Saturday Gardening Thread: Father's Day 2016 Edition [KT]

Think Dad might like a money tree for Father's Day? You may not have high-powered Wall Street connections, but you could still give him one of these:

Chinese Money Tree

Historically, houseplants were for the rich.

This plant is actually a Malabar chestnut tree that in the wild can get to be 50 feet [15 meters] tall, but in the houseplant world we usually see them as desktop plants or maybe a 4-5 foot [1.2-1.5 meter] specimen . . .


Braided Money Tree Bonsai

Sweet Corn

When I was growing up, both my parents gardened. But I think of my father when I think of sweet corn. He seemed to be in charge of this crop, somehow. I am allergic to corn now, but I still remember corn on the cob. I especially liked the bicolors, extra young.


What’s the difference between field corn and sweet corn?

Years ago, it was a ritual to get a pot of water boiling before pickiing your corn, because the sugars in the corn immediately start to turn to starch when corn is picked. Time from ear to table is no longer as critical as it once was. Purdue's extension service has an informative pdf on growing sweet corn. It includes a good summary on genetic advances in sweet corn breeding.

Cultivars from different breeding lines tend to be similar to each other. The first
Sugary Supersweets were VERY sweet, with crisp kernels and sometimes tough skins. They had to be planted in warm soil. Sugar Enhanced types tend to be very tender with a creamier texture.

In case your Dad has become a raw food vegan, I have a recipe (well, an ingredient list) for raw corn salad. You can make this on site at a picnic if you want to. You can also use cooked leftover corn on the cob.

Sweet corn cut from the cob
Diced tomato
Diced bell pepper or mild chiles (optional)
Avocado, diced
Lemon juice
Salt
Fresh-ground black pepper or red pepper

Mix avocado with lemon juice and smoosh it up a little. Toss with veggies and seasoning.

Farm and Produce News

Broccoli Rabe now has its own PR and marketing teams. Will it be "the next kale"? Expect an unusual number of recipes and stories about Broccoli Rabe in popular media in the coming months. And remember that you may be able to grow some yourself. It is one of the easier cole crops to grow (in a friendly climate). If you have never grown it before, you may need some guidance on know when to harvest it. I recommend timing harvest for cool weather. The warmer the weather, the stronger the flavor will be.

Why, here's a recipe now! Dedicated to fathers!


Slow-roasted pork sandwich with broccoli rabe and provolone

Happy Father's Day to all the fathers and other fatherly guys out there.

leftovers removed in editing.


Posted by: Open Blogger at 12:25 PM




Comments

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1 That corn looks good.

Posted by: HH at June 18, 2016 12:24 PM (DrCtv)

2 By happy coincidence, I have two pieces of succulent pork in the slow cooker.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, Literate Savage at June 18, 2016 12:26 PM (jR7Wy)

3 Where my hoes at?

Posted by: Insomniac at June 18, 2016 12:27 PM (0mRoj)

4 Corn is for closers!

Posted by: eman at June 18, 2016 12:27 PM (MQEz6)

5 I think I shall have a very nice steak for Fathers Day.

Posted by: eman at June 18, 2016 12:28 PM (MQEz6)

6 I love corn. I call the other corn cow corn.

Posted by: CaliGirl at June 18, 2016 12:29 PM (egOGm)

7 There are two types of people.

Those that let the corn mix in with their mashed potatoes and those that do not.

Posted by: eman at June 18, 2016 12:32 PM (MQEz6)

8 That sandwich, executed well, is one of the glories of the sandwich-makers art.

Posted by: CharlieBrown'sDildo -- Am Yisrael Chai at June 18, 2016 12:32 PM (Zu3d9)

9 "Cow corn" is accurate around here, CaliGirl. Almost all the local field corn is made into silage before the ears mature.

Posted by: KT at June 18, 2016 12:32 PM (qahv/)

10 CharlieBrown'sDildo -- Am Yisrael Chai at June 18, 2016 12:32 PM

So I chose well? Never had one myself. Maybe I'll try it.

Posted by: KT at June 18, 2016 12:35 PM (qahv/)

11
8 That sandwich, executed well, is one of the glories of the sandwich-makers art.
Posted by: CharlieBrown'sDildo -- Am Yisrael Chai at June 18, 2016 12:32 PM (Zu3d9)

Indeed, it does look pretty good.

Posted by: eman at June 18, 2016 12:35 PM (MQEz6)

12 Garden is coming along, many buds have started to turn into veggies. But it's been quite dry, the rainy day this week didn't fill but half my water barrel.

Posted by: Skip at June 18, 2016 12:36 PM (d9qXV)

13 There are a few kinds of field corn, generally flour-type grinding corns, that can be used as sweet corn when very young. With the pot boiling. The Blue Aztec type is one. Has to be picked when the kernels are tiny and white for sweet corn.

Posted by: KT at June 18, 2016 12:37 PM (qahv/)

14 Always thought the bi-colored corn was the best.

Posted by: Skip at June 18, 2016 12:38 PM (d9qXV)

15 My hibiscus plant won't bloom. Bought it three weeks ago with miracle grow. Took plant out with the potting soiling after digging a hole. Then I placed plant (with potting soil) in the hole with the miracle grow.

1. Leaves are turning yellow.
2. Only one bloom, then the bloom dies within 24 hours.

Posted by: perdogg at June 18, 2016 12:38 PM (VKV+9)

16 Skip at June 18, 2016 12:36 PM

Glad things are looking up, Skip.

Posted by: KT at June 18, 2016 12:38 PM (qahv/)

17 I love corn on the cob. We rarely have it because son never developed a taste for it ( 8 years of off and on braces) 6 year old granddaughter has lost all her front teeth, and it gives the two year old big disgusting poops. Also, soon-to-be-mister makes too many mouth noises when he eats it. Other than that, it's a fine addition to any summer meal.

Posted by: grammie winger, 2 Chronicles 7:14 at June 18, 2016 12:40 PM (dFi94)

18 We always have corn from the farmers' market in the freezer, oven roasted, cut from the cobs and bagged.

Our own garden was hit hard by a hail storm Thursday. Poor plants looked like someone took a weed whacker to them.

Posted by: OldDominionMom at June 18, 2016 12:40 PM (GzDYP)

19 Most corn grown here in large fields is cow corn for feed. But plenty of corn for people is grown in small plots.

Posted by: Skip at June 18, 2016 12:41 PM (d9qXV)

20 KT
Here is a new mechanical planter. https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=PwBpDsF-lNE&feature=youtu.be

Posted by: CaliGirl at June 18, 2016 12:45 PM (egOGm)

21 Garden is.. growing. Seeds have sprouted, plants gotten bigger and some have flowered, but nothing to eat yet.


Posted by: JQ Flyover at June 18, 2016 12:46 PM (044Fx)

22 I like corn.

After it has been converted into a nice medium rare ribeye.

Posted by: Fox2! at June 18, 2016 12:47 PM (brIR5)

23 mmm, sweet corn. My brother used to grow a maroon and white (Aggie) corn that was wonderful. It was recommended to cook it by microwave because boiling water would make the color run or something.

Posted by: stace at June 18, 2016 12:47 PM (ozZau)

24 Posted by: KT at June 18, 2016 12:35 PM (qahv/)

Oh yes! You chose perfectly!

But maybe you can explain to me how to choose broccoli rabe that isn't too bitter.

Posted by: CharlieBrown'sDildo -- Am Yisrael Chai at June 18, 2016 12:47 PM (Zu3d9)

25 Sweet corn isn't grown as much around here. I know who grows it and where the ranch is. It's usually not ready until July. We steal it. (It's our friends ranch, they steal from us).

Posted by: CaliGirl at June 18, 2016 12:47 PM (egOGm)

26 "Think Dad might like a money tree for Father's Day?"

Seen that movie already. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/It_Grows_on_Trees Doesn't end well...

Posted by: Apostic at June 18, 2016 12:48 PM (iE5OI)

27 Bodacious is what I got today, my peaches and cream need another week ish, but I lost a bit of that to a storm.

I have to concentrate on strategies to help my plants cope with heat and humidity. Seems like as soon as most things start to fruit they fade from heat.

Posted by: Traye at June 18, 2016 12:49 PM (BN1dV)

28 CharlieBrown'sDildo -- Am Yisrael Chai at June 18, 2016 12:47 PM

If you don't want broccoli rabe to be too bitter, don't buy it when the weather is warm.

You might also think about substituting a similar veggie, like gai lan or even broccolini.

Posted by: KT at June 18, 2016 12:51 PM (qahv/)

29 I take back my "nothing to eat yet" comment: there have been a few strawberries. Raspberries are beginning to ripen, cherries coming on also.

It's just that the word "garden" conjures up (in my mind) a specific plot of ground, where stuff is planted anew each year.

Posted by: JQ Flyover at June 18, 2016 12:52 PM (044Fx)

30 Loves me some sweet corn. Local is best, but it won't be ready for another couple-two-tree weeks. We should start to see southern Illinois sweet corn up here soon. My brother's BiL runs a veggie stand. I'll buy several dozen just for blanching and freezing for winter.

Posted by: chiefjaybob, who hates everyone at June 18, 2016 12:56 PM (G2Sc9)

31 This week made some sauerkraut and kimchi, but with store-bought cabbages.

This morning picked enough peppers to put up another refrigerator pickle jar. Now Im at the point of evaluating the varieties I planted. I cut back the two bull's horn pepper's because for the space and water they were using, the peppers aren't that tasty or abundant.

Of course there's one plant that's just starting to explode with cute peppers and I have no idea what its name is. I KNEW I should've made a little map with the names when I planted them, but no. This one's tag says "hot pepper". Oh yeah, that's real helpful.

Posted by: stace at June 18, 2016 12:56 PM (ozZau)

32 perdogg at June 18, 2016 12:38 PM

Make sure you aren't over-watering you hibiscus. Could be one cause of yellow leaves. And give it some time to adjust. Some people would pick off the flower buds when transplanting to give the plant a chance to gain some strength.

And don't over-fertilize it, either. Hope you get some nice blooms when the plant adjusts.

Posted by: KT at June 18, 2016 12:56 PM (qahv/)

33 By the By, The FAB has a new prodigy. A male one.

Posted by: Nevergiveup at June 18, 2016 12:57 PM (Ozsfq)

34 CaliGirl at June 18, 2016 12:45 PM

That planter is amazing. Also noisy.

Posted by: KT at June 18, 2016 12:59 PM (qahv/)

35 I'm a squash fanatic, summer or winter types, and we got our first zucchini to pick this week. It's a Fordhook heirloom from Burpee. Absolutely delicious! I lightly sautee slices with chunks of Vidalia onion added to well buttered jasmine rice. That's a meal. We have more coming in but this one took off early for some reason. I hope the rest do as well.

This is why we garden. You just can't get this quality at a supermarket. Mrs. JTB keeps notes on what worked for us and the quality. This one gets five stars.

Posted by: JTB at June 18, 2016 01:01 PM (V+03K)

36 CaliGirl at June 18, 2016 12:47 PM

Corn is a space hog. There are more valuable crops to grow in your climate. Glad you still have access to some, though.

Posted by: KT at June 18, 2016 01:02 PM (qahv/)

37 Traye at June 18, 2016 12:49 PM

Bodacious and Peaches and Cream are two great corn cultivars. Sorry you lost part of your crop.

Posted by: KT at June 18, 2016 01:04 PM (qahv/)

38 Corn fed girls, at the peak of their sweetness, are a treasure.

Posted by: Count de Monet at June 18, 2016 01:06 PM (JO9+V)

39 This one's tag says "hot pepper". Oh yeah, that's real helpful.
Posted by: stace at June 18, 2016 12:56 PM (ozZau)

Lol! Narrows it down a little, I guess. We've got a good number of pepper plants, but they just started flowering last and this week. We can make a few jars of pickles, tho.

Posted by: OldDominionMom at June 18, 2016 01:08 PM (GzDYP)

40 OUTLANDERS!!!

WE HAVE YOUR WOMEN!!!

Posted by: Malachi at June 18, 2016 01:10 PM (Cq0oW)

41 I'm finding out that growing stuff on a large enough scale to sell some is all about loss. But with what I'm doing loss isn't really loss it's just turned into eggs and bacon and sold.

Posted by: Traye at June 18, 2016 01:13 PM (BN1dV)

42 JQ Flyover at June 18, 2016 12:52 PM

Strawberries, raspberries AND cherries! Fantastic.

Commercial strawberries and cherries are done here. You-pick places may have some raspberries, still. But some of them plant the kind that bear on new wood in the fall and mow down the plants, sacrificing the spring crop.


Posted by: KT at June 18, 2016 01:13 PM (qahv/)

43 The salad greens are slow this year. The odd spring weather may have messed things up. We'll get some in the next week or two but not the bumper crop like in past years. But the Italian parsley is going great, and the mint. We use large amounts of both in fatoosh (sp?), a Lebanese salad I grew up eating. (It will be even better when our tomatoes and cukes come in.) I don't know if we'll get enough to dry for the winter but I hope so. Like the zucchini I mentioned above, the taste is so much better than anything from the store.

Posted by: JTB at June 18, 2016 01:14 PM (V+03K)

44 stace at June 18, 2016 12:56 PM

It's so easy to think that you will remember where you planted each type. Heh.

Posted by: KT at June 18, 2016 01:14 PM (qahv/)

45 JTB at June 18, 2016 01:01 PM

Thanks for the squash report. You're right about quality of produce from the garden. Though it is possible to let that zucchini get away from you and get to the tough stage.

I like the pale Lebaneze-style zucchinis a lot. Magda is my favorite. And I like yellow straightneck or crookneck squash mixed with zucchini, too.

Posted by: KT at June 18, 2016 01:18 PM (qahv/)

46 Want to see if anyone agrees, last year nay first Anaheim pepper took forever to ripen to its red fullness. But this year I'm going to sacrifice the first on each plant.

Posted by: Skip at June 18, 2016 01:20 PM (d9qXV)

47 So my one tomato, the Rodeo tomato, has produced one (1) tomato. Actually two, but some bug got the other one. I think the plant is probably done for the summer. The One is sitting on the counter ripening.

I forget the real name of the variety (it's on the tag though) but it's a beefsteak, and I can't grow beefsteaks.

Posted by: stace at June 18, 2016 01:20 PM (ozZau)

48 KT, Thanks for another garden thread. That picture of the corn has my mouth watering. Sorry you can't enjoy it anymore. I can't eat the quantities I used to, too many carbs if I overdo it. (Major bummer!) That corn salad recipe looks great and will be used this summer.

We don't have the space to grow corn so we get it from a local farmers market. Not a few seconds from stalk to pot but less than twelve hours so it's still pretty darn good.

Posted by: JTB at June 18, 2016 01:22 PM (V+03K)

49 45 ... KT, We have some of the Lebanese Magda style squash and regular yellow crook neck. (When it's fresh, I eat a LOT of summer squash.) Mrs. JTB isn't a fan of green veggies but she will have some. We haven't had much luck with the Magda before but these plants look very good. Nothing big enough to pick yet but plenty of blossoms and baby fruits so I have hopes.

Posted by: JTB at June 18, 2016 01:31 PM (V+03K)

50 I love broccoli raab too but it was an acquired taste that took years of encouraging by my Italian inlaws. You have to pick it before any of the yellow flowers start or it will be way too bitter. Def a cool weather crop.

Trapped the squirrel that was at my tomatoes. That's good until another one finds them. Lots of zucchini, green beans and cherry tomatoes this week. Yep tomatoes should be ripening right when we're on vacation by my calculations..damn!

Posted by: keena at June 18, 2016 01:32 PM (RiTnx)

51 Skip at June 18, 2016 01:20 PM

It's possible that picking your first Anaheim pepper green would speed up ripening of the rest. Sometimes plants concentrate on setting seed if a fruit or even a few leaves are removed.

Do you prefer Anaheim peppers ripe? When dry, they are called "Chile California" here.

Posted by: KT at June 18, 2016 01:35 PM (qahv/)

52 There are strawberry plants here and there throughout the front landscaping. Had planted a clay 'strawberry jar' several years ago, which later broke and the plants had sent runners all over. So, I replanted the little things ('Quinalt' iirc) to cover bare spots and just let them go.

I can grab a little treat while pruning and weeding, but it's certainly no major crop, lol. The birds and bunnies get most of them.

The raspberries need to move. I had failed to consider the aggressive nature of their spreading roots... thought the curb-like barrier along the property line was deeper than it actually is... and now they are popping up next door.

Neighbor is polite, says don't worry about it he'll dig them out (but probably is none too happy about this invasion and I don't blame him.)

Guess how my *vacation* will be spent this summer?



Posted by: JQ Flyover at June 18, 2016 01:37 PM (044Fx)

53 keena at June 18, 2016 01:32 PM

Yes, picking broccoli rabe when the buds are still tight is another good tip for CBD. Thanks.

Tomatoes have a way of ripening at the wrong time. Heh.

Posted by: KT at June 18, 2016 01:39 PM (qahv/)

54 The local favorite here is Olathe Sweet Corn. I think it was Black Tie farm guy that cultivated it. There is something about the soil and weather in Olathe that can't be duplicated. I could eat 3 or 4 ears in a sitting.

Posted by: Infidel at June 18, 2016 01:42 PM (zn/Le)

55 The pickling cukes are looking good so far. I'll let some get fairly big but most will be to make cornichons.

I have become a fan of home made, lacto-fermented veggies and want to try the process to make sour pickles. Besides the taste, lacto-fermentation offers big health benefits for those with diabetes. We use Ball canning jars of different sizes for the fermenting so we don't need mass quantities at one time. The sauerkraut I made this past winter in quart canning jars worked great.

Posted by: JTB at June 18, 2016 01:42 PM (V+03K)

56 KT,
I think the noise is the drone. Our friend grows sweet corn so his grandchildren can sell it at the berry stand.
No more commercially grown corn here. No cow corn either.

Posted by: CaliGirl at June 18, 2016 01:42 PM (egOGm)

57 It occurs to me that if you want a little turnip-y flavor (as from broccoli rabe) without the bitterness, you could also substitute leaves of the new, sweet, hairless "summer turnips", with the central leaf vein removed.

Posted by: KT at June 18, 2016 01:44 PM (qahv/)

58 Opps, correction. Tuxedo Farms.

Posted by: Infidel at June 18, 2016 01:46 PM (zn/Le)

59 JTB at June 18, 2016 01:42 PM

For to-die-for dills, start with a little raw cider vinegar and dill seed heads that are still green. I have a recipe for refrigerator pickles done this way somewhere. Some lacto-fermentation of the veggies occurs with time, but you can start eating these soon.

Posted by: KT at June 18, 2016 01:49 PM (qahv/)

60 I grown indian corn. I used to work in a vegetable cannery and weeks of processing sweet corn really made me reluctant to eat it.

I now grow indian corn and grind it into meal.
Fresh corn meal is wonderful for cornbread. It is good for cornmeal mush too.

If you parch it before grinding it smells heavenly

Mine is mostly all planted and sprouting up

Posted by: Kindltot at June 18, 2016 01:53 PM (ry34m)

61 KT,
is it going to be hot your way next week? It may be upper 90's here. I want it to cool off, we have that bad fire at El Capitan and refugio.
It's not as smokey today.

Posted by: CaliGirl at June 18, 2016 01:54 PM (egOGm)

62 Infidel at June 18, 2016 01:42 PM

I looked up Olathe Sweet Corn. Looks like a really big deal in Olathe. The festival attracts 20,000 people now?

Posted by: KT at June 18, 2016 01:55 PM (qahv/)

63 http://www.mindofachef.com/tag/cornbread-recipe/

oh yes

Posted by: Bigby's Knuckle Sandwich at June 18, 2016 01:55 PM (Cq0oW)

64 CaliGirl at June 18, 2016 01:54 PM

Forecast here is for 106 next Tueaday. It has been mostly in the high 80s this week. Nice.

Posted by: KT at June 18, 2016 01:57 PM (qahv/)

65 And sorry about the smoke and fires out your way, CaliGirl.

Posted by: KT at June 18, 2016 01:57 PM (qahv/)

66 also indian pudding for that cornmeal

Posted by: Bigby's Knuckle Sandwich at June 18, 2016 01:57 PM (Cq0oW)

67 The hot weather is here and the sweet corn is probably finished this weekend. I put up 48 ears today. But we have Fredericksburg peaches! God bless Texas.

Posted by: Dave at Buffalo Roam at June 18, 2016 01:59 PM (jujYg)

68 Kindltot at June 18, 2016 01:53 PM

Sounds neat. Do you grow flour corn or flint corn?

An older friend used to buy parched corn every fall and resonstitute it for eating. I think it was sort of a reminder of her youth on a ranch.

Posted by: KT at June 18, 2016 01:59 PM (qahv/)

69 Dave at Buffalo Roam at June 18, 2016 01:59 PM

What are Frederickburg peaches like? White or yellow? Juicy or firm? Freestone?

Posted by: KT at June 18, 2016 02:01 PM (qahv/)

70 KT, Thanks for the suggestion. If you find the recipe, please post it. The non-cornichons (to make up a word) will become refrigerator pickles. We are big fans of cider vinegar, especially Bragg's organic cider vinegar, and have dill that keeps reseeding itself. I think it has designs on the neighborhood. Pickles like that are wonderful fresh and improve over time. (In our house they usually don't last that long.) A pile of those cold pickle slices with some good Italian salami and sharp cheddar makes an excellent snack or light meal. Our fridge pickle recipe is on the sweet side. Your vinegar version sounds better.

Posted by: JTB at June 18, 2016 02:02 PM (V+03K)

71 Everybody around here seems to plant the Milk and Honey variety of sweet corn. There is a quart of creamed corn sitting in the skillet with way too much butter in it right now. It's for tomorrow, Father's Day, Juneteenth and my birthday.

Posted by: Dave at Buffalo Roam at June 18, 2016 02:02 PM (jujYg)

72 Fredericksburg peaches are yellow, cling stone and so juicy it runs down your neck.

Posted by: Dave at Buffalo Roam at June 18, 2016 02:04 PM (jujYg)

73 Temperatures here in NEPA are very pleasant. Mid 70's, low humidity. Neighbor lady with the chickens dropped off another five dozen eggs. The yolks in these eggs are the color of canned apricots, and overall the flavor is amazing.

To all you morons, and ettes, when you see those signs on the side of the road advertising eggs for a couple bucks a dozen.....stop and pick some up, you won't regret it.

Posted by: Sticky Wicket at June 18, 2016 02:05 PM (CHQEC)

74 JTB at June 18, 2016 02:02 PM

If I find the pickle recipe, I'll post it in the Food Thread tomorrow. It was pretty adaptable.

Posted by: KT at June 18, 2016 02:08 PM (qahv/)

75
OUTLANDERS!!!

WE HAVE YOUR WOMEN!!!

Posted by: Malachi


Don't need 'em.

Posted by: Milo Bonerbender at June 18, 2016 02:11 PM (IqV8l)

76 http://www.mindofachef.com/tag/cornbread-recipe/



oh yes

Posted by: Bigby's Knuckle Sandwich at June 18, 2016 01:55 PM (Cq0oW)


I make skillet cornbread all the time. It's super easy, and fast. Kids love it.

The trick is pre heating the greased skillet in the oven at about 400 degrees. It has to sizzle when you pour the batter in. You can make it sweet, or savory with minor modifications to the recipes. If your skillet has a lid, you can make cornbread on your grill.
There are dozens of recipes for skillet cornbread online...find one you like, and use it, modifying as desired.

Posted by: Sticky Wicket at June 18, 2016 02:14 PM (CHQEC)

77 KT

Here is a new mechanical planter. https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=PwBpDsF-lNEfeature=youtu.be

Posted by: CaliGirl at June 18, 2016 12:45 PM (egOGm)

Your destroying all the $15 hour jobs with all the new fanged machines.Here in NY, Cuomo and the unions would come after you with a sledge hammer and destroy the equipment, like they did barrels of whisky at the the start of prohibition.


Posted by: Colin at June 18, 2016 02:14 PM (3skdc)

78 Homemade creamed corn is the best summer food ever. My aunt used to make it during corn season. It's luscious and salty and sweet and tastes nothing like the abomination that I guess they maybe still sell in cans.

Posted by: huerfano at June 18, 2016 02:14 PM (jkkMG)

79 Doubt anyone is making a mint from it but there are many people that have road side stands un-maned with just a drop box and price list. But I live in suburbia of separate homes and housing developments of same.

Posted by: Skip at June 18, 2016 02:18 PM (d9qXV)

80 Posted by: KT at June 18, 2016 01:57 PM (qahv/)
What a scorcher, stay cool.

Posted by: CaliGirl at June 18, 2016 02:19 PM (egOGm)

81 Mrs928 has discovered that Piggly Wiggly has barbequed pork butts aready cooked. Two out of the last three Friday's she has brought home a good sized butt. At the cost of, at most, four pork sandwiches at the local pit, we get at least 25 sandwiches worth of delicious swine. Unfortunately I am out of my Carolina yellow sauce. I need to mail order another "Patriot's Pack" from Piggy Park.

Posted by: Grump928(C) says Free Soothie!, with purchase of commenter of equal or greater value at June 18, 2016 02:20 PM (rwI+c)

82 Posted by: Colin at June 18, 2016 02:14 PM (3skdc)
We still have to have people to load the transplants and others to walk behind and pick up the plants that have fallen over. But still, less people is always better.

Posted by: CaliGirl at June 18, 2016 02:21 PM (egOGm)

83 74 ... Thanks, KT. I'll look for it on the food thread.

If all goes well, we should have a decent crop of various types of tomatoes. All the plants have a good amount of little green fruits. Have to admit, many of the cherry tomatoes never make it into the house. They mysteriously disappear between picking them and getting them into the pail. One of those mysteries of science.

Posted by: JTB at June 18, 2016 02:22 PM (V+03K)

84 I planted 3 zucchini hills this year. Forgot to plant them until Monday. (generally need to wait till memorial day here so not super late) They have all sprouted and look good so far. Its a 6 week type so I should have some fresh zucchini in august.

A few iris are still going in the flower bed and the hollyhocks are getting big but won't bloom for a couple weeks yet.

I'm in my typical fight with goats head burrs in the horse paddocks. The smaller pen that got sprayed regular the past 3-4 years has hardly any coming up and there are very few left in the yard but 10 acres of sand and riding out on the horses with ditches and field roads that get them every year makes for a lot of diligent spraying to keep from being overrun.

Posted by: PaleRider at June 18, 2016 02:22 PM (wYRTH)

85 Our tomatoes have already stopped flowering as the nighttime temps are staying above 80.

Posted by: Grump928(C) says Free Soothie!, with purchase of commenter of equal or greater value at June 18, 2016 02:23 PM (rwI+c)

86 My pulled pork is every bit as magnificent as I'd hoped.

Don't need no bun.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, Literate Savage at June 18, 2016 02:23 PM (jR7Wy)

87 The Weather Channel web site has a good article on growing hops. 49th Parallel, New York State used to be the hop growing part of the US back in the 1800's. I don't believe they grow much in the state anymore.

Posted by: Colin at June 18, 2016 02:24 PM (3skdc)

88
A good wife always forgives her husband when she's wrong.

~~ Stuff Thomas Jefferson Said, vol. IV

Posted by: Bruce With a Wang! at June 18, 2016 02:26 PM (iQIUe)

89 Hi gardeners, pet thread is Nood

Posted by: L, Elle at June 18, 2016 02:35 PM (6IPEM)

90 My neighbor, when he got divorced a couple of years ago, converted his dining room into a sports bar. Beautiful oak bar, brass rail, big TV, etc. Has lots of people over for all of the local teams' games (Niners, Giants, Warriors). I'm not much of a sports fan so I usually don't go. I told him after the first game of the NBA finals that if the series went to game 7, I'd provide the BBQ pulled pork sandwiches. I figured it'd be a long shot that I'd have to do it...

...So tomorrow morning I'm getting up early to put a couple of shoulders in the pit. I figure 10-12 hours should do the trick. Tonight I'll be baking homemade soft rolls. Homemade BBQ sauce and crisp cole slaw to top it off.

All this to say: "Broccoli rabe"? WTF?

Posted by: Average Guy at June 18, 2016 02:37 PM (LMcFk)

91 Damn, people mentioned pulled pork! Mrs. JTB does one that is so tasty it's almost bacon. Almost.
To keep this on gardening, a pile of it along with slices of fresh tomatoes is a treat. It also goes great with the Lebanese salad I mentioned earlier. That salad uses a VERY tart lemon and olive oil dressing that complements pork, chicken or beef.

Posted by: JTB at June 18, 2016 02:39 PM (V+03K)

92 JTB at June 18, 2016 02:39 PM

I've had tabouleh with mint and parsley, but not the salad you mentioned. Sounds good.

Posted by: KT at June 18, 2016 03:14 PM (qahv/)

93 KT, It's more like a lettuce style salad with pita bread with leaf lettuce or, preferably, romaine, not iceberg. I'll look up the recipe and put it in the food thread tomorrow. It is cool, tart and refreshing. Probably every Mediterranean country has a version of it.

Posted by: JTB at June 18, 2016 03:25 PM (V+03K)

94 Tomatoes stop flowering when night time Temps stay above 80 degrees? Doesn't happen much here, had tomatoes from July to October.

Posted by: Skip at June 18, 2016 03:50 PM (d9qXV)

95 Sorry, KT, the girlfriend came over.

I think I have flint corn, but since I bought it years ago as a couple of decorative ears and started planting it and saving seed for the next year I have no idea.
It would explain why I don't get a decent fine flour out of it, but always have a good proportion of "grits". It means I can't make decent pupusas or arepas, but have to get by on excellent corn bread and mush and chile.
It is a good corn though, very tasty and fresh when I grind it, and it is pink from all the red kernels.

My compost heap volunteer squash is going great guns. The leaves are enormous and the flowers are about 8" across. I may have a decent harvest this year

Posted by: Kindltot at June 18, 2016 05:38 PM (ry34m)

96 94 Tomatoes stop flowering when night time Temps stay above 80 degrees? Doesn't happen much here, had tomatoes from July to October.
Posted by: Skip at June 18, 2016 03:50 PM (d9qXV)

Yeah, here in TX we put out tomatoes in March, to get a spring crop, then depending on the variety, we let them go dormant for the rest of the summer, or yank them and replace them with fall tomato plants, planted in Aug, IIRC.

Posted by: stace at June 18, 2016 05:40 PM (ozZau)

97 Kindltot at June 18, 2016 05:38 PM

Most decorative corn is the flint type. Flour-type corn tends to look shriveled when it dries. Corn meal vs. corn flour.

Posted by: KT at June 18, 2016 05:52 PM (qahv/)

98 Having salad, from the garden - lettuce, spinach, Greek oregino, parsley, basil and chives. Hope in another month this list will be a lot longer.

Posted by: Skip at June 18, 2016 05:55 PM (d9qXV)

99 Flowering in tomatoes is temperature-related but there are other factors, too, so the 80 degree rule doesn't always apply. Cherry tomatoes often keep blooming in hotter weather, and there are even a few heirloom types that do also. If there is a break in hot weather, tomatoes may start blooming again.

"Heat-set" hybrids set at somewhat higher temperatures. And keeping the roots cool seems to help.

Posted by: KT at June 18, 2016 05:56 PM (qahv/)

100
Most decorative corn is the flint type. Flour-type corn tends to look shriveled when it dries. Corn meal vs. corn flour.
Posted by: KT at June 18, 2016 05:52 PM (qahv/)


I should probably make hominy.

however . . .

Posted by: Kindltot at June 18, 2016 06:22 PM (ry34m)

101 Thought of this later so will have to wiki it but is pop corn a special variety or any sweet corn do?

Posted by: Skip at June 18, 2016 07:15 PM (d9qXV)

102 Popcorn is a specific variety. There are a number of heirloom types that are supposed to be tasty.

I grew some for a while but my pop-to-old-maid ratio was bad and I don't eat much popcorn to begin with. This is supposed to be the most wonderful strain

http://www.territorialseed.com/product/glass-gem-corn-seed

Posted by: Kindltot at June 18, 2016 07:26 PM (ry34m)

103 Looked it up, appears 2 types making mushroom kind and the butterfly kind. It needs to be a hard shelled kernel to work.

Posted by: Skip at June 18, 2016 08:00 PM (d9qXV)

104 Oh lord, fatoush; makes me momentarily nostalgic for Cali. I bought sumac when we left, and forgot I had it til just now.

Posted by: Tammy al-Thor at June 18, 2016 08:07 PM (Jt36d)

105 Probably over fertilizing the hibiscus, plus they are fussy for a bit when they get moved. Also fussy about temps.

Red eared-slider turtles love the flowers of the double pink ones.

Posted by: Tammy al-Thor at June 18, 2016 08:11 PM (Jt36d)

106 Most non-native tabbouleh makers put way too much of the Bulgar wheat in it.

Posted by: Tammy al-Thor at June 18, 2016 08:15 PM (Jt36d)

107 We'v been in the 90s and low 100s here, everything is frying, even with watering.

Posted by: Tammy al-Thor at June 18, 2016 08:18 PM (Jt36d)

108 My advice: ALWAYS draw a map of your garden, with what got planted where. Our 9 raised beds' worth of plantings diverged significantly from the scribbled winter plan, and I would have no idea what's where if not for the map.

From Idaho's Treasure Valley (Boise area): Spring planting of radishes is done with. I'm letting some flower to see if I can get any seed. It's a store-bought hybrid, but 2014 seed still germinated fine, so if I can get seed, I'll see if it breeds true. (Small radish seed pods are also good to eat right off the plant.)

Bibb lettuces have produced well, but are getting ready to bolt. All tomatoes have fruits but Sun Gold minis will be ripe first. (Why don't tomato and lettuce seasons overlap??)

Asian snow peas are producing heavily. It's nearly time to thin more carrots, which are almost pinky-sized.

Red raspberry patch is just about to start producing ripe fruit (we will try brewing a raspberry wheat beer when we get 5 pounds' worth!).

I have all the parsley and chives I can eat, plus some spearmint - looking forward to the tomatoes so I can make some tabbouli from scratch.

Corn (growing out in the former paddock) is up past my waist and starting to tassel.

Had to try growing potatoes now that I'm an Idahoan - plants get really big and you should pay attention when it says how far apart to plant them!

Weather next week will hit low 90's, but our irrigation should keep everything sufficiently hydrated.

Posted by: Pat* at June 18, 2016 11:36 PM (ZdNOH)

109 Back late but what the heck--

I'm growing Glass Gem corn, hoping for popcorn (as well as decorations, they're supposed to be very colorful!)

Kindltot, was it GGcorn full of oldmaids?

Mom's trick for better popping: store kernels in the freezer until ready to use. Works pretty well for store-bought, anyway.

We made popcorn the hard way: In a heavy pan on the stovetop, heat oil (just enough to coat the entire bottom of the pan) until it shimmers then add a pat of butter and enough (still ice-cold) kernels for single-layer in pan. Put the lid on and wait until popping begins, then shake/slide pan back+forth rapidly while popping increases and until it begins to slow. Remove pan from heat --but continue shaking-- when pops are about 1/2 second apart. Stop shaking pan when pops are a full second apart, or you think pan is cool enough to not scorch the corn. Leave the lid on until popping is done. Dump popped corn into a bigger pan (we used a roaster) and drizzle with melted butter, put on the lid and shake shake shake, then salt to taste and shake some more. YUM!!!


Posted by: JQ Flyover at June 19, 2016 01:44 AM (044Fx)

110 Kindltot at June 18, 2016 06:22 PM

The corn I have seen recommended for hominy is Hickory King. Big kernels. Also used for roasting when young. A seed company once sent me 2 big seed packets of white Hickory King from someone else's order. They didn't want me to ship it back. They WOULD make that mistake with someone who is allergic to corn. Heh.

Hickory King Corn

http://preview.tinyurl.com/zkrw4jb

Posted by: KT at June 19, 2016 03:05 AM (qahv/)

111 Pat* at June 18, 2016 11:36 PM

Radish seed should not be hard to save. The only hybrid radishes I can remember growing were diakon types and one with hairless leaves bred mostly as a salad green.

I expect that most F3 hybrid radishes may not look too different from the F2 parent even if they don't breed true. There may be subtle differences in size, disease resistance, etc.

Be careful you don't have wild radishes around, though.

Thanks for the report on the rest of your garden, too.


Posted by: KT at June 19, 2016 03:13 AM (qahv/)

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