Sunday Morning Book Thread 01-24-2016: Rarities [OregonMuse]


Thomas Fisher Rare Book Library U of T.jpg
Thomas Fisher Rare Book Library, University of Toronto

Good morning to all of you morons and moronettes and bartenders everywhere and all the ships at sea. Welcome to AoSHQ's stately, prestigious, internationally acclaimed and high-class Sunday Morning Book Thread. The Sunday Morning Book Thread is the only AoSHQ thread that is so hoity-toity, pants are required. And when I type up the book thread, my pinkies remain elevated the whole time, and I drink Earl Grey tea from a bone china cup, that's how classy it is.


“The true reader reads every work seriously in the sense that he reads it whole-heartedly, makes himself as receptive as he can. But for that very reason he cannot possibly read every work solemnly or gravely. For he will read 'in the same spirit that the author writ.'... He will never commit the error of trying to munch whipped cream as if it were venison.”
― C.S. Lewis


On The Necessity of Book Reviews

This has been mentioned by authors in the book thread comments before, and I'm sorry I haven't done so myself in my capacity as book thread proprietor, so let me to wit: writing book reviews for the books you read is important. You might say book reviews are like mother's milk to authors, especially new indy authors trying to get a leg up.

This is in response to an e-mail from Sgt. Mom, who asks:

Can you... encourage readers to take a bit of time to post reviews of books they have enjoyed? Doesn't have to be long and literary, and detailed - although that is meat and drink to the indy author soul -- but an honest rating with stars and a couple of lines specific to why they liked the book, and would recommend it to a reader -- might be an effective way to counter the juggernaut of Big Publishing.

In addition,

...posting reviews would be an additional excellent way to support authors that the Moron Horde likes. I have been told in other author discussion groups that having a huge number of for-real reader reviews (over 50) on a book, that Amazon will do a little more to "push" the book. Exposure to the casual surfer at Amazon is a good thing for indy authors.

None of us here enjoys the experience of reading a good story and then all of a sudden getting smacked in the face with some progressive/PC crap that ruins the whole thing. It's like cutting yourself a slice from a moist and delicious chocolate cake and then biting into a dog turd. We can help to minimize this sort of unpleasantness by, of course, including purchases from the authors we know and like into our book budget, and also remembering that posting online reviews is an important means of support, as well.

And so to all you book thread regulars and lurkers (you know who you are) I say this: get busy, do your duty, and write those reviews. We need to reclaim the culture, we need our own Long March, and this is where it starts. With you.


And Speaking of Rare Books

Rare Books Uncovered: True Stories of Fantastic Finds in Unlikely Places by Rebecca Barry is a compilation of those maddening "why don't things like this ever happen to me?" stories such as:

the family whose discovery in their attic of a copy of Action Comics No. 1--the first appearance of Superman-saved their home from foreclosure. Or the Salt Lake City bookseller who volunteered for a local fundraiser--and came across a 500-year-old copy of the Nuremberg Chronicle. Or the collector who, while browsing his local thrift shop, found a collectible copy of Calvary in China--inscribed by the author to the collector's grandfather

And naturally with these things, teh internetz is involved:

Barry illustrates how collectors are as diverse as the books that they pursue. Some refuse to use the Internet, instead seeking their treasures in person and relying on long-accumulated insider knowledge. Others have stumbled upon their most desired finds on eBay—like George Koppelman, who in 2008 claimed to have found a quadruple dictionary annotated by Shakespeare himself on the online auction website.

This reminds me the kind of stuff I used to see on that PBS program Antiques Roadshow:

Naive Young Couple: "We found this painting in grandfather's attic in Sheboygan".

Appraiser: "Well, today is your lucky today, what you have there is an original Rembrandt masterpiece untouched by human hands and it still has some crumbs from ol' Harmenszoon's bologna sandwich he was eating when he painted it. This painting is worth 8 billion dollars."

Books: Rarities

If you're looking to purchase a particular rare or out-of-print book, a good place to start is BookFinder.com, which results will give you some idea of the availability of the book you're looking for and about how much you'd expect to pay. Moron commenter 'CBD' pointed me to this site, in particular, to their annual report where they discuss book finding/buying trends, and in particular, where they rank the 100 top most searched-for book.

There's a number of interesting titles. For example, for the past several years, the number one most sought after book is, hold on to your hats, Sex by that tiresome old slattern, Madonna.

Now, Madonna's book takes a provocative look at sexual fantasies in photographs and words, with the erotic imaginings highlighted by a series of innovative special effects. Contains adult material of a controversial nature. Includes a one-cut CD from Madonna's newest recording project. Full color.

Yawn. I remember when this book came out in 1992. This sort of pr0n seems pretty tame now, but I think it was getting past its sell-by date even back then.

And you may need to cough up $150 or more if you want to look this collection of Madonna's filthy pictures. Either that or sneak into one of your your liberal friends' homes and swipe it off the coffee table.

But, with all that, this anthology of Madonna's peep-show pics is not the top book this year. This year, it's On The Psychology of Military Incompetence by Norman F Dixon. I would've expected to see this one on at least one of the military lists I've discussed in the past few weeks. Pity that it's not. It looks interesting. According to the Bookfinder report:

The book dives into combat futility by using a fascinating series of examples of utter ineptitude throughout the 100 years prior to the book’s writing from the Crimean War to the Boer War and the disastrous ‘Market Garden’ operation of WWII. Dixon analyzes poor decision-making (or sometimes the lack of decision-making at all) from a psychological point of view...He also works to explain how officers of dubious skill made their way up the ranks by virtue of class and social connections. It’s a fascinating read, and if it didn’t involve so many tragic events for common soldiers it might almost be comical in parts. Clearly, the book has great relevance for today’s military leaders in helping to prevent the repeat of past mistakes.

And the Madonna pr0n book has slipped to #3. So a bunch of incompetent REMF-types are more interesting than Madonna.

Lots of Stephen King on the Bookfinder lists. Other recognizable authors include Nora Roberts, Ray Bradbury, Carl Sagan and Madeleine L'Engle.


Banned In Toronto

What, are you telling me that some social justice crybullies are purging politically incorrect authors from bookstores in Toronto

The devil you say:

I've talked to a couple of book store owners in Toronto and someone is sending out Jim Hines roundup of the SP/RP affair. As a result, they are stopping making orders for [Larry] Correia, [John C.] Wright, [Brad] Torgersen, [Mike] Williamson and others of the worst broadcasters who have supported homophobic statements.

The source for this is a commenter at File 770. File 770 describes itself as "a fanzine about the news of SF fandom".

Admittedly, this isn't the best sourcing for a story like this, and it hasn't been confirmed. So right now, it's basically a rumor.

But I just love the accusation. They "supported homophobic statements." What does that even mean? What statements? The authors that aroused the ire of the crybullies didn't actually make them, mind you, they just "supported" them, these bad, bad statements, whatever they are.

Doubtless the image of a bunch of crybullies running around Toronto trying to enforce RightThink™ is one that would make ol' Joe Stalin chortle in delight, if his hollowed-out skull was not currently being used as a charcoal brazier by Satan.

Thanks to moron commenter 'Bitter Clinger And All That' for bringing this to my attention.


Banned In America

But here's one that's been confirmed:

Following a flood of criticism, children's publisher Scholastic has decided to stop distributing a picture book about one of George Washington's slaves.

Why would that be?

The book, "A Birthday Cake for George Washington," tells the story of a Hercules, a slave used by the president as his chef. When the country is struck by a sugar shortage, Hercules and his daughter Delia cheerfully navigate the problem and bake the president a cake without sugar.

The book, which shows Hercules and Delia smiling on nearly every page and taking pride in their position, has been roundly criticized for whitewashing the history of slavery.

The author, Ramin Ganeshram, who is of Iranian-Trinidadian descent, spoke out in defense of her book:

“Bizarrely, and yes, disturbingly, there were some enslaved people who had a better quality of life than others and ‘close’ relationships with those who enslaved them,” wrote Ms. Ganeshram, who said she researched the subject for nearly four years. “It is the historical record – not my opinion – that shows that enslaved people who received ‘status’ positions were proud of these positions – and made use of the ‘perks’ of those positions.”

So it looks like Ms. Ganeshram is defending herself the old-fashioned way, by appealing to the facts. How quaint.

These days, that's a fool's errand.

But when all was said and done, Scholastic caved to the crybullies and yanked the book. You can still buy it on Amazon, though, but it'll cost you $150.

I wonder if Ms. Ganeshram's inbox got flooded with hate mail and did the crybullies threaten her job?

I also wonder if this children's book is going to be included on those 'Banned Book' lists that get published every year.

Thanks to @votermom for tipping me to this.


This Has To Be A Joke, Right?

OK, so this New York bookstore owner asked some celebrities what 10 books they would take with them on a desert island, among them Lena Dunham.

I'm not going to go through Dunham's list, because who cares, but sacred honor compels me to point out that the first book on the list is, if you can believe this, Lolita.

Really. One of self-admitted child molester Lena Dunham's favorite books is the story about a man who wants to molest a child.

If I were doing a parody list of Dunham's favorite books, I wouldn't put Lolita on there because the joke is just too obvious.

Can she be that clueless? Either that or maybe she took a page from the Obama playbook and she's just trolling conservatives. Yeah, that's probably it.

Open question: do you really have to be a conservative to think that Lena Dunham is repugnant?


Books By Morons

Sgt. Mom has a new book out. This one is called The Chronicles of Luna City and she co-wrote it with her dauughter, Jeanne Hayden. Luna City, Texas is a quirky town where

...the high school football team is called the Mighty Fighting Moths...and their yearly Homecoming game is under some strange and irregular curse.

Where half the townsfolk has the surname of Gonzalez or Gonzales, they’re all related and descended from the holder of the original Spanish land grant... but no one has ever been able to figure out whether his name ended in an ‘s’ or a ‘z’, due to illegible handwriting on the original paperwork …

Where the last two members of a Sixties hippy nudist commune still still keep the faith with peace, love, and organic vegetables at the Age of Aquarius Campground and Goat Farm...

And a historic marker on Town Square marks the spot where a local bootlegger was nearly hung in 1926 for (among a long list of offenses against the laws of God and Man) impersonating a nun.

Sgt. Mom tells me they've got two sequels planned.


___________

AOSHQ scholar-in-residence boulder terlit hobo has completed his translation (from the original French) of the book Mohammed and the End of the World: A Critical Study Of Primitive Islam by Paul Casanova. According to the introduction, Casanova's thesis is that the Quran really isn't all that:

One generally assumes of the text of the Qur’ân, such as it has come down to us, that it is authentic and that it reproduces exactly the thought of Muhammad, faithfully gathered by his secretaries as the revelations gradually appeared...I maintain, however, that the real doctrine of Muhammad was, if not falsified, at least concealed with the greatest of care. I shall set out soon the extremely simple reasons which led first Abu Bakr, then Uthman, to alter thoroughly the sacred text, and this rearrangement was done with such skill that, thenceforth, it seemed impossible to reconstitute the Ur-Qur’ân or the original Qur’ân.

Casanova's book was first published in 1911. And so now I have to wonder if Muslim scholars have ever come up with a rigorous answer to it.

Mr. terlit hobo has graciously made his work available to the rest of us as a .pdf document, which you can read or download from this link after you jump through a couple of hoops.

And bht's original review can be read here.

___________

Don't forget the AoSHQ reading group on Goodreads. It's meant to support horde writers and to talk about the great books that come up on the book thread. It's called AoSHQ Moron Horde and the link to it is here: https://www.goodreads.com/group/show/175335-aoshq-moron-horde.

___________

So that's all for this week. As always, book thread tips, suggestions, bribes, rumors, threats, and insults may be sent to OregonMuse, Proprietor, AoSHQ Book Thread, at the book thread e-mail address: aoshqbookthread, followed by the 'at' sign, and then 'G' mail, and then dot cee oh emm.

What have you all been reading this week? Hopefully something good, because, as you all know, life is too short to be reading lousy books.

Posted by: Open Blogger at 08:59 AM




Comments

(Jump to bottom of page)

1 2nd

Posted by: Skip at January 24, 2016 08:59 AM (hk3Fb)

2 Ask and ye shall receive.

Posted by: Vic-we have no party at January 24, 2016 08:59 AM (t2KH5)

3 Read among other short books A Battle More Desperate by Randy Pilz
About a airborne squad during the Battle of the Bulge. I liked it

Posted by: Skip at January 24, 2016 09:02 AM (hk3Fb)

4 Damn sugar ruined my teeth.

Posted by: George Washington at January 24, 2016 09:04 AM (UBS9M)

5 looks like that library is for viewing only

Posted by: Bigby's Knuckle Sandwich at January 24, 2016 09:04 AM (Cq0oW)

6 Psychology of Military Incompetence sounds like an interesting read. Because it's war, I have always wondered whether some of these military blunders were predicted by others involved in the planning or whether the criticism was possible because of 20/20 hindsight.

Posted by: Max Rockatansky at January 24, 2016 09:08 AM (MNgU2)

7 I made the big mistake of buying hardcover books at the goodwill, now I can't find my reading glasses lol.

Posted by: FCF at January 24, 2016 09:11 AM (kejii)

8 Currently re-reading the Honor Harrington series. Re-read Modisette's Spellsong War series last week.

Posted by: Vic-we have no party at January 24, 2016 09:11 AM (t2KH5)

9 Good morning, Bookies.

Posted by: mindful webworker - shhh! people are reading! at January 24, 2016 09:13 AM (ECUyd)

10 7
I made the big mistake of buying hardcover books at the goodwill, now I can't find my reading glasses lol.



Posted by: FCF at January 24, 2016 09:11 AM (kejii)

That's why I love my Samsung Galaxy Tab 2. You don't need reading glasses. You can make the text what ever size you want.

Posted by: Vic-we have no party at January 24, 2016 09:14 AM (t2KH5)

11 Ah, the book thread - got that fresh minty smell! Thanks for the plug, OM!

As for a giggle about Madonna and her book "Sex", I remember when that book of pr*ny photos first came out - IIRC, it cost $50, and at least one wit cracked than in some neighborhoods you could get the real thing for considerably less.

Posted by: CeliaHayes at January 24, 2016 09:15 AM (95iDF)

12 Ah, Sunday morning book thread AND the power is still on. A wonderful start to the day.

On Moron recommendation I got Ted Koppel's "Lights Out" on cyberattacks and the aftermath. I jumped to the section on surviving the aftermath, which begins: "For the most part, public reaction to the possibility of a massive cyberattack has not even risen to the level of apathy. Apathy suggests the awareness of a problem and the decision not to worry about it. To the degree that government and its disaster relief operations focus our attention at all, they direct it toward the familiar: natural disasters common to our region, or variations on terrorist attacks that have already occurred."

He has thus far treated the prepping community with respect. Anyone who has observed government response to disasters over the last decade, and the lack of guidance for dealing with anything longer than 72 hours, can see that individuals are on their own.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, Literate Savage at January 24, 2016 09:18 AM (jR7Wy)

13 Vic, I know, thats how my glasses got misplaced

I went for older books: Hong Kong (195 byby Mona Gardner
and The Winds of War by Wouk.

Did read 13 hours last week in prep for seeing the movie.

Posted by: FCF at January 24, 2016 09:18 AM (kejii)

14 err thats 1958

Posted by: FCF at January 24, 2016 09:20 AM (kejii)

15 Almost out the door to church (MY church) but what I've been reading is Lutheranism 101 by Concordia Publishing House, because, upcoming marriage to Lutheran minister. My conclusion: On the essential doctrines, I think I'll be okay. On the peripheral issues, I'm in trouble. On style of worship, just forget about it. I told my intended, "I don't know if I can be a Lutheran. This is just not me." His response was basically to suck it up, say bland non-committal stuff in case someone talks about things I disagree with, and pray that no one asks me any questions.


So I'll do the Sunday thing at the Lutheran church. But I'm going to do a Saturday night thing at a church where they don't fall over in a dead faint if you raise your hands during the singing.

Posted by: grammie winger, sign of The Time at January 24, 2016 09:21 AM (dFi94)

16 I don't know if this has been mentioned on the Book Thread before, but there's a an app called TotalBoox. Some can use it for free through their local library, but anyone can pay to use it. They have a different model--you only pay for what you read, so if you give up on a book 10% in, you only pay 10% of the cost of the book.

I haven't used it, but I came across it doing research for work, and thought some people here might find that useful.

Posted by: Turd Ferguson at January 24, 2016 09:22 AM (/ciMI)

17 went for older books: Hong Kong (195 byby Mona Gardner

and The Winds of War by Wouk.



Did read 13 hours last week in prep for seeing the movie.

Posted by: FCF at January 24, 2016 09:18 AM (kejii)

I have that as well as War and Remembrance. The only problem is both of them are in paperback and I can no longer read them. I do have some 2.5x reading glasses but I don't like using them.

Posted by: Vic-we have no party at January 24, 2016 09:23 AM (t2KH5)

18 Grammie Winger, this book may be of more practical application:

http://tinyurl.com/j7mtcdf

Posted by: All Hail Eris, Literate Savage at January 24, 2016 09:24 AM (jR7Wy)

19 All Hail Eris - that's EXACTLY what I need! Ha!



Now, off I go. I'm gonna dance at church while I still can....

Posted by: grammie winger, sign of The Time at January 24, 2016 09:26 AM (dFi94)

20 Hey man, this book ain't got no pitures in it! I ain't reading that.

Boring!

Posted by: weirdflunky at January 24, 2016 09:26 AM (0QF3c)

21 Still reading books on Interviewing techniques. My big interview, for a big promotion, is this Friday.

As a respite, read The Reason Why: The Story of the Fatal Charge of the Light Brigade by Cecil Woodham-Smith.

Quite informative on a number of areas, like British aristocracy, the Irish famine, the sad state of leadership in the British Army, and especially the Crimea and the Charge.

Posted by: NaCly Dog at January 24, 2016 09:26 AM (u82oZ)

22 Best place to find unusual old books in the DC area is the Friends of Montgomery Library Bookstore in Rockville, Md.
http://www.folmc.org/bookstores/

Posted by: Ddad99 at January 24, 2016 09:26 AM (fUksb)

23 Posted by: NaCly Dog at January 24, 2016 09:26 AM (u82oZ)

I will put you on the prayer list- if I may (?)- for your interview this Friday

Posted by: FenelonSpoke at January 24, 2016 09:28 AM (w4NZ8)

24 Also, writers of books, push your local libraries to purchase Enki, which is ebooks from small, indie, and self publishers.

Posted by: Turd Ferguson at January 24, 2016 09:29 AM (/ciMI)

25 This week I read Prophecy by S. J. Parris, the pen name of Stephanie Merritt. It is a historical thriller set in London in 1583 and is based on the life of a real historical figure, Giordano Bruno. It is a sequel to Heresy, which I reviewed last week. This book is excellent as well, as Bruno continues to spy for Queen Elizabeth I against the Papists who work to bring the Catholic Mary Queen of Scots to the English throne. Plot twists, great characters, great descriptions of London at this time; this book has it all.

I also read Abandoned In Hell: The Fight for Vietnam's Firebase Kate by William Abracht and Marvin J.Wolf. Albracht was a Green Beret captain who took command of a hilltop outpost named Kate in the western edge of the central highlands of Vietnam, near the Cambodian border. Kate was held by twenty-seven Americans and 156 Montagnard militiamen. Arbracht took command the day before the stuff started to hit the fan. For five days this small band withheld attacks from an estimated 6000 North Vietnam Army regulars. They were helped by brave helicopter pilots running resupply drops, B-52 strikes, helicopter gunships, and AC-47 gunships. Running out of ammo and water, Albracht led the survivors in a night time escape through enemy lines and back to safety while loosing only one man. A great story of bravery and heroism.

Posted by: Zoltan at January 24, 2016 09:30 AM (JYer2)

26 Outside of a dog, a book is man's best friend.

Inside of a dog, it's too dark to read.

- Groucho Marx.

Posted by: BackwardsBoy at January 24, 2016 09:33 AM (LUgeY)

27 Good morning (I hope) Gentle Book Threadists. I've been reading books on basic drawing and sketching skills and using artist quality colored pencils. Thank God no one else needs to see my efforts but it is fun. Read some more of The Everlasting Man which will lead into a re-read of Mere Christianity.

BTW, saw the photo on Amazon for Celia Hayes. What an attractive lady! (I'm downloading her new book later today.)

More comments in the course of the day, but I have over 30" of snow to start shoveling. If I'm in a less than lovely mood later, you'll know why.

Posted by: JTB at January 24, 2016 09:33 AM (FvdPb)

28 A library for viewing only would be a pity indeed. Then again, given that the public destroys everything it touches could you blame them if it were so, especially for rare books? The world makes me sad sometimes.

Posted by: Blacksheep at January 24, 2016 09:34 AM (bS6uW)

29 Thank you FenelonSpoke. Gratefully accepted.

Can your husband give me any questions to answer? I want to be the local school district's Director of Transportation.

rot-13 address:
AnPyl_qbt@xfoebnqonaq.arg

Posted by: NaCly Dog at January 24, 2016 09:36 AM (u82oZ)

30 One of the advantages of the Kindle is the ability to impulse-buy and not worry about the weight of what you're lugging around.

So yesterday I found myself at a bar, eating a steak and cheese sammich and reading The Rise and Fall of the Third Reich.

It's interesting, I already know a lot of the story, I imagine that this volume is the basis of what is conventional knowledge about Hitler and the Reich.

Right now I'm in a part that is new to me. Munich in 1920. There's a government in Berlin, the Army is trying to be the government, Munich has rotating governments. Various cities are taken over by Soviet councils.

I didn't realize the degree to which defeated Germany was not a functioning nation-state, nor a nation-state at all.

Posted by: Bandersnatch, let all the children boogie at January 24, 2016 09:37 AM (1xUj/)

31 I just started a Library Management course; one of the first papers we had to read was something about Library Management from a Feminist POV. Her point was librarians are primarily female, but upper management is male in numbers far surpassing what the percentage of males in libraries would suggest. So, therefore, libraries are sexist. Even when, she says, managers are female, they are forced to behave as males, so even female managers are sexist.

This lady has been teaching library management classes forever, and she asks her classes in anonymous surveys whether sexism is a problem in the library, and she is butthurt that nearly 100% say no. Now, nearly every person that takes a library management course is female, and over half are already in management positions, and this lady is ticked that they don't see that sexism is huge problem.

/rant

Posted by: Turd Ferguson at January 24, 2016 09:39 AM (/ciMI)

32 Morning all. Time to shovel snow. Hopefully time to read later.

Posted by: Beth M at January 24, 2016 09:40 AM (kiy9d)

33 My Christmas bonus this year was in the form of Amazon gift cards. After buying presents, and with the addition of some cc points plus a B and N gift card I got from my grandmother I just spent the remainder a couple weeks ago. I got a book on tomahawk fighting, a reprint of an old book on Kentucky rifles, the Horace Kephart book on camping and woodcraft that someone recommend here on the blog, a book on still-hunting, a book on preserving meat, a copy of In the Shadow of the Sword that TBH mentioned, and two books on wilderness evasion (which were both kind of disappointments - I was looking for countertracking/bushcraft-under pressure, what I got was one book on how to evade capture if you are shot down behind enemy lines and how to pull an Eric Rudolph.) Plus a cd...I've been reading those as they come in.

Plus, I just found a copy of Dresslar's The Engraved Powder Horn for about thirty percent off its list price of $85 - still pretty pricey, but worth it in the long run, I think.

Posted by: Grey Fox at January 24, 2016 09:40 AM (bZ7mE)

34 OM - Teh Book Thread is such a blessed relief. Here at Casa de Babe, we've been inundated with a foot of snow and the Trump/Cruz wars are heating up all over the rest of the sites. Thank you for purveying this wonderful respite!

Posted by: RushBabe at January 24, 2016 09:41 AM (/NEnw)

35 @31 - That sounds painful. Some people can ruin even the most interesting subjects.

Posted by: Blacksheep at January 24, 2016 09:42 AM (bS6uW)

36 Yay for the book thread! A perfect break from snow shoveling.

This weekend my big project is purging and reshelving all my books. Last month I had to pack up my bookshelves because I had new floors installed. Now, after moving my router and doing some other cable work, I'm finally ready to put the books back on the shelves. I'm taking this opportunity to get rid of some books that, honestly, I will never get around to reading. Also, I'm getting rid of all the classics that I can get for free on kindle. And I'm really paring down my 'keeper' books, most of which are classics that I now have on my kindle. It's somewhat emotionally draining to say to myself, "Come on, you're never going to read this book", but it's also liberating. I hope to finish this project by the end of today.

Posted by: biancaneve at January 24, 2016 09:43 AM (e98eb)

37 So yesterday I found myself at a bar, eating a steak and cheese sammich and reading The Rise and Fall of the Third Reich.

Posted by: Bandersnatch, let all the children boogie at January 24, 2016 09:37 AM (1xUj/)


You in Philly, Bandersnatch?

Posted by: OregonMuse at January 24, 2016 09:43 AM (UCmQM)

38 @30 - Bet that is interesting. May have to take a dip.

Posted by: Blacksheep at January 24, 2016 09:44 AM (bS6uW)

39 That sounds painful. Some people can ruin even the most interesting subjects.

Posted by: Blacksheep

I'm hopeful that's the extent of this particular subject we'll be exploring. It was just so pathetic: "99% of women who are actively working in libraries do not think sexism is a problem there--they must be brain-damaged, because PATRIARCHY!"

Posted by: Turd Ferguson at January 24, 2016 09:45 AM (/ciMI)

40 a reprint of an old book on Kentucky rifles, the Horace Kephart book on camping and woodcraft that someone recommend here on the blog


I was not familiar with that and just looked it up.

*adds to list*

Thanks

Posted by: Bandersnatch, let all the children boogie at January 24, 2016 09:45 AM (1xUj/)

41 She got sick and asked for a raincheck.

I think she's actually sick.

Posted by: Ghost of kari at January 24, 2016 09:45 AM (ubByS)

42 Denizens of the SMBT may enjoy this vocabulary/IQ test:
http://bit.ly/1S3rySn

Posted by: RushBabe at January 24, 2016 09:46 AM (/NEnw)

43 "I didn't realize the degree to which defeated Germany was not a functioning nation-state, nor a nation-state at all."

Frumy, I believe that's the reason Germany surrendered WW1. The internal politics back home were such that they were barely able to exist as a state by 1918 and thus they quit to try take care of home. They weren't losing the war so much as losing the homefront.

Posted by: Ricardo Kill at January 24, 2016 09:47 AM (VkVd+)

44 @6 Max,

If you haven't read it already, you might also like "Military Misfortunes: The Anatomy of Failure in War" by Cohen and Gooch, 1991. They do case studies that start from the premise that the individuals involved were actually competent and hard-working, yet nevertheless failed, then attempt to discern principles or modes of failure.



I'm about 3/4 through "Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance". I don't anything more about zen or motorcycles than I did when I started (which wasn't much...), but it's kind of fun to read a book that uses words like "groovy" and "dig it" without irony. The last one I read that did that was "Deliverance". Anyway, now I want to know more about both metaphysics and the most scenic route through Bozeman.

Posted by: MarkW at January 24, 2016 09:48 AM (kQfoP)

45 @31 - Everyone knows the Dewey decimal system is sexist, and probably racist, too. The Library of Congress cataloging system is homophobic. Putting things in alphabetical order does not consider the thought patterns of other cultures.

Of course, all books other than the Koran will be haram in the near future, so all that is moot.

Posted by: PabloD at January 24, 2016 09:48 AM (c9t4Y)

46 This lady has been teaching library management classes forever, and she asks her classes in anonymous surveys whether sexism is a problem in the library, and she is butthurt that nearly 100% say no. Now, nearly every person that takes a library management course is female, and over half are already in management positions, and this lady is ticked that they don't see that sexism is huge problem.

/rant
Posted by: Turd Ferguson at January 24, 2016 09:39 AM (/ciMI)


I've got a bad feeling about this. The fymynyst wymyn's disconnect from reality might be an amusing phenomenon now, that you can laugh at or ignore, but somehow, somewhere down the line, You Will Be Made To Care.

Because with progressives, totalitarianism is always just around the corner.

Posted by: OregonMuse at January 24, 2016 09:49 AM (UCmQM)

47 So yesterday I found myself at a bar, eating a steak and cheese sammich and reading The Rise and Fall of the Third Reich.

Posted by: Bandersnatch, let all the children boogie at January 24, 2016 09:37 AM (1xUj/)

You in Philly, Bandersnatch?


I am not. At the risk of digressing from the hoity toity bookishness of the thread, I shall state that the Philly cheesesteak is the only food in the world that gets worse the closer you get to its epicenter.

I'm from the general Philly area, I moved back for a few months a few years ago. I made it a mission to find a good cheesesteak. Bleh. Lousy bread, dried shaved meat, cheez-whiz.

There are now two (there was one) pubs in CT with good steak and cheese sammiches made out of chunks of meat and real cheese and toasted in the oven.

I shall now return to literature. I was already proud of myself for not just pouncing on the Madonna Sex book topic.

Posted by: Bandersnatch, let all the children boogie at January 24, 2016 09:50 AM (1xUj/)

48 Can't some send a "report" to Toronto booksellers that one of these sjw d-bags like Scalzi made "homophobic" statements? Or as they as litigious as the Climatologists (like Mann)?

Posted by: angela urkel at January 24, 2016 09:50 AM (jIjKK)

49 One book that seems to be prophetic - Camp of the Saints by Jean Raspail - in view of the invasion of Europe going on right now.

And if I can blow my own horn - Before I Go - is not a novel but a how-to book to read before you meet your maker. http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00CB3D2YU/ref=dp-kindle-redirect?ie=UTF8&btkr=1

Posted by: Arie Korving at January 24, 2016 09:50 AM (q+kb4)

50 Bandersnatch,

I got the "Field size" 1910 reprint, which is just book one but has the illustrations (the second book, added in later editions, is more about living out of a vacation cottage than actual camping, IIRC). Some versions don't have the illustrations, apparently.

I found the section of tree species and firewood to be worth the cost of the book.

Posted by: Grey Fox at January 24, 2016 09:50 AM (bZ7mE)

51 They weren't losing the war so much as losing the homefront.

Yes, that's a pretty good read of the situation.

Posted by: Bandersnatch, let all the children boogie at January 24, 2016 09:52 AM (1xUj/)

52 There have been several mentions about older film cameras lately. Someone (Palpatine?) brought up TLRs. That got me reading about some of my older gear, 35 MM mechanical rangefinders and SLRs, The Minolta Autocord in medium format and an old Graflex press camera in 4x5 format. Makes me think about resurrecting the darkroom gear for B and W film. It's been a while so more reading would be called for.

Posted by: JTB at January 24, 2016 09:52 AM (FvdPb)

53 @44 - I learned how to pack a motorcycle for a long trip. Dude had half his apartment and a three-drawer tool box with him.

Posted by: Blacksheep at January 24, 2016 09:53 AM (bS6uW)

54 I'm about 3/4 through "Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance".

Oh, come tell the Book Thread about it when you're finished.

I have an opinion but it includes a spoiler and I don't want to spoil it.

Posted by: Bandersnatch, let all the children boogie at January 24, 2016 09:54 AM (1xUj/)

55 I just started a Library Management course

Used to read Annoyed Librarian's blog because occasionally she would criticize the ALA groupthink, but it soon became evident she wasn't doing in out of principles beyond self-interest

Posted by: derit at January 24, 2016 09:54 AM (OC+TJ)

56 Bandersnatch - I thought that dry bread, questionable meat, and cheez-whiz were essential to a good cheesesteak.
My own Philly experience was that the roach coaches had the best ones; better than the two places which claimed to have invented the sandwich.
I did find a street cart in Portland, OR that did a good version.

Posted by: PabloD at January 24, 2016 09:55 AM (c9t4Y)

57
On npr some they were going on and on about racism in children's books. One talking head said her 3 year old son selected a book about Ralph Bunch for her to read to him. Right.... lol

Posted by: Bruce With a Wang! at January 24, 2016 09:55 AM (iQIUe)

58 I'm about 3/4 through "Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance". I don't anything more about zen or motorcycles than I did when I started (which wasn't much...), but it's kind of fun to read a book that uses words like "groovy" and "dig it" without irony.

Posted by: MarkW at January 24, 2016 09:48 AM (kQfoP)


Heh. Welcome to the 1970s. I read that book when I was in college, which, coincidentally, was in the 70s. It was a yuuuge bestseller back then. Pirsig is an interesting character. It was kind of creepy reading about him going through his notes that he wrote prior to his electroshock therapy as if they were written by a completely different person. As they sort of were.

Posted by: OregonMuse at January 24, 2016 09:56 AM (UCmQM)

59 Denizens of the SMBT may enjoy this vocabulary/IQ test:
http://bit.ly/1S3rySn

Posted by: RushBabe

IQ of 133--I missed one

Posted by: Turd Ferguson at January 24, 2016 09:57 AM (/ciMI)

60 The Chronicles of Luna City sounds excellent, and I'm picking up the Kindle edition now (after a moment to recover from the shocking difference between the US and Canadian prices--wow, our dollar really is sinking rapidly).

Posted by: Necromommycon at January 24, 2016 09:57 AM (59Rfm)

61 Agreed, RushBabe... but first I just want to throw another brickbat at TRUMP! (I keed, I keed!)

Yesterday, No Country (NCFOM) by Cormac McC somehow got mentioned in several posts.

Don't like. Magic realism like Garcia Marquez. Cormac is a leftwing activist, btw... unless he died, in which case he WAS a leftoid.

But I digress.

A prisoner murders a deputy sheriff; escapes jail; steals police cruiser; uses cruiser to stop motorist; murders motorist; then murders DEA agent.

Biggest manhunt since John Wilkes Booth? No. One local police officer tracks the perp down unassisted? Yes, correct.

Posted by: mnw (fair and ballast) at January 24, 2016 09:58 AM (NiHAc)

62 I have an opinion but it includes a spoiler and I don't want to spoil it.

Posted by: Bandersnatch, let all the children boogie at January 24, 2016 09:54 AM (1xUj/)


I'd be interested in hearing this.

Posted by: OregonMuse at January 24, 2016 09:59 AM (UCmQM)

63 Posted by: NaCly Dog at January 24, 2016 09:36 AM (u82oZ)

Hi; I'm sure Spouse would be glad to help you in whatever way he can, but I'm a little confused what is it you need?.Questions to ask of the interviewers?

What you have in your post is what- a e-mail address

Posted by: FenelonSpoke at January 24, 2016 09:59 AM (w4NZ8)

64 The post WWI scene is very interesting. The war really didn't end on 11/11/18. The Allies were still fighting the Soviets into 1920, the Greeks (along with the French) were still fighting the Turks, and the Germans were fighting each other. Hungary also had a brief Soviet republic & Red Terror until Romania invaded & put a stop to that "experiment."

I've been looking for a good book on the Greco-Turkish War for a long time, but to no avail.

Posted by: Josephistan at January 24, 2016 09:59 AM (7qAYi)

65 I've got a bad feeling about this. The fymynyst wymyn's disconnect from reality might be an amusing phenomenon now, that you can laugh at or ignore, but somehow, somewhere down the line, You Will Be Made To Care.

Because with progressives, totalitarianism is always just around the corner.


Posted by: OregonMuse

I managed to switch to this management class from a "Multicultural Librarianship" class at the last second, which just added a section on LGBT rights. For librarians. Lefties will never be satisfied until every traditional institution is reborn in their own image.

Which is partially why I chose to go into libraries, to inject some conservative sanity into the debate from the inside.

Posted by: Turd Ferguson at January 24, 2016 10:00 AM (/ciMI)

66 I've got a bad feeling about this. The fymynyst wymyn's disconnect from reality might be an amusing phenomenon now, that you can laugh at or ignore, but somehow, somewhere down the line, You Will Be Made To Care.

That ship already sailed; with press gangs working at full steam

Posted by: derit at January 24, 2016 10:00 AM (OC+TJ)

67 Just finished Henry V by Christopher Allmond.

Posted by: mnw (fair and ballast) at January 24, 2016 10:04 AM (NiHAc)

68 I have an opinion but it includes a spoiler and I don't want to spoil it.

Posted by: Bandersnatch, let all the children boogie at January 24, 2016 09:54 AM (1xUj/)

I'd be interested in hearing this.
Posted by: OregonMuse



Trying to be non-spoily. I had a sense of foreboding about someone in the book. It doesn't happen in the book, but in the epilogue written seven years later it has happened.

Posted by: Bandersnatch, let all the children boogie at January 24, 2016 10:04 AM (1xUj/)

69 I imagine the French would love cheesesteaks. They love long rolls of bread, they love beef, they love onions, and they love cheese. Perhaps if Western Civilization hasn't completely collapsed by then, I'll move to Paris when I retire & open a stand.

Posted by: Josephistan at January 24, 2016 10:04 AM (7qAYi)

70 I always review the books I read on Goodreads, using it as a personal database, then duplicate it on Amazon for Horde writers. Don't always bother for other books. Since Amazon owns Goodreads they should make it possible to just copy them over automatically.

Listened to Who I Am by Pete Townshend, where he narrates his life story. He speaks a fair amount about his band-mates and the making of his classic albums, but focuses mostly on his childhood, then some about his projects after the Who. He occasionally says something that indicates he's a big lefty but mostly it's not political. He also makes the case that he was innocent of having any child porn or seeing any of it. It goes on a bit too long and he talks a lot about his religious interests but was pretty good.

Read To Save Us All From Ruin: A Muldoon Adventure by James Schroeder which tells the story of brothers going to war in WWII Italy. It was entertaining and did a good job of explaining some of the fighting there, which I knew nothing about other than it was a tough nut to crack. The youngest of the brothers is portrayed as being involved in a fantastic secret project involving hamsters, which I found chuckle-worthy.

Read Mort (Discworld #4, Death #1) by Terry Pratchett, which shows Death as a main character who hires Mort, a young stumbling farm boy as an apprentice. Really well-written and entertaining, maybe the best one I've read yet. The wizard Rincewind who is the main character in earlier books makes a brief appearance.

Listened to Son of the Black Sword (Saga of the Forgotten Warrior #1) by Larry Correia, start of a fantasy series without (gasp!) any guns whatsoever. Is pretty violent anyway with swords, crossbows and some magic. It starts a bit slow as it focuses mostly on the protagonist, a warrior lawman with a magic sword, then improves as it develops other characters. The oceans contain magical creatures that attack sailing vessels and occasionally make forays on land. Intriguing world he's built and he leaves you with a lot of questions that hopefully will get addressed in later books.

Posted by: waelse1 at January 24, 2016 10:05 AM (lJjhL)

71 Used to read Annoyed Librarian's blog because occasionally she would criticize the ALA groupthink,

Posted by: derit

Yeah, ALA's pretty awful. What's the rule? "Any organization that isn't explicitly conservative will become a cesspool of leftist ideology and lockstep neo-Stalinism" or something like that.

Posted by: Turd Ferguson at January 24, 2016 10:05 AM (/ciMI)

72 Given the rise of electronic print, is there even much of a future in library management?

Posted by: angela urkel at January 24, 2016 10:06 AM (jIjKK)

73 At our daughter's for dinner earlier this month, I sat down near her bookcase and picked up a copy of The Time Traveler's Wife. Been a while since I first read it, and I found myself immediately drawn back in.

So, found our copy at home and have been reading that. Time travel romance. Being aware of how it turns out this time makes it different. Still, enjoying the journey.

Couple of thoughts:

There's no real explanation for the time traveling; no mechanism or even as much the psychic technique in Time and Again. He just jumps. And only his body travels; he arrives naked. Only other case of that I can think of is the Terminator.

I also suspect TT's Wife was the inspiration for one of the better things they've done in the modern Doctor Who series, giving the Doctor a girlfriend, River Song. They are both time travelers and meet out of order through the years. The last episode, the Christmas special, was one of the best Dr Whos, funny and sad and a great wrap-up of the River Song story.

So much to read, and I'm doing a re-read. Well, I can't stop now.

Posted by: mindful webworker - time traveler (in one direction only) at January 24, 2016 10:07 AM (ECUyd)

74 Very interesting IQ test RushBabe. I am kind of surprised by my results but thank you.

Posted by: Tim in Illinois. Old and Unimproved. at January 24, 2016 10:08 AM (WVsWD)

75 Posted by: Ricardo Kill at January 24, 2016 09:47 AM (VkVd+)
---
In Ernst Udet's autobiography he goes from successful air ace to unemployed nobody almost overnight, spat on for his Iron Cross, unable to find any work. He is approached by a manufacturer from Milwaukee who wants to build planes in Germany, which is illegal. They work in secret, with windows painted over, bear traps positioned under the windows, and alarms everywhere. He and his fellow flyers work in other small factories making "locks, beehives, and chicken coops" until the ban is lifted years later.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, Literate Savage at January 24, 2016 10:10 AM (jR7Wy)

76 Given the rise of electronic print, is there even much of a future in library management?

Posted by: angela urkel

Short answer: probably. Libraries are still viewed very positively by majorities of the public, and poor communities rely very heavily on library services.

Posted by: Turd Ferguson at January 24, 2016 10:10 AM (/ciMI)

77 Reading "Pink Gestapo" by Dieter. Lots of real German leather and a mysterious monkey. Too many spoilers, so I'll shut up

Posted by: Soona at January 24, 2016 10:12 AM (Fmupd)

78 Right now I'm in a part that is new to me. Munich
in 1920. There's a government in Berlin, the Army is trying to be the
government, Munich has rotating governments. Various cities are taken
over by Soviet councils.



I didn't realize the degree to which defeated Germany was not a functioning nation-state, nor a nation-state at all.
Posted by: Bandersnatch, let all the children boogie at January 24, 2016 09:37 AM (1xUj/)

One of my all time favorite detective/spy writers was Manning Coles (who was actually two people) but the first two Tommy Hambledon book, A Drink to Yesterday, and A Toast to Tomorrow both talk about surviving post WW1 German collapse.
My favorite quote is one describing the candidates for Chancellor in the Weimar elections to being of all sorts, shading from hard-core communists to "hopefully pink"

The Manning Coles books shade between "boys own book" breezy sort of old school attitude to stuff that would fit a gritty section in a Clancy novel.

Posted by: Kindltot at January 24, 2016 10:13 AM (q2o38)

79 I'm about one third of the way through the Unabridged The Three Musketeers audio book. Funnier than I remember, or maybe now I just get more of the jokes/wordplay.

Posted by: Lincolntf at January 24, 2016 10:13 AM (2cS/G)

80 In rural areas 'round here libraries are like community centers with free (or nearly so) activities of all kinds for young people and their parents who can't afford to belong to the local golf club or even the Y.

Posted by: Blacksheep at January 24, 2016 10:15 AM (bS6uW)

81 Someone predicted Tina Fey would make an appearance on SNL as Sarah Palin after Palin endorsed Trump. That person can collect their winnings at the window anytime today.

Posted by: Dack Thrombosis at January 24, 2016 10:15 AM (4ErVI)

82 Yeah, ALA's pretty awful. What's the rule? "Any
organization that isn't explicitly conservative will become a cesspool
of leftist ideology and lockstep neo-Stalinism" or something like that.
Posted by: Turd Ferguson at January 24, 2016 10:05 AM (/ciMI)


Yes, Carl Menger said that.

Posted by: Kindltot at January 24, 2016 10:15 AM (q2o38)

83 57 On npr some they were going on and on about racism in children's books. One talking head said her 3 year old son selected a book about Ralph Bunch for her to read to him. Right.... lol
Posted by: Bruce With a Wang! at January 24, 2016 09:55 AM (iQIUe)
---
Oh God, nothing makes me sadder than seeing the recommended children's fiction books at the library. The AA selections are always about racism and Selma and some young jazz saxophonist in the Depression. Where are the black pirates and astronauts and adventurers? What kid wants to read spinach books?

Posted by: All Hail Eris, Literate Savage at January 24, 2016 10:17 AM (jR7Wy)

84
The Jihadis Next Door

UK doc that just aired and now on youtube. Scary stuff. The jihad asshole does make a point when he argues how far they have advanced in the UK.

https://goo.gl/t0CiV1

Posted by: Bruce With a Wang! at January 24, 2016 10:18 AM (iQIUe)

85 I am free to move about the country
Next is to figure why the heater is running but not circulating.
Odd about the review request, yesterday got some emails from Amazon to do that. It was the first time I've ever done that. I'm sure I need to get practice at that so hopefully I will improve.

Posted by: Skip at January 24, 2016 10:18 AM (hk3Fb)

86 One of my most unusual book finds occurred at a department store of all places. We were just browsing through the furniture section of the store. And I noticed on a book shelf, instead of the phony box displays that are sometimes used, actual books being used as props.

One largish book in dark hunter's green was looking a bit tatty but at the same time it caught my eye and I pulled it from the shelf. The heft of the tome surprised me even as I read the title on the spine. Edition de Luxe The Universal Anthology Vol. 2 Illustrated.

Which caused me to open the book. Only a thousand sets were produced. In 1899. Senior editor was Richard Garnett - Keeper of Printed Books British Museum 1851-1899. One of the other names listed who contributed is Emile Zola.

My companion was as thoroughly amused as the store employee was confused whilst I offered money to buy the book. After a few minutes the worker was convinced I was serious and not insane, though I guess the point is debatable, finally accepted my offer and I took the book home.

Posted by: Anna Puma at January 24, 2016 10:18 AM (r+/qI)

87 I also got one wrong and a score of 133 on the vocabulary IQ test.

(i) It didn't say which one I got wrong. This annoys me, as I like to fight with test writers.

(B) This is why I always did well on standardized tests like SAT and GMATs and whatnot. I go to war with the test writers. I try to get inside their heads and figure out how they're trying to trick me.

(3) This does not translate into anything useful in life skills.

(IV) I think it's fallacious to equate vocabulary with IQ.

(Cinco) I still like to win when competing in meaningless tests so I'm pretty happy about 44/45 and would like to argue with the test writers about the one I got "wrong" and why s/he is so apeheadedly stupid about the construction of that question.

Posted by: Bandersnatch, let all the children boogie at January 24, 2016 10:19 AM (1xUj/)

88 He and his fellow flyers work in other small
factories making "locks, beehives, and chicken coops" until the ban is
lifted years later.
Posted by: All Hail Eris, Literate Savage at January 24, 2016 10:10 AM (jR7Wy)


There was a German joke from the 30's about how they guy who worked at the baby-carriage factory kept stealing parts to take home to build his own baby carriage because he couldn't afford to buy one on his salary, and dammit, they kept turning out to be machine guns.

Posted by: Kindltot at January 24, 2016 10:20 AM (q2o38)

89 63 FenelonSpoke

My e-mail is encrypted with a simple cypher. Search rot-13 translator. Copy my encrypted address into it, and my real address will pop up. I did it this way to foil the spam-bots.

Here is a chance for FenelonSpouse to ask recondite questions that are relevant to what his boss should know. I am wondering if there are questions I do not know about, even given my own wide experience. The state of the art is in flux as we speak.

I have my own list of questions to ask the interviewers.

Posted by: NaCly Dog at January 24, 2016 10:20 AM (u82oZ)

90 It's fun to remind librarians lamenting the societal decay their institutions indulge in its patronage that privately held orgs (i.e. C-Span) aren't bound to cower to the coming Idiocracy

Posted by: derit at January 24, 2016 10:20 AM (OC+TJ)

91 Re the request for book reviews, I can tell you one of my pet peeves of (what I'm guessing are younger) authors is throwing in explicit language when we were humming along like adults with decent vocabularies.

I realize that the Millenials-and-younger set peppers every other sentence with a four-letter word, but it's a shame when you've started a well-written story only to be accosted by a character blurting out @#$%.

Mind you, I may be the mother of two teenagers, I'm all over the interwebz and for goodness sake, I'm a member of the Horde! but I find that aspect of what passes for current-day conversation off-putting, especially by young authors who show promise otherwise.

A few months ago I read a free download that I would've given five stars until I got to the gutter speak and raunch. As it was, I couldn't delete it from my iPad fast enough let alone write a review. I just wrote off the authorette.

Posted by: RushBabe at January 24, 2016 10:22 AM (/NEnw)

92
To anyone that likes mystery novels...


Read two more "Commissario Guido Brunetti " mysteries this week...by Donna Leon.

Her books are good little escape for a while vehicles....even if they aren't considered "great literature" all of them don't have "great" police cases involved either, but, they are enjoyable to me.


Brunetti and his family are warm interesting characters that are a pleasure to read about....you don't have to worry about graphic violence or excessive swearing so give them a try if you like short and sweet mystery novels.


Try to read them in order (although it's not ABSOLUTELY necessary)...as the main character's children grow up along the way in the novels

Posted by: Some Guy in Wisconsin at January 24, 2016 10:22 AM (Qj6zv)

93 I've just started reading Ivan The Terrible: A Military History by Alexander Filjushkin. Very interesting so far. Under Ivan, Russia invaded Europe proper for the first time, and began the first of many wars against the Ottoman Empire.

Posted by: Josephistan at January 24, 2016 10:23 AM (7qAYi)

94 Psychology of Military Incomatinse sounds right up my alley, my guess is some other officers always has a better plan, as Scharnhorst is quoted "What we should do I know right well, what we will do only the God's know"

Posted by: Skip at January 24, 2016 10:24 AM (hk3Fb)

95 Posted by: Bandersnatch, let all the children boogie at January 24, 2016 09:45 AM (1xUj/)
---
As an aficionado of bushcraft, I would have thought you'd own Madonna's SEX book.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, Literate Savage at January 24, 2016 10:24 AM (jR7Wy)

96 Whoops, that's supposed to be "e.g.," not "i.e."

Posted by: derit at January 24, 2016 10:25 AM (OC+TJ)

97 Posted by: All Hail Eris, Literate Savage at January 24, 2016 10:17 AM (jR7Wy)

"Spinach books."

Heh.

Posted by: RushBabe at January 24, 2016 10:26 AM (/NEnw)

98 Oh, forgot to mention a very personal aspect of re-reading Time Traveler's Wife - the main "present time" and place for the story is North side of Chicago, in the early 1990s. Milady and I moved there in 1980, had our three kids, and fled in 1994. Familiar scenes, driving past the Green Mill, dining at Ann Sather's, the museum or the lake shore or downtown.

Those were (mostly) good years for us, in some ways the best life we ever had. Well, not to compare, because I enjoy our humbler Oklahoma rural life so much, but, you know, the early days with our kids, and the advantages a city has. Can hardly stand to even go back to visit, but it was a good time and place to live.

Posted by: mindful webworker - time traveler (in one direction only) at January 24, 2016 10:26 AM (ECUyd)

99 It takes less than two hours to read Forstchen's potboiler "Day of Wrath." Meh. Very dumb ending. Not worth the $3.99 I paid.

Now reading Feynman's "Six Easy Pieces." Well worth the quarter I paid for used. I wonder if today's attention-deficient freshmen could sit still all the way thru one of these lectures. Doubt it. Not after having been raised on Bill Nye style hyperkinetic thirty-second sci-bites.

Posted by: gp at January 24, 2016 10:26 AM (mk9aG)

100 Today is Edith Wharton' s birthday - I have a short bio on my blog (link in nic)

I also did an op ed on that banned book earlier this week
http://www.bookhorde.org/2016/01/the-first-banned-book-of-2016.html

And some new book reviews including a Horde one (Outward Frontier by Moron Dana Epperson) posted this Friday

Posted by: @votermom at January 24, 2016 10:27 AM (cbfNE)

101 Posted by: NaCly Dog at January 24, 2016 09:26 AM (u82oZ)

Good luck!

Posted by: @votermom at January 24, 2016 10:30 AM (cbfNE)

102 Posted by: NaCly Dog at January 24, 2016 10:20 AM (u82oZ)

O.K. I'm a Luddite-sort of. I didn't know what that meant. :^). I'll give it to spouse. He's got some massive cold or flu right now and is in bed, so it may take a while to get back to you.

Posted by: FenelonSpoke at January 24, 2016 10:30 AM (w4NZ8)

103 As an aficionado of bushcraft, I would have thought you'd own Madonna's SEX book.
Posted by: All Hail Eris, Literate Savage at January 24, 2016 10:24 AM (jR7Wy)



Oh you Scamp! Of course I do.

I was trying to stay out of the gutter, but since it's mentioned in the Actual Content (TM) I suppose I may weigh in on the SEX book.

Generally in the old days when there were standards actresses and musicians posed nude when they were young and needed the money or when they were approaching their sell-by date and trying to regain relevance.

Madonna in 1992 was at the absolute peak of her worldwide fame, the absolute peak of her physical beauty, and that's when she did the SEX book, the Erotica video, and the movie with Willem Dafoe with the sex and nudity.

I quite respect her for that.

Posted by: Bandersnatch, let all the children boogie at January 24, 2016 10:30 AM (1xUj/)

104 I read Stealing America in one sitting - great book.

Posted by: @votermom at January 24, 2016 10:31 AM (cbfNE)

105 Libraries are still viewed very positively by majorities of the public, and poor communities rely very heavily on library services.
Posted by: Turd Ferguson


Yes, I used to live in Queens and the emphasis seemed to be switching to services: lots of seminars/classes for adults as well as kids, computers always in full use, cultural events. Good luck, but as you know, it does lean heavily left (seminars for gay parents, immigrants etc.). Hope the reverse discrimination isn't too bad. If so you could always say, "actually, I was born a ciswoman"

/kidding

Posted by: angela urkel at January 24, 2016 10:32 AM (jIjKK)

106 Denizens of the SMBT may enjoy this vocabulary/IQ test:
http://bit.ly/1S3rySn


Nuts. 133. Well, I'm considered more of a math guy anyways. But that one "I don't know" is going to haunt me the rest of the day!

Posted by: t-bird at January 24, 2016 10:32 AM (w/iDp)

107 To anyone that likes mystery novels...


Read two more "Commissario Guido Brunetti " mysteries this week...by Donna Leon.

Her books are good little escape for a while vehicles....even if they aren't considered "great literature" all of them don't have "great" police cases involved either, but, they are enjoyable to me.


Brunetti and his family are warm interesting characters that are a pleasure to read about....you don't have to worry about graphic violence or excessive swearing so give them a try if you like short and sweet mystery novels.


Try to read them in order (although it's not ABSOLUTELY necessary)...as the main character's children grow up along the way in the novels
Posted by: Some Guy in Wisconsin at January 24, 2016 10:22 AM (Qj6zv)

=============

I've watched the series. As soon as I got over the fact they spoke german, I was okay. It is very good. You see how the people of Venice really live.

Posted by: Bruce With a Wang! at January 24, 2016 10:32 AM (iQIUe)

108 As an aficionado of bushcraft, I would have thought you'd own Madonna's SEX book.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, Literate Savage at January 24, 2016 10:24 AM (jR7Wy)

The Sunday Morning Book Thread. Come for the lofty discussion; stay for the snark. (That's an LOL, not a scold.)

Posted by: RushBabe at January 24, 2016 10:33 AM (/NEnw)

109 Libraries are still viewed very positively by majorities of the public

Highest quality toilet paper! Where's your pool, by the way?

Posted by: Achmed Al-"Syria" at January 24, 2016 10:33 AM (w/iDp)

110 Posted by: RushBabe at January 24, 2016 10:22 AM (/NEnw)

My pet peeve is the gratuitous sex scene. Specially as they are usually not very well written. Unless you have studie the art of erotic writing, you are much better off fading to black, trust me.

Posted by: @votermom at January 24, 2016 10:34 AM (cbfNE)

111 Anna, that is a wonderful story. I've often seen old books used as props in home displays and wanted to abscond with them. What kind of decorator would stack them without fondling them longingly, or be so unaware of their value? Anyone with aesthetic sense should be a book fanatic too, I would think.

Of course I had a grand mal nerd freakout when I found a first edition of Heinlein's "The Door into Summer" for a buck at my local library's annual sale:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Door_into_Summer

Posted by: All Hail Eris, Literate Savage at January 24, 2016 10:35 AM (jR7Wy)

112 Every copy of 'Sex' seems to be glued shut. Odd.

Posted by: Pawn Star Book Expert at January 24, 2016 10:36 AM (UBS9M)

113 I also did an op ed on that banned book earlier this week
http://www.bookhorde.org/2016/01/the-first-banned-book-of-2016.html
And some new book reviews including a Horde one (Outward Frontier by Moron Dana Epperson) posted this Friday

Posted by: @votermom at January 24, 2016 10:27 AM (cbfNE)

Your blog is what tipped me, and I forgot to credit you, my apologies.

Corrected.

Posted by: OregonMuse at January 24, 2016 10:36 AM (UCmQM)

114 Hope the reverse discrimination isn't too bad.
Posted by: angela urkel

It's not a problem, though it does get a little annoying when some of my coworkers say things like "Why did you get that project? Because you're a man?" (When the reason is because I work my ass off and am willing to do anything asked of me, while YOU play with your phone for hours at a time.)

And librarians, from my experience, are largely apolitical--it's the institutions like ALA and state orgs that do the heavy pushing of progressivism.

Posted by: Turd Ferguson at January 24, 2016 10:37 AM (/ciMI)

115 Btw we are almost halfway through digging our way to freedom(aka clearing the driveway)
Two feet of snow I think.

Posted by: @votermom at January 24, 2016 10:38 AM (cbfNE)

116 On that vocab/IQ test, missed one question. So only scored a 133.

Posted by: Anna Puma at January 24, 2016 10:38 AM (r+/qI)

117 IV) I think it's fallacious to equate vocabulary with IQ.

I agree, and I got one wrong as well.

Posted by: FenelonSpoke at January 24, 2016 10:38 AM (w4NZ8)

118 I tried to download BTH's pdf of the mohammed book, but the site requires use of either Assbook or Gurgle Piss. Not doing it.

Posted by: Alberta Oil Peon at January 24, 2016 10:39 AM (Z8fuk)

119 My son got all of them correct.

Posted by: FenelonSpoke at January 24, 2016 10:39 AM (w4NZ8)

120 131 on the word-IQ test, that was fun.

Posted by: waelse1 at January 24, 2016 10:39 AM (lJjhL)

121 Books? Who has time for books with all this shoveling and trump?

Posted by: Nevergiveup at January 24, 2016 10:39 AM (DUoqb)

122 Unless you have studie the art of erotic writing, you are much better off fading to black, trust me.

Posted by: @votermom at January 24, 2016 10:34 AM (cbfNE)

Amen. When you consider Vince Flynn and Brad Thor books are heavy action-packed thrillers filled with no-nonsense tough guys, they still manage to be classy, even though you know in real life that things aren't all that sanitized.

It's the same way Hitchcock masterfully let viewers use their own imaginations to get the full thrust of suspense or horror.

Posted by: RushBabe at January 24, 2016 10:39 AM (/NEnw)

123 Wonder if we all missed the same question on the IQ Vocab quiz.

Posted by: Turd Ferguson at January 24, 2016 10:39 AM (/ciMI)

124 Your blog is what tipped me, and I forgot to credit you, my apologies.

Corrected.
Posted by: OregonMuse at January 24, 2016 10:36 AM (UCmQM)

--

OM reads my blog!!!

Woot!

Posted by: @votermom at January 24, 2016 10:40 AM (cbfNE)

125 There is still snow on my walk. Where is the government?

Posted by: Julia at January 24, 2016 10:40 AM (AJAk6)

126 My local college library turned a blind eye as Muslims on campus encroached upon its territory. Each semester, they camped out to pray in more and more aisles amid the stacks, spreading to multiple floors, on the Mecca-facing side of the building.

Good times.

Posted by: derit at January 24, 2016 10:41 AM (OC+TJ)

127
@107

I didn't even know there was a tv series about those books... I'll have to look for it on Netflix...

Thanks, Bruce with a Wang!...

Posted by: Some Guy in Wisconsin at January 24, 2016 10:41 AM (Qj6zv)

128 Psychology of Military Incomatinse sounds right up my alley

ISWYDT

Posted by: OregonMuse at January 24, 2016 10:43 AM (UCmQM)

129 I just read Ashley Bell by Dean Koontz. Never read one of his before, supernatural and horror genre, so wanted to try it.

It was good! And he is definitely a righty. His critique of the left shapes some of his story.

Posted by: pj at January 24, 2016 10:43 AM (cHuNI)

130 We are changing our hit song name to "Snow Shovels and Freedom"

Posted by: Rascal Flatts at January 24, 2016 10:43 AM (AJAk6)

131 From reading the comments, top score of 45 right and 0 wrong only gives you 135.

Posted by: t-bird at January 24, 2016 10:44 AM (w/iDp)

132 There is still snow on my walk. Where is the government?

Posted by: Julia

I'm fine--I've got my cocoa and my footy pajamas.

Posted by: Pajama Boy at January 24, 2016 10:44 AM (/ciMI)

133 OM reads my blog!!!

Woot!
Posted by: @votermom at January 24, 2016 10:40 AM (cbfNE)


Oh yes, your blog is one of my regular stops during my weekly search for book thread material.

Posted by: OregonMuse at January 24, 2016 10:44 AM (UCmQM)

134 Somewhere around here in a box I've got some old books. I have no idea as to their potential rarity or value, but one intrigues me in particular. It's a collection of photos from "The Great War in Europe" (WWI) and was printed and distributed by some U.S. cigar company to its clientele. What makes it interesting is that it was printed in 1916.

Posted by: Country Singer at January 24, 2016 10:44 AM (GUBah)

135 Where is the vocab quiz?

Posted by: @votermom at January 24, 2016 10:44 AM (cbfNE)

136 Wonder if we all missed the same question on the IQ Vocab quiz.

The 'cardinal' one is the one for which I put 'I don't know'.

Posted by: t-bird at January 24, 2016 10:45 AM (w/iDp)

137 I'm reading "A Padre Pio profile" by Jon A Schug, OFA, Cap. St Pio was an Italian capuchin fair who was canonized in 2002, I think. I'm sure the RC's know of him. He was a capuchin friar who had the stigmata, could apparently bilocate, did healings and could read peoples soul. Like John Vianney he spent hours in the confessional. This is a series of interviews by people who know him.

I would like to read his letters, but there are quite of them and I don't have the money to get a copy right now.

Posted by: FenelonSpoke at January 24, 2016 10:45 AM (w4NZ8)

138 Read a short story by Poul Anderson last night, "Call Me Joe." It's really interesting how James Cameron pretty much stole everything in "Avatar" and yet didn't make a thoughtful movie with it.

Posted by: BeckoningChasm at January 24, 2016 10:45 AM (B8JRQ)

139 Where is the vocab quiz?

...and, someone just failed.

Posted by: t-bird at January 24, 2016 10:46 AM (w/iDp)

140 All Hail Eris, that is a tres cool find. Heinlein.

Library book sales can be incredible. College at such a book sale found The Star and The Laurel: The Centennial History of Daimler, Mercedes, and Benz 1886 - 1986 by Beverly Rae Kimes.

Dust jacket has a price tag of $80. Bought it for $0.50.

Posted by: Anna Puma at January 24, 2016 10:46 AM (r+/qI)

141 Where is the vocab quiz?
Posted by: @votermom


RushBabe's post at #42.

Posted by: Bandersnatch, let all the children boogie at January 24, 2016 10:47 AM (1xUj/)

142 Link for IQ vocabulary test:

http://personality-testing.info/tests/VIQT/

Posted by: FenelonSpoke at January 24, 2016 10:47 AM (w4NZ8)

143 (Cinco) I still like to win when competing in meaningless tests so I'm pretty happy about 44/45 and would like to argue with the test writers about the one I got "wrong" and why s/he is so apeheadedly stupid about the construction of that question.

Posted by: Bandersnatch, let all the children boogie at January 24, 2016 10:19 AM (1xUj/)


Two wrong, and a score of 130. And the only question that I will admit to being doubtful about was #44 of 45. All the rest were practically "gimmes". So I, too, would like to see the answer list. Shenanigans suspected.

Posted by: Alberta Oil Peon at January 24, 2016 10:48 AM (Z8fuk)

144 Couple of thoughts on the release of Mein Kampf, one I wonder who is buying them up, Europeans or Muzzies. Second if Europeans, are they thinking jews are not the problem it's Muzzies,or is it just antisemitism plain and simple. If Muzzies it's nothing new.

Posted by: Skip at January 24, 2016 10:48 AM (hk3Fb)

145 When Cameron's Smurfs in Space movie came out, many people pointed out the jacking in similarities between it and Poul Anderson's story.

Posted by: Anna Puma at January 24, 2016 10:48 AM (r+/qI)

146 126 My local college library turned a blind eye as Muslims on campus encroached upon its territory. Each semester, they camped out to pray in more and more aisles amid the stacks, spreading to multiple floors, on the Mecca-facing side of the building.

Good times.
Posted by: derit at January 24, 2016 10:41 AM (OC+TJ)
----
This is appalling. A library is a quiet oasis, not a town square.

Taking over public spaces seems to be a thing with some Muslims.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, Literate Savage at January 24, 2016 10:48 AM (jR7Wy)

147 Feeling, you are interested in Padre Pio? We went to the Church /Museum in PA for a field trip when my kid was up for confirmation.

Posted by: @votermom at January 24, 2016 10:48 AM (cbfNE)

148 Couple of thoughts on the release of Mein Kampf, one I wonder who is buying them up, Europeans or Muzzies. Second if Europeans, are they thinking jews are not the problem it's Muzzies,or is it just antisemitism plain and simple. If Muzzies it's nothing new.
Posted by: Skip at January 24, 2016 10:48 AM (hk3Fb)

Jews get out of Europe now...don't make the same mistake twice. Sigh

Posted by: Nevergiveup at January 24, 2016 10:49 AM (DUoqb)

149
I only scored a 119 on the IQ test...

I blame the trick questions....

Like this one...

12. Trivial Crude Presidential flow Minor

...the OBVIOUS answer in the age of Obama is Trivial and Presidential. Yet I got that wrong I suppose....

Posted by: Some Guy in Wisconsin at January 24, 2016 10:50 AM (Qj6zv)

150 I'm a Cruz guy but it is looking more any more like Trump vs Sanders

And Trump will win because of the fuckin idiot RINO establishment and how they attack him. Sigh

Posted by: Nevergiveup at January 24, 2016 10:50 AM (DUoqb)

151 147 - There's a Padre Pio museum in Pennsylvania?

Posted by: Josephistan at January 24, 2016 10:51 AM (7qAYi)

152 129 I just read Ashley Bell by Dean Koontz. Never read one of his before, supernatural and horror genre, so wanted to try it
Posted by: pj at January 24, 2016 10:43 AM (cHuNI)


pj, my 2 favorite koontz books are Lightning & Watchers. I think you'll like them.

Posted by: bebe's boobs destroy at January 24, 2016 10:52 AM (pfW35)

153 Thanks for posting this, OregonMuse.

In what OregonMuse has posted, *that* translation was from where Ibn Warraq started in 2007 in the "New English Review". He had done the first paragraph-and-half. I used that as a starting-point; I did, of course, credit him in the footnote. And where Casanova has quoted other sources, I went looking for English translations (Weil, Ibn Khaldun, and the Qur'an itself) and quoted from those instead. Otherwise, yeah, mine.

AOP: sorry about the hoops. I wanted to post it somewhere I could get laughed at by professional scholars. I can email the PDF if you like.

Posted by: boulder terlit hobo at January 24, 2016 10:52 AM (6FqZa)

154 Padre Pio.

My Dad every now and then brings up that matter. I was in southern Italy near where Padre Pio lived for two different two week deployments. But I did not have access to one of the vehicles to drive around, so would go with the groups. While I visited the Vatican and even Monte San Agenlo, which is near Padre Pio's location, Dad still asks why I didn't make it over to Padre Pio's place.

Go figure.

Posted by: Anna Puma at January 24, 2016 10:52 AM (r+/qI)

155 If you guys haven't discovered John C Wright, he's written some of the best sci-fi/fantasy around today. I only learned of him through the Sad Puppies imbroglio, and thank God.

His Golden Age series is maybe the best piece of human literature extant today, if you like highbrow stuff. SOMEWHITHER is a lot more accessible, a great sci-fi adventure in the classic mold. The Everness and Chaos books are also very good, Awake in the Night Land is exquisitely well done. Really everything by Wright is excellent, I almost hate to read anything else.

http://www.amazon.com/John-C.-Wright/e/B001IR1FZS

Posted by: TallDave at January 24, 2016 10:52 AM (74ZYB)

156 Yes; Barto PA is the National Center for Padre Pio. I've been there; It's very interesting.

Posted by: FenelonSpoke at January 24, 2016 10:52 AM (w4NZ8)

157 Terrorist who murdered Dafna Meir incited after watching Palestinian TV
The 15-year-old terrorist who killed Dafna Meir tells Shin Bet investigators that he decided to murder a Jew after watching inciting programs on Palestinian television.

But according to Fredo. horserace and the NY Slime it is the Joos and Israel which are the problem

Posted by: Nevergiveup at January 24, 2016 10:53 AM (DUoqb)

158 Posted by: Some Guy in Wisconsin at January 24, 2016 10:50 AM (Qj6zv)

LOL.

Posted by: FenelonSpoke at January 24, 2016 10:53 AM (w4NZ8)

159 ...the OBVIOUS answer in the age of Obama is Trivial and Presidential. Yet I got that wrong I suppose...

Oh, I know! That was on of several where I had to resist the urge to give the smartass answer instead of the right one.

Posted by: Bandersnatch, let all the children boogie at January 24, 2016 10:53 AM (1xUj/)

160 BTW remember kids, Gingrich and Giuliani were leading the polls at this point in 2012/2008.

It's still possible voters will discover the things Trump has been doing and saying the last 25 years. Great Weekly Standard piece this week on his past.

http://www.weeklystandard.com/nine-tales-of-trump-at-his-trumpiest/article/2000697

Posted by: TallDave at January 24, 2016 10:54 AM (74ZYB)

161 @47 Amoroso's rolls for cheesesteaks

As someone who grew up in the Philly 'burbs, finding good meat or cheese to make a great cheesesteak was never a problem anywhere in the country.

Amoroso's bread rolls were an essential for an optimal cheesesteak and they must be fresh. Crisp outside, soft inside, and a unique flavor. Yumm! That's one ingredient that was best local, but even they have moved to NJ. (Philly government is a poster child for Democrat incompetence and has been for 50 years.)

If you have Wawa convenience stores, they make pretty good hoagies on Amoroso's great rolls.

Posted by: doug at January 24, 2016 10:54 AM (3oZsF)

162 I got zero questions right and zero questions wrong for an IQ of 32.

Must be this headache.

But If i'm that dumb, how was I able to even read the test?

I even knew all the words, but two didn't have any similarities that I could see.

Must be this sinus headache.

Or I forgot to enable scripts. That might be it.

I'mma gonna go soak my head. It sometimes lessens the pain.

Posted by: Skandia Recluse at January 24, 2016 10:55 AM (I2VBa)

163 Guess I should plug my book.

http://astore.amazon.com/aoshq-20/detail/B014BTSEYO

Please buy if you haven't. If you have bought and read it, as Oregon Muse asks please leave a review. The more reviews us poor authors get the greater chance of us breaking out to be noticed by more people.

Thanks.

Posted by: Anna Puma at January 24, 2016 10:55 AM (r+/qI)

164 Wonder if we all missed the same question on the IQ Vocab quiz.

Posted by: Turd Ferguson at January 24, 2016 10:39 AM (/ciMI)

Reading a few of the comments at the site, the biggest complaint was the inability to see which answer was deemed "wrong" by the designer.

Posted by: RushBabe at January 24, 2016 10:56 AM (/NEnw)

165 The 15-year-old terrorist who killed Dafna Meir tells Shin Bet investigators that he decided to murder a Jew after watching inciting programs on Palestinian television.

Their After-School Specials are a little different than ours.

Posted by: t-bird at January 24, 2016 10:56 AM (w/iDp)

166 The 'cardinal' one is the one for which I put 'I don't know'.

Posted by: t-bird at January 24, 2016 10:45 AM (w/iDp)


I paired "cardinal" with "pilot", because no other pairing in that list seemed to make sense. A Cardinal could be considered a "pilot" for the Church, and a compass has cardinal points, so there is at least a hint of association.

So maybe that was the wrong that docked me 2 questions worth.

Posted by: Alberta Oil Peon at January 24, 2016 10:57 AM (Z8fuk)

167 Nevergiveup, so Paleostinian TV after school specials are called what?

Schoohouse Rockets?

Posted by: Anna Puma at January 24, 2016 10:57 AM (r+/qI)

168 I only got 130 on the IQ/vocab test. It says I got 0 wrong, but I had a couple of ''don't know"s.

Posted by: OregonMuse at January 24, 2016 10:57 AM (UCmQM)

169 Their After-School Specials are a little different than ours.

Posted by: t-bird

*Shooting Star*
The More You Kill!

Posted by: PLO PSA at January 24, 2016 10:58 AM (/ciMI)

170 @161
Oh yeah. Amoroso's make the difference. I'm sure you've had a Delassandro's steak, no?

Posted by: Josephistan at January 24, 2016 10:58 AM (7qAYi)

171 Another kvetch about methodology. Someone here got 133 with a "don't know". I got a 133 with one wrong (I didn't do any "don't know"s).

The test claims that wrong answers count against you. So I shouldn't have the same score as the other poster.

Posted by: Bandersnatch, let all the children boogie at January 24, 2016 10:59 AM (1xUj/)

172 This is appalling. A library is a quiet oasis, not a town square.

Taking over public spaces seems to be a thing with some Muslims.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, Literate Savage at January 24, 2016 10:48 AM (jR7Wy)


Solution? Walk through the library, strewing baon bits on the floors. Johnny Baconseed!

Posted by: Alberta Oil Peon at January 24, 2016 10:59 AM (Z8fuk)

173
Thank you for the book thread every week...

Oregon Muse

I read a bit of it in the mornings when I have time and I go back to it later in the day to read more comments and get good options for my next good read.

This thread is one of the best things on the internetz in my humble opinion. You really do a wonderful job on it every week.

I don't always comment on this thread or other threads- for that matter...but I do read and enjoy the treads so much here at the HQ.

Posted by: Some Guy in Wisconsin at January 24, 2016 11:00 AM (Qj6zv)

174 Still reading "The Arabs" by David Lamb. In the middle of a chapter about Libya. A previous reader underlined a lot, in pencil. Either he gave up or got bored because there are huge chunks in the middle that do not have underlining.

Still reading "Jesus: a biography from a believer" by Paul Johnson. It's quite good.

And I started reading "Back in Blood" by Tom Wolfe. Not sure about this one - hoping it develops a plot soon. It seems like he started his schtick - inserting sounds and repeating dialog with accents - too soon. We shall see.

Posted by: Tonestaple at January 24, 2016 11:00 AM (RtCTo)

175 Their After-School Specials are a little different than ours.
Posted by: t-bird at January 24, 2016 10:56 AM

Yes, but like ours, are funded with our tax dollars.
And generous funding from The Chubb Group.

Posted by: Josephistan at January 24, 2016 11:00 AM (7qAYi)

176 Unless you have studie the art of erotic writing, you are much better off fading to black, trust me.

Posted by: @votermom at January 24, 2016 10:34 AM (cbfNE)

Amen. When you consider Vince Flynn and Brad Thor books are heavy action-packed thrillers filled with no-nonsense tough guys, they still manage to be classy, even though you know in real life that things aren't all that sanitized.

It's the same way Hitchcock masterfully let viewers use their own imaginations to get the full thrust of suspense or horror.

Posted by: RushBabe at January 24, 2016 10:39 AM


Then there is John Ringo's "Ghost", which generated one of the most epic book reviews in history:

OH JOHN RINGO NO
http://hradzka.livejournal.com/194753.html

Posted by: cool breeze at January 24, 2016 11:01 AM (ckvus)

177 My first novel is now in its final form and I started on the second. Difficult to do much, given how busy my life is these days, but I advance in fits and starts.

A couple of people at school (a physics PhD and a Math PhD student) read it and liked it. The female student *really* liked it and is now a bona fide fan, who almost drooled when I offered to let her be the first to see my completed first chapter of the second book.

The physics PhD was turned off a little by what he considered gratuitous details, but what I call realism. He suggested that it might turn off conservative, female readers. Ironically, the PhD student who loved it is a conservative female reader.

So, yay. Target demographic (fantasy-reading adults) seems to be a bull's eye.

Posted by: Apostate at January 24, 2016 11:01 AM (k1vHn)

178 Fenelon, my dad spent a short time in Italy near the end of WWII and has quite a devotion to Padre Pio. He had a dream about him where Pio advised, "Pray the rosary." He said he was also told that he was healed. He had been battling prostate cancer for years and taking mega-bucks injections every six months or so, and the disease stayed the same, no progress no regression. He asked to be tested at the next visit and the doctor said his cancer was gone.

Didn't know about all of Pio's time in the confessional. I switched to a church where the young priest is devout and always urging confession. It's as if he knows something the rest of us are only surmising IYKWIMAITTYD.

Posted by: RushBabe at January 24, 2016 11:01 AM (/NEnw)

179 I got 96% correct on vocabulary IQ.
I know the meaning of probably 500, 000
words. Some barely but in the context of
a sentence I know them fully.

That's my excuse and I'm sticking with it.

Since this is a book thread I was just driving
about in suburban Pennsylvania and this is
not a good day to drive around buying books.
Roads are still ice and snow covered and very
narrow. Top speed I hit was about 20 mph. The
guys with the plows are everywhere.

Posted by: ugg boots at January 24, 2016 11:01 AM (fbovC)

180 I took the IQ test and got 133 as well. The one question I debated was mean/small/?angry? or some such. Mean can mean paltry as well, so I was unsure what to choose.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, Literate Savage at January 24, 2016 11:02 AM (jR7Wy)

181 Just a head's up, a new Moron author will be joining the quest for readership.

AllenG just got the proof copy of his novel.

Posted by: Anna Puma at January 24, 2016 11:03 AM (r+/qI)

182 I was working in a book store when the Madonna book came out. It was shipped sealed and we had permission to open one copy to allow adult customers a brief glimpse. It was really badly made. The one we opened soon fell apart and reports came in that this was a common complaint. It was so fragile that you could tell which customers bought it to stash away in hopes it would someday be worth an immense amount.

These people were idiots as the collector's market was grossly overfilled by then and most items never achieved any great markup. Anyone with a basic concept of economics could see why.

The book itself was crap. The writing barely rose above Penthouse Forum in an arty mood. There were maybe two or three pictures of note and several that were downright repugnant, like those with the pair of really ugly lesbian they brought in to be transgressive, a word that was overused when writing about the book's 'author.'

Not ever having been a teenage girl or gay man, the appeal of Madonna always evaded me. She had a few hits after that book, so it wasn't her shark jumping moment but it may have been when she started up the ramp.

Posted by: Epobirs at January 24, 2016 11:03 AM (IdCqF)

183 Denizens of the SMBT may enjoy this vocabulary/IQ test:
http://bit.ly/1S3rySn
Posted by: RushBabe at January 24, 2016 09:46 AM (/NEnw)

So I took that little quiz, and finished in under 4 minutes. Some tests factor speed into the results, this isn't one of them.

2 wrong. No way to find out which 2 , because I'd like to argue my case.
Some of us take these things waaay too seriously.

Posted by: OneEyedJack at January 24, 2016 11:04 AM (kKHcp)

184 Every copy of 'Sex' seems to be glued shut. Odd.

By real glue, in most cases.

Posted by: boulder terlit hobo at January 24, 2016 11:04 AM (6FqZa)

185 I don't know that I own any truly rare books, but I do have a first edition hardcover of "Queen of the Flat-Tops" by Stanley Johnston, which belonged to my father and is inscribed by him. It's about the aircraft carrier USS Lexington and the Battle of the Coral Sea in 1942. My dad was on the ship and participated in the battle.

I think I read in an earlier book thread that Johnston later got in trouble for inadvertently revealing classified information in a newspaper article that could have affected the outcome of the Battle of Midway, but luckily the Japanese apparently never saw it. In this book, the USS Yorktown, which also took part in the battle, is referred to only as "Carrier II".

Posted by: rickl at January 24, 2016 11:05 AM (sdi6R)

186 42 Rushbabe

Missed 3. So not as smart as others.

#44 of 45 seemed a tad obscure.

Posted by: NaCly Dog at January 24, 2016 11:06 AM (u82oZ)

187 2 wrong. No way to find out which 2 , because I'd like to argue my case.
Some of us take these things waaay too seriously.


*fistbump*

Posted by: Bandersnatch, let all the children boogie at January 24, 2016 11:06 AM (1xUj/)

188 I paired "cardinal" with "pilot", because no other pairing in that list seemed to make sense. A Cardinal could be considered a "pilot" for the Church, and a compass has cardinal points, so there is at least a hint of association.

So maybe that was the wrong that docked me 2 questions worth.
Posted by: Alberta Oil Peon at January 24, 2016 10:57 AM (Z8fuk)
---
I also made this pairing. Can "Cardinal" mean "initial, primary"? Is it wrong? It felt right to me, and feelings trump facts.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, Literate Savage at January 24, 2016 11:06 AM (jR7Wy)

189 AOP: sorry about the hoops. I wanted to post it somewhere I could get laughed at by professional scholars. I can email the PDF if you like.

Posted by: boulder terlit hobo at January 24, 2016 10:52 AM (6FqZa)


Not a slam at you, bth. Kind of surprised that a supposedly "academic" site would require log-in from two flighty social-networking cesspools, is all. What about Arkiv.org?


Just pop in to Table 9 now and then, and if you catch me there, we can open a private chat, and I can give you my e-mail. Or get it from Rose, Birk, or Osprey, or Kirly.


Good luck with the publication. Watch out for fat was.

Posted by: Alberta Oil Peon at January 24, 2016 11:06 AM (Z8fuk)

190 The more reviews us poor authors get the greater chance of us breaking out to be noticed by more people.

This. I'm bad about doing reviews too, to be fair. I plan on going back and reviewing a lot of the books I enjoyed.

Posted by: Craig Allen at January 24, 2016 11:07 AM (Bu03j)

191 Regarding the side bar: The Texas Tribune and the Texas Observer are uber lefty publications. Plus the people who work there are snotty hipster brats.

Posted by: Bruce With a Wang! at January 24, 2016 11:07 AM (iQIUe)

192 Or I forgot to enable scripts. That might be it.


Chuckles. Yes, any test like that would require JavaScript.

I used to write intranet tests like that for use in an elementary school computer lab. Pretty much impossible to do much computation with plain old html.

Posted by: ugg boots at January 24, 2016 11:07 AM (fbovC)

193 I really like collections of letters of spiritual direction, which is why I enjoy the letters of Fenelon among other writers.. The letters of St Pio, I think, are letters he wrote to people as well as letters from his own spiritual director. It's funny to me think of the devout Pio having a spiritual director, but he obviously needed someone he could unburden himself to and it's probably "required" or strongly suggested if you're in a religious order .Like almost every other mystic-or the ones I've read, at least- he had his times of a "'dark night of the soul" and his spiritual director told him to persevere anyway. To me this is reminiscent of John Wesley, the founder of the Methodist movement who wasn't feeling like he was saved and was told by a Moravian minister, "Preach faith until you have it."

Some militant atheists or people who loathe Catholicism were-I would say- "delighted" that Mother Teresa of Calcutta had a long time where she was in darkness. To them, this apparently proved that it was all nonsense. My thought was about the people who had that reaction was, "You haven't read the lives of many mystics have you?" It's quite common, and as far as I can tell their spiritual disciplines carried them through or it didn't matter that they didn't "Feel it" because our feelings are no reliable indication that God is present. As St Pio says in his advice to a person he gave spiritual direction to:

"Jesus is always with you, even when you don't feel his presence. He is never so close to you as he is during spiritual battles."

Posted by: FenelonSpoke at January 24, 2016 11:07 AM (w4NZ8)

194 A library is a quiet oasis, not a town square

Around that time the adminstrators eliminated the second floor stacks, favoring a lounge area for "group learning" and more computer labs

Students seeking quiet solitude be damned

Posted by: derit at January 24, 2016 11:08 AM (OC+TJ)

195 Finished reading 1177BC: The Year Civilization Collapsed. An interesting look at how a globalized, interconnected international community may, in fact, become more vulnerable to collapse from things that would normally be weathered locally, because each actor bears not just their own burdens but everyone else's--and the result isn't always to spread the risk, but sometimes multiply. I'm oversimplifying, but it's worth a read.

Looking at the Great Courses catalog right now. I've been in a learning mood of late.

Posted by: Brother Cavil, hither and yon at January 24, 2016 11:08 AM (m9V0o)

196 My wife bought a garage sale book about carving wooden duck decoys. It had all kinds of handwritten annotations in it, so she paid only a dollar for it.

It was a galley proof copy-- the annotations were amendments & corrections that were later incorporated into the first edition.

She sold it on ebay for $300. This was her biggest coup by far. Strictly a desultory hobby. She's also had a lot of success with craft books about painting on mailboxes & metal milk containers-- there's a term of art for that, but I can't think of it.

Posted by: mnw (fair and ballast) at January 24, 2016 11:08 AM (NiHAc)

197 My only rare book is the USNI Press Hunt for Red October signed by Tom Clancy. I gave it to my father, who was on the Glomar Explorer, and got it back when he passed.

Posted by: NaCly Dog at January 24, 2016 11:08 AM (u82oZ)

198
You got 43 questions right and 2 questions wrong, which produces a raw score of 42.3 and converts to an IQ score of 130.

An IQ score is relative to a population. The average is 100 and the scores are distributed like in the graph below.

--
I am sure I got the 4th question wrong:
Finish
Embellish
Cap
Squeak
Talk

I couldn't decide squeak - talk, finish - embellish, or finish - cap?


My other error is probably
Hightail-abscond


Posted by: @votermom at January 24, 2016 11:08 AM (cbfNE)

199 Queen of the Flattops should be read for a simple reason. The immediacy is there. Even as Stanley writes of the fighter pilots shooting up a destroyer with their machine guns or having dog-fights with Messerschmidt fighters.

And yes US Naval Intelligence worried that some spy would read Johnson's off-hand comment about reading the Japanese code. Luckily if it did happen, the Japanese did not change JN-25 until a week before Operation MI and after Hypo had decoded about 15% of Yamamoto's plan.

Posted by: Anna Puma at January 24, 2016 11:09 AM (r+/qI)

200 I paired "cardinal" with "pilot", because no other pairing in that list seemed to make sense. A Cardinal could be considered a "pilot" for the Church, and a compass has cardinal points, so there is at least a hint of association.

So maybe that was the wrong that docked me 2 questions worth.
Posted by: Alberta Oil Peon at January 24, 2016 10:57 AM (Z8fuk)
---
I also made this pairing. Can "Cardinal" mean "initial, primary"? Is it wrong? It felt right to me, and feelings trump facts.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, Literate Savage at January 24, 2016 11:06 AM (jR7Wy)



I paired "pilot" and "trial," based on the assumption that there was some pop culture influence on the test. A TV show pilot is a trial run to see how much potential the show has for success.

Posted by: Country Singer at January 24, 2016 11:09 AM (GUBah)

201 Trying to be non-spoily. I had a sense of foreboding about someone in the book. It doesn't happen in the book, but in the epilogue written seven years later it has happened.

Posted by: Bandersnatch, let all the children boogie at January 24, 2016 10:04 AM (1xUj/)


I think I know who and what you're talking about. When I first read the book, I don't think it had happened yet, so I had to wait till later to find out. What a tragedy. Eff that guy in particular who did it.

Posted by: OregonMuse at January 24, 2016 11:09 AM (UCmQM)

202 I also made this pairing. Can "Cardinal" mean "initial, primary"? Is it wrong? It felt right to me, and feelings trump facts.

On the Cardinal question I matched "pilot" with "trial", in the sense of an initial test.

No way to know whether that's the one I got wrong, though.

*junkpunches the test*

Posted by: Bandersnatch, let all the children boogie at January 24, 2016 11:10 AM (1xUj/)

203 Allen G and I exchanged email addresses last year so I could read/edit his book. Never heard from him, haven't seen him around here ('burn it down, salt the earth, etc.'. Glad he's still alive?

Posted by: Apostate at January 24, 2016 11:10 AM (k1vHn)

204 Hmm, I put hightail-abscond and cap-finish.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, Literate Savage at January 24, 2016 11:10 AM (jR7Wy)

205 "Pilot" is paired with "trial"--a pilot program, e.g.

Posted by: Turd Ferguson at January 24, 2016 11:10 AM (/ciMI)

206 If you wanted to argue your case on the vocabulary quiz, you probably had to answer a few questions which I declined to do.

Posted by: FenelonSpoke at January 24, 2016 11:11 AM (w4NZ8)

207 My only rare book is the USNI Press Hunt for Red October signed by Tom Clancy. I gave it to my father, who was on the Glomar Explorer, and got it back when he passed.
Posted by: NaCly Dog at January 24, 2016 11:08 AM (u82oZ)

Wow

Posted by: Nevergiveup at January 24, 2016 11:12 AM (DUoqb)

208 http://www.weeklystandard.com/nine-tales-of-trump-at-his-trumpiest/article/2000697

Posted by: TallDave at January 24, 2016 10:54 AM (74ZYB)

Just read a little and will go back to it, but Labash is Moron material. Spot on. Thanks for posting.

Posted by: RushBabe at January 24, 2016 11:12 AM (/NEnw)

209 Yeah, also didn't want to give out my email to something called 'academia'.

Also, it seems that the average IQ is 133. Garrison Keillor would be so proud of us!

(Note: my browser actually spell-checks 'Garrison Keillor'. Guess he is just that important.)

Posted by: t-bird at January 24, 2016 11:13 AM (w/iDp)

210 Or did I pair "trial" with "pilot"? I think I did.

We should have made copies of our answers and compared notes. I'm kind of a wordwang and this annoys me.

*junkpunches test in solidarity with Bander*

Posted by: All Hail Eris, Literate Savage at January 24, 2016 11:13 AM (jR7Wy)

211 Greetings:

Just mention my name in Sheboygan,
But please don't tell them where I am.

Posted by: 11B40 at January 24, 2016 11:13 AM (evgyj)

212 What a tragedy. Eff that guy in particular who did it.
Posted by: OregonMuse


Yes, that. Eff that guy in particular.

Posted by: Bandersnatch, let all the children boogie at January 24, 2016 11:13 AM (1xUj/)

213 I guess the quickest way to find the 'correct' answer to one particular question Is to 'don't know' the 44 other questions.

Posted by: ugg boots at January 24, 2016 11:13 AM (fbovC)

214 Finish - cap was right.

Posted by: t-bird at January 24, 2016 11:15 AM (w/iDp)

215 And now I go back to where I left of in the comments, before being derailed by the mini-quiz.

Turns out we're all combative test takers.
It was amusing to see so many with the same thoughts.

Posted by: OneEyedJack at January 24, 2016 11:15 AM (kKHcp)

216 Schlesinger wrote "The Disuniting of America" 25 years ago.
http://www.city-journal.org/2016/eon0122fs.html

Reminds me of Thomas Del Beccaro's "The Divided Era". American and ancient history. From last year.

"The larger our governments, the greater the competition for their spoils--therefore our divisions"

Posted by: KT at January 24, 2016 11:15 AM (qahv/)

217 Stanchion and pole?

Posted by: Anna Puma at January 24, 2016 11:15 AM (r+/qI)

218 I paired "pilot" and "trial," based on the assumption that there was some pop culture influence on the test. A TV show pilot is a trial run to see how much potential the show has for success.

Posted by: Country Singer at January 24, 2016 11:09 AM (GUBah)


That makes sense!

Posted by: Alberta Oil Peon at January 24, 2016 11:15 AM (Z8fuk)

219 185 rickl

For me the Wow!! point in Queen of the Flattops
was when a man overboard was reported.

The order from the Task Force Commander was Maintain Course and Speed.

A different time, WWII wartime steaming.

Posted by: NaCly Dog at January 24, 2016 11:16 AM (u82oZ)

220 *gives RushBabe the Bright Shiny Object to Distract the Horde Award*

Posted by: Bandersnatch, let all the children boogie at January 24, 2016 11:16 AM (1xUj/)

221 Stanchion and pole?

Posted by: Anna Puma at January 24, 2016 11:15 AM (r+/qI)




That's what I used. No idea if it was one of the three incorrect answers I had.

Posted by: Country Singer at January 24, 2016 11:16 AM (GUBah)

222 Stanchion and pole?

Yes. Being a farm boy helped on that one!

Posted by: t-bird at January 24, 2016 11:17 AM (w/iDp)

223 I don't think my IQ as high as that would indicate; I think it's all bosh. I feel as I get older my IQ is slipping a great deal.

Posted by: FenelonSpoke at January 24, 2016 11:17 AM (w4NZ8)

224 Re #196

Tole painting. Couldn't think of that term.

Posted by: mnw (fair and ballast) at January 24, 2016 11:18 AM (NiHAc)

225 207 My only rare book is the USNI Press Hunt for Red October signed by Tom Clancy. I gave it to my father, who was on the Glomar Explorer, and got it back when he passed.
Posted by: NaCly Dog at January 24, 2016 11:08 AM (u82oZ)

Wow
Posted by: Nevergiveup at January 24, 2016 11:12 AM (DUoqb)
---
You win.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, Literate Savage at January 24, 2016 11:18 AM (jR7Wy)

226 214 Finish - cap was right.
Posted by: t-bird at January 24, 2016 11:15 AM (w/iDp)

Damnit!

Posted by: @votermom at January 24, 2016 11:18 AM (cbfNE)

227 but there's a an app called TotalBoox. Some can use it for free through their local library, but anyone can pay to use it. They have a different model--you only pay for what you read, so if you give up on a book 10% in, you only pay 10% of the cost of the book.
Woohoo! 97% refund to Ace on The Hound of the Baskervilles!

Posted by: andycanuck at January 24, 2016 11:18 AM (DLIIY)

228 Stanchion and pole?

Posted by: Anna Puma at January 24, 2016 11:15 AM (r+/qI)


You've never watched the stanchion dancers at Spearmint Rhino, have you?

Posted by: Alberta Oil Peon at January 24, 2016 11:18 AM (Z8fuk)

229 221 Stanchion and pole?
Posted by: Anna Puma at January 24, 2016 11:15 AM (r+/qI)

That's what I used. No idea if it was one of the three incorrect answers I had.
Posted by: Country Singer at January 24, 2016 11:16 AM (GUBah)


That's what I did, and it told me I missed 0. So I guess it's right.

Posted by: OregonMuse at January 24, 2016 11:19 AM (UCmQM)

230 Posted by: mnw (fair and ballast) at January 24, 2016 11:08 AM (NiHAc)

Wow. Does she use an app or something to check prices before she buys?

Posted by: @votermom at January 24, 2016 11:20 AM (cbfNE)

231 Salty Dog, you should read Battleship at War about USS Washington.

Early '42 when the battleship was assigned to the British Home Fleet and was steaming in the North Atlantic with waves, gales, and everything bad the North Atlantic is known for.

And there was a call "Man overboard!" The ship's complement was fully accounted for. So who went over board? Then they couldn't find the Admiral. It was him who went overboard and never recovered.

Posted by: Anna Puma at January 24, 2016 11:20 AM (r+/qI)

232 Tole painting. Couldn't think of that term.

Posted by: mnw (fair and ballast) at January 24, 2016 11:18 AM (NiHAc)


Yeah. Go to the swap meets and flea markets here in the Phoenix area, and you see lots of tole booths.

Posted by: Alberta Oil Peon at January 24, 2016 11:22 AM (Z8fuk)

233 Posted by: boulder terlit hobo at January 24, 2016 11:04 AM (6FqZa)

For me, it would be permanently glued-as I find Madonna neither sexy or have a desire to read her great thoughts. It's not that I wouldn't look at tasteful nude pictures of some other entertainers-even woman, but not Madonna.

Posted by: FenelonSpoke at January 24, 2016 11:22 AM (w4NZ8)

234 Finished listening to G A Hinty's With Henry at Agincourt. Wow, had no idea the Parisians had so much practice at mob violence *before* the revolution. Mad kings are horrible for a country. England got off lightly by only losing the US compared to the disaster Charles the Mad was for France. In the book the King *knows* he's mad and a pawn, which makes it all the worse.

Posted by: Polliwog the 'Ette at January 24, 2016 11:22 AM (GDulk)

235 I guess the silver lining in Captain Retar...er...Trump being the nominee will be the 100s of hours of free time I'll have that I typically spend reading political blogs and polls.

Maybe I'll take up model making.

Posted by: VBJonny at January 24, 2016 11:24 AM (NX9H4)

236 Someone upthread may have hit on the key to the 145 score, and that would be to find one you know is right, and "don't know" the rest.
The rules, such as they were, clearly point out you won't be scored against for don't knows, only wrong answers.

Perhaps that was the actual point of the test. Combined with the small survey at the bottom, it could paint a picture of those who, like us, are combative test takers, and those who look for the loopholes.

Posted by: OneEyedJack at January 24, 2016 11:24 AM (kKHcp)

237 208 http://www.weeklystandard.com/nine-tales-of-trump-at-his-trumpiest/article/2000697

Posted by: TallDave at January 24, 2016 10:54 AM (74ZYB)


I laughed out loud at this description of Trump's toupe:

There's that hair that looks like a mac-'n'-cheese-colored nutria that was hit by an oil truck.

The rest of the piece is pretty funny, too.

Posted by: OregonMuse at January 24, 2016 11:25 AM (UCmQM)

238 Maybe I'll take up model making.

Posted by: VBJonny at January 24, 2016 11:24 AM (NX9H4)


Trump has the same hobby!

Posted by: Alberta Oil Peon at January 24, 2016 11:25 AM (Z8fuk)

239 Face the Nation panel still tongue bathing Zipster. They just can't help themselves. It's sickening.

Posted by: Hadoop at January 24, 2016 11:25 AM (2X7pN)

240 VBJohnny, what kind of model making?

This kind?
http://www.e2046.com/product/Dark+Wolf/24314/

Posted by: Anna Puma at January 24, 2016 11:26 AM (r+/qI)

241 LeBron James becomes Israeli public's newest enemy after Blatt firing

LMAO

Posted by: Nevergiveup at January 24, 2016 11:26 AM (DUoqb)

242 Haha, I thought the same thing as I typed that, Alberta.

Posted by: VBJonny at January 24, 2016 11:26 AM (NX9H4)

243 http://www.weeklystandard.com/nine-tales-of-trump-at-his-trumpiest/article/2000697
Posted by: TallDave at January 24, 2016 10:54 AM (74ZYB)
Just read a little and will go back to it, but Labash is Moron material. Spot on. Thanks for posting.
Posted by: RushBabe at January 24, 2016 11:12 AM (/NEnw)
_________

My Sunday mornings are various editorials and McLaughlin, along with SMGT, so I just read that this am. Sometimes I miss print papers Sunday morning because it is not the same reading screen vs reading greasy newsprint. Need to do my windows ASAP and I don't have papers sitting around (window-licking grandkid, dog and cat).

Affection and admiration with acknowledgement of deep faults. Actually, a good essay.

Posted by: mustbequantum at January 24, 2016 11:27 AM (MIKMs)

244 I want to thank our panelists for fellating President Teenbeat!

Posted by: Hadoop at January 24, 2016 11:27 AM (2X7pN)

245 VBJohnny, what kind of model making?

This kind?
http://www.e2046.com/product/Dark+Wolf/24314/

Posted by: Anna Puma at January 24, 2016 11:26 AM (r+/qI)




I was hoping this kind: https://youtu.be/25q3hxlgvw4


Then I was going to place an order.

Posted by: Country Singer at January 24, 2016 11:28 AM (GUBah)

246 I don't think my IQ as high as that would indicate; I think it's all
bosh. I feel as I get older my IQ is slipping a great deal.


I know the feeling, though I get an occasional opposite feeling. Back when I went back into school for a couple of years I went straight As and stood out in most of my classes. The only thing was, I didn't feel like I was that smart or that good--but I could look around me at the kids I was taking the courses with and, well, I really wondered what the hell they were getting taught in school those days. (Some of the material I'd learned in high school, twenty years previously, and yet these kids looked dazed and begged for an out!)

It's not that I got smarter, in other words. It's that the world is so much dumber, you feel like a titan in comparison. It did not make for a good feeling.

Posted by: Brother Cavil, hither and yon at January 24, 2016 11:30 AM (m9V0o)

247 Huh. Did not know that Trump was a scale modeler. I build 1/72 combat jets & experimental planes. I have over 100 built, with at least that many unbuilt kits.

Posted by: Josephistan at January 24, 2016 11:30 AM (7qAYi)

248 Right now, my family and I are reading aloud Saul David's "Operation Thunderbolt", which is a chronological telling of the Israeli raid on Entebbe Airport in Uganda, to free several hundred hostages who'd been taken prisoner by Palestinian and German terrorists. It's an amazing story, very well told; well worth reading.

For fellow Jane Austen fans, I recommend the version of "Sanditon", Austen last, unfinished novel, which was completed by an anonymous author in 1976; and which my wife and I are reading now. The author does a very good job of fleshing out the story and mimicking the Austen style. The first 11 chapters, by Austen herself, are different from the six principal novels; for one thing, they feature characters who actually have to work for a living (apart from naval officers and clergymen); and the comedy is sharp and highly amusing. Highly recommended!

Here endeth the lesson ...

Posted by: Brown Line at January 24, 2016 11:30 AM (a5bF3)

249 For those who have 25,000 words/100 pages of non-fiction written, perhaps this might tempt you.

http://preview.tinyurl.com/hnqrstv

I have multiple ideas of what to write. Doubt I could crank out 25,000 words plus an outline by the 31st.

Posted by: Anna Puma at January 24, 2016 11:30 AM (r+/qI)

250 Votermom

No app, & she doesn't do it much any more.

She did VERY well with old cookbooks, btw. Especially regional ones, & ones that were published by long-gone restaurants.

Posted by: mnw (fair and ballast) at January 24, 2016 11:30 AM (NiHAc)

251 231 Anna Puma

Yes. I always thought Read Admiral John W. Wilcox was either pushed, or too infirm to be the in charge.

FWIW, in the 80s we had a sailor mysteriously fall off the fantail at 0400. He was a well known jerk.

The ship got very silent when it was reported The man has been in the water 2 hours. Fortunately, it was in the Caribbean. A helicopter rescued him after 6 hours in the water. The daylight sure helped.

Posted by: NaCly Dog at January 24, 2016 11:31 AM (u82oZ)

252 My wife recently got me this model.

https://www.reapermini .com/OnlineStore/sophie/latest/01418

I lack time for miniatures, these days, but it's not going anywhere.

Posted by: Apostate at January 24, 2016 11:31 AM (k1vHn)

253 Morning horde. 247+ comments already.

*scrolls up while stuffing myself with canuckistan bacon.

Posted by: RWC - Team BOHICA at January 24, 2016 11:32 AM (hlMPp)

254 I don't think my IQ as high as that would indicate; I think it's all bosh. I feel as I get older my IQ is slipping a great deal.
Posted by: FenelonSpoke at January 24, 2016 11:17 AM (w4NZ

You may be getting to that age where you've forgotten more than some people have learned. Lack of recall in a timely fashion, so to speak.

Do you find yourself having an "aha!" moment hours after not knowing something trivial?

Or, it could be that like most sentient beings, the more you know, the more you realize how little you know.

Posted by: OneEyedJack at January 24, 2016 11:32 AM (kKHcp)

255 Huh. Did not know that Trump was a scale modeler. I build 1/72 combat jets & experimental planes. I have over 100 built, with at least that many unbuilt kits.

Posted by: Josephistan at January 24, 2016 11:30 AM (7qAYi)


Uhhh, no. Leastwise, if he builds scale models, I never heard of it. It was a pun. He boinks fashion models. "make" is an old slang term, meaning the same as "boink" does now.

Posted by: Alberta Oil Peon at January 24, 2016 11:33 AM (Z8fuk)

256 I want to make a Harryhausen Talos. I don't know if they're even in production.

Posted by: VBJonny at January 24, 2016 11:33 AM (NX9H4)

257 Greetings:

Finished "Outlaw Platoon" by Sean Parnell et al. earlier this week. So, as ordered, directed, and required by Sgt. Mom, here's my reviewport.

(N.B. My local library branch has recently overthrown the Dewey Decimal patriarchy so I found it in their new brand "Bio" section as opposed to the "900s" history of the recently deposed system.)

It was a pretty light read about Lt. Parnell's tour as a Platoon Leader in Afghanistan with the 10th Mountain Division. He was involved in several significant battles that he does a good job reporting on. He conveys pretty much all the disappointments an infantry leader can expect in his relations with the US Army, the local nasties and not-so-nasties, and our "Pak" allies along that border. His unit was "stop-lossed" but he does not much dwell on it much the way America didn't and doesn't. He also kind of glosses over whatever deadheads he had in his platoon which leaves a bit of a positive skew in its wake. The Afghan army units with their US Marine advisers performed pretty aggressively in actions with him.

Overall, a worthwhile but light read. A good bit of the inner angst bit, below average mapping (and none of the actual gunfights), some good photos, and an interesting story of a young Lt. who took his responsibilities admirably seriously.

I continue to be underwhelmed by the quality of the mapping in military books these days.



Posted by: 11B40 at January 24, 2016 11:33 AM (evgyj)

258 Country Singer, so you are a 'degenerate' Silly question, you are a Moron after all.

Posted by: Anna Puma at January 24, 2016 11:33 AM (r+/qI)

259 She did VERY well with old cookbooks, btw. Especially regional ones, & ones that were published by long-gone restaurants.
Posted by: mnw (fair and ballast) at January 24, 2016 11:30 AM (NiHAc)


--

Good to know!
Thanks!

Posted by: @votermom at January 24, 2016 11:34 AM (cbfNE)

260 Uhhh, no. Leastwise, if he builds scale models, I never heard of it. It was a pun. He boinks fashion models. "make" is an old slang term, meaning the same as "boink" does now.

Heh. As a teen, when I would get on my bike & go to the local hobby store to get a model, my dad would often say "Bring me back a nice blonde!"

Posted by: Josephistan at January 24, 2016 11:34 AM (7qAYi)

261 VBJohnny is this what you are looking for??

http://preview.tinyurl.com/ho2tvex

Posted by: Anna Puma at January 24, 2016 11:35 AM (r+/qI)

262 It's not that I got smarter, in other words. It's that the world is so much dumber, you feel like a titan in comparison. It did not make for a good feeling.
Posted by: Brother Cavil, hither and yon at January 24, 2016 11:30 AM (m9V0o)

This.

I have 2 nephews and one niece in college, and I wonder, based on their thoughts and knowledge base, what the hell are they doing with that time and money?
Hopefully, they will maintain a desire to learn beyond getting credentialed.

Posted by: OneEyedJack at January 24, 2016 11:35 AM (kKHcp)

263 mindful - Thank you for the review "The Time Traveller's Wife". I'll be sure to put it on my queue. As it happens, I'm a lifelong north-sider, in the Lincoln Square neighborhood, and it's always amusing to see my part of town pop up in novels.

BTW, Jim Butcher sets his Harry Dresden books in Chicago, but clearly he has never set foot here - at one point describing "acres of parking" around Wrigley Field: oy veh!

Posted by: Brown Line at January 24, 2016 11:36 AM (a5bF3)

264 I continue to be underwhelmed by the quality of the mapping in military books these days.
Posted by: 11B40 at January 24, 2016 11:33 AM

Seriously. If they even have maps at all. There's a military history publishing house in the UK called Hellion, a father & son outfit, that publishes good, if expensive books on smaller wars & secondary theaters of bigger wars. They usually include very good maps.

Posted by: Josephistan at January 24, 2016 11:36 AM (7qAYi)

265 /cocks head at "Sophie"

...I'm guessing the black rectangle is not included.

Christ on a crutch, no wonder I'm finding my old interests falling away.

Posted by: Brother Cavil, hither and yon at January 24, 2016 11:37 AM (m9V0o)

266 FWIW, in the 80s we had a sailor mysteriously fall off the fantail at 0400. He was a well known jerk.

Posted by: NaCly Dog at January 24, 2016 11:31 AM (u82oZ)



We had a particular asshole LT almost get washed over the side in heavy seas while he was standing OOD. Partly dumbassery on his behalf, partly skullduggery of the BMOW.

Posted by: Country Singer at January 24, 2016 11:37 AM (GUBah)

267 206 If you wanted to argue your case on the vocabulary quiz, you probably had to answer a few questions which I declined to do.
Posted by: FenelonSpoke at January 24, 2016 11:11 AM (w4NZ


No, I answered the questions and it still didn't tell me which ones I got wrong or let me argue my case.

It said I missed 3 for an IQ of 128. I was stubborn and didn't answer "don't know" to any question, even though I was unsure about a few.

Posted by: rickl at January 24, 2016 11:37 AM (sdi6R)

268 266 Country Singer

Hey.
I managed to hang on to the mahogany railing. Crisis averted.

Posted by: NaCly Dog at January 24, 2016 11:40 AM (u82oZ)

269 I continue to be underwhelmed by the quality of the mapping in military books these days.

Posted by: 11B40 at January 24, 2016 11:33 AM (evgyj)
---
I have a lot of 19th Century "In Darkest (Bloody Wogland) with Gun and Daguerreotype" books and I like the detailed foldout maps they always included. Is it just a question of price? Today's hardbacks are damned expensive so I feel I'm owed better maps -- or any maps at all.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, Literate Savage at January 24, 2016 11:41 AM (jR7Wy)

270 That's the one, Anna. I believe it comes assembled and painted, though.

Posted by: VBJonny at January 24, 2016 11:43 AM (NX9H4)

271 The Tsarina Catherine genre of romance novels

http://www.ufunk.net/wp-content/uploads/2016/01/selection-du-weekend-176-19.jpg

Posted by: Anna Puma at January 24, 2016 11:44 AM (r+/qI)

272 It said I missed 3 for an IQ of 128. I was stubborn and didn't answer "don't know" to any question, even though I was unsure about a few.

Posted by: rickl at January 24, 2016 11:37 AM (sdi6R)


It is the hardest thing in the world for me to chose "don't know" on one of these tests even when I'm told that getting it wrong is worse.

Posted by: OregonMuse at January 24, 2016 11:45 AM (UCmQM)

273 271 Anna Puma

Oh my.

You know it's a fake urban legend?

Posted by: NaCly Dog at January 24, 2016 11:45 AM (u82oZ)

274 Hey.
I managed to hang on to the mahogany railing. Crisis averted.

Posted by: NaCly Dog at January 24, 2016 11:40 AM (u82oZ)




He said he got washed halfway down the O2 level and almost went through the lifelines by the Mk75.

Posted by: Country Singer at January 24, 2016 11:45 AM (GUBah)

275 A horse with arms? Not a Minotaur. Not a Centaur. A Minohipp?

Posted by: Kindltot at January 24, 2016 11:47 AM (q2o38)

276 Life is too lousy to be reading short books.

Posted by: Insomniac - Pale Horse/Death 2016 at January 24, 2016 11:47 AM (kpqmD)

277 Salty Dog, we talking trashy romance novels...

Posted by: Anna Puma at January 24, 2016 11:47 AM (r+/qI)

278 I have a lot of 19th Century "In Darkest (Bloody Wogland) with Gun and Daguerreotype" books


*nominates this for Best Turn of Phrase in the Thread*

Posted by: Bandersnatch, let all the children boogie at January 24, 2016 11:47 AM (1xUj/)

279 271 The Tsarina Catherine genre of romance novels

http://www.ufunk.net/wp-content/uploads/2016/01/ selection-du-weekend-176-19.jpg

Posted by: Anna Puma at January 24, 2016 11:44 AM (r+/qI)


That actually looks pretty tame compared to that bear shapeshifting bbw romance stuff I posted a few weeks ago.

Posted by: OregonMuse at January 24, 2016 11:48 AM (UCmQM)

280 This is probably the time and place to mention that David Hartwell, the senior editor at Tor Books and a legend in the science fiction field, passed away suddenly this week. He was 74. One of the commenters was praising John C. Wright's work above -- Hartwell was his editor. Also Gene Wolfe's editor, and scores of other authors' as well.

Posted by: Trimegistus at January 24, 2016 11:48 AM (zq6az)

281 You know it's a fake urban legend?

Then explain John Kerry's genes.

Posted by: t-bird at January 24, 2016 11:48 AM (OLNwX)

282 Kindltot, The Island of Dr. Katerina Moreau?

Posted by: Anna Puma at January 24, 2016 11:49 AM (r+/qI)

283 It is the hardest thing in the world for me to chose "don't know" on one of these tests even when I'm told that getting it wrong is worse.

From reading various comments, you weren't penalized any more for a wrong answer than for an 'I don't know'. Also, time didn't factor into the scores.

Posted by: t-bird at January 24, 2016 11:52 AM (OLNwX)

284 274 Country Singer

Different OOD. Whew.

Posted by: NaCly Dog at January 24, 2016 11:52 AM (u82oZ)

285
'Huge sums from abroad are funding Arab terror'

Hotovely slams hundreds of millions of dollars going to PA, after Dafna Meir's murderer found to be a 'product of wild PA incitement.'

And the EU's response is stick a Yellow Star on Israeli imports and the US State Department agrees with that!

Posted by: Nevergiveup at January 24, 2016 11:53 AM (DUoqb)

286 I have a lot of 19th Century "In Darkest (Bloody Wogland) with Gun and Daguerreotype" books and I like the detailed foldout maps they always included. Is it just a question of price? Today's hardbacks are damned expensive so I feel I'm owed better maps -- or any maps at all.
Posted by: All Hail Eris, Literate Savage at January 24, 2016 11:41 AM (jR7Wy)
***
I love that entire genre. Galton's Art of Travel amounts to a how-to, should a gentleman decide to mount such an expedition.

(In my parents' library, there's a complete set of "With the Allies on All Fronts" - WWI stuff; fascinated me as a kid.)

Posted by: Your Decidedly Devious Uncle Palpatine, Still Accepting Harem Applicants at January 24, 2016 11:53 AM (lutOX)

287 281 t-bird

John Kerry is in no way related to nobility.

I suspect a mudder somewhere in his family tree.

Posted by: NaCly Dog at January 24, 2016 11:54 AM (u82oZ)

288 Then explain John Kerry's genes.

Frasier: And we're not Romanovs.  We're descended from thieves and whores.

Posted by: derit at January 24, 2016 11:54 AM (OC+TJ)

289 Khamenei gloats over capture of US sailors, meets captors

Same day Iran says it may reinstate flights to the US, Supreme Leader meets those who kidnapped sailors and praises 'act of God.'

Posted by: Nevergiveup at January 24, 2016 11:54 AM (DUoqb)

290 Different OOD. Whew.

Posted by: NaCly Dog at January 24, 2016 11:52 AM (u82oZ)




If you were him, I'd be bitching at you about the black olives on the pizza incident. And taunting you with tales of all the wardroom mess crank genitalia that came into contact with the glasses, plates, and silverware you used.

Posted by: Country Singer at January 24, 2016 11:55 AM (GUBah)

291 FenelonSpoke: Padre Pio... could apparently bilocate...

I wasn't even aware that "bilocation" was a thing, or there was a term for it, until reading about this here, probably in a FenelonSpoke previous mention of Padre Pio.

I'd read about an instance of it, though... did I tell this before? It was in Miracle of Love, a posthumously-collected book of tales of the Neem Karoli Baba - the guru of Dr Richard Alpert (acid head cohort of Tim Leary), a/k/a Baba Ram Dass, the "Be Here Now" guy. There is a PDF of the book online at Hanuman-Foundation.org, but I'm going to tell this from memory rather than look it up.

The guru goes to a barber who gives free haircuts and shaves to holy men. While the guru is in the chair, the barber talks about his son, who is far away and from whom the barber hasn't heard in too long.

Halfway through the shave, the guru excuses himself to go urinate, then comes back and the barber finishes the shave.

Days later, the barber's son shows up. He tells his father that he was approached by a crazy old man with half a beard telling him that he had to immediately go see his father.

I always liked that story. ... That is m/l what "bilocation" means, right?

Posted by: mindful webworker - time traveler (in one direction only) at January 24, 2016 11:55 AM (ECUyd)

292 277 Anna Puma

+ 6.022 x 10^23

Posted by: NaCly Dog at January 24, 2016 11:56 AM (u82oZ)

293 A few years ago I went through a period of seeking out books about the early years of the Space Age. While most of them are out of print, they weren't too expensive because they aren't widely sought after. So I don't know whether they count as "rare".

Some I've read and some I haven't. My favorite was "Atlas: The Story of a Missile" by John L. Chapman, published in 1960. It tells about the development and testing of America's first ICBM, or at least as much as was publicly available at time, considering that it was a pretty serious national security matter.

Atlas soon became obsolete as an ICBM due to the development of solid-fueled missiles like the Polaris and Minuteman, and those with storable liquid propellants like the Titan II, but Atlas went on to a long and glorious career as a workhorse satellite launcher, and of course launched the first American astronauts in Project Mercury. But all of that happened after the book.

Posted by: rickl at January 24, 2016 11:57 AM (sdi6R)

294 >>> That actually looks pretty tame compared to that bear shapeshifting bbw romance stuff I posted a few weeks ago.

Don't knock it! You spend early December making love in a warm den while all the suckers are dodging hunters and scrounging through garbage cans.

You lose a little weight, but you have your bedtime snack right there before settling in for the winter.

Posted by: Ursine chubby chaser at January 24, 2016 11:58 AM (AfsKp)

295 Then explain John Kerry's genes.
Posted by: t-bird


Mom genes.

Posted by: Bertram Cabot Jr. at January 24, 2016 11:59 AM (FkBIv)

296 The book dives into combat futility by using a fascinating series of examples of utter ineptitude throughout the 100 years prior to the book's writing

-
I don't have to read it. I lived it.

- Field Marshal Obozo

Posted by: The Great White Snark at January 24, 2016 12:00 PM (Nwg0u)

297 290 Country Singer

LOL. 10 percent of 4,000 underway OOD and SWO qualified LTs is 400.

Although I do believe that number today is much lower, due to the smaller Navy. Not sure if the number of assholes is any lower than back in the day.

Posted by: NaCly Dog at January 24, 2016 12:02 PM (u82oZ)

298 I don't have to read it. I lived it.

- Field Marshal Obozo
---

I'm here for ya, Brother.

Posted by: Brian Williams at January 24, 2016 12:02 PM (AfsKp)

299 138 Read a short story by Poul Anderson last night, "Call Me Joe." It's really interesting how James Cameron pretty much stole everything in "Avatar" and yet didn't make a thoughtful movie with it.
Posted by: BeckoningChasm at January 24, 2016 10:45 AM (B8JRQ)


That's a classic sci-fi story. I have a 3-vol. set of "Greatest Sci-Fi Stories Evah" and that was one of them.

It's amusing how "Joe" was causing damage to the equipment by causing tubes to blow. Yeah, tubes.

Now you youngsters might not know this, but vacuum tubes used to be...

Posted by: OregonMuse at January 24, 2016 12:03 PM (UCmQM)

300 Ok, hows about this? I'll make Washington into a violent drunken vulgarian who beats Martha. Then one day Hercules comes upon them and kills Washington in order to protect Martha. He and Matha flee to the West Indies to get married. They have ten kids and she lives the rest of her life happier and more "satisfied" (IYKWIM) by the buff Hercules than she ever was with the lout George. Would THAT be ok?

Posted by: Ramin Ganeshram at January 24, 2016 12:03 PM (jIjKK)

301 Re: bilocation & Padre Pio - I remember one episode of "Unsolved Mysteries" where there was a kid who was very sick & hospitalized. His family wrote to Padre Pio, asking for his prayers. One day the kid says to his mom how great it was that his uncle was able to come by & visit him in the hospital. His mom said that his uncle never came by to visit, he's in San Francisco or somehere, but her son's roommate says that he saw him praying by his bed. He described a man that did look like his uncle - which also happened to fit the description of Padre Pio. The boy made a complete recovery shortly thereafter.

Posted by: Josephistan at January 24, 2016 12:03 PM (7qAYi)

302 First time I ran across the term 'bilocation' was in Sybil Leek's book Diary of a Witch. As a child in school she would unconsciously do it.

Posted by: Anna Puma at January 24, 2016 12:03 PM (r+/qI)

303 Not sure if the number of assholes is any lower than back in the day.

Posted by: NaCly Dog at January 24, 2016 12:02 PM (u82oZ)




Heh, probably higher. To give context, this all happened on FFG-19 in the 90s.

Posted by: Country Singer at January 24, 2016 12:04 PM (GUBah)

304 Did someone say book rarities?

http://www.lawrenceperson.com/?tag=books

Because I've been collecting science fiction first editions for about a quarter century now....

Posted by: Lawrence Person at January 24, 2016 12:05 PM (Jm+BD)

305 The snow is melting, but it's not melting fast enough. I'm going to have to go out and deal with it at some point.

Posted by: rickl at January 24, 2016 12:05 PM (sdi6R)

306 *gives RushBabe the Bright Shiny Object to Distract the Horde Award*

Posted by: Bandersnatch, let all the children boogie at January 24, 2016 11:16 AM (1xUj/)

Just throw cash.

Posted by: RushBabe at January 24, 2016 12:06 PM (/NEnw)

307 303 Country Singer

Spru-can in the 80s.

I have some concerns about our training and execution these days.

Posted by: NaCly Dog at January 24, 2016 12:08 PM (u82oZ)

308 Now you youngsters might not know this, but vacuum tubes used to be...
Posted by: OregonMuse


Some claim they are immune from EMP.

Posted by: Bertram Cabot Jr. at January 24, 2016 12:08 PM (FkBIv)

309 Now you youngsters might not know this, but vacuum tubes used to be...
Posted by: OregonMuse at January 24, 2016 12:03 PM (UCmQM)


You should read Venus Equilateral by George O Smith.

Venus Equilateral is a third-point solar satellite used to link Venus and Earth both as a booster station for radio, but also when Venus was in occlusion by the Sun.

Everything was run on tubes, and at one point they turn a disabled spaceship into a giant electron gun to squirt an SOS

Posted by: Kindltot at January 24, 2016 12:09 PM (q2o38)

310 social justice crybullies are purging politically incorrect authors

-
Some good news. And from the belly of the beast.

http://tinyurl.com/jaylu6u

Posted by: The Great White Snark at January 24, 2016 12:09 PM (Nwg0u)

311 217 Stanchion and pole?
Posted by: Anna Puma at January 24, 2016 11:15 AM (r+/qI)
***
Hell, I'm game - just wear those stompy boots.

Posted by: Your Decidedly Devious Uncle Palpatine, Still Accepting Harem Applicants at January 24, 2016 12:09 PM (lutOX)

312 Heh. "Literally Just 21 Mr. Burns Quotes on Pictures of Donald Trump." It's Buzzfeed, but still pretty funny.

Posted by: Turd Ferguson at January 24, 2016 12:10 PM (/ciMI)

313 33 .. You got some good books there. The Kephart is a still useful classic, both for info and attitude. If you want a book on making powder horns from scratch, check out "Recreating the 18th Century Powder Horn" by Scott Sibley.

Posted by: JTB at January 24, 2016 12:11 PM (FvdPb)

314 The snow is melting, but it's not melting fast enough.

Have you considered changing the historical data? You can make it melt as fast as you want.

Posted by: NOAA at January 24, 2016 12:13 PM (mxCgt)

315 Perhaps I should read Poul Anderson's "Marques and Reprisals."

Posted by: Anna Puma at January 24, 2016 12:14 PM (r+/qI)

316 313 33 .. You got some good books there. The Kephart is a still useful classic, both for info and attitude. If you want a book on making powder horns from scratch, check out "Recreating the 18th Century Powder Horn" by Scott Sibley.
Posted by: JTB at January 24, 2016 12:11 PM (FvdPb)
***
Also worth checking out are the entire Foxfire series, and - if you can get past the man's atrocious politics - The Survivor series by Kurt Saxon.

Posted by: Your Decidedly Devious Uncle Palpatine, Still Accepting Harem Applicants at January 24, 2016 12:14 PM (lutOX)

317 The topic of rare books came up briefly on the ONT last night, as a commenter mentioned that he had worked for some while for an auction house that dealt with, among other things, rare books, which had been his specialty.

That piqued my curiosity, as I had only days before been in touch with Heritage Auctions regarding a book that I would like to sell. It is certainly the rarest book that I own, but they sneered at it as being worth less than the $5,000 minimum value, with which they deal.

Sadly, 'rare' and 'valuable' are only coincident when there are two potential buyers. In the case of auctions, it is necessary to get those two people in the same room.

I would be interested in comments about books that are prized possessions (as opposed to 'valuable') for one reason or another. As a for-instance, I have several Golden Books that passed through various cousins and older sibling which I treasure. One is a lavishly illustrated copy of 'The Night Before Christmas'.

The particular book mentioned above is 'Jekyl Island Club, Brunswick, Georgia 1916', which was privately published by Charles Lanier. Lanier was a major player in Wall Street finance, a friend of J.P Morgan. As an aside, it was Lanier who provided financing to Edison for his electric bulb.

I have a first edition of 'Man of High Fidelity: Edwin Howard Armstrong' which is probably worth $100 or so, but I would never sell it.

I have a complete collection of Mazo de la Roche's 'Jalna' novels that I would never part with. They have become family. There are many others, but a complete list would be too long.

Putting aside monetary value, what books do you have that you could not part with?

Posted by: Mike Hammer, etc., etc. at January 24, 2016 12:14 PM (RrDm2)

318 If you were him, I'd be bitching at you about the black olives on the pizza incident. And taunting you with tales of all the wardroom mess crank genitalia that came into contact with the glasses, plates, and silverware you used.
Posted by: Country Singer at January 24, 2016 11:55 AM (GUBah)
---
I was amused to see that, per "13 Hours" at least, the time-honored tradition of coffee cup dicking is still in full swing, as it were.

I'm not constitutionally capable of participating -- and wouldn't anyway, I hasten to add! -- but I used to observe it on the watchfloor during promotion/initiation cycles.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, Literate Savage at January 24, 2016 12:15 PM (jR7Wy)

319 "Some claim they are immune from EMP."

That's largely correct. The smaller electronics are, the more likely their components will be damaged by an impulse wave. Big, simple, ancient electric components are more resistant.

Posted by: Apostate at January 24, 2016 12:15 PM (k1vHn)

320 271 The Tsarina Catherine genre of romance novels

http://www.ufunk.net/wp-content/uploads/2016/01/selection-du-weekend-176-19.jpg
Posted by: Anna Puma at January 24, 2016 11:44 AM (r+/qI)

I didn't know BoJack Horseman did a book cover.

Posted by: Insomniac - Pale Horse/Death 2016 at January 24, 2016 12:16 PM (kpqmD)

321 Brown Line: ...at one point describing "acres of parking" around Wrigley Field: oy veh!

Perhaps he was thinking of Cominsky [sic]?

You might enjoy my brother-in-law's Chicago-set stories. He was a cabbie there, so, knows the streets, and the geography of the city figures into the stories. Former resident of your neighborhood. Often plays at the Grafton on Tuesday open mic nights.

http://bit.ly/jack-clark

(Link to Amazon, should have Ace kick-back in URL.)

Posted by: mindful webworker - Chicagoan-in-law at January 24, 2016 12:17 PM (ECUyd)

322 Still working on 'Counterinsurgency: Exposing the Myths of the New Way of War'. As a historical review, it is a tour de force. The author is a bit wordy, and run-on now and then, but the substance is thorough.

Posted by: Mike Hammer, etc., etc. at January 24, 2016 12:18 PM (RrDm2)

323 I have some concerns about our training and execution these days.

Posted by: NaCly Dog at January 24, 2016 12:08 PM (u82oZ)




I'm long removed from it in a Navy context, but from what I hear from the guys that are still in, you have valid concerns; I will say that is the case on the Army side. I know it frustrates an old A School buddy of mine that I still talk to. He just got selected for Command at Sea...I'd love to be a fly on the wall in that future wardroom.

Posted by: Country Singer at January 24, 2016 12:19 PM (GUBah)

324 "It is the historical record - not my opinion - that shows that enslaved people who received 'status' positions were proud of these positions - and made use of the 'perks' of those positions."

-
There's truth that lives and truth that dies.
I don't know which so never mind.

- Leonard Cohen

Posted by: The Great White Snark at January 24, 2016 12:20 PM (Nwg0u)

325 Just throw cash.
Posted by: RushBabe



You gonna be on the pole or the stanchion?


(I tried to resist. Sort of).

Posted by: Bandersnatch, let all the children boogie at January 24, 2016 12:20 PM (1xUj/)

326 I wouldn't mind a copy of the original boxed edition of Griff Borgeson's 'Erret Lobban Cord' - there's a few out there in the $1000 range which the spouse would not appreciate, I'm not going to pay $400 for the reproduction.

Posted by: JEM at January 24, 2016 12:21 PM (o+SC1)

327 I'm not constitutionally capable of participating -- and wouldn't anyway, I hasten to add! -- but I used to observe it on the watchfloor during promotion/initiation cycles.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, Literate Savage at January 24, 2016 12:15 PM (jR7Wy)




I never did it myself, but I definitely saw it done. Frequently, in certain cases with particular targets.

Posted by: Country Singer at January 24, 2016 12:21 PM (GUBah)

328 319 "Some claim they are immune from EMP."

That's largely correct. The smaller electronics are, the more likely their components will be damaged by an impulse wave. Big, simple, ancient electric components are more resistant.
Posted by: Apostate at January 24, 2016 12:15 PM (k1vHn)
***
A lot of the older tech is just about bulletproof. I've still got my Remington-Rand Deluxe Model 5 typewriter (picked it up in a thrift shop in Brighton in '92) in perfect working order. My best andmost reliable cameras are all from the 50's and 60's. My favorite shortwave radio (you older 'rons can explain it to the Millennials; I'm tired of doing it) hums and glows with the merry warmth of tubes.

These things I'll pass to my children, who will be able to use them long after the last iPad stops working.

Posted by: Your Decidedly Devious Uncle Palpatine, Still Accepting Harem Applicants at January 24, 2016 12:22 PM (lutOX)

329 Putting aside monetary value, what books do you have that you could not part with?
Posted by: Mike Hammer, etc., etc. at January 24, 2016 12:14 PM (RrDm2)
---
Oooh, great question. Most of mine are handed down from dad, who was an omnivorous and voracious reader and traveler (the aforementioned explorer books), plus a lot of my own finds through the years:

- A two-volume Shakespeare compendium from the 1840's with magnificent illustrations on almost every page
- A four volume set of "The Fall of the Roman Empire" from 1843
- My collection of old volumes on or about Teddy Roosevelt
- My childhood paperbacks of ERB's Barsoom series, and all my old sci-fi favorites, the cheesier the cover, the better
- Fancy hardcovers of The Hobbit/LotR. All I have to do is open them and inhale that wonderful book smell and I am transported back to my first magical readings.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, Literate Savage at January 24, 2016 12:23 PM (jR7Wy)

330 If you want a book on making powder horns from scratch, check out "Recreating the 18th Century Powder Horn" by Scott Sibley.

Thanks. I don't own that one b/c by the time it came out I had already gained enough proficiency in making horns that I already knew most of what it contained. I did look it over at a bookshop and picked up the trick of using a file handle to taper the spout hole, which makes a much better horn IMHO. At some point I really should get it for the info on coloring horns, which is an aspect of the craft that I haven't yet really delved into.

Palpatine,

I actually have volumes 1-3 and 5 of the Foxfire series. Living in Appalachia as I do they are thick on the ground...I'm not sure I've heard of Saxon's books before, though the name sounds vaguely familiar.

Posted by: Grey Fox at January 24, 2016 12:24 PM (bZ7mE)

331 I'm playing catch-up here. I got 44 right and one wrong and, as noted, the sumbitches don't tell you the one you got wrong. I have a suspicion but I would have to take the test again and I'm feeling lazy.

Posted by: Insomniac - Pale Horse/Death 2016 at January 24, 2016 12:24 PM (kpqmD)

332 @15 Grammie: "So I'll do the Sunday thing at the Lutheran church. But I'm going to do a Saturday night thing at a church where they don't fall over in a dead faint if you raise your hands during the singing."

I spend a lot of time among the Lutherans, living as I do in Minnesota. These days they are a varied bunch. Go to a church in Minneapolis and it feels like Unitarian, with a bit of a spine. Marty L. wouldn't recognize the place. Go to one in a small town and they Are Serious Lutherans with all that implies.

I texted my wife a picture of 15 electric roasters lined up on a counter. "Where am I?" She, who grew up in these parts, immediately replied "In a Lutheran church basement."

Posted by: Gordon at January 24, 2016 12:25 PM (hqhmo)

333 325 Just throw cash.
Posted by: RushBabe


You gonna be on the pole or the stanchion?


(I tried to resist. Sort of).
Posted by: Bandersnatch, let all the children boogie at January 24, 2016 12:20 PM (1xUj/)

Make it rain!

Posted by: Insomniac - Pale Horse/Death 2016 at January 24, 2016 12:25 PM (kpqmD)

334
Palpatine,

I actually have volumes 1-3 and 5 of the Foxfire series. Living in Appalachia as I do they are thick on the ground...I'm not sure I've heard of Saxon's books before, though the name sounds vaguely familiar.
Posted by: Grey Fox at January 24, 2016 12:24 PM (bZ7mE)
***
Appalachia? Well, shit-fire and Hell's bells! I'm from there, m'self. Whereabouts?

Posted by: Your Decidedly Devious Uncle Palpatine, Still Accepting Harem Applicants at January 24, 2016 12:26 PM (lutOX)

335 Atlas went on to a long and glorious career as a workhorse satellite
launcher, and of course launched the first American astronauts in
Project Mercury.


Mere pedantry, I suppose, but Shepard and Grissom were on Redstones.

My S-I-L's father, 95, was an Atlas development engineer. My aunt used to hand-loom those wiring harnesses. I think they both have the T-shirt.

("Yes, as a matter of fact, I am a rocket scientist")

Posted by: Stringer Davis at January 24, 2016 12:27 PM (xq1UY)

336 Pardon an O/T comment, but I noticed Anna Puma posting one of her frequent links above, and wondered...

Sherry McEvil got chastised the other night for a long link blowing out the margins for cell readers. Cob went in and edited it. Don't think Sherry's link was much longer than Anna's usual.

Sometimes people will type a long stretch of text (ARGGGHH...HHH) that will enwiden the boxes.

Wondering
a) just what the length-limit is, about, any idea? and
2) if there's a difference if a link contains something, e.g. hyphens, browsers can use to wrap on? (Anna's, at least, wrapped in my Opera browser.)

Wrap = divide across lines, FYI.

Posted by: mindful webworker - technically squeaking at January 24, 2016 12:27 PM (ECUyd)

337 That's largely correct. The smaller electronics are, the more likely their components will be damaged by an impulse wave. Big, simple, ancient electric components are more resistant.

Posted by: Apostate at January 24, 2016 12:15 PM (k1vHn)


Basically thermal mass. Tubes run hot anyway, and can briefly sustain perhaps as much as a 1000% overload. Which is why musicians love them for guitar amps. You have several ounces of metal and glass to heat up. A power IC or transistor might do the same normal work with half a gram of silicon.

Posted by: Alberta Oil Peon at January 24, 2016 12:27 PM (Z8fuk)

338 Alright, whichever one of you did this, give it back. http://preview.tinyurl.com/stolenbullsemen

McGyver, Out

Posted by: McGyver at January 24, 2016 12:28 PM (6hAG+)

339 Reading is fun to mentals.

Posted by: psa at January 24, 2016 12:28 PM (1IRuK)

340 Perhaps I should read Poul Anderson's "Marques and Reprisals."
Posted by: Anna Puma at January 24, 2016 12:14 PM (r+/qI)

I was thinking of the random juxtapostion of two books that I couldn't sell back to the bookstore: Trouble Twisters by Poul Anderson and We Few by Ringo and Weber. Both of them are parts of a series about traveling to the stars and trading information and techniques to aliens to get something in returm.

I now think Ringo's book is much better, if only because of the idealism in it, and what I think is a better understanding of markets and information. Falkayn's universe is about decay and exploitation. The Prince Roger book is about characters living in a corrupt world striving make it better. Anderson's books are about exploitation based on superior knowledge and techniques. Ringo's is all about trading what they had for what was needed, and embracing that information and technological gap.

I suspect Anderson held the notion that any trade that was not equitable was exploitation ( a Marxist view ) and Ringo holds the more modern view that all trades are unequal, since the very reason to trade is to get something you value or need more than what you have in your hand at the moment, and your trading partner is doing the exact same thing.

Posted by: Kindltot at January 24, 2016 12:32 PM (q2o38)

341 I had a high school teacher that went through "The Rise And Fall of the Third Reich". I thought it was a great class and an interesting book. One of these days, I want to get back into WWI books though. The background to that war is so difficult to understand and it was truly horrific.

Posted by: Notsothoreau at January 24, 2016 12:33 PM (Lqy/e)

342 Wondering
a) just what the length-limit is, about, any idea? and
2) if there's a difference if a link contains something, e.g. hyphens, browsers can use to wrap on? (Anna's, at least, wrapped in my Opera browser.)

Wrap = divide across lines, FYI.
Posted by: mindful webworker - technically squeaking at January 24, 2016 12:27 PM (ECUyd)

My personal rule of thumb is if it's longer than a youtube link, I use tinyurl.

Posted by: Insomniac - Pale Horse/Death 2016 at January 24, 2016 12:33 PM (kpqmD)

343 I took the test again and my IQ has risen to 135. Thanks be to Teh Horde! Proof positive that the book thread makes you smarter...

Posted by: t-bird at January 24, 2016 12:34 PM (n22zQ)

344 Just wanna say, again, thank you Oregon Muse for the book thread, and to all Moron readers who have enriched my reading and impoverished my bank account.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, Literate Savage at January 24, 2016 12:35 PM (jR7Wy)

345 343 I took the test again and my IQ has risen to 135. Thanks be to Teh Horde! Proof positive that the book thread makes you smarter...
Posted by: t-bird at January 24, 2016 12:34 PM (n22zQ)

Well, look who's all hoity-toity smartypants over here.

(I'm still vexed over the one apparently wrong answer.)

Posted by: Insomniac - Pale Horse/Death 2016 at January 24, 2016 12:37 PM (kpqmD)

346 Balkan elbows.

Consider it a warm-up for the main elbow-thread, later today.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AoOXyaPVVgI

Posted by: Your Decidedly Devious Uncle Palpatine, Still Accepting Harem Applicants at January 24, 2016 12:37 PM (lutOX)

347 *dangles 56,000 words of rough draft before All Hail Eris' monitor*

As for URLs. If Pixy lets me post the real link I do to inform others before clicking. If Pixy does not like it, then I post the TinyURL Preview version.

Posted by: Anna Puma at January 24, 2016 12:38 PM (r+/qI)

348 So, EE thoughts on this: would the rather new "microminiature" vacuum tubes be less resistant to EMP than the good old heaters? I have been given to understand that it is the vacuum break (that's a plumbing thing, so, you know, a joke) vs solidity-of-state that negates the pulse. Others here have other explanations.

Posted by: Stringer Davis at January 24, 2016 12:38 PM (xq1UY)

349 I see a book on bourbon up on the top shelf. *hic*

Posted by: Ready For Hillary!!11!! at January 24, 2016 12:39 PM (Dwehj)

350 346 Balkan elbows.

Consider it a warm-up for the main elbow-thread, later today.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AoOXyaPVVgI
Posted by: Your Decidedly Devious Uncle Palpatine, Still Accepting Harem Applicants at January 24, 2016 12:37 PM (lutOX)

No matter where you go, there will be gold-diggers.

Posted by: Insomniac - Pale Horse/Death 2016 at January 24, 2016 12:40 PM (kpqmD)

351 Bring it, Anna! I may be off for another day anyway.

Which reminds me, better dig my car out just in case.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, Literate Savage at January 24, 2016 12:42 PM (jR7Wy)

352 I'm still vexed over the one apparently wrong answer.

Taking it the second time goes much, much faster. Again, because I'm smarter now than I was this morning.

Posted by: t-bird at January 24, 2016 12:42 PM (+c55T)

353 And it's time for this week's

MOMENT OF INTERCULTURAL PECULIARITY:

Chatting with a colleague from the PRC who'd taught in the USSR at one point, so, for fun, we lapse into Russki for a bit.

A student - easily 6 feet tall - walks over and joins us. This guy has blonde-ish hair, hazel-colored eyes, and is 1/4 Bulgarian, 1/4 Turkmen, and half-chinese.

As we wrap up our chat, he turns to me, this hulking descendant of a mass of people, this most un-Chinese of all Chinese I've ever met, and says, "Yes, I knew you weren't an American. You don't look like one at all."

"Whaddaya mean?"

"You're short, your nose is too sharp, your hair too dark, and your eyes have a bit of slant to them. No, I knew you weren't from here the first time I saw you."

Posted by: Your Decidedly Devious Uncle Palpatine, Still Accepting Harem Applicants at January 24, 2016 12:43 PM (lutOX)

354 You gonna be on the pole or the stanchion?


You laugh, but that's how I answered that question. (And believe me, you don't want to see me on either. Put another way, I'm built for comfort, not for speed.)

Posted by: RushBabe at January 24, 2016 12:44 PM (/NEnw)

355 O/T

Feel good story of the day.



http://tinyurl.com/zqhawom

Posted by: Nip Sip at January 24, 2016 12:45 PM (jJRIy)

356
Boulder, I am so proud of you. Have read some of what you wrote, and now I want to buy a hard copy. Hubby's book on Islam is similar to Casanova's thoughts, although he (hubby) never read Casanova. He came to the same conclusion after living there and talking with Muslim friends over 15 years. So. He is reading your translation as we speak, and is mightily impressed with your skill, and with what Casanova has to say.

Thank you.

Posted by: Moki at January 24, 2016 12:46 PM (7q2ch)

357 350 346 Balkan elbows.

Consider it a warm-up for the main elbow-thread, later today.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AoOXyaPVVgI
Posted by: Your Decidedly Devious Uncle Palpatine, Still Accepting Harem Applicants at January 24, 2016 12:37 PM (lutOX)

No matter where you go, there will be gold-diggers.
Posted by: Insomniac - Pale Horse/Death 2016 at January 24, 2016 12:40 PM (kpqmD)
***
Heh. From me, they might get free laundry, but not much else.....

Goga herself, however, has quite a bit of loot....

Hmm....maybe need to brush up on my Serbian....

Posted by: Your Decidedly Devious Uncle Palpatine, Still Accepting Harem Applicants at January 24, 2016 12:46 PM (lutOX)

358 355 O/T

Feel good story of the day.



http://tinyurl.com/zqhawom
Posted by: Nip Sip at January 24, 2016 12:45 PM (jJRIy)

'Murica.

Posted by: Insomniac - Pale Horse/Death 2016 at January 24, 2016 12:48 PM (kpqmD)

359 One of these days, I want to get back into WWI books though. The background to that war is so difficult to understand and it was truly horrific.


I keep wanting to read more, but it's all so horrific and stupid.

I read Tuchman's "Guns of August" and was just so head-shakey. Gah, what a waste.

Posted by: Bandersnatch, let all the children boogie at January 24, 2016 12:49 PM (1xUj/)

360 So I'll do the Sunday thing at the Lutheran church. But I'm going to do a Saturday night thing at a church where they don't fall over in a dead faint if you raise your hands during the singing.

Posted by: grammie winger


When I raise my hands *everyone* falls over in a dead faint, and I'm not even Lutheran.

Posted by: Benny Hinn at January 24, 2016 12:49 PM (jIjKK)

361 If one is not safe at the barbershop, then where?

It's getting out of hand.

Posted by: Caer Lug at January 24, 2016 12:49 PM (g9aMJ)

362 Good luck with the snow clearing All Hail Eris and enjoy the reading opportunities.

Posted by: Anna Puma at January 24, 2016 12:49 PM (r+/qI)

363 No, I knew you weren't from here the first time I saw you.

That's how you know he isn't an American, when he thinks you can tell us by our looks.

Posted by: t-bird at January 24, 2016 12:50 PM (RrDm2)

364 You laugh, but that's how I answered that question. (And believe me, you don't want to see me on either. Put another way, I'm built for comfort, not for speed.)
Posted by: RushBabe at January 24, 2016 12:44 PM (/NEnw)


So...you going to be on the pillar, or the column?


/bad taste?

Posted by: OneEyedJack at January 24, 2016 12:50 PM (kKHcp)

365 363 No, I knew you weren't from here the first time I saw you.

That's how you know he isn't an American, when he thinks you can tell us by our looks.
Posted by: t-bird at January 24, 2016 12:50 PM (RrDm2)

You tell us by our cowboy hats and guns. Duh.

Posted by: Insomniac - Pale Horse/Death 2016 at January 24, 2016 12:50 PM (kpqmD)

366 358 355 O/T

Feel good story of the day.



http://tinyurl.com/zqhawom
Posted by: Nip Sip at January 24, 2016 12:45 PM (jJRIy)

'Murica.
Posted by: Insomniac - Pale Horse/Death 2016 at January 24, 2016 12:48 PM (kpqmD)
***
Fuck yeah!

We need to get stories like this out there more.

Warms my ice-cold heart.

If ever in the area, I'll stop in for a shave and haircut, and tip the proprietor most generously.

Posted by: Your Decidedly Devious Uncle Palpatine, Still Accepting Harem Applicants at January 24, 2016 12:52 PM (lutOX)

367 If one is not safe at the barbershop, then where?

I know! Poor youths, turning their lives around. We need more safe spaces for criminals. #ItsWhoWeAre

Posted by: Barky O at January 24, 2016 12:53 PM (RrDm2)

368 Well, 120 on IQ test first go around.

Posted by: Ricardo Kill at January 24, 2016 12:53 PM (VkVd+)

369 Gotta go run some errands. I'll catch you reprobates later.

Posted by: Insomniac - Pale Horse/Death 2016 at January 24, 2016 12:54 PM (kpqmD)

370 Insomniac: My personal rule of thumb is if it's longer than a youtube link, I use tinyurl.

Anna Puma: As for URLs. If Pixy lets me post the real link I do to inform others before clicking. If Pixy does not like it, then I post the TinyURL Preview version.

I know Pixy will tell folks sometimes to shorten up a line, but it apparently is not catching some too-long lines. Yours, Anna, usually have hyphens, too, I've noticed, and at least in my browser will wrap on those.

Using short links is best practice, of course. Just wondering what the worst limit is. For the survival guide, which I need to update.

http://bit.ly/aoshq-csg

Posted by: mindful webworker - technically squeaking at January 24, 2016 12:54 PM (ECUyd)

371 Or perhaps will read Armageddon 2419 A.D. The Seminal "Buck Rodgers" Novel.

Posted by: Anna Puma at January 24, 2016 12:54 PM (r+/qI)

372 Just judging by the barber's name -- rayciss, I know -- I get a feel that those guys may have committed the cultural appropriation of trying to hold up a black barbershop. Talk about not being from here...

Posted by: Stringer Davis at January 24, 2016 12:54 PM (xq1UY)

373 Heh. Took the IQ quiz. It reported that I got 0 correct, and 0 wrong. I blame my script blocker. At any rate, the resulting IQ score was 32. That may, in fact, be correct, I mean, I AM a Moron. It is curious though that a 0/0 score implies a certain intellect. Apparently just getting every thing wrong suggests a certain acuity.

I wonder if this is a marketable trait? "Hire Hammer to test your thesis. If he agrees, then abandon it."

Posted by: Mike Hammer, etc., etc. at January 24, 2016 12:54 PM (RrDm2)

374 363 No, I knew you weren't from here the first time I saw you.

That's how you know he isn't an American, when he thinks you can tell us by our looks.
Posted by: t-bird at January 24, 2016 12:50 PM (RrDm2)
***
well, duh - the dude's from Urumqi, Xinjiang Province.

Posted by: Your Decidedly Devious Uncle Palpatine, Still Accepting Harem Applicants at January 24, 2016 12:56 PM (lutOX)

375 Hammer, did you get any of the frozen precipitation or are you too far inland?

Posted by: fluffy at January 24, 2016 12:57 PM (AfsKp)

376 372 Just judging by the barber's name -- rayciss, I know -- I get a feel that those guys may have committed the cultural appropriation of trying to hold up a black barbershop. Talk about not being from here...
Posted by: Stringer Davis at January 24, 2016 12:54 PM (xq1UY)
***
Yeah, you really don't want to try robbing a black-owned business......

Posted by: Your Decidedly Devious Uncle Palpatine, Still Accepting Harem Applicants at January 24, 2016 12:57 PM (lutOX)

377 If one is not safe at the barbershop, then where? It's getting out of hand.
Posted by: Caer Lug


Word.

Posted by: Sweeney Todd at January 24, 2016 12:58 PM (jIjKK)

378 Appalachia? Well, shit-fire and Hell's bells! I'm from there, m'self. Whereabouts?

Western NC, Asheville area.

Posted by: Grey Fox at January 24, 2016 12:59 PM (bZ7mE)

379 I wonder if this is a marketable trait? "Hire Hammer to test your thesis. If he agrees, then abandon it."
Posted by: Mike Hammer, etc., etc. at January 24, 2016 12:54 PM (RrDm2)

It's like we've said about ShitMidas for years. It is impossible to get that many things wrong by accident.
Dumb luck or a coin flip should get one to 50%.

So yes, you have a highly marketable, uh, skill.


Actually, you have to enable scripts or something like that....you're not the first person to have that happen.
Look upthread, I'm probably misremembering.

Posted by: OneEyedJack at January 24, 2016 12:59 PM (kKHcp)

380
Mike Hammer, gonna hunt down that counter-insurgency book. Local library doesn't have it (an old friend and now the wife have enlightened my cheap bastard a** about borrowing from the library instead of buying everything - I have been a buyer for decades, but now I might become a borrower - of most things, anyway).

I did find a related book, a critical review of the accepted wisdom regarding - yes - "the British in Malaya in the 1950s"- that is, their storied counter-insurgency success, in the local library. ("local" library is a big-city system with a massive collection, so far I have failed to find just two books I was seeking out).

Having observed, in agony and frustration, a major recent chapter of "counter-insurgency" warfare from the very near sidelines, I am tremendously predisposed towards skepticism about any "doctrine" or nonsense that departs from common sense about human behavior and conflict.

Posted by: rhomboid at January 24, 2016 01:00 PM (QDnY+)

381 All Hail Eris 'way back at #18: Grammie Winger, this book may be of more practical application:
http://tinyurl.com/j7mtcdf


Milady and Daughter were chortling over an old book received for Christmas - Saturday Evening Post cookbook. Recipe after recipe that starts with Jello. Many celebrity recipes, including, Richard Nixon's Guacamole Salad, which is a Jello mold. Many of the salads are actually Jello things. Daughter was more amazed and amused than the older generation who lived through those trying times.

Told 'em they should write it up for the food thread.

Posted by: mindful webworker - technically squeaking at January 24, 2016 01:01 PM (ECUyd)

382 On woodscraft pick up the Calvin Rutstrum books. I read about him on one of the outdoors blogs. His books were popular in the 60s but have fallen out of fashion.

Posted by: Notsothoreau at January 24, 2016 01:03 PM (Lqy/e)

383 My companion was as thoroughly amused as the store employee was confused whilst I offered money to buy the book. After a few minutes the worker was convinced I was serious and not insane, though I guess the point is debatable, finally accepted my offer and I took the book home.
Posted by: Anna Puma
---------------

That is approximately how I came into possession of the Jekyl Island book mentioned above. I was having dinner at a large old Victorian home in Oxford, Indiana which had been converted to a restaurant. I found the book on a shelf while waiting to be seated, and made them an offer. I think we settled on $7.00. Last copy sold fetched $1000.00.

It pays to know what you are looking at.

Posted by: Mike Hammer, etc., etc. at January 24, 2016 01:03 PM (RrDm2)

384 378 Appalachia? Well, shit-fire and Hell's bells! I'm from there, m'self. Whereabouts?

Western NC, Asheville area.
Posted by: Grey Fox at January 24, 2016 12:59 PM (bZ7mE)
***
Me? Born on a 'baccy farm with orchards just outside Ravenswood, WV. Stone farmhouse - no phone, no electricity, no indoor plumbing, save the hand pump in the kitchen.

Glad to meet you.

[Reaches into bottom drawer of desk and pulls out two half-pint Mason jars and a quart jar of the good stuff]

Na zdrovye, friend.

Posted by: Your Decidedly Devious Uncle Palpatine, Still Accepting Harem Applicants at January 24, 2016 01:05 PM (lutOX)

385 Having observed, in agony and frustration, a major recent chapter of "counter-insurgency" warfare from the very near sidelines, I am tremendously predisposed towards skepticism about any "doctrine" or nonsense that departs from common sense about human behavior and conflict.

Posted by: rhomboid at January 24, 2016 01:00 PM (QDnY+)


rhomboid, your cee-gars are on their way to you via UPS; should arrive on the 26th, they tell me. e-mail me if you want the tracking number.

Posted by: Alberta Oil Peon at January 24, 2016 01:07 PM (Z8fuk)

386 It's like we've said about ShitMidas for years. It is impossible to get that many things wrong by accident.
Dumb luck or a coin flip should get one to 50%.
----------

I dislike going OT on the book thread, but McCarthy made this observation about George Marshall:

"What can be made of this unbroken series of decisions and acts contributing to the strategy of defeat? They cannot be attributed to incompetence. If Marshall were merely stupid, the laws of probability would dictate that part of his decisions would serve this country's interest."

Posted by: Mike Hammer, etc., etc. at January 24, 2016 01:09 PM (RrDm2)

387 The balls on that Hercules guy.

Posted by: Tom Brady at January 24, 2016 01:10 PM (Dwehj)

388 Thank you ((moki)) :^) Glad your hubby thinks I did a good job... I mean, beyond the 1.5 paragraphs I ripped off.

My French does need work (and Casanova's prose made for a challenge here and there). Not all of that stuff was taught at GCSE! So there's contact info on that page to suggest improvements.

Posted by: boulder terlit hobo at January 24, 2016 01:13 PM (6FqZa)

389 Finally started reading Atlas Shrugged. Kind of amazing how she can make the pouring of molten metal such an adventure!only 3 chapters in so not much i can say but i did run across this line :
"Hank Reardon is the kind of man who sticks his name on everything he touches. You may, from this, form your own opinion about the character of Hank Reardon."
Seemed relevant somehow.

And the fun review: I got my momma for Christmas a Saturday Evening Post cookbook. It's a collection of recipes from readers and the magazine. Some pretty funny things in there such as "Richard Nixon's avocado salad" which, like so many other of the "salads"listed in the book, starts with the important ingredient of jello. Yes, what i have learned is that people in the last century loved them some jello. It's seriously almost all of the salads.
The book is interspersed with funny little cartoons and really chock full of strange and name-dropping recipes. I'd mention more but, as i said, i gave the book to momma for Christmas. May have been more worth the amusement factor than actually coming out of it! We'll see.
Now, got that out of my system, off to read the content!

Posted by: Sugar Plum Fairy #176-671 at January 24, 2016 01:13 PM (hnCis)

390 McCarthy's critics are mostly wrong, McCarthy was often right, and McCarthy would not have recognized a national strategy if it bit him on the ass.

Posted by: RioBravo at January 24, 2016 01:13 PM (NUqwG)

391 Mindful-

I probably mentioned it (about St Pio) because I tend to read books on the same subject or the same books over and over again. Yes, bilocation is the ability to be seen by several people in several places at the same time. Apparently, St Francis of Assisi was credited with this too. I like your story of the Indian guru. People across religious traditions have been examples of this. I am firmly and unapologetically a Christian, but I do think there is something of the holy that unites people of great faith and love and prayer across traditions.

It's not so much that I'm fascinated by these strange phenomenon of Pio. It's more the fact that he could tel people their sins before the confessed or that he spent hours in prayer or that in his body he showed the wounds of Christ and Doctors testified that he was not hysterical and the wounds were not made by auto suggestion. I guess I find that identifying with Christ so very powerful, but the most important thing is not those sorts of things but that he was always pointing people to Christ which changed their lives. George Whitfield and Francis Asbury and John Wesley had gifts of the Holy Spirit which were used by God to draw people to Christ in powerful ways and they didn't have the ability to bilobate.

Because of what's happening in the world I think we need spiritual revival in the Christian Churches now and these people I read-Protestant and Catholic were instruments of that in their time..

Posted by: FenelonSpoke at January 24, 2016 01:16 PM (w4NZ8)

392 Hammer, did you get any of the frozen precipitation or are you too far inland?
Posted by: fluffy
-------------

Yeah a good bit. Started Thursday night, and *finally* stopped last night. Temperatures in the teens and windy. Lost power for a bit, and the satellite TV was out for a day and a half.

Today (as Grey will attest) is a spectacular, clear, sunny day with rising temperatures. This stuff will be gone by Tuesday.

Posted by: Mike Hammer, etc., etc. at January 24, 2016 01:16 PM (RrDm2)

393 Nixon's salads seem to be on a lot of people's reading lists lately. Now what in the hopping hell do you make of that?

Posted by: Stringer Davis at January 24, 2016 01:16 PM (xq1UY)

394 >>>Open question: do you really have to be a conservative to think that Lena Dunham is repugnant?<<<

An non-scientific poll I conducted amongst 10 random associates suggests that the answer to your question is no. Follow-up commentary, when proffered, suggests that Lena is a disgusting pig.

Posted by: Fritz at January 24, 2016 01:17 PM (BngQR)

395 Since the thread is aging, my self-plugola of the week. I don't claim to be much of a writer, but I writ sumpin' once.

Link in nic to the table of contents for Invulnerable, a short, science fictionish thing in pictures and words about a young fellow with a strange kind of power. Comments may be left at the bottom of the ToC and PayPal donation buttons which theoretically work are on every page.

Posted by: mindful webworker - words fail me at January 24, 2016 01:18 PM (ECUyd)

396 I read Tuchman's "Guns of August" and was just so head-shakey. Gah, what a waste.

I've been saying for years that. Note the datestamp on the Casanova book.

But the Great Central European Suicide Attempt of 1914-45 meant that nobody could have nice things.

Posted by: boulder terlit hobo at January 24, 2016 01:18 PM (6FqZa)

397 393 Nixon's salads seem to be on a lot of people's reading lists lately. Now what in the hopping hell do you make of that?
Posted by: Stringer Davis at January 24, 2016 01:16 PM (xq1UY)
***
Hell, when my employer - Madame, as I call her - wanted me to draft her will, I used Nixon's as the model.

The man was a great many things, but a fool he wasn't.

Posted by: Your Decidedly Devious Uncle Palpatine, Still Accepting Harem Applicants at January 24, 2016 01:23 PM (lutOX)

398 I've noticed for a while that books are bought by the yard by interior decorators. Not to read, but to put a patina of class to their establishment.

Posted by: NaCly Dog at January 24, 2016 01:23 PM (u82oZ)

399 Sup' everyone. Slow day here so far... Made chipped beef on toast for breakfast and it took forever. How did my Mom take the time back in the day I have no idea.. the gravy took forever.. but it was good. LIke a rock in my stomach now, but soooo good.

Posted by: Yip at January 24, 2016 01:24 PM (e7T6D)

400 OregonMuse, thank you so much for the book thread. So much content today, I will have to do it justice when I get back from the library later today. I'm going to try to get in another 3 hours on my book of my hotel experiences today.

Speaking of which, I have a job interview at the Hampton Inn & Homewood Suites tomorrow. It's one of the newest hotels in downtown Cincinnati, and it's HQed in the old Enquirer building, one of the earliest examples of Art Deco architecture in this fair city. As an old hotel employee and history buff, that would the best of both worlds for me. Please, good Morons, your prayers are greatly desired.

And as soon as I'm all written out today, I will be reading the 8th installment of Merwin-Webster's Calumet "K" from its original appearance in the Saturday Evening Post (July 13, 1901). You don't have to be an Ayn Rand fan to enjoy this novel (she once said it was her favorite -- it's not hard to see why) and I'm learning a lot about the grain business and early labor practices besides. After all, the subtitle of the book is "A Romance of the Great Wheat Corner."

OM, I may be writing to you this week about some of my adventures in collecting and reading old magazines. See you later!

Posted by: DynamiteDan at January 24, 2016 01:24 PM (BaDMP)

401 The books I'd take to a desert island.

Flora and Fauna of Desert Islands
How To Build Stuff Like the Professor On Gilligan's Island
First Aid
Boy Scout Handbook

Posted by: The Great White Snark at January 24, 2016 01:24 PM (Nwg0u)

402 Also, you guyz see this yet? 2 min vid... snowboarding in NYC behind Jeep .. ending will make you laugh..

https://youtu.be/qRv7G7WpOoU


Posted by: Yip at January 24, 2016 01:25 PM (e7T6D)

403 I've noticed for a while that books are bought by the yard by interior decorators. Not to read, but to put a patina of class to their establishment.
Posted by: NaCly Dog at January 24, 2016 01:23 PM (u82oZ)
---------
Rather like certain dining establishments lining the walls with old farm tools and antique (or retro) metal signs.

Posted by: RioBravo at January 24, 2016 01:25 PM (NUqwG)

404 Will pray for you, Dynamite Dan.

Posted by: FenelonSpoke at January 24, 2016 01:25 PM (w4NZ8)

405 I've noticed for a while that books are bought by the yard by interior decorators. Not to read, but to put a patina of class to their establishment.

Posted by: NaCly Dog at January 24, 2016 01:23 PM (u82oZ)


Well, at least books that are bought and used for that purpose are preserved for a while, and displayed where collectors might find them. As opposed to the other likely fate of unwanted bulk books.

Posted by: Alberta Oil Peon at January 24, 2016 01:30 PM (Z8fuk)

406 403 I've noticed for a while that books are bought by the yard by interior decorators. Not to read, but to put a patina of class to their establishment.
Posted by: NaCly Dog at January 24, 2016 01:23 PM (u82oZ)


IIRC, Jay Gatsby's library was entirely made up of uncut books.

Posted by: Just Some Guy at January 24, 2016 01:30 PM (DsU1p)

407 So, EE thoughts on this: would the rather new "microminiature" vacuum tubes be less resistant to EMP than the good old heaters? I have been given to understand that it is the vacuum break (that's a plumbing thing, so, you know, a joke) vs solidity-of-state that negates the pulse. Others here have other explanations.
Posted by: Stringer
--------------------

Warning: I did NOT stay at a Holiday In Express last night.

My opinion is that the damage that occurs is a simple consequence of a massive magnetic field transient. That causes an induced current in *any* conductor that it encounters. The problem is that (for the most part) microelectronics are designed to only deal with micro-currents. All of the little conductors become fuses, blown fuses.

Tubes are generally much sturdier, if only because of the necessary physical structure required to construct them. Thus, more able to stand currents that would blow out the microscopic circuits in most semiconductors.

Posted by: Mike Hammer, etc., etc. at January 24, 2016 01:30 PM (RrDm2)

408 I love old books. I have what I think is a first edition of "Tarzan And The Apes" from 1914 and a copy of Emerson's Essays" identified as "First Series", undated.

"The Works Of Poe" from 1927.

"Cooper's Sea Tales" from 1849. (Book was first published in 1823).

Posted by: Meremortal at January 24, 2016 01:30 PM (3myMJ)

409 398 I've noticed for a while that books are bought by the yard by interior decorators. Not to read, but to put a patina of class to their establishment.
Posted by: NaCly Dog at January 24, 2016 01:23 PM (u82oZ)
***
Shades of Gatsby....

Posted by: Your Decidedly Devious Uncle Palpatine, Still Accepting Harem Applicants at January 24, 2016 01:32 PM (lutOX)

410 Try AbeBooks.com. They have rare and out-of-print books. They're nice people too.

Posted by: Dion at January 24, 2016 01:34 PM (Um5Y5)

411 FenelonSpoke: ...I am firmly and unapologetically a Christian, but I do think there is something of the holy that unites people of great faith and love and prayer across traditions....

Don't have much truck with most gurus. Charlatans and prestidigitators and self-aggrandizers, as a rule - not much different than too many "Christian" preachers in that regard, I suppose. (heh)

But I've a special fondness for Ram Dass's guru, what I've read of him. He was stern but funny, quirky, and as in the story I related, he emphasized love, and family, and always pointed toward God.

Moreover, as it says elsewhere in Miracle of Love...

"Maharajji's love of Christ was unearthly....

You never knew what a devotee's statement would evoke. A boy came one time and asked, "Maharajji, did Jesus really get angry?"

As soon as Maharajji heard the word 'Jesus,' tears came to his eyes....

Posted by: mindful webworker - yeah, like that at January 24, 2016 01:34 PM (ECUyd)

412 406 403 I've noticed for a while that books are bought by the yard by interior decorators. Not to read, but to put a patina of class to their establishment.
Posted by: NaCly Dog at January 24, 2016 01:23 PM (u82oZ)


IIRC, Jay Gatsby's library was entirely made up of uncut books.
Posted by: Just Some Guy at January 24, 2016 01:30 PM (DsU1p)
***
Jinx.

Posted by: Your Decidedly Devious Uncle Palpatine, Still Accepting Harem Applicants at January 24, 2016 01:35 PM (lutOX)

413 Speaking of seafaring tales, I remember reading a novel once about a man who had been a sailor in Drake's fleet against the Spanish Armada, and who had committed a great act of cowardice, and as punishment, was forced to live forever, and be reincarnated as a sailor ever after, and placed in trying circumstances. I believe the book was intended to be the start of a series. Ring a bell?

Posted by: Alberta Oil Peon at January 24, 2016 01:36 PM (Z8fuk)

414 bth, Muslims have no qualms applying higher critical methods to the Bible, but they don't appreciate the same done to the Koran. I hope safety isn't a concern
I recall Robert M Price (the "Bible geek") saying one of the titles in your review (Hagarism) was effectively banned because the Muzzies found it so offensive.

Posted by: angela urkel at January 24, 2016 01:38 PM (jIjKK)

415 FenelonSpoke

I've spent a good deal of time in Padre Pio's village and nearby, my father's village is about 15 minutes away in Abruzzo.

Very spiritual area, you can feel it.

Posted by: Meremortal at January 24, 2016 01:38 PM (3myMJ)

416 Frumy, I believe that's the reason Germany surrendered WW1. The internal politics back home were such that they were barely able to exist as a state by 1918 and thus they quit to try take care of home. They weren't losing the war so much as losing the homefront.

-
I have read/am reading two Frederick Morton books, A Nervous Splendor and Thunder At Twilight. A common theme is that Austria/Hungary was living in a delusional day dream that prevented real political/economic growth such that when a crisis came and reality intruded into their daydream, they collapsed.

Any similarity with contemporary US is purely coincidental.

Posted by: The Great White Snark at January 24, 2016 01:38 PM (Nwg0u)

417 Posted by: Alberta Oil Peon at January 24, 2016 01:36 PM (Z8fuk)

A distant bell but can't place it. Love sea tales, Treasure Island got me started.

Posted by: Meremortal at January 24, 2016 01:40 PM (3myMJ)

418 DynamiteDan: ...Hampton Inn & Homewood Suites ...HQed in the old Enquirer building, one of the earliest examples of Art Deco architecture in this fair city. ...best of both worlds for me.

Wow, Dan, that sounds like just what you needed. God bless you with success, and in your book, too.

Posted by: mindful webworker - indubitably at January 24, 2016 01:41 PM (ECUyd)

419 Try AbeBooks.com.

A great source!

Posted by: Meremortal at January 24, 2016 01:41 PM (3myMJ)

420 Yes, there are charlatans and prestidigitators who are Christians . Some of them are televangelists or are one TV as "name it and claim" it pastors" or do healing i regard as fake.. I don't travel in those circles. I don't know people raking in money. I know some pastors who I think should perhaps chosen another line of work because they don't seem very pastoral or don't like people very much, but the ones I know who work full time work very hard. and really went into the ministry because they loved Jesus and wanted to serve. Of course, none of us are prefect and I don't work very hard that often :^) because I work part time and have a drama ministry which I'm trying to get off the ground...

I like what you shared. Thx.

Posted by: FenelonSpoke at January 24, 2016 01:42 PM (w4NZ8)

421 I read Zen & 'Cycles many years ago and liked it. I quite remember the scene in which he's staring into a mirror as he's losing his mind. That book definitely broadened my horizons.

Posted by: The Great White Snark at January 24, 2016 01:42 PM (Nwg0u)

422 Prayers up for you Dan.

And may each of us find our Vocation in life - the thing that is resonant with God's given gifts and serves the Kingdom best!

Posted by: Jade Sea at January 24, 2016 01:42 PM (O108X)

423 https://youtu.be/qRv7G7WpOoU


Posted by: Yip at January 24, 2016 01:25 PM (e7T6D)

Ah, to be young enough to be that stupid again. Looks like a blast.

Posted by: OneEyedJack at January 24, 2016 01:42 PM (kKHcp)

424 Why the Fuck are the games starting so late today.

Posted by: Nevergiveup at January 24, 2016 01:43 PM (DUoqb)

425 Posted by: Meremortal at January 24, 2016 01:38 PM (3myMJ)

I'd love to go there if i had money and time. I hope that the spirituality will save that area from infestation by Muslims. i don't know what the situation with Islam is in Italy.

Posted by: FenelonSpoke at January 24, 2016 01:44 PM (w4NZ8)

426 + 6.022 x 10^23
Posted by: NaCly
----------

Ha! NaCly is actually Avogadro

Posted by: Mike Hammer, etc., etc. at January 24, 2016 01:44 PM (oFSUK)

427 Netanyahu: US-Israel relationship is strong and solid
The prime minister defends the relationship between Israel and the US

With Fredo and Horserace? Dream on Bibi

Posted by: Nevergiveup at January 24, 2016 01:45 PM (DUoqb)

428 books are bought by the yard

-
Same way I buy pizza.

Posted by: The Great White Snark at January 24, 2016 01:45 PM (Nwg0u)

429
A lot of the movers and shakers of WWI ended up starving to death in WW2.

Posted by: Bruce With a Wang! at January 24, 2016 01:45 PM (iQIUe)

430 Found it. Nicholas Monsarrat, best known as author of "The Cruel Sea" from Wikipedia:


"His final work, unfinished at the time of his death but published in its incomplete form, was a two-volume historical novel titled The Master Mariner. Based on the legend of the Wandering Jew, it told the story of an Elizabethan English seaman who, as punishment for a terrible act of cowardice, is doomed to sail the world's seas until the end of time. His hero participates in critical moments in history; Monsarrat used him to illustrate the central role of seamen."

Posted by: Alberta Oil Peon at January 24, 2016 01:46 PM (Z8fuk)

431 Wow; Those snowboarders are lucky they didn't get killed, but it looks really fun if you are young and fit.

Posted by: FenelonSpoke at January 24, 2016 01:46 PM (w4NZ8)

432 Wow; Those snowboarders are lucky they didn't get killed, but it looks really fun if you are young and fit.


I was in my 40s when I taught myself to snowboard.

It hurt a lot for the first few days.

Posted by: Bandersnatch, let all the children boogie at January 24, 2016 01:48 PM (1xUj/)

433 Posted by: FenelonSpoke at January 24, 2016 01:44 PM (w4NZ

It's pretty isolated. Very poor economy. It's on my short list as a hideout if the mountains of Colorado get ruined. Rome is ruined, I fear. I would still brave it to re-visit certain pilgrimage churches though.

Posted by: Meremortal at January 24, 2016 01:48 PM (3myMJ)

434 FenelonSpoke: ...charlatans and prestidigitators...

In matters religious, as a rule, the ones making the biggest noise don't tend to be the ones who are the holiest. Funny thing about the quality of humility. : D

Posted by: mindful webworker - theo logically at January 24, 2016 01:49 PM (ECUyd)

435 Not exactly a "collection," but I have a mitt-full of tiny little "vest pocket editions" they used to print before other diversions became available. They vary in quality from brochures on pulp to pretty good, with leather bindings. Of course there are many Bibles, most of them horrible (latest non-KJV of their time, inspirational verses only) although the military's NT with Psalms wasn't a bad traveller. I don't think you have a real Bible without Ecclesiastes and Song O'Solomon.

"Barrack Room Ballads" and selected Poe have been all over this continent with me on two wheels, and show it. I tried plastic bagging and it didn't help much. A truer devotee of the 1934 "Hints and Tips for Motor Cyclists" would have put them inside a Travelling Sweets tin wrapped in paraffined silk.

The constant availability and applicability of these volumes have caused a generation of Boy Scouts to moan when they first hear the lines "I have clashed and closed with the frozen north" or "You may talk of gin and beer."

Posted by: Stringer Davis at January 24, 2016 01:50 PM (xq1UY)

436 Good for you, Bandersnatch. I can see you doing that with great enjoyment as i can see you doing lots of things with great enjoyment. :^)

It's too late for me, though, I'm not in my forties.

Posted by: FenelonSpoke at January 24, 2016 01:50 PM (w4NZ8)

437 as punishment, was forced to live forever, and be reincarnated as a sailor ever after, and placed in trying circumstances.

-
Similar to the Casca series by Barry Sadler (who, many decades ago, had a one hit wonder #1 song, The Green Berets). He had little to nothing to do with naval warfare and he was being punished for shoving his sword into Jesus's side.

Posted by: The Great White Snark at January 24, 2016 01:51 PM (Nwg0u)

438 I love the part where the cops say.... someone complained so we're gonna act like we're talking to you... heh.

Posted by: Yip at January 24, 2016 01:52 PM (e7T6D)

439 A medical team was sent to Shimon Peres' house after he complained of feeling pressure in his chest.


Not good news

Posted by: Nevergiveup at January 24, 2016 01:52 PM (DUoqb)

440 Well, I'm off to a gun show in Mesa.

Posted by: Alberta Oil Peon at January 24, 2016 01:53 PM (Z8fuk)

441 Don't have much truck with most gurus. Charlatans and prestidigitators and self-aggrandizers, as a rule - not much different than too many "Christian" preachers in that regard, I suppose. (heh)

Especially the ones on TBN!
Re Pio, telling sins before the confession could be "cold reading", stigmata could have been acid in his case, but I'm no expert. As FS notes- Wesley and Whitfield didn't do this. The leading to conversion's the impotant thing.

Posted by: Benny Hinn at January 24, 2016 01:54 PM (jIjKK)

442 But all I've read about Padre Pio makes me think he was the real deal. It's sort of fascinating that someone who seems like he would fit in better in the Middle Ages-with all that went on his life died in 1968.

I don't know that I'dd want to be that holy. He and St John Vianney used to get dragged around and beaten up by the devil or devils. Ouch!!

Posted by: FenelonSpoke at January 24, 2016 01:54 PM (w4NZ8)

443 Posted by: Alberta Oil Peon at January 24, 2016 01:46 PM (Z8fuk)

Interesting, thanks. The Cruel Sea is badass.

Posted by: Meremortal at January 24, 2016 01:54 PM (3myMJ)

444 I'll second the abebooks.com recommendation. Have also used alibris.com.

I can't remember which of those two it was, but I later found a foreign transaction fee on my credit card statement, which tripped security flags for me. It turns out whichever firm it was had a Canadian domicile. They didn't overcharge me, but it did tack on a few cents to the tab.

Also in Canadian news, and this rumor about Canuck bookstores pulling SJW-disapproved authors off of shelves, it's grimly funny because for many years, gay and lesbian bookstores north of the border had a hard time stocking imported titles because of antiquated government blue laws which got their shipments seized. From one form of censorship to another.

That country may be part of the Anglosphere, but it's always had trouble with the concept of untrammeled freedom of speech. (Except for Islamic speech, which is sacrosanct above all other forms. See Mark Steyn's mordant work on exactly this subject.)

Posted by: torquewrench at January 24, 2016 01:56 PM (noWW6)

445 Frumy, I believe that's the reason Germany surrendered WW1. The internal politics back home were such that they were barely able to exist as a state by 1918 and thus they quit to try take care of home. They weren't losing the war so much as losing the homefront.
--------
Starvation will have that effect. The Bolsheviks found a similar solution though they gave up much more. Albeit most was quickly regained following Germany's surrender. Both Germany and Russia had regained most of the rest (except for the bulk of Finland and the line in Poland moved to the east). What was fine in June 1914 was no longer fine in June 1940.

Posted by: RioBravo at January 24, 2016 01:56 PM (NUqwG)

446 So we pull up to church this morning and there are several cop cars in the parking lot. I thought they were enjoying a donut break. 4-year old grandbaby was convinced they were after him for throwing his candy wrapper on the ground. Turns out we had a terrorist threat. Pastor joked about how he hoped a few of us had conceal/carry licenses. Everything went off without a hitch. Police were still there when we left though.

Posted by: grammie winger, sign of The Time at January 24, 2016 01:57 PM (dFi94)

447 Posted by: Benny Hinn at January 24, 2016 01:54 PM (jIjKK)

No, benny I doubt it was acid, and conversion WAS the thing he was most concerned about since he wrote thousands of letters of spiritual direction to people almost pointing people towards Christ, the eucharist and prayer.

And BTW as you may know
and John Wesley had experiences he regarded as being attacks of the devil and he had a ability to read people spiritually.

Posted by: FenelonSpoke at January 24, 2016 01:58 PM (w4NZ8)

448 Why the Fuck are the games starting so late today.

Posted by: Nevergiveup at January 24, 2016 01:43 PM (DUoqb)

Because Colorado. That's a 1 PM start here.

Posted by: Meremortal at January 24, 2016 01:58 PM (3myMJ)

449 Posted by: grammie winger, sign of The Time at January 24, 2016 01:57 PM (dFi94)

Wow; That's unnerving whether it was some Muslim or a disaffected church member or zealous Anti theist.

Posted by: FenelonSpoke at January 24, 2016 01:59 PM (w4NZ8)

450 Glenn Beck has gone completely insane. Now he's swearing in presidents at public events.

Posted by: Dack Thrombosis at January 24, 2016 02:00 PM (4ErVI)

451 Gramme-

Something occurred to me about not being sure if you will fit as a Lutheran rather than a lively Evangelical. if you're going to be attending the Lutheran church is there anyway the church (I don't know if this is where your intended poachers or not) could consider a sarting an alternative worship service at another time for people who respond to that stye of worship?

Posted by: FenelonSpoke at January 24, 2016 02:02 PM (w4NZ8)

452 Wow; That's unnerving whether it was some Muslim or a disaffected church member or zealous Anti theist.

Posted by: FenelonSpoke at January 24, 2016 01:59 PM (w4NZ
===============================================

Yeah, hard telling who it was. They didn't give out any clues, but apparently the police took it seriously enough to be on hand. Funny thing - it never occurred to me to be scared. I didn't see anyone else leave either.

Posted by: grammie winger, sign of The Time at January 24, 2016 02:03 PM (dFi94)

453
450 Glenn Beck has gone completely insane. Now he's swearing in presidents at public events.
Posted by: Dack Thrombosis at January 24, 2016 02:00 PM (4ErVI)

Why did Cruz participate?



Posted by: eman at January 24, 2016 02:03 PM (MQEz6)

454 "15
Almost out the door to church (MY church) but what I've been reading is
Lutheranism 101 by Concordia Publishing House, because, upcoming
marriage to Lutheran minister. My conclusion: On the essential
doctrines, I think I'll be okay. On the peripheral issues, I'm in
trouble. On style of worship, just forget about it. I told my intended,
"I don't know if I can be a Lutheran. This is just not me." His response
was basically to suck it up, say bland non-committal stuff in case
someone talks about things I disagree with, and pray that no one asks me
any questions.


So I'll do the Sunday thing at the Lutheran
church. But I'm going to do a Saturday night thing at a church where
they don't fall over in a dead faint if you raise your hands during the
singing.


Posted by: grammie winger, sign of The Time at January 24, 2016 09:21 AM (dFi94)"

The Lutheran theology is not so strange but the worship service! Last time I went I got splashed with chicken blood when they cut the head off the rooster and sprayed the blood on the congregation. The dry cleaners never really got it all out. Next time I will know better than to wear my best suit.

Posted by: Obnoxious A-Hole at January 24, 2016 02:03 PM (QHgTq)

455 Glenn Beck has gone completely insane.
--------
More important is who is on stage with insane.

Posted by: RioBravo at January 24, 2016 02:03 PM (NUqwG)

456 Posted by: FenelonSpoke at January 24, 2016 01:50 PM (w4NZ8

BTW, Fen, there are cheap ways to see Italy's wonders. I stayed in a convent in Sienna that was fabulous and inexpensive. The only rule was to not speak to the nuns.

Many hostels are available too. You should go, somehow. It will be a lifetime highlight experience.

Posted by: Meremortal at January 24, 2016 02:04 PM (3myMJ)

457 Why did Cruz participate?









Posted by: eman at January 24, 2016 02:03 PM (MQEz6)

Maybe to put out a vibe as being presidential? Dunno but it's ridiculous.

Posted by: Dack Thrombosis at January 24, 2016 02:04 PM (4ErVI)

458 Re: the necessity of book reviews, yes--I know who I am. I have been properly shamed into posting my book review on amazon for "To Save Us All From Ruin.

I was waiting until I had time to make it perfect, but that probably won't happen, so I did it on the fly.

I will work on my reviews for the Amy Lynn series shortly. I enjoyed them very much, also.

Posted by: April at January 24, 2016 02:04 PM (79ZSg)

459 "Tubes are generally much sturdier, if only because of the necessary
physical structure required to construct them. Thus, more able to stand
currents that would blow out the microscopic circuits in most
semiconductors."

The Sovs continued to use tubes in certain milspec systems even after they had absconded with enough transistor technology from the West to have replaced those with lighter, smaller solid state circuits.

EMP resistance was the goal. The Red forces were fully expecting that tactical nuclear weapons were going to get used by _someone_, were a Fulda Gap scenario to eventuate.

Posted by: torquewrench at January 24, 2016 02:04 PM (noWW6)

460 Every time a Praise Team strums, an angel has its wings torn out by the roots.

Posted by: Stringer Davis at January 24, 2016 02:05 PM (xq1UY)

461 Posted by: Meremortal at January 24, 2016 02:04 PM (3myMJ)

Thx for the suggestions. I have been to other parts of Europe but not there. Spouse would like to go for the art museums which I enjoy too. Maybe someday.

Posted by: FenelonSpoke at January 24, 2016 02:06 PM (w4NZ8)

462 Just getting back from more shoveling, granted Glen I wish would have just stayed home but not sure Sarah hasn't gone off the rails also

Posted by: Skip at January 24, 2016 02:06 PM (hk3Fb)

463 is there anyway the church (I don't know if this is
where your intended poachers or not) could consider a sarting an
alternative worship service at another time for people who respond to
that stye of worship?

Posted by: FenelonSpoke at January 24, 2016 02:02 PM (w4NZ
==============================================

Yes, that would be the best alternative - to start a more contemporary service at an alternate time. That's what they do at the Lutheran church where my son is a member. Most of this congregation unfortunately are stern Germans in their sixties or older, and think using anything besides the 1947 hymnal as scandalous.


Oh shoot. I'm used to going to church in jeans. I bet that's not gonna fly either.

Posted by: grammie winger, sign of The Time at January 24, 2016 02:07 PM (dFi94)

464 Every time a Praise Team strums, an angel has its wings torn out by the roots.

LOL. Now, now! ;^) It's not my preferred style of worship but different strikes for different folks.

Posted by: FenelonSpoke at January 24, 2016 02:07 PM (w4NZ8)

465
43 right 0 wrong IQ 132.

So I'm supposed to be smart.

Posted by: Ed Anger at January 24, 2016 02:08 PM (RcpcZ)

466 once upon a time i bought an iliad, paris, c.1520, (first latin translation published in paris), original binding. not too expensive, either.

Posted by: musical jolly chimp at January 24, 2016 02:10 PM (WTSFk)

467 Whoops. Another spoonerism.

Different "strokes." I guess you would consider it a strike, though. ;^)

Actually I like some praise choruses. I like Taize chants and that people sing together but it's more reflective. I also don't like standing up for 20-30 minutes before the service begins

Posted by: FenelonSpoke at January 24, 2016 02:10 PM (w4NZ8)

468 I'd love to go there if i had money and time. I hope that the spirituality will save that area from infestation by Muslims. i don't know what the situation with Islam is in Italy.

The Italians are doing far better than most of Europe in re to the Moslem problem: http://bit.ly/1ONo4Pm

Posted by: RushBabe at January 24, 2016 02:10 PM (/NEnw)

469 Glenn Beck has gone completely insane. Now he's swearing in presidents at public events.
Posted by: Dack Thrombosis at January 24, 2016 02:00 PM (4ErVI)

Why did Cruz participate?

I read somewhere this morning that Cruz has put a stop to that.

Posted by: Meremortal at January 24, 2016 02:10 PM (3myMJ)

470 "Having observed, in agony and frustration, a major recent chapter of 'counter-insurgency' warfare from the very near sidelines, I am
tremendously predisposed towards skepticism about any 'doctrine' or
nonsense that departs from common sense about human behavior and
conflict."

If your tolerance for ridiculous cant wrapped up in a big gaudy decorative bow reading "COUNTERINSURGENCY DOCTRINE" is low, then in the bowels of Christ I beseech you to go nowhere near the doctoral thesis of David Petraeus.

It is nothing but ridiculous cant. Princeton handed the guy a glossy new Ph.D for it. I said after reading it that I could have written the whole thing from start to finish in one long and probably drunken weekend.

That this utter malarkey was taken with the gravest seriousness up and down the flag ranks of the U.S. Army was a sign equivalent to Cheyne-Stokes respiration in a hospital patient. Not good. Not at all good.

Posted by: torquewrench at January 24, 2016 02:10 PM (noWW6)

471 telling sins before the confession

Heh.

"Come, see a man, which told me all things that ever I did..." (John 4:29)

He didn't really, just some of them... but I'm sure she sure felt like he did.

grammiewinger: Glad the terrorists didn't win!! And kudos to your pastor!

Posted by: mindful webworker - theo logically at January 24, 2016 02:11 PM (ECUyd)

472 "Glenn Beck has gone completely insane."

Also known as "Tuesday".

Posted by: torquewrench at January 24, 2016 02:11 PM (noWW6)

473 It must have been those Missouri Synod nuts after grammie's church. Did the cops have the Jell-O-sniffing dogs onsite, grammie?

Posted by: andycanuck at January 24, 2016 02:12 PM (DLIIY)

474 once upon another time i bought an animal farm , first american edition, at a nyc street kiosk for $5.00. not worth a lot, but still, a neat find.

Posted by: musical jolly chimp at January 24, 2016 02:13 PM (WTSFk)

475 Posted by: FenelonSpoke at January 24, 2016 02:06 PM (w4NZ

Bona fortuna, FenelonSpoke.

Posted by: Meremortal at January 24, 2016 02:13 PM (3myMJ)

476 Posted by: FenelonSpoke at January 24, 2016 02:07 PM (w4NZ

The people in the church I serve now are all older. They like hymns, but I sometimes clap to some of the livelier ones or raise my hands and they haven't thrown me out yet. They're not going to throw you out if you raise your hands. they'll just think you[re a weirdo ;^). jeans-you may be pushing it, but surely some of them-even women wear slacks?

Posted by: FenelonSpoke at January 24, 2016 02:13 PM (w4NZ8)

477 Did the cops have the Jell-O-sniffing dogs onsite, grammie?

Posted by: andycanuck at January 24, 2016 02:12 PM (DLIIY)
==============================================

Now that you mention it, there was a distinct odor of shaved carrots in the air...... hmmm

Posted by: grammie winger, sign of The Time at January 24, 2016 02:14 PM (dFi94)

478 once upon a time i bought an iliad, paris, c.1520, (first latin translation published in paris), original binding. not too expensive, either.

Posted by: musical jolly chimp at January 24, 2016 02:10 PM (WTSFk

Cool find. That's OLD!

Posted by: Meremortal at January 24, 2016 02:15 PM (3myMJ)

479 . jeans-you may be pushing it, but surely some of them-even women wear slacks?

Posted by: FenelonSpoke at January 24, 2016 02:13 PM (w4NZ
==============================================

Yeah, I'll have to ask him what the ladies there wear. Oh I forgot. He's a man. He won't have any idea.

Posted by: grammie winger, sign of The Time at January 24, 2016 02:15 PM (dFi94)

480 The only rule was to not speak to the nuns.
You had to sing to them?

Posted by: andycanuck at January 24, 2016 02:15 PM (DLIIY)

481 T-bird, yeah, I got 44 correct, but I too skipped that "cardinal" one (it was the next-to-last). According to the people who put that test together, two of these words are supposed to be synonyms, at least in some context:

cardinal
pilot
full
inkling

Sorry, even after considering it for a few minutes, I just couldn't --- and still can't --- see it. Does anyone else? Maybe this is the one everyone missed, because there don't seem to be any synonyms in there, like maybe they did it on purpose so no-one would get a perfect score? Keep us in our place, ya know.


Posted by: Trotsky w/a thesis in his headwound at January 24, 2016 02:16 PM (Y4Gwv)

482 I don't know that I'dd want to be that holy. He and St John Vianney used to get dragged around and beaten up by the devil or devils. Ouch!!

Posted by: FenelonSpoke at January 24, 2016 01:54 PM (w4NZ

Our priest will throw in the occasional mention of a saint and his or her proclivities. He mentioned one brother whom the monks had to literally chain to the floor because he kept floating upward. I can't remember the name, though.

Posted by: RushBabe at January 24, 2016 02:16 PM (/NEnw)

483 and finally, there's the shortest short story in english:

"for sale. baby shoes. never used."

that one is free, but i hear the author got $10 for it.

Posted by: musical jolly chimp at January 24, 2016 02:16 PM (WTSFk)

484 Posted by: RushBabe at January 24, 2016 02:16 PM (/NEnw)

Sounds like St Francis.

Posted by: FenelonSpoke at January 24, 2016 02:17 PM (w4NZ8)

485 OM, assuming you're still lurking--I think you did a book thread this past year about publishing. Was wondering if you could point me towards the proper one, or if it would be material for next week. I wrote a manuscript for a children's book almost a decade ago and am thinking of finally publishing it. I have only the vaguest of notions of how this worked umpteen years ago with agents and big New York publishing houses, and even less an idea how it works now. FWIW it would be the type of book that pics would be important, so an eBook format is probably suboptimal.

Posted by: Conservative Crank's iPhone at January 24, 2016 02:17 PM (Gosad)

486 All of us down at the Brattleboro Women's Reproductive Health Clinic want to thank Presdent Obama for doing such a great job protecting us and cleaning up after this Global Warming produced snow storm that just went through. Thank Mr. Presdent and we all love you .............

Posted by: Mary Clogginstien from Brattleboro, VT at January 24, 2016 02:18 PM (Fbj4h)

487 Off to help watch Milady make lunch. Catch ya here, next week, bookies.

Posted by: mindful webworker - sayanoraloha at January 24, 2016 02:18 PM (ECUyd)

488 478:

one of the neat things about it was that ezra pound praised that translation. he probably read it too, though i can't read latin.

Posted by: musical jolly chimp at January 24, 2016 02:19 PM (WTSFk)

489 Posted by: Benny Hinn at January 24, 2016

Benny Hinn? The lecherous Yakkity Sax guy?

Posted by: Bertram Cabot Jr. at January 24, 2016 02:20 PM (FkBIv)

490 Not Lutheran nor Christian, but in defense of Lutherans, I think their main beef with contemporary megachurch/Charismatic worship is they find the theology of the songs problematic as compared to hymns.

Pastor Bryan Wolfmueller explains his "Praise Song cruncher", which he uses to evaluate them:
http://www.tabletalkradio.org/content/taxonomy/term/84

He's a funny, easygoing LCMS type, if that is not a self contradiction.

Posted by: angela urkel at January 24, 2016 02:20 PM (jIjKK)

491 I have a few books from the 1800s but 1520, priceless ( almost)

Posted by: Skip at January 24, 2016 02:21 PM (hk3Fb)

492 Fenelon, have you ever read Julia Spencer-Fleming's Claire Ferguson/Russ Alston series? The first one is "In the Bleak Midwinter." (All the titles are from old-time hymns.)

Posted by: RushBabe at January 24, 2016 02:21 PM (/NEnw)

493 @483 That's Papa H. His finest work, and the only one I know by heart.

The only rule was to not speak to the nuns.
Indeed this rule has been in effect at many places I have stayed.
The trick, to me, has been how to ascertain which ones were going to be the nuns. In many cases, if only I'd known sooner...

A nun sits next to me at the symphony. Retired music teacher. I wish I could get her to shut up.

Posted by: Stringer Davis at January 24, 2016 02:21 PM (xq1UY)

494 For crying out loud, Mary! This is not a women's reproductive clinic.

http://www.brattlebororetreat.org

Posted by: Mary's group therapy leader at January 24, 2016 02:22 PM (AfsKp)

495 ... i thought it was a nice line of descent from homer to renaissance paris to modern 20th century poet.

Posted by: musical jolly chimp at January 24, 2016 02:22 PM (WTSFk)

496 Regarding collectible books: Are the two copies of "Little Black Sambo" my brother and I were given as children collectibles, or do they just mark us as total RACISSSSSTS? How about the geography and history books my grandmother taught school with in the early 1900's? Lots of unacceptable thoughts/information in those these days.

Posted by: The Cynic at January 24, 2016 02:23 PM (celhm)

497 BTW M-Clog, it didn't snow in Brattleboro yesterday.

Posted by: fluffy at January 24, 2016 02:23 PM (AfsKp)

498 "51
They weren't losing the war so much as losing the homefront.



Yes, that's a pretty good read of the situation.

Posted by: Bandersnatch, let all the children boogie at January 24, 2016 09:52 AM (1xUj/)"

They were also taken in by Woodrow Wilson and his 14 points. The German delegation that arrived to negotiate the Armistice were as naive as the Vietnamese, the Iraqis or the Ukrainians in believing that American politicians actually mean what they say and intend to keep their promises. What the hell, in view of how well the Indian treaties worked for the United States we were just sticking with something that works.

I believe there is a well known line from "Animal House" on the subject.

Posted by: Obnoxious A-Hole at January 24, 2016 02:23 PM (QHgTq)

499 OM - Apologies for hijacking the book thread with the vocab quiz. I can see it was majorly distracting after you put all the work into topics for your post. I should have mailed it you and let you use it when you saw fit. Mea culpa.

Posted by: RushBabe at January 24, 2016 02:23 PM (/NEnw)

500 One of these days, I want to get back into WWI books though. The background to that war is so difficult to understand and it was truly horrific.

Posted by: Notsothoreau at January 24, 2016 12:33 PM (Lqy/e)


For almost 100 years, the historiography of the First Global Unpleasantness was dominated by a group I call the Versailles Mafia. So determined to fix 100% of the "war guilt" on Germany that they simply ignored (I won't say "suppressed", because they didn't actually destroy evidence) all of the events, statements and correspondence that on close examination, spread the blame a bit more broadly (to put it mildly).

With the centennial of the start of the war, a number of more balanced accounts of the pre-war period, and in particular the events of July 1914, have become available. Otte's July Crisis, McMeekin's July 1914 and Clark's The Sleepwalkers are the best of the lot. Martel's The Month that Changed the World is another effort by the "ever Blameberlin" crowd, however.

Another book that I recently finished is Inventing the Schlieffen Plan by Terence Zuber. The basic thesis is that the plan never existed at all (in the form of an official Aufmarschplan), it was just a study (Denkshrift) written by Schlieffen after his retirement, taken a bit too seriously (and somewhat out of context) by his successor, who then attempted to implement it despite the fact that he had neither the resources nor the strategic option of a war with France alone as envisioned in Schlieffen's thought experiment.

Note that I say all of the above from the perspective that, while Germany may not have been 100% responsible for the start of the war, I'm glad she lost it. Churchill was right when he observed that the Hun is always either at your throat or at your feet (even though in that statement he was talking about WWII, and was paraphrasing someone else to boot, it still applies here).

Posted by: HTL at January 24, 2016 02:24 PM (s4eYP)

501 Hillary going to debate herself:

"A Democratic presidential forum scheduled at the 11th hour will give Hillary Clinton one last chance to make her case to the Iowa voters as some polls show rival Bernie Sanders overtaking her in the first-in-the-nation caucus state."

Fear is in the air.

Posted by: Meremortal at January 24, 2016 02:24 PM (3myMJ)

502 http://www.brattlebororetreat.org

Thankfully, there is a "get help now" button.

Posted by: Bertram Cabot Jr. at January 24, 2016 02:25 PM (FkBIv)

503 Benny Hinn? The lecherous Yakkity Sax guy?
Posted by: Bertram Cabot Jr. at January 24, 2016 02:20 PM (FkBIv)


No, not Hill. Hinn is infinitely more retarded. If you really don't know, google "benny hinn let the bodies hit the floor", or he's on TBN a lot doing pledge drives.

Posted by: Benny Hinn at January 24, 2016 02:25 PM (jIjKK)

504 Posted by: Mary Clogginstien from Brattleboro, VT at January 24, 2016 02:18 PM (Fbj4h)

You know what Ii really liked, Mar?y. it was the way he personally came up to the center this morning and shoveled some snow for us for at least four hours so that women could come in and get their reproductive health services early Monday morning. I feel the media doesn't report wonderful things President Obama does, but being the self effacing person he is he just slipped in and didn't tell anyone. I know. Thanks for getting out the word, sis.

Posted by: Your Brother Ben at January 24, 2016 02:25 PM (w4NZ8)

505 "Benny Hinn? The lecherous Yakkity Sax guy?



Posted by: Bertram Cabot Jr. at January 24, 2016 02:20 PM (FkBIv)"

He was great as the computer guy who loved women with big butts in the original "Italian Job" with Michael Caine.

Posted by: Obnoxious A-Hole at January 24, 2016 02:26 PM (QHgTq)

506 As a Lutheran born and raised, my biggest issue with contemporary worship music is that it seems to lack the solemnity of the older hymns. The pop feel of the songs doesn't jive with my concept of an orderly and formal high Lutheran mass.

If your idea of worship is Amy Grant songs, then God love you, but it isn't mine. I defer to St. Paul, with that wonderful bit about how he who does not eat meat does so to glorify God, and he who does eat meat gives thanks to God. Same with mode of worship.*

*Excluding the prosperity gospel types, who deserve to be whipped out of the Temple, IMO.

Posted by: Conservative Crank's iPhone at January 24, 2016 02:27 PM (Gosad)

507 500 htl:

what do you think about tuchman's '"the guns of august". i thought she made a very persuasive case laying the blame essentially at berlin's feet. but i'm not an historian and that was my take.

Posted by: musical jolly chimp at January 24, 2016 02:30 PM (WTSFk)

508 osted by: RushBabe at January 24, 2016 02:21 PM (/NEnw)

Are they mystery stories?

Thanks for the suggestions. i'll have to look for them.

Posted by: Your Brother Ben at January 24, 2016 02:31 PM (w4NZ8)

509 They were also taken in by Woodrow Wilson and his 14 points. The German delegation that arrived to negotiate the Armistice were as naive...
-----
I'm not sure how naive the negotiators of a country which concluded the Treaty of Brest-Litovsk could have really been. The fact that the food embargo of Germany continued during negotiations was a bitter pill to 'swallow'.

Posted by: RioBravo at January 24, 2016 02:32 PM (NUqwG)

510 Posted by: Conservative Crank's iPhone at January 24, 2016 02:27 PM (Gosad)

Not judging, just observing...

It's an interesting continuum, from Islam which forbids music period, to your take, to the anything goes rockers in church.

Hint. I know a lot of musicians who play church gigs. Most of them hate everything that happens there except their pay. Not all, but most.

Posted by: Meremortal at January 24, 2016 02:32 PM (3myMJ)

511 506 As a Lutheran born and raised, my biggest issue with contemporary worship music is that it seems to lack the solemnity of the older hymns. The pop feel of the songs doesn't jive with my concept of an orderly and formal high Lutheran mass.

If your idea of worship is Amy Grant songs, then God love you, but it isn't mine. I defer to St. Paul, with that wonderful bit about how he who does not eat meat does so to glorify God, and he who does eat meat gives thanks to God. Same with mode of worship.*

*Excluding the prosperity gospel types, who deserve to be whipped out of the Temple, IMO.
Posted by: Conservative Crank's iPhone at January 24, 2016 02:27 PM (Gosad)
***
I'm something of a bad Jew, myself, and I agree.

If you were going to meet the governor of your state, you'd be groomed and dressed for the occasion, and you'd conduct yourself in a respectful manner.

And people think they can just roll out of bed and sing love-songs to Melech ha'Olam? At least give the Big Guy the same respect you'd pay a human leader.

Posted by: Your Decidedly Devious Uncle Palpatine, Still Accepting Harem Applicants at January 24, 2016 02:34 PM (lutOX)

512 I know a lot of musicians who play church gigs

Are you speaking of bands or organists/pianists or both?

Posted by: Your Brother Ben at January 24, 2016 02:35 PM (w4NZ8)

513 As a Lutheran, we're all sinners and fall short. Naturally I think I fall a little less short, because ego is a dirty sinful whore.

Posted by: Conservative Crank's iPhone at January 24, 2016 02:35 PM (Gosad)

514 *Excluding the prosperity gospel types, who deserve to be whipped out of the Temple, IMO.

Posted by: Conservative Crank's iPhone at January 24, 2016 02:27 PM (Gosad)
============================================

I'm right there with you on the prosperity un-gospel thing. I say this as a person who is listening to a loop of contemporary praise and worship playlist at the moment.

It's all good. Anything that draws a person to the love of God and His magnificent gift of His beloved Son on our behalf - that's a good thing. For me, that might be Chris Tomlin or Dave Crowder or Michael W. Smith. For others it's something else entirely. Those things are peripheral. The essence is Jesus.

Posted by: grammie winger, sign of The Time at January 24, 2016 02:35 PM (dFi94)

515 "The only rule was to not speak to the nuns.
You had to sing to them?"

I was taught by nuns, starting with first grade.

They are about the only people that I find scary.

Remember the nun scene from the Blues Brothers Movie. That. That was Sister Mary Joseph, my first grade teacher.

*shudders*

Posted by: Meremortal at January 24, 2016 02:35 PM (3myMJ)

516 And... I thought I had a back-up...

It seems when the netbook corrupted the profile, it took about a 2,000 word short story with it.

So remember to have current back-ups.

Posted by: Anna Puma at January 24, 2016 02:35 PM (r+/qI)

517 Posted by: Your Brother Ben at January 24, 2016 02:35 PM (w4NZ

Sorry; Leftist Vermont sock off

Posted by: FenelonSpoke at January 24, 2016 02:36 PM (w4NZ8)

518 "what do you think about tuchman's 'the guns of august'."

An intelligence spook and historian chimes in.

http://20committee.com/2015/05/12/that-terrible-tuchman-woman/

Posted by: torquewrench at January 24, 2016 02:36 PM (noWW6)

519 Posted by: grammie winger, sign of The Time at January 24, 2016 02:35 PM (dFi94)

Well said.

Posted by: FenelonSpoke at January 24, 2016 02:37 PM (w4NZ8)

520 Merkel: Anti-Semitism More Widespread Than We Imagined Among Asylum Seekers



Gee, who woulda thunk?

Weasel Zippers

Ya just can't make this shit up

Posted by: Nevergiveup at January 24, 2016 02:37 PM (DUoqb)

521
I loved little black Sambo. He was brave. He was fast. He out smarted that tiger. And because of him we have delicious butter for our scrumptious pancakes.

Posted by: Bruce With a Wang! at January 24, 2016 02:40 PM (iQIUe)

522 I know a lot of musicians who play church gigs

Are you speaking of bands or organists/pianists or both?



Posted by: Your Brother Ben at January 24, 2016 02:35 PM (w4NZ

Drummers, bassists, guitards. They use churches to make extra money on Sunday. Not the little old ladies on the piano.

Posted by: Meremortal at January 24, 2016 02:40 PM (3myMJ)

523 "Gee, who woulda thunk? "



Shocking. If they'd only had some way of predicting this.

Posted by: Ricardo Kill at January 24, 2016 02:41 PM (aNoaf)

524 Gaza rocket explodes in southern Israel; no injuries

but according to Fredo Jewish nails are the problem

Posted by: Nevergiveup at January 24, 2016 02:41 PM (DUoqb)

525 Absolutely, grammie winger. If you're more Pentecostal or Southern Baptist, or the other extreme and a Quaker, have at it. It's just not my comfort zone.

But seriously, you might like Lutherans. It's the drinking man's denomination, after all.

Posted by: Conservative Crank's iPhone at January 24, 2016 02:41 PM (Gosad)

526 btw, regarding that 16th cent.. book: early books is an interesting field. i find it rewarding at times to peruse rare book dealers catalogs. you get a sense of the breadth and depth of knowledge and inquiry before the pocky lips.

Posted by: musical jolly chimp at January 24, 2016 02:42 PM (WTSFk)

527 It's the drinking man's denomination, after all.

Posted by: Conservative Crank's iPhone at January 24, 2016 02:41 PM (Gosad)
=================================================

So I've heard. First time Little Winger went over to a Lutheran minister's house as a young teen, he came home all flabbergasted that the pastor had BEER in his fridge! I think that was a large part of his decision to become Lutheran.

Posted by: grammie winger, sign of The Time at January 24, 2016 02:44 PM (dFi94)

528 Gaza rocket explodes in southern Israel; no injuries
but according to Fredo Jewish nails are the problem
Posted by: Nevergiveup


And today on Fareed Zakaria's TV show I heard him preface a spot by saying "Netanyahu. Can there ever be peace in the middle east while he is in office."

Posted by: Bertram Cabot Jr. at January 24, 2016 02:44 PM (FkBIv)

529 And people think they can just roll out of bed and sing love-songs to Melech ha'Olam?

Christianity is a little different than Rabbinic Judaism in that there is more of a "marriage" concept in how Christianity approaches its faith. It comes from God actually showing up here to walk around and touch people (according to Christianity's doctrine). That is why a lot of Christian hymns look like love songs, and why the worship can be more informal.

(In Hosea, Ezekiel, etc., the Israelites have also used marriage as an analogy for undistracted worship; and I am certainly *not* saying that Jews do not love G-d. But, as you note, the Jewish God seems mainly approached as malik al-alameen, if you'll pardon the slip into that Other Religious Language.)

Posted by: boulder terlit hobo at January 24, 2016 02:44 PM (6FqZa)

530 ... you might find it fun, too, so take a look through some of the dealer's offerings. that, at least, is free!

Posted by: musical jolly chimp at January 24, 2016 02:45 PM (WTSFk)

531 Posted by: Meremortal at January 24, 2016 02:40 PM (3myMJ)

And chances are they are mostly leftists too, correct. Aside from Backwards Boy and Piercello and County Singer-whom I assuming is a musician, most musicians I know tend to be leftists so they have a bias against Christianity to begin with. It's always my hope that they will be playing in a church and have a profound experience that draws them to Christ so that they cease to be performers and do it for the love of God.

Posted by: FenelonSpoke at January 24, 2016 02:45 PM (w4NZ8)

532 And today on Fareed Zakaria's TV show I heard him preface a spot by saying "Netanyahu. Can there ever be peace in the middle east while he is in office."
Posted by: Bertram Cabot Jr. at January 24, 2016 02:44 PM (FkBIv)

He's a not so closet Jew hater

Posted by: Nevergiveup at January 24, 2016 02:46 PM (DUoqb)

533 Merkel: Anti-Semitism More Widespread Than We Imagined Among Asylum Seekers

If it weren't for the competition in the last century, which is admittedly pretty stiff, Merkel would be a shoo-in for worst head of state in German history.

Posted by: boulder terlit hobo at January 24, 2016 02:47 PM (6FqZa)

534 I was still Lutheran when they came up with "Lutheran Youth Encounter," whose summer stock companies were indoctrinated to call themselves to group hugs with "Puddle, Guys!" (pronouncing the initials PTL, for Praise the Lord). Folk guitar versions of hard rock songs, because God's People may not be quite ready for feedback yet. And re-written lyrics to Cream songs, that were so obviously drug paeans that even those of us in the know on these matters were a little embarrassed by them in their straight form, and then you had to sing them at Luther League.

It was an embarrassment to God and man. Put me right off that shit. And I was managing and booking for a church-sponsored "coffee house" at the time (first rule of mainline religion, you have to wait 15 years after something is hip, then do it with both feet). My music venture may have inspired a few young couples to not be too grossed-out to get married in (a) church, but the Encounter antic did not save the Current and Benevolence accounts one single backslider.

Posted by: Stringer Davis at January 24, 2016 02:48 PM (xq1UY)

535 South African mayor awards scholarships to virgin women

Cough Cough....Yeah i bet he did

Posted by: Nevergiveup at January 24, 2016 02:48 PM (DUoqb)

536
And today on Fareed Zakaria's TV show I heard him preface a spot by saying "Netanyahu. Can there ever be peace in the middle east while he is in office."

He's too chicken to say "Can there ever be peace in the ME while Israel exists?"

Which is what he thinks.

Posted by: Meremortal at January 24, 2016 02:48 PM (3myMJ)

537 529 And people think they can just roll out of bed and sing love-songs to Melech ha'Olam?

Christianity is a little different than Rabbinic Judaism in that there is more of a "marriage" concept in how Christianity approaches its faith. It comes from God actually showing up here to walk around and touch people (according to Christianity's doctrine). That is why a lot of Christian hymns look like love songs, and why the worship can be more informal.

(In Hosea, Ezekiel, etc., the Israelites have also used marriage as an analogy for undistracted worship; and I am certainly *not* saying that Jews do not love G-d. But, as you note, the Jewish God seems mainly approached as malik al-alameen, if you'll pardon the slip into that Other Religious Language.)
Posted by: boulder terlit hobo at January 24, 2016 02:44 PM (6FqZa)
***
Truth is, I've always envied Christians their relationship with the Boss. So much more direct and somehow real than ours.

Meh, adopted kids often end up the favorites....

Posted by: Your Decidedly Devious Uncle Palpatine, Still Accepting Harem Applicants at January 24, 2016 02:49 PM (lutOX)

538 I have to believe that Bibi will have the last laugh over Obama and the other world assholes.

Posted by: Bruce With a Wang! at January 24, 2016 02:49 PM (iQIUe)

539 I'm hoping and praying for Germany that Merkel gets a clue before it's too late if it's not already..

Posted by: FenelonSpoke at January 24, 2016 02:51 PM (w4NZ8)

540
Should have brought this up earlier but it amazes me how many alcoholic authors there are and that the can write under the influence. I guess it generally catches up to them and they cant write at all.

Posted by: Bruce With a Wang! at January 24, 2016 02:52 PM (iQIUe)

541 Elbows?

Posted by: Brady vs Big Head at January 24, 2016 02:52 PM (H9MG5)

542 (first rule of mainline religion, you have to wait 15 years after something is hip, then do it with both feet).
======================================



Stringer - you made me laugh so hard !! Ha!

Posted by: grammie winger, sign of The Time at January 24, 2016 02:52 PM (dFi94)

543 Posted by: FenelonSpoke at January 24, 2016 02:45 PM (w4NZ

Radical leftys and athiests many of them.

I'm a rare right-wing musician. Piercello is a prince of a guy in person and very talented by the way.

These guys I'm talking about are hired guns with a lot more skills than most. They get hired, but they curse the entire proceedings. I just smile at them.

Posted by: Meremortal at January 24, 2016 02:53 PM (3myMJ)

544 new Rubio PAC anti-Cruz ad is hilarious.

"whats Canadian about Ted Cruz? HIS TAX PLAN! HE SUPPORTS A VAT!!!!"

Posted by: Harry Paratestes at January 24, 2016 02:53 PM (AkOaV)

545 Long book thread.

Posted by: Vic-we have no party at January 24, 2016 02:54 PM (t2KH5)

546 Lutheran beer, meh, three-two.

they will be playing in a church and have a profound experience that draws them to Christ
Bach chorales will do that for you if you play loud and don't hold back on the 16-footers.

Posted by: Stringer Davis at January 24, 2016 02:54 PM (xq1UY)

547 what do you think about tuchman's '"the guns of august". i thought she made a very persuasive case laying the blame essentially at berlin's feet. but i'm not an historian and that was my take.

Posted by: musical jolly chimp at January 24, 2016 02:30 PM (WTSFk)


Tuchman was part of the Versailles Mafia. You have to ignore a lot of evidence, and take some other stuff seriously out of context, to come up with their conclusions. She was a great writer but a bad historian, at least on this particular subject.

I will give you one (but by no means the only) example. Her entire "coverage" of the events of July is only one page long, and in it she states that Russia declared general mobilization on 30 July, at the same time as Austria. In fact, Russia had begun to mobilize five days before that, using a subterfuge called "the period preparatory to war", which began the mobilization process without explicitly calling it that, a step of which Germany was well aware. Given the importance of relative mobilization speeds in everybody's war plans, this was a major escalation, undertaken by Russia before any of the other Great Powers had taken similar steps. Yet not only does Tuchman not mention this, she actually throws in a line stating that "Agents at frontiers were reporting every cavalry patrol as a deployment", to pre-emptively dismiss this point. Which indicates to me that she was actively trying to suppress this information, rather than merely having missed it in her initial research.

Posted by: HTL at January 24, 2016 02:55 PM (s4eYP)

548 541 Elbows?
Posted by: Brady vs Big Head at January 24, 2016 02:52 PM (H9MG5)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AoOXyaPVVgI

Posted by: Your Decidedly Devious Uncle Palpatine, Still Accepting Harem Applicants at January 24, 2016 02:55 PM (lutOX)

549 I'm a rare right-wing musician.

What instrument(s) do you play?

I'm interested whenever Piercello shows up because my son plays the cello although I can't imagine him ever doing it professionally.

It's the same in theatre. I know ONE actor who's conservative. I know some religious ones, but they're mostly liberals so when I'trying to find actors for a religious drama-at this point we can't pay; it has to be amateurs-Nobody shows up. It;s frustrating.

Posted by: FenelonSpoke at January 24, 2016 02:57 PM (w4NZ8)

550 "It's always my hope that they will be playing in a church and have a profound experience that draws them to Christ so that they cease to be performers and do it for the love of God."

That would be nice, they'd be better people for it.

Reminds of the first time the Merewife and I walked into the Vatican. She looked up and said, "Oh my God."

I said, "Yeah, I think that was the whole idea."

Posted by: Meremortal at January 24, 2016 02:57 PM (3myMJ)

551 Posted by: Vic-we have no party at January 24, 2016 02:54 PM (t2KH5)

Vic, we went off track. I am much to blame. ;^)

Posted by: FenelonSpoke at January 24, 2016 02:58 PM (w4NZ8)

552 OK Game time

Posted by: Nevergiveup at January 24, 2016 02:59 PM (DUoqb)

553 I'm sure someone has probably already mentioned this, but Mark Levin linked Ace on his FB page.

https://www.facebook.com/marklevinshow/?fref=nf

Posted by: spypeach at January 24, 2016 02:59 PM (nyYhO)

554 Bottomline is that there is not that much outrage in Germany. Coverage may be suppressed. But if shit like that happened here, people would go nuts.

Posted by: Bruce With a Wang! at January 24, 2016 03:00 PM (iQIUe)

555 Tuchman also counted Vietnam as part of the "March of Folly".

So, what you said. Court-historian of the Western postwar consensus. Whig historian, in short. Not a historian, to be even briefer.

Posted by: boulder terlit hobo at January 24, 2016 03:02 PM (6FqZa)

556 Posted by: spypeach at January 24, 2016 02:59 PM (nyYhO)

good for ace.

Posted by: Harry Paratestes at January 24, 2016 03:02 PM (AkOaV)

557 It seems that the Brit tactic is to take away the passports of jihadis. What's their option? Let them go and fight with isis? Either way, it leaves a sour taste. This is why I am glad we have/had gitmo.

Posted by: Bruce With a Wang! at January 24, 2016 03:02 PM (iQIUe)

558 An intelligence spook and historian chimes in.

http://20committee.com/2015/05/12/that-terrible-tuchman-woman/

Posted by: torquewrench at January 24, 2016 02:36 PM (noWW6)


Thanks for that link! Wish I'd written that myself. I have several other books on the Galician campaign, but am going to add Schindler's to the collection as well.

Posted by: HTL at January 24, 2016 03:03 PM (s4eYP)

559 "What instrument(s) do you play?

I'm interested whenever Piercello shows up because my son plays the cello although I can't imagine him ever doing it professionally."

Piercello is a good classical player who can jam too, a somewhat rare combination.

I play piano and guitar for songwriting purposes. I'm a hired gun on electric bass, tour bands and recording sessions when I was young, just play for enjoyment now.

Posted by: Meremortal at January 24, 2016 03:04 PM (3myMJ)

560 There's something you don't see everyday: A NE running play

Posted by: Nevergiveup at January 24, 2016 03:08 PM (DUoqb)

561 Gotta run, great chatting.

Posted by: Meremortal at January 24, 2016 03:10 PM (3myMJ)

562 547:

thank you for the observation, the context and example.

i was taught that ww I was nobody's fault, the result of entangling treaties & basically the momentum of events. but i've taken to the blame germany first crowd, after reading tuchman and some other very general histories. (exhibit A: rail schedules!)

germany's 30 year war to establish its national credibility was very expensive. we face another, more protracted if not as bloody (let's hope) conflict with post-cold war islam.

Posted by: musical jolly chimp at January 24, 2016 03:12 PM (WTSFk)

563 Emails not the only thing delayed by the snow storm

Posted by: Skip at January 24, 2016 03:12 PM (hk3Fb)

564 hmm, book thread is a little musty

Posted by: chemjeff at January 24, 2016 03:15 PM (uZNvH)

565 What NO elbows? I sure hope we get some for the Panther's game.

Posted by: Nip Sip at January 24, 2016 03:15 PM (jJRIy)

566 "The Moon Moth" is a science fiction short story by American author Jack Vance.

And quite good on its own terms.

Posted by: sf reader at January 24, 2016 03:15 PM (kk/oj)

567 Hoping Broncos win, I detest the Pats

Posted by: Skip at January 24, 2016 03:16 PM (hk3Fb)

568 Hell, what do I care, I'll be AT the second game.

Posted by: Nip Sip at January 24, 2016 03:16 PM (jJRIy)

569 "what do you think about tuchman's 'the guns of august'."

An intelligence spook and historian chimes in.



Heh. I found quite a lot valuable in The Guns of August but that's quite a hilarious takedown.

Posted by: Bandersnatch, let all the children boogie at January 24, 2016 03:16 PM (1xUj/)

570 Which indicates to me that she was actively trying to suppress this information, rather than merely having missed it in her initial research.

Posted by: HTL at January 24, 2016 02:55 PM (s4eYP)
-------
She was equally misleading in "Stillwell and the American Experience in China"

Posted by: RioBravo at January 24, 2016 03:17 PM (NUqwG)

571 Slow day at the HQ.
I guess a lot of folks are outside trying to tunnel out?

Posted by: Chi at January 24, 2016 03:19 PM (I7I0v)

572 Meh, adopted kids often end up the favorites....

Posted by: Your Decidedly Devious Uncle Palpatine, Still Accepting Harem Applicants at January 24, 2016 02:49 PM (lutOX)


Funny you say that. There are many NT passages that stress gentile Christians are "adopted" (though not "favorites"). Rom 11, Paul and his olive branch analogy. Jesus in Matthew repeatedly admonishing his Jewish audience to some duty and adding, "even the Gentiles do this". I've often wondered if this emphasis has unconsciously contributed to anti semitism throughout the ages. Not because the bible supports it, but because of envy at being merely "adopted".

Posted by: angela urkel at January 24, 2016 03:19 PM (jIjKK)

573 Um football thread?

Posted by: buzzion at January 24, 2016 03:20 PM (zt+N6)

574 I have "A nice day for screaming" by James H. Schmitz.

Posted by: sf reader at January 24, 2016 03:20 PM (kk/oj)

575 7-0 Broncos

Posted by: Skip at January 24, 2016 03:20 PM (hk3Fb)

576
7-0 Broncos...

Posted by: Spun and Murky at January 24, 2016 03:22 PM (06b4v)

577 Um football thread?
Posted by: buzzion at January 24, 2016 03:20 PM (zt+N6)
-------
'Canes or Wolverines?

Posted by: RioBravo at January 24, 2016 03:23 PM (NUqwG)

578 hmm, book thread is a little musty

It smells of rich mahogany.

Posted by: Grump928(C) says Free Soothie!, with purchase of commenter of equal or greater value at January 24, 2016 03:23 PM (rwI+c)

579 Football thread?
Is now

Posted by: Skip at January 24, 2016 03:23 PM (hk3Fb)

580 I hope the Broncos are all over the Cheatriots like that hillbilly was all over Ned Beatty in Deliverance.

Come to think of it Bill Bellicheat looks a lot like Ned Beatty.

Go Broncos!

Posted by: Hairyback Guy at January 24, 2016 03:24 PM (ej1L0)

581 Could be the first book thread to hit 1000 comments, unless some elbows show up soon.

Posted by: cool breeze at January 24, 2016 03:24 PM (ckvus)

582 Why couldn't Morgan Freeman had died in Olympus has Fallen as well so we didn't have to see him in the sequel?

Posted by: buzzion at January 24, 2016 03:25 PM (zt+N6)

583 ...Luna City, Texas Mighty Fighting Moths...
"The Moon Moth" by Jack Vance

Posted by: sf reader at January 24, 2016 03:25 PM (kk/oj)

584
573 Um football thread?
Posted by: buzzion at January 24, 2016 03:20 PM (zt+N6)


When even the dead notice the obvious delay and ripeness of the current thread, things have gone bad wrong.

Posted by: Krebs v Carnot: Epic Battle of the Cycling Stars (TM) at January 24, 2016 03:26 PM (BK3ZS)

585 There's going to be a sequel to that dreck?

Posted by: Chi at January 24, 2016 03:26 PM (I7I0v)

586 Antisemitism und sexism und intolerance zehr videshpread, more so than I had thought... but that cannot be, because zey are the religion of peace.

That is axiomatic. So the explanation must be that we offended them somehow.

We must apologize to them and make more concessions, and then perhaps we can make up for whatever horrible sin we have committed against them, and then perhaps we can be reconciled eventually.

Posted by: angela urkel at January 24, 2016 03:27 PM (jIjKK)

587 "The Moon Moth" by Jack Vance

A most excellent story, and available online for free.

http://www.unexploredworlds.com/RealPulp/htm/rpulp145.htm

Posted by: Grump928(C) says Free Soothie!, with purchase of commenter of equal or greater value at January 24, 2016 03:27 PM (rwI+c)

588 where's the nfl thread?

Posted by: davidt at January 24, 2016 03:28 PM (8aOqE)

589 Think the football thread will have boobs?

Posted by: Weasel at January 24, 2016 03:29 PM (e3bId)

590 I'm hoping the Cheating dogs loose 40 - 0

Posted by: Skip at January 24, 2016 03:29 PM (hk3Fb)

591 To the haters: if you're a WWI historian you may find fault with Tuchman's observations of specifics, such as whether the Russians mobilized 5 days before they mobilized.

What she captured well was the utter pointlessness of the waste and the slaughter.

One of the things she touches on early on is that it was still French military doctrine that "elan" was the decisive factor in battle. Whoever charged into the line with the most spirit would win the day.

Back in the day countries sent observers to watch other people's wars. Everyone had seen the first industrial war, the American Civil War. Everyone had gone to watch the Russo-Japanese war in 1905. Everyone knew perfectly well that the Industrial Age had changed everything about war.

And everyone went into that war with chivalric notions of war fighting. It was an appalling waste and she got that part right.

Posted by: Bandersnatch, let all the children boogie at January 24, 2016 03:29 PM (1xUj/)

592 btw, cbssports.com has free livestream of game

Posted by: davidt at January 24, 2016 03:29 PM (8aOqE)

593 The cheerleaders must be wearing their long johns.

Posted by: normal person at January 24, 2016 03:29 PM (Queum)

594 578 hmm, book thread is a little musty

It smells of rich mahogany.
Posted by: Grump928(C) says Free Soothie!, with purchase of commenter of equal or greater value at January 24, 2016 03:23 PM (rwI+c)
***
And fine Corinthian leather....

Posted by: Your Decidedly Devious Uncle Palpatine, Still Accepting Harem Applicants at January 24, 2016 03:31 PM (lutOX)

595 Omaha!

Posted by: Lizzy at January 24, 2016 03:31 PM (NOIQH)

596 Thought that smell was stale cigars and cheap bourbon.

Posted by: Weasel at January 24, 2016 03:32 PM (e3bId)

597 Where's rdbrewer? Havent seen him in days.

Posted by: Bruce With a Wang! at January 24, 2016 03:33 PM (iQIUe)

598 The Football Thread has become brother to the Gub Thread.

Posted by: Grump928(C) says Free Soothie!, with purchase of commenter of equal or greater value at January 24, 2016 03:33 PM (rwI+c)

599 And everyone went into that war with chivalric notions of war fighting. It was an appalling waste and she got that part right.
Posted by: Bandersnatch, let all the children boogie at January 24, 2016 03:29 PM (1xUj/)

Correct....and with the invention of reliable, accurate machine guns tactics of the past were obsolete.

Posted by: Hairyback Guy at January 24, 2016 03:33 PM (ej1L0)

600 Hoping for a fertile spring.

Posted by: Grump928(C) says Free Soothie!, with purchase of commenter of equal or greater value at January 24, 2016 03:33 PM (rwI+c)

601 Gun thread?

I still have about 100 rounds left to load. That Lat 100 are the hardest.

Posted by: Weasel at January 24, 2016 03:34 PM (e3bId)

602 It was an appalling waste and she got that part right.

Wow, what a keen insight.

Posted by: stop the presses! at January 24, 2016 03:34 PM (LL8i9)

603 Still, smells better than Tauntauns. Inside or out.

Posted by: Han Solo at January 24, 2016 03:36 PM (JO9+V)

604 594 578 hmm, book thread is a little musty

It smells of rich mahogany.
Posted by: Grump928(C) says Free Soothie!, with purchase of commenter of equal or greater value at January 24, 2016 03:23 PM (rwI+c)
***
And fine Corinthian leather....
Posted by: Your Decidedly Devious Uncle Palpatine, Still Accepting Harem Applicants at January 24, 2016 03:31 PM (lutOX)
***
Had a friend who drove a Chrysler Cordoba back in the day.

When it finally went kaput, we drained the gas from its tank, soaked down the upholstery with same, and set it ablaze before pushing it off the ledge and into the quarry.

Most gratifying.

Posted by: Your Decidedly Devious Uncle Palpatine, Still Accepting Harem Applicants at January 24, 2016 03:36 PM (lutOX)

605 587 Jack Vance also wrote a great book called Emphyrio.

A race has been enslaved by aliens from a nearby moon by convincing the natives they are all welfare recipients in a planetary con game.

Posted by: San Franpsycho at January 24, 2016 03:36 PM (EZebt)

606 *sprays Febreeze*

Posted by: Turd Ferguson at January 24, 2016 03:37 PM (/ciMI)

607 checks for pointy elbow thread.... seeing none...

Posted by: Yip at January 24, 2016 03:38 PM (e7T6D)

608 Hoping for a fertile spring.

Posted by: Grump928(C) says Free Soothie!, with purchase of commenter of
equal or greater value at January 24, 2016 03:33 PM (rwI+c)


Yes! There will be growth in the spring!

Posted by: Chance the Gardner at January 24, 2016 03:38 PM (JO9+V)

609 Fwiw. And it is. Re: padre pio. Pray the rosary. There's an easy kindle app. Audio rosary. You can turn the sound off and just follow the words. Better yet visit the rosary confraternity on the web and order the little pocket booklet praying the rosary without distraction. It will do more for you than you can imagine.

Try a few times and see if it doesn't.

Posted by: simplemind at January 24, 2016 03:39 PM (BTnAK)

610 590
I'm hoping the Cheating dogs loose 40 - 0

Posted by: Skip at January 24, 2016 03:29 PM (hk3Fb)

Ditto.

Posted by: Nip Sip at January 24, 2016 03:39 PM (jJRIy)

611 Wow, what a keen insight.


Despite others' opinions, I still believe that ordering Pickett's frontal assault at Gettysburg on Day 3 was a grave error on Lee's part.

Posted by: Grump928(C) says Free Soothie!, with purchase of commenter of equal or greater value at January 24, 2016 03:39 PM (rwI+c)

612 Might be a lateral.

Posted by: Teh Hoodie at January 24, 2016 03:40 PM (H9MG5)

613 Go Pats! Squeeze the Broncs' balls!

Posted by: Turd Ferguson at January 24, 2016 03:41 PM (/ciMI)

614 609 Fwiw. And it is. Re: padre pio. Pray the rosary. There's an easy kindle app. Audio rosary. You can turn the sound off and just follow the words. Better yet visit the rosary confraternity on the web and order the little pocket booklet praying the rosary without distraction. It will do more for you than you can imagine.

Try a few times and see if it doesn't.
Posted by: simplemind at January 24, 2016 03:39 PM (BTnAK)
***
The future Empress prays the rosary, and has been known to do a novena or chaplet or three.

Seriously, I envy her the peace she finds in it.

Posted by: Your Decidedly Devious Uncle Palpatine, Still Accepting Harem Applicants at January 24, 2016 03:41 PM (lutOX)

615 Football thread up.

Posted by: Marcel Marceau at January 24, 2016 03:41 PM (DrCtv)

616 pointy elbow thread.... activate! Thanks NDH!

Posted by: Yip at January 24, 2016 03:41 PM (e7T6D)

617 For the love of God, a precious snowflake lost an ear ring in our neighborhood and sent everyone a picture of the one she didn't lose.



We are to look out for it? It a cheap pearl ear ring and WHITE. Something tells me it's NOT going to show up in the snow.

Posted by: Nip Sip at January 24, 2016 03:41 PM (jJRIy)

618 I think the evil empire wibs this challenge

Posted by: tbodie at January 24, 2016 03:42 PM (wXHOL)

619 Posted by: simplemind at January 24, 2016 03:39 PM (BTnAK)

I appreciate the devotion Catholics have for Mary and for the rosary. Being a Protestant I can't really get into it because I don't have the same understanding that Catholics have of Mary. You are certainly right that Pio said to pray the rosary and did it regularly.

I do pray the Divine Mercy Chaplet however

Posted by: FenelonSpoke at January 24, 2016 03:42 PM (w4NZ8)

620 Had a friend who drove a Chrysler Cordoba back in the day
-------------------
Heh.
Dad drove a Cordoba for a couple years. White with burgundy vinyl top & matching velvet interior.
Then he traded it in, and he & Mom got a pair. His was white/green, hers was white/blue.
I would drive a Cordoba today if I found one. They've probably all been crushed & turned into Kias though.

Posted by: Chi at January 24, 2016 03:43 PM (I7I0v)

621 595
Omaha!

Posted by: Lizzy at January 24, 2016 03:31 PM (NOIQH)

Asshole!

Posted by: Council Bluffites at January 24, 2016 03:44 PM (uZNvH)

622 Casca! One of the greatest "Eternal warrior cursed by Christ from the Cross" series ever written. Seriously. Read most of them some thirty years ago when I was young Marine; the early ones were the best. Little did I know that the soldier who pierced the side of the Lord later fought as a Panzer Grenadier for the Nazis. Eat that, Tuchman!

Posted by: eastofsuez at January 24, 2016 03:44 PM (oKO0e)

623 thanks for the link to the XX committee. i wasn't familiar with that site. very interesting.

i did like "a distant mirror" a lot. the first third engaging, the middle a slog, the last gripping in a grand crescendo

Posted by: musical jolly chimp at January 24, 2016 03:58 PM (WTSFk)

624 Should have brought this up earlier but it amazes me how many alcoholic authors there are and that the can write under the influence. I guess it generally catches up to them and they cant write at all.
Posted by: Bruce
-----
In my youth, I thought that despondency and/or addiction were a necessary affliction for great writers. I finally figured out that it wasn't true. Still, the field of lauded writers is strewn with the bodies of such.

One of my favorite examples is Malcolm Lowery, who was something of an archetype. This is worth a quick look, and is an interesting story:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Malcolm_Lowry


Posted by: Mike Hammer, etc., etc. at January 24, 2016 04:03 PM (n22zQ)

625 We are to look out for it? It a cheap pearl ear ring and WHITE. Something tells me it's NOT going to show up in the snow.
Posted by: Nip Sip
------------

I'm circulating pictures of my truck (also white). I remain hopeful.

Posted by: Mike Hammer, etc., etc. at January 24, 2016 04:06 PM (n22zQ)

626 I'm circulating pictures of my truck (also white). I remain hopeful.

You'll find it in the Spring.

Posted by: Grump928(C) says Free Soothie!, with purchase of commenter of equal or greater value at January 24, 2016 04:09 PM (rwI+c)

627 Despite others' opinions, I still believe that ordering Pickett's frontal assault at Gettysburg on Day 3 was a grave error on Lee's part.
Posted by: Grump
---------------

Ah! A fellow traveler. In the face of much criticism, I continue to maintain that the charge of the Light Brigade was damned foolish.

Posted by: Mike Hammer, etc., etc. at January 24, 2016 04:09 PM (n22zQ)

628 Tuchman's representations re myself were pure slander.

Posted by: The Black Plague at January 24, 2016 04:14 PM (n22zQ)

629 We are to look out for it? It a cheap pearl ear ring and WHITE. Something tells me it's NOT going to show up in the snow.
Posted by: Nip Sip
------------
Don't be such a crusty old fart, Nip. Not everyone's picking Kobe beef out of their Tiffany grill with a gold toothpick.

It's probably that young girl's first nice pair of earrings.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, Literate Savage at January 24, 2016 04:17 PM (jR7Wy)

630 Don't be such a crusty old fart, Nip. Not everyone's picking Kobe beef out of their Tiffany grill with a gold toothpick.

I think he should ask the parents permission and buy her a nice pair of pearl earrings. :^)

Posted by: FenelonSpoke at January 24, 2016 04:32 PM (w4NZ8)

631 499 OM - Apologies for hijacking the book thread with the vocab quiz. I can see it was majorly distracting after you put all the work into topics for your post. I should have mailed it you and let you use it when you saw fit. Mea culpa.
Posted by: RushBabe at January 24, 2016 02:23 PM (/NEnw)


Hey no harm, no foul. I consider a vocab quiz to be well within the bounds of the book thread. So no apologies necessary.

Will check back later today, home from church, off to watch football.

Posted by: OregonMuse at January 24, 2016 04:37 PM (UCmQM)

632 Are they mystery stories?

Thanks for the suggestions. i'll have to look for them.
Posted by: Your Brother Ben at January 24, 2016 02:31 PM (w4NZ

They're primarily mystery with a smoldering lust. Claire is a young Protestant priest assigned to an upstate, uptight NY church made up predominantly of oldsters who don't care for the idea of a young female pastor.

Russ is the local, married police chief (a Harrison Ford type) who comes into contact with Claire when a newborn is left on the church steps in December.

The pastor is also an Army vet, helicopter pilot who did time in the Middle East. Russ is a vet as well, although long before Claire. There's a bit of an age difference. It's quite the series.

Posted by: RushBabe at January 24, 2016 04:41 PM (/NEnw)

633 "The only rule was to not speak to the nuns.
You had to sing to them?"

I was taught by nuns, starting with first grade.


I had nuns along the way from 1st through 12th grade. We were allowed to talk to them. Some were wound a little too tight, most were reasonable, and some were fun and taught things in bio that adults would've found shocking for the time. Sister Antoinette knew that high-school age kids were horny as hell and gave some pointers along the way as to when one was fertile and one was not.

As for the singing, they were always harping on us to sing because "Singing was like praying twice."

Posted by: RushBabe at January 24, 2016 04:46 PM (/NEnw)

634 315 Anna Puma

Rereading Poul Anderson's Marques and Reprisals in my omnibus hardback The Star Fox.

Thank you for the suggestion.

Posted by: NaCly Dog at January 24, 2016 04:47 PM (u82oZ)

635 I do pray the Divine Mercy Chaplet however
Posted by: FenelonSpoke at January 24, 2016 03:42 PM (w4NZ

Always surprised at how fast one can get through one of those.

As to complaints about the length of a "regular" rosary, our priest suggested we try a "decade a day" and we'd therefore complete a rosary a week, four per month. He said he took up a challenge from another student in seminary and said it changed his life and outlook.

Posted by: RushBabe at January 24, 2016 04:52 PM (/NEnw)

636 5 OM, assuming you're still lurking--I think you did a book thread this past year about publishing. Was wondering if you could point me towards the proper one, or if it would be material for next week. I wrote a manuscript for a children's book almost a decade ago and am thinking of finally publishing it. I have only the vaguest of notions of how this worked umpteen years ago with agents and big New York publishing houses, and even less an idea how it works now. FWIW it would be the type of book that pics would be important, so an eBook format is probably suboptimal.
Posted by: Conservative Crank's iPhone at January 24, 2016 02:17 PM (Gosad)

--

Try underdown.org to start.
He's an Amazon affiliate who seems to know quite a bit on the topic of traditional children's book publishing.

Posted by: @votermom at January 24, 2016 05:40 PM (cbfNE)

637 Finally finished "The Lance and the Veil" by Kevin Rush. Overall a decent read, but I got bogged down in the first quarter and had to walk away from it for a bit. The story provides background on minor Biblical characters leading up to Christ's crucifixion and resurrection, including the centurion who made sure Jesus was dead (the lance), St. Veronica (the veil), the centurion whose servant was healed, Barabbas, Salome, etc. Pilate's wife Claudia starts out as a dramatic teenager (a set-up for why she must warn Pilate about her dream), and I have limited tolerance for that.

I am currently reading "The Most They Ever Had" by Rick Bragg, recommended here a couple of weeks ago. I concur, this makes you really thankful for a safe job and a decent paycheck. The mill in this book is two hours down the road.

The rarest book I have is "Toolies, The Official Handbook of Engineers and Applied Scientists" by Stephen Clark, an engineer who used his P.E. (professional engineer) stamp in lieu of an autograph. It's one of my favorite humor books, but then I am an engineer. There is a long list of engineering books; if you have 10, you are definitely a toolie. The hubby and I have 14.

Posted by: roamingfirehydrant at January 24, 2016 05:46 PM (G8DQR)

638 Yay, I do book reviews! It's a lot of fun and one thing I've also discovered is the great variety of styles of reviewing. If you are inclined to try it, go for it!

Also, I am amazed at how many treasures there are to discover amongst the indie (and small press) community. A couple of my favorites are _Martyrs and Traitors_ (Marina Julia Neary), _The Graham Saga_ (Anna Belfrage), _Witch Ever Way You Look At It_ (Jennie Orbell) and James Boschert's _Force 12 in German Bight_. But really there are so many fabulous reads--and if you like reading off a Kindle, you can get a LOT for free or at seriously reduced prices via Book Bub. Plus, authors often have a lot of specials to help promote their work. Word of mouth and reviews really do play a very large role in getting their books exposure.

Right now I'm reading _Where the Jungle is Silent_ (Boschert) and about to start _FUBAR_ (Weston Ochse).

Posted by: Lisl at January 24, 2016 08:26 PM (86eeo)

639 485 OM, assuming you're still lurking--I think you did a book thread this past year about publishing. Was wondering if you could point me towards the proper one, or if it would be material for next week.

Posted by: Conservative Crank's iPhone at January 24, 2016 02:17 PM (Gosad)


Sorry, didn't mean to leave you hanging there, cc, if you're still here, I can't help you as I don't know much about the publishing end of things, but there are probably morons out there who do, and who can help, so I'll ask about this in next week's book thread.

Awesome hash, by the way...

Posted by: OregonMuse at January 24, 2016 11:36 PM (UCmQM)

640 Saying hi for Goodreads group.

Posted by: Chuck at January 27, 2016 02:02 PM (yFFSH)

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