all her different book series into one grand universe so the Pern books, dinosaur planet books, and planet pirates are on one timeline.

But to this day I meet McCaffrey true believers who think anything she or her son has written are the greatest things since sliced bread. Ugh, at least the yeast in the bread was alive at one point.

Posted by: Anna Puma at June 26, 2016 12:17 PM (zf/7c)

219 #98

You'll also want to check out Clines' recent 'The Fold.' It's set in the same universe.

Clines also has a fun superheroes vs. zombies series that is now up to five books, starting with Ex-Heroes. All of the book's titles start with Ex, in reference to how the zombies are called Exes, as in Ex-people.

Posted by: Epobirs at June 26, 2016 12:21 PM (IdCqF)

220 Posted by: the guy that moves pianos for a living at June 26, 2016 11:50 AM (tEDMc)

Thanks, I've added season one to my Netflix queue. They also plan this year to film the four War of the Roses plays, look forward to that too.

Posted by: waelse1 at June 26, 2016 12:31 PM (Ai7Vd)

221 Clines also has a fun superheroes vs. zombies series that is now up to five books, starting with Ex-Heroes. All of the book's titles start with Ex, in reference to how the zombies are called Exes, as in Ex-people.
Posted by: Epobirs at June 26, 2016 12:21 PM (IdCqF)

This is a pretty good series (aside from the logic of basing your post zombie apocalypse society in the middle of a major population center when there is a whole country of wasteland to move into.)

Posted by: Aetius451AD at June 26, 2016 12:32 PM (3ZoRf)

222 207 I concur with that. Several years ago, I read (as
in skimmed rapidly) the novel he wrote about Freemason (full disclosure,
I am one) and found it the stupidest dreck I ever had the displeasure
to read. The murderer's motivation was beyond stupid (he wanted the
"real" secret of the Freemason in order to become god-like).



Posted by: Retired Buckeye Cop is now an engineer at June 26, 2016 12:05 PM (5Yee7)

I don't recall a book by him about FreeMasons??

Posted by: Vic We Have No Party at June 26, 2016 12:34 PM (mpXpK)

223 Diana hears for the first time in her life the call to prayer of the faithful. To her it sounds like someone gargling while being strangled.
...
Posted by: Anna Puma at June 26, 2016 10:34 AM (zf/7c)


A. You just guaranteed I'll be buying book 2!

B. I hope your income taxes are in order because Barky, and by extension Koskinen and Lerner, think it is the most beautiful sound on earth!

Posted by: Hrothgar at June 26, 2016 12:34 PM (wYnyS)

224 #218

From what I heard, an editor convinced her the way to the big money was tie everything together so her entire backlist would be as active as the Pern series. Considering how few big name SF authors didn't need a day job to survive, I imagine it was an overwhelming temptation to get more payout from existing works by making additions rather than keep plugging away at completely original material with so little payoff.

Of all the people I've known in the field, the few who've become genuinely wealthy solely from writing fiction is a very short list. A couple were born rich and were never in fear of starving. Pretty much all of the others had teaching positions or some other career that restricted their writing output. For some that may have been for the best as they put more effort into refining each story rather than whipping it out and moving on.

Way back, I used to be under the impression that some of the big names I'd met at cons or at the homes of other big names were just very casual dressers. I later came to realize that many of them were barely managing a middle-class existence despite their fame among the readership. Something like getting a short story adapted for Twilight Zone or Outer Limits could mean more income than all of their writing sales put together for that year or several years for a movie deal.

Posted by: Epobirs at June 26, 2016 12:35 PM (IdCqF)

225 Epobirs, thanks for the clarification. It still cheapens the works for me because it diminished the magic I guess.

Yeah the concept of the rich fantasy/science fiction author is a creation of the past couple decades. And most 'big' names are still just barely keeping afloat. Then there are the likes of Martin who seems to dump out steaming piles of words and people lap it up.

Why do I want to be a writer again? Oh yeah, got stories to tell.

Posted by: Anna Puma at June 26, 2016 12:44 PM (zf/7c)

226 185----You will hate it...Conrad is slow, boring and full of hate for his fellow European colonialists.
Posted by: Hairyback Guy at June 26, 2016 11:40 AM
-------------------------------
To be fair, Conrad is full of hate for the natives too, which puts him way above the noble-savage lovers of today.

As for Heart of Darkness, at least it is short ---not that brevity can really redeem plodding, ponderous prose.
"Thank heaven it's over quickly" is not a good review!


Posted by: Margarita DeVille at June 26, 2016 12:44 PM (T/5A0)

227 I'm so far behind this weekend I'm still on the pet thread. But I can say that because there are kittehs in the pic up top. Right?

-=dangling conversationalitis again=-

Pardon more musing on the art of promoting one's art.

@votermom made a good point last week I didn't get back to answer, about web-based self-publication versus material which one can download or otherwise peruse offline (as in, e.g. ebooks or print).

Most of my webworks are one-page items, but there are some multi-page series, and while there are ways to save web pages, either individually or in a zipped file, saving and reading such would take a level of techspertise above the average kindler.

I was in high school when I first started collecting rejection slips from magazines and syndicates for my stories and comics. I came to the conclusion that my work was either too amateurish (could be improved) or eclectic (could be but wouldn't be improved) for the top 10, top 40, broader masses public market.

That conclusion was doubled down upon when, during and after college, I started composing my "cartoon music" - where the only possible market might be Dr Demento.

I did do some self-publication, photocopied stuff sent out to (annoy) friends and relatives. I especially appreciated the "mini-comic" format popularized by Matt "Cynicalman" Feazell, and the mini-comic remain the only material which I ever sold.

Matt's site
http://www.mattfeazell.com/

When the web came along, I first put up a page advertising my mini-comics. (Even had a VRML - anyone remember that? - 3D comics spinner rack.)

I then put up a sample web-ized comic ("It's All in Your Mind") which was fully in color, and, moments after this "sample comic" was online, I realized, the web is the way to publish. No photocopying, folding, cutting, or stapling - full color and essentially costless distribution. I soon gave up printing mini-comics and began adapting utterly to webwork format. (And consequently quit having any sales.)

I have considered collections of cartoons, and other webworks, in print, but I'm always deterred by the amount of work stupidity of the idea - some third parties get a slice of a pie that's already freely available (donations welcomed) online - yet, people actually pay for e-books and i-tunes and don't hit the donation buttons on a free web page. *scratches head*

Clearly, I not only have an idiot for an editor, but a fool for a publisher and promoter. But, for now anyway, even if it will never garner me an Amazon review star, I'm sticking with the resolution I made 20 years ago, to devote myself to the no-paywall freebie format and let the "free market" decide if I'm to be financially recompensed for my webworks. So far, "so what."

It's All in Your Mind
http://mindfulwebworks.com/best-of-spirits/its-all-in-your-mind

Mind Fuel (long ago attempt at a daily web comicstrip which considers monetizing self-published webworks)
http://mindfulwebworks.com/art-of/mind-fuel

Invulnerable - a short story in multi-genre format of passive superpowers and galactic conflict
http://mindfulwebworks.com/invulnerable

Posted by: mindful webworker - the long conversationalist at June 26, 2016 12:55 PM (exNvx)

228 Christopher, I never found that about Twain. I saw him as incandescent at foibles, stupidities, and moral preening; saw him self-flagellate over his short comings and failures, and be almost incoherent about his dumb luck. His courtship of Livvy is one example.
But his treatment of how people spoke and lived, his discussion on how they acted and thought shows both a affection for most folk, as well as exasperation about what they got up to.
His discussion of people he actually did not like or respect, like Brett Harte, is much different from the way he spoke about other blowhards and petty fools that he rubbed shoulders with.

You cannot achieve the voice that Twain had, with its rhythm and continually shifting between voices, with its small minded functionaries and its mining camp expansiveness and its flights of absurd fancy without seeing, understanding and being compassionate for the people around you. You don't chronicle what you don't much like.

Now Ambrose Bierce did not like people, is portrayed as thinking that much of his poor luck was due to other people, and his prose always struck me as being meticulous and cold. I never found much variety in his prose, and much of it has the same temper as his Devil's Dictionary

I like to think on two stories together:

Twain's "Jim Blaine's digression" about the old ram, from Roughing It, which has no ram in it at all,
and
Ambrose Bierce's "My Favorite Murder" which features a rather grisly murder involving a ram

They both are humorous but Twain seems to get along with the characters. Bierce's story has everyone being vile.

Posted by: Kindltot at June 26, 2016 01:12 PM (ry34m)

229 Every Twain book I ever read he seems to really despise everyone he writes about. A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court portrays everyone as a bigoted moron, for example.

Posted by: Christopher Taylor at June 26, 2016 01:14 PM (39g3+)

230 So, Retired Buckeye Cop, die you read John Robinsons Born In Blood, and what did you think of it?

Posted by: Kindltot at June 26, 2016 01:16 PM (ry34m)

231 Christopher, I haven't read them all, but then I have a lot of Bierce left to read too.

Posted by: Kindltot at June 26, 2016 01:17 PM (ry34m)

232 Another author who is a bit guilty of doing crossovers to the extreme is Simon R. Green. In some cases it makes sense, such as the Drood family and the Karnacki Institute and the Darkside being in the same universe. But the second Drood book 'Daemons Are Forever' (they're all takes on James Bond titles as the lead character is a sort of cross between Bond and a superhero with magical powers) brings in a major character from the Deathstalker series and indicates that this is somehow the distant future. It just doesn't feel right as the supernatural elements of the other series don't really have a place in the Deathstalker setting, which is very much a Star Wars-style science fantasy setting.

Posted by: Epobirs at June 26, 2016 01:20 PM (IdCqF)

233 Joe B. Fulton has said (in class, at least, not sure about print) that Twain had very little understanding of the concept of grace. And I think there's some truth to that, especially in his later works when he really starts to sound bitter.

But then there's Personal Recollections of Joan of Arc. Twain genuinely liked Joan, and it shows.

Posted by: Elisabeth G. Wolfe at June 26, 2016 01:27 PM (m2sZd)

234 Thank you for the list of 31 publishers who don't require an agent. I'm working on stuff right now that I'll want to submit someday soon. Pray for me because it's now or never. Been putting this off for 4 decades and quite frankly do not see any other way to support myself in my advancing age. Feeling all but unemployable at this point, and it's not even so much that "they" don't want me, as much as I just don't have the energy to deal with the superficial and frankly illiterate business world.

And yes, get the hell off my lawn.

Posted by: Miley's Tongue at June 26, 2016 02:07 PM (4p3Tz)

235 We have actually been paying "reparations" since 1965, they just call it welfare.

Posted by: Vic We Have No Party at June 26, 2016 02:08 PM (mpXpK)

236 #233 That was his favorite work. I bought it for hubby for Christmas. Unfortunately he died before I could give it to him, so I have it in my "to read" pile.

Posted by: Miley's Tongue at June 26, 2016 02:09 PM (4p3Tz)

237 oops, wrong thread

Posted by: Vic We Have No Party at June 26, 2016 02:09 PM (mpXpK)

238 #35 I was top tracked in 'language arts' back then and I noticed that some
of my smarter classmates had the Cliff Notes version of the required
book. I suspect now, to get the 'A' on the test while avoiding the
tedious reading.

As an English major, I never read Cliff Notes in my life. Thought they were for cheaters. I'm still naive in many ways, even at the tender age of 61.

Posted by: Miley's Tongue at June 26, 2016 02:45 PM (4p3Tz)

239 I'm sorry, but apart from "A Christmas Story", I found Dickens painful to read. I HATED Great Expectations. I remember reading it in school and other people who read as I did thought the same thing: "What is the point of this? What is the bloody plot?"
Interesting observations on Dale Brown. I haven't read anything of his in about 10 years. "Flight of the Old Dog" was awesome (read that when I was 16, but that came after I read "Silver Tower", which I loved even more than "Flight of the Old Dog"). And I enjoyed "Day of the Cheetah"...speaking of which, the 20th anniversary of that day beckons on Tuesday.

Posted by: CatchThirtyThr33 at June 26, 2016 02:55 PM (uUgDN)

240 I loved Twain's critique of Fennimore Cooper (and on German). It was only years later when I finally read 'Last of the Mohicans' that I learned Twain was understated. The movies based on Cooper's books are better than his writing.

Posted by: JTB at June 26, 2016 03:06 PM (V+03K)

241 As if I don't have enough backlog of books -- including a collection of the first five Amber novels that I picked up cheap more than 20 years ago -- you guys mention the OSS tale. Local library system didn't have it, but the library is hooked into a consortium named Mobius (sp?), which did. Order placed. Hope renewals are possible; I love to read but don't do it daily. With library books, I tend to start them, then set them down. Weeks of renewals pass, and I finally finish the book, swear to start one of my TBRS -- and head to the library.

We're asking, "Where are the heroes?" I'll narrow that down -- where are the heroes in comics?

Take Scott Summers of the X-Men. When I was reading that title, a common snipe at him in fandom was that he was a Boy Scout. To which I asked, what was wrong with that? Yes, apparently villains are more fun to write/portray, but I say that's a shortcoming of the writers/actors. Same with the concept that married heroes are dull. I disagree.

To me, Scott's story should have ended with his marriage in the original run. I would have missed the character, but it would have been an ending in keeping with C. Xavier's dream of assimilation -- but now that's nasty thinking. Outmoded attitude. Can'the have that. Add the clamor to restore Scott and Jean as a couple, and that was it. I never can feel the same way about Cyclops.

I don't long for bland, true-blue heroes, but it seems to me that the shift has gone too far the other way. I don't follow Marvel and DC much these days, restricting myself to the library's TPCs, but although sometimes the stories are good, something is missing.

Glad I can manipulate those universes in my mind, omitting some stories and concepts that the publisher deigned worthy of putting on a page.

Scott + Madelyn!

Posted by: Weak Geek at June 26, 2016 03:11 PM (qDOUK)

242 Wish I'd written that screed to Marvel, but by the time I'd learned what had happened -- through the fan press; I had dropped X-Men before then -- the damage was done.

Posted by: Weak Geek at June 26, 2016 03:17 PM (qDOUK)

243 The Da Vinci Code was fortunate in that it came out during the priest pedophile scandal and became the benificiary of everyone's two-miniute hate on the Church. After the initial setup the book was:

Go to a place
set the scence
anti-catholic/bible screed
nope, the McGuffin ain't here
oh look, a clue.

lather, rinse, repeat.

again and again and again

After the third or fourth bait-and-switch it became quite tedious.

Posted by: Vlad the Impaler, whittling away like mad at June 26, 2016 03:21 PM (3Mimg)

244 This may be heresy, but if you want heroes (mostly) and don't object to fanfic, check out

https://www.fanfiction.net/game/Elder-Scroll-series/

I've got four stories there, and believe me, Yssha (my Dragonborn) is heroic. And married. And currently very happily pregnant, plus having a son she adopted earlier.

There are any number of stories with heroic protagonists, some very well written. Other fandoms on fanfiction.net may be the same, but I'm only familiar with the Elder Scrolls section.

Posted by: Empire1 TEXIT at June 26, 2016 04:35 PM (u4P8c)

245 I bought "Wearing the Cat" - Thanks for the reviews Sunday Morning Book Thread CBloggers!

Posted by: MoJoTee at June 26, 2016 05:18 PM (aR8Ih)

246 e

Posted by: Mister Magoo at June 26, 2016 05:24 PM (zdz8j)

247 I loved Twain's critique of Fennimore Cooper (and on German). It was only years later when I finally read 'Last of the Mohicans' that I learned Twain was understated. The movies based on Cooper's books are better than his writing.
Posted by: JTB
------------

Hmm. I always regarded The Leatherstocking Tales as boy's books. I certainly read them when I was an adolescent. While Cooper may not have intended that, nuanced writing doesn't work well with youth.

The same might be said about Walter Scott, I think.

My point is that as an 'author' Cooper may not deserve much credit, but readers certainly beat a path to his door.

Cooper placed some quotes in his forewords that appealed to me, from Byron:

"I love not man the less, but Nature more. "

As a passing note, to read the books in chronological order it is only necessary to place the titles in alphabetical order.

Posted by: Mike Hammer, etc., etc. at June 26, 2016 07:21 PM (mxCgt)

248 So who thinks the average unengaged dope that will be dragged to the polls by the Clinton ground game in November reads books?

Posted by: Gobbagoo at June 26, 2016 07:53 PM (A/saJ)

249 Whatever Oprah recommends, but they'll never finish it.

Posted by: Weak Geek at June 26, 2016 09:14 PM (qDOUK)

250 Mike Hammer's Cat is named for Tristram Shandy's uncle.

Posted by: Mike Hammer, etc., etc. at June 26, 2016 09:49 PM (ZxmMG)

251 You are correct: Unlimited Access has the stuff on Clinton-era White House Christmas tree ornaments. One year, Hillary invited art students to make and send ornaments on the theme "The Twelve Days of Christmas". I don't know whether the invitation was broadcast nationally, or directed to art schools at "elite" colleges, but I suspect the latter, because many of the submissions were variously nasty or obscene. Aldrich was assigned to help hang the ornaments.

There were many ornaments made with crack pipes, syringes, coke spoons, and roach clips. (At least some of these were not hung.)

Among the obscene submissions was a set of five linked cock rings. Another was a gingerbread man with five rings: two in his ears, two on his chest, and one in his crotch. This one was hung, though Aldrich made sure the "interesting" side was facing in.


Posted by: Rich Rostrom at June 27, 2016 01:59 AM (YkV15)

252 174 "People rarely write about heroes these days because the entire concept of heroism and good is rejected -- if its even understood."

Ow. So true. (And the source of some of my head-banging frustration at trying to find good books to read.) After all, heroism requires 1) you risk something important to you, and 2) you do it because _it's the right thing to do._

And if there is a right thing to do, that implies there is a wrong thing to do. Most people don't like to think they might not be on the side of the good guys.

I think one of the key questions that shows how much people don't like to think about right and wrong is the old, is it wrong to steal if you're starving to death? Most of the people I dealt with in college said it wasn't. And then looked at me cross-eyed when I said it _was_ wrong - it was simply _less wrong_ than dying. Stealing was still stealing.

...But then, I grew up reading Conan the Barbarian, who made no bones about the fact that he was a thief, a pirate, and various other unsavory things - he never bothered with excuses!

Posted by: crossoverChaos at June 27, 2016 09:31 PM (/1w3k)

253 181 "I think you are right in that they do not believe in absolute good anymore than they believe in absolute evil, but I think they truly believe decency and honor is boring, so they muddle their characters to make them interesting."

*Facepalm* This must be how we get messes like that Batman vs. Superman movie.

Decency and honor, boring? Someone sit these guys down to watch "Rawhide!" reruns. Gil Favor's one of the most decent, honorable characters I've seen in a TV show. He's also hard-headed, sometimes cagy, and has a sense of humor that can border on the positively dry. Not to mention he has a tough job that requires him to weigh risks and benefits for the whole trail outfit, and decide what they can and can't afford to get mixed up in, no matter what seems ethical on the surface. Definitely not boring!

Posted by: crossoverChaos at June 27, 2016 09:42 PM (/1w3k)

254 183 "For crossoverChaos and others looking for good fiction: Try the Conservative Libertarian Fiction Alliance."

I'm not on Facebook, but I'll take a look. Thanks!

Posted by: crossoverChaos at June 27, 2016 09:43 PM (/1w3k)

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