Sunday Morning Book Thread 01-03-2016: Chick Lit [OregonMuse]


dudes who lost their shirts.jpg
Best Sellers

Good morning to all of you morons and moronettes and bartenders everywhere and all the ships at sea. Welcome to AoSHQ's stately, prestigious, internationally acclaimed and high-class Sunday Morning Book Thread. The Sunday Morning Book Thread is the only AoSHQ thread that is so hoity-toity, pants are required. And when I type up the book thread, my pinkies remain elevated the whole time, that's how classy it is. Even Donald Trump thinks the book thread is classy. Also, yuuge.


“Reading requires actual concentration. If you skipped a paragraph, or even an important sentence, you could lose the entire story. With most TV shows, though, you didn't have to concentrate at all. You could space out for a good ten minutes, then come back and still figure out what was going on.”
― Daniel Ehrenhaft


Make Boatloads of Money By Writing This One Weird Book

One of the "downsides" of free speech is that people can say things that you don't approve of.

One of the "downsides" of enabling lots of people to publish books is that lots of books can get published that you don't approve of, or think "whoever would want to read a book like THAT?" Including holiday-themed romance novels involving individual who can turn themselves into animals.

As Dave Barry is wont to say, no, I am not making this up.

One such specimen in this "WTF" category is Bear Mine for Christmas: BBW Holiday Paranormal Bear Shifter Romance (Christmas Bear Shifter Romance Book 2) by "Ariana Hawkes".

Let's unpack this title a bit.

BBW: "big beautiful woman", i.e. a woman who is overweight. I'm assuming this adjective applies to the main character, who is a woman, rather than the bear. I mean, look at the 6-pack on that guy in the cover art. Is that from a photo, or did some cover artist whip it up from scratch?

So the hunky bear-dude is kind of a "chubby chaser" then.

Holiday: this novel takes place during the Christmas season.

Paranormal: in this context, it means having unusual abilities or attributes beyond the lot of mortal men. Like being able to turn into an animal of some sort, as in this book. Or, in other stories, being a sparkly vampire. I've also seen mystery novels where the detective main character is (a) psychic or (b) can speak with the dead. But I think that would be too much like cheating: "So, Mrs. Detective main character person, who is the malefactor who strangled Mr. Grey with a pair of his own socks?" "I don't know, let me whip out my crystal ball here and contact a dead guy, and we'll find out." Kind of takes the fun out of looking for clues and making logical deductions, doesn't it? It would be like Chesterton having his Father Brown character solve his cases by praying to God and having a giant finger come down from heaven and point out the bad guy, like they did in that Monty Python sketch. Yeah, I know the authors who write those "clairvoyant detective" stories build in limitations to the character's abilities so that quick and easy solutions aren't possible, but I guess I have to suspend waaay too much disbelief for these stories to be work, at least for me. Sorry for this digression, but I've been wanting to get this rant into the book thread for quite awhile.

Bear Shifter: perhaps another name for this would be "werebear", but that word sounds more silly than scary; it simply does not carry the same fear cache as the word "werewolf" does. So "shifter" is a pretty good alternative -- it has a nice, foreboding ambiguity to it. Maybe "shifting" is good. Maybe it's bad. Maybe it's both. You don't know.

Romance: the feeling of being in love with a powerful alpha male, preferably with one with 6-pack abs and no shirt.

So this book, not only is it a romance, not only is it a paranormal romance, not only is it a paranormal romance involving bear shifters, but it's a paranormal romance involving bear shifters during the holiday season pursuing overweight women, and now I've got this image in my mind of a shaggy brown bear chasing a fat chick through the snow.

If you're laughing at this like I am, listen to this, it might sober you up: this novel is listed as a #1 Bestseller on Amazon, and amazingly, as of when I'm writing this, it's ranked #168 overall in the Amazon paid Kindle store. I have no idea how being ranked #168 translates into actual sales, but whatever the figure, I think it's quite an achievement for a book of this type, considering the hundreds of thousands of Kindle books available.

Last week, I wondered aloud why women are attracted to billionaires. And I got some interesting answers. But apparently, having more money than you can spend in a lifetime is not an absolute requirement to make a woman's heart go thump-thump-thump. If a hot guy can turn himself into a bear, that'll work, too.

This is a standalone, short, sweet, and steamy read, perfect for a lunch break, bath time, or a little dose of me-time, wherever you are. HEA and no cliffhanger!

I had to look that last part up. HEA means "happily ever after". This is in contrast to HFN, or "happy for now" endings.

The growth of self-publishing has evidently uncovered a huge, untapped market for books of this type. They must be like crack to women. So, the lesson for all you moron authors is obvious: if you want to make a big pot of money, add a shape-shifting, shirtless bear-man to your novel and watch your sales skyrocket.

Oh, did I say bear? How about reindeer? Buck Me... For New Year's: BBW Paranormal Were-reindeer Shapeshifter Holiday Romance (Frost Brothers' Brides). Currently ranked #477 overall in the paid Kindle store.

Yeah.


chrome for the hollandaise.jpg
Ha! Take THAT, Muldoon!


What Are They Reading In The Army?

So, like other branches of the Armed Forces, the Army maintains its own reading list for both officers and enlisted personnel. The list is divided into four subsections based on rank, so I'll highlight one selection from each.

One of the books they want the enlisteds and the junior NCOs to read is Stephen Crane's classic, The Red Badge of Courage:

A classic of American literature, this Civil War novel depicts a Union soldier's terrifying baptism of fire and his ensuing transformation from coward to hero. Originally published in 1895, its vivid evocation of battle remains unsurpassed.

The amazing part of this classic book is that its amazing realism in its depiction of Civil War battles, even though Crane did not fight in the Civil War (which took place before he was born), nor in any other war.

For company grade officers, The Dynamics of Military Revolution, 1300-2050 by MacGregor Knox and Williamson Murray, which

provide[s] a conceptual framework and historical context for understanding the patterns of change, innovation, and adaptation that have marked war in the Western world since the fourteenth century. Case studies and a conceptual overview offer an indispensable introduction to military change for all Army leaders.

Available on Amazon, if you want to spend $25 for the Kindle edition.

It takes some doing to get a raw recruit to point a gun at another human being and pull the trigger. This is why the Army brass wants their senior NCOs and field grade officers to read On Killing: The Psychological Cost of Learning to Kill in War and Society by Lt. Col. Dave Grossman that examines the psychological and societal costs of training young men to overcome this natural aversion.

Senior leaders above Brigade Level need to read Reid, Michael Reid's The Forgotten Continent: The Battle for Latin America's Soul.

The thesis of the book is simple: Latin America is torn between reformers - democrats who support free markets and democracy, and populists - who support neither. Reid argues that although the populists have considerable appeal in the region, the tide has turned against them. Unlike previous eras, the current embrace of democracy and capitalism - augmented with a great deal of redistribution policies - is here to last.

We really dropped the ball on South America. Reagan had the rat bastard commies running for the tall grass back in the 80s, but then we just sort of wandered off, which is why we've had to deal with annoying pests like Hugo Chavez and his Bolivian mini-me, Evo Morales.

Commies are like blackberry bushes. No matter how much you prune them, uproot them, burn them, or poison them, it never seems to be enough; you always have to go back out to your garden and go whack, whack, whack, otherwise, they're grow right back again.


Jump Into the Fire

So I was a given a Kindle Fire 7 as a Christmas gift, and I've been using it for a couple of weeks now. It's an adequate Android device, and by "Android", I mean "FireOS", which is Amazon's in-house version of Android. I thought a 5th generation Fire tablet would be relatively light, but it is surprisingly heavy, as heavy as my 2012 Nexus. It comes with 8GB onboard storage with provision for adding a micro SD card of up to 32GB.

So my first question once I had it set up was, how do I sideload this thing?

Up to now, my "go-to" e-book format has been epub, which has become the de facto standard. I have many e-books stored on my desktop's hard drive as epub files. Of course, the Amazon Kindle world does not do epub. So I went looking in the Amazon store for an epub reader, and there really isn't one I can use. There are library managers, a couple of pdf readera, and one epub reader that does such a poor job, it's pretty much useless. The epub apps I use on the Nexus, Aldiko Reader, FBReafer, Moon+, are not compatible with the Fire.

Several weeks ago, one of you morons helpfully provided a link to this procedure to install the Google suite of apps on a 5th generation Fire tablet, and thank you for doing that, but I don't think I want to go through all of this quite yet. I'm a little reluctant to load a number of apps Google that I have no intention of ever using, such as Google+, Google Play, News, Video, etc. that take up storage space. Actually, the only app I'm really interested in is the Google Read app, which does a good job with ePub books.

But I've come up with an acceptable 'Plan B' solution: the Kindle app may not read epub, but it handles mobi files just fine. So, if I connect the Fire to my Windows 8 PC, I can transfer mobi files to the \Books folder on the Fire (other folders may be usable for this, but I haven't tried any other one) and it will be picked up and displayed for reading by the Kindle app. I have the Calibre e-book manager installed on my Windows PC, and I can use it to convert any epub book I might want to read on the Kindle to mobi.

This should be enough for my needs, at least for now.


The Impossible Dream

Another book I happened upon, Guided By The Beauty Of Their Weapons: Notes on Science Fiction and Culture in the Year of Angry Dogs by Philip Sandifer, is a Sad Puppies commentary from the other side:

This anthology of essays written by acclaimed Marxist occultist critic Philip Sandifer during 2015 starts from the Puppies controversy, presenting an alternative vision of science fiction grounded in progressive politics and the ability of the genre to explore strange and unthinkable ideas - one that holds that its primary value is its ability to do new things, as opposed to being in permanent debt to antiquated ideas and styles.

Yawn. I get so tired of this self-congratulatory balloon juice from progressives, it's all so boring and predictable, like pony-tailed, over-60 hippies who think they're on the cutting edge of hipness. But I'm not going to waste any time deconstructing this piece of dishonest hackery. Larry Correia would do a much better job. Rather, what I noticed is what it says about the author:

This anthology of essays written by acclaimed Marxist occultist critic Philip Sandifer during 2015...

OK, so what, exactly, is a "Marxist occultist"? I thought the whole idea of the Marxism, and therefore, progressive thought in general, is wrapped around something called "dialectical materialism", where everything is explained in terms of purely natural processes and purely natural phenomena.

Hence religion is looked down upon as "the opiate of the masses."

I know there are progressives who call themselves Christian, but if you're going to go so far as to specifically identify yourself with Marxism, as Sandifer does, that's not something that naturally goes along with being an "occultist", a word which has all kinds of supernatural connotations. It's like claiming to be a "compassionate murderer" or a "smart, knowledgeable MSNBC commentator." It just doesn't make sense.

Perhaps Mr. Sandifer is using a meaning for the word "occultist" that's different than the one I am accustomed to. Regardless, his Zen-like self-appellation "Marxist occultist" reminds me of this bit in CS Lewis' classic The Screwtape Letters where the materialist/supernatural conflict is discussed:

We are really faced with a cruel dilemma. When the humans disbelieve in our existence we lose all he pleasing results of direct terrorism and we make no magicians. On the other hand, when they believe in us, we cannot make them materialists and skeptics. At least, not yet. I have great hopes that we shall learn in due time how to emotionalise and mythologise their science to such an extent that what is, in effect, belief in us, (though not under that name) will creep in while the human mind remains closed to belief in the Enemy. The “Life Force”, the worship of sex, and some aspects of Psychoanalysis, may here prove useful. If once we can produce our perfect work—the Materialist Magician, the man, not using, but veritably worshiping, what he vaguely calls “Forces” while denying the existence of “spirits”—then the end of the war will be in sight.

Dread Arch-demon Screwtape, allow me to introduce you to Mr. Philip Sandifer, the monstrous culmination of your unholy labors.


What I'm Reading

Mrs. Muse likes to catch the morning showing of the old Perry Mason show with Raymond Burr on the Me-TV channel (that series ran for 9 years). So last week I thought I'd read some of the original source material to find out more about this iconic crime-solver and grabbed The Case of the Velvet Claws, Erle Stanley Gardner's first Perry Mason novel, published in 1933. As I was reading, I kept imagining Raymond Burr as Perry Mason doing the things described in the book, which quickly got weird because the Perry Mason in the book is different than the TV version.

First, he admits to Della Street, his secretary, who complained about all the phonies and liars that they have to contend with, that he isn't a normal lawyer, has never probated a will or done much contract work, but rather, charges a lot of money ("my prices are high, but fair") to phonies and liars to help them get out of jams, and he knows they're phonies and liars. All he cares about, he says, is that they pay him.

This is something I'd expect if AMC was doing a "gritty reboot" of the Perry Mason series. But no, this is how he was originally written.

Also, he chain smokes. He's tailing this particular low life and he's sitting in his car lighting one cigarette from the butt of another and even having to get a new pack to continue his chain smoking.

Lastly, Perry Mason hits people. Early on in the book, some palooka was giving him some lip, impeding his investigation, so he just hauls back and pops him right in the puss. Palooka goes down like a sack of cement and Perry Mason continues on his way. It was a little disconcerting to see him do this, but I've come to see that he is not so much the clean but tough lawyer, but rather a "fixer" who makes his living servicing the intersection between legal and illegal activities. Not that Mason would do anything shady or illegal, but he has figured out that people who do often find themselves in situations where they're going to get hurt, and so he can charge them lots of money to clean up their poop.

So this is not your father's Perry-- wait a minute, actually, this is your father's Perry Mason. But, this is only the first of about 80(!) Perry Mason novels, so I don't know if the character changed over time. Perhaps he did. But even if he did, I must say I kind of like this harder-edged version.


___________

Don't forget the AoSHQ reading group on Goodreads. It's meant to support horde writers and to talk about the great books that come up on the book thread. It's called AoSHQ Moron Horde and the link to it is here: https://www.goodreads.com/group/show/175335-aoshq-moron-horde.

___________

So that's all for this week. As always, book thread tips, suggestions, bribes, rumors, threats, and insults may be sent to OregonMuse, Proprietor, AoSHQ Book Thread, at the book thread e-mail address: aoshqbookthread, followed by the 'at' sign, and then 'G' mail, and then dot cee oh emm.

What have you all been reading this week? Hopefully something good, because, as you all know, life is too short to be reading lousy books.

Posted by: Open Blogger at 08:56 AM




Comments

(Jump to bottom of page)

1 Happy new year to the Book Threadists. May the coming year be filled with the joy of words.

Posted by: JTB at January 03, 2016 08:51 AM (FvdPb)

2 Wow! First time to be first on the thread.

Posted by: JTB at January 03, 2016 08:52 AM (FvdPb)

3 YAY first ONT of 2016!

Posted by: @votermom at January 03, 2016 08:52 AM (cbfNE)

4 So much content! Yum!

Btw I have a pinup girl on my blog today for the 'rons (link in nic)

Posted by: @votermom at January 03, 2016 08:54 AM (cbfNE)

5 Buck me?! No, BUCK YOU!

Posted by: Grump928(C) says Free Soothie!, with purchase of commenter of equal or greater value at January 03, 2016 08:57 AM (rwI+c)

6 Yay! So much low brow, bear shifting, dudes who lost their shirts goodness.

In the top picture bottom left you see a Christian feehan book and iirc all of her books are either shifters or vampires. Not that I read any of them or anything...

Posted by: Lea at January 03, 2016 08:57 AM (vmMMi)

7 Seriously, I'm aghast yet amazed and envious. It's the same feeling I had over the Pet Rock.

Posted by: Grump928(C) says Free Soothie!, with purchase of commenter of equal or greater value at January 03, 2016 08:58 AM (rwI+c)

8 >>>One of the "downsides" of free speech is that people can say things that you don't approve of.


That is also a downside of an *absence* of free speech, unless you are "lucky" enough to be one of the top (Hill)dogs in the totalitarian totem pole.

That's the caveat that useful idiots keep missing.

Posted by: Hezekiah at January 03, 2016 09:00 AM (7EHW6)

9 I'm a bear.

Posted by: Crpw T. Robot at January 03, 2016 09:00 AM (BO/km)

10 But I've come up with an acceptable 'Plan B' solution: the Kindle app may not read epub, but it handles mobi files just fine.

--

What I do is email the mobi file to my amazon email and it will show up under Docs.
Find out what your amazpn email is in your amazon account under manage your devices I think

Posted by: @votermom at January 03, 2016 09:01 AM (cbfNE)

11 Was looking for tis, I have a problem. My beloved kindle was broke New Years day and got talked into a Galexy tablet but found it had to get kindle app ( that's ok) but downloaded the books I am reading from Gutenberg.org and it doesn't recognize them. The Kindle app only seems to get amazon books, another app I tried only got books from them in think so dumped that. Any suggestions?

Posted by: skip at January 03, 2016 09:02 AM (C1Suc)

12 From OM's quote: "Reading requires actual concentration. If you skipped a paragraph, or
even an important sentence, you could lose the entire story..."

This. All of this. This is why I cannot abide an audiobook. Someone else is forcing my pace of concentration.

Nearing the end of Seveneves. I've enjoyed it.

Posted by: GnuBreed at January 03, 2016 09:02 AM (gyKtp)

13 Thank you, OregonMuse, for the pandering to us lower, more common, denominators.

So I'm guessing Tawny and Lynsay are not the authors' real names? They could even be the nomes de plume of some of our 'rons!

'Fess u, Muldoon.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, Literate Savage at January 03, 2016 09:03 AM (jR7Wy)

14 Thank goodness Sandifer hasn't discovered that his ideas would spread like warm butter on toast if only he wrote about paranormal were-Marxists occultists with bulging biceps and comfortable loafers.

Posted by: NEC338x at January 03, 2016 09:04 AM (FEfCl)

15 As to military reading lists , I am reading " Dereliction of Duty " by HR Mc Master , I think off the USMC list. It is scary : Johnson being fed bad intel by Mac Namara and Taylor for their own personal 'political' agendas . When one reads the ugly bad behavior that gets 58,000 good kids killed , it is sad to the point of rage . But apparently , like the man says , as to history repeating itself , first as tragedy and then as farce , the O Follies

Posted by: jay hoenemeyer at January 03, 2016 09:05 AM (uvj0z)

16 I won't go so far as to say 'women like shit,' but I will say that the biggest shit out there is marketed toward women.

Posted by: Pappy O'Daniel at January 03, 2016 09:07 AM (oVJmc)

17 Skip, the email thing in comment 10 will work on kindle apps too.

Also, I use calibre on my computer to convert books to mobi so I can read it on kindle / kindle app

Posted by: @votermom at January 03, 2016 09:07 AM (cbfNE)

18 Read '13 Hours' this past week. Those guys on the ground were exceptional men. The same might be said about the people in D.C., but in a rather different way. A good read. May or may not see the movie, depending on what people say.

Now reading 'Longitude'. A tip o' the hat to the recommending Moron. John Harrison must surely be the archetype of the self-educated engineer.

It has been my experience that such folk have three qualities: Native intellect, scientific curiosity, and most importantly, tenacity. It requires all three, but the latter may be most important. Harrison had it in spades.

As Edison said, "Genius is 1% inspiration, and 99% perspiration".

Posted by: Mike Hammer, etc., etc. at January 03, 2016 09:08 AM (n22zQ)

19 Any suggestions?

Use Calibre to convert them.

Posted by: Pappy O'Daniel at January 03, 2016 09:08 AM (oVJmc)

20 Bear Mine for Christmas: BBW Holiday Paranormal Bear Shifter Romance (Christmas Bear Shifter Romance Book 2) by "Ariana Hawkes".

every genre seems to be crossed with Romance now
bleck

it's the tags, and probably major promotional push that you can't see that pushed the book to #1 (I've done it myself just with Twitter - really not hard to do).

but, the Amazon genre's and Tags probably also helped - and it's self-published

#3 in Books > Romance > Science Fiction

#7 in Books > Romance > Multicultural

#7 in Kindle Store > Kindle eBooks > Romance > Multicultural & Interracial

Posted by: artisanal 'ette at January 03, 2016 09:09 AM (qCMvj)

21 Did Perry Mason change? You bet he did. The show became "The Edge of Night" when it first came to TV.

Posted by: lonetown at January 03, 2016 09:10 AM (M6Esb)

22 I got news for you. Ladies would probably swoon over gorilla shifters as well.

There was a story out of Japan a few months ago.

Apparently there's a gorilla in one of the zoos there that acts as an enormous draw to Japanese women. They find him to be teh hawt, so thoughful and handsome.

Is it any wonder that they are in a demographic death spiral? When the women become as sexually perverse as the men, it's probably game over for that civilization.

Posted by: Koko at January 03, 2016 09:10 AM (7EHW6)

23

177 pages lends itself more to this current atmosphere of non-readers and social media bees

Posted by: artisanal 'ette at January 03, 2016 09:10 AM (qCMvj)

24 Glad you found the original Perry Mason books. I've read several and they beat the heck out of the TV show. (Except for Barbara Hale who played Della Street. She was a babe when younger and stayed gorgeous as she aged.) The books had mystery, humor, even some slap stick, and I love the idea of a Mason decking an obnoxious character.

There were some movies made in the 30s or 40s based on the book character which are pretty good. You can see them on TCM now and then.

Posted by: JTB at January 03, 2016 09:10 AM (FvdPb)

25 Speaking as a middle aged woman who on ocassion has been known to read paranormal romances and other books of similar ilk, the sheer escapism is what's attractive. It's nice to shed reality for a couple of hours reading about Mr Bear getting hot and bothered about some chick or other. I know it's rubbish, but it's fun and a nice interlude between serious reading. I rarely buy these books though, just 'borrow' them via Scribd.

Posted by: IC at January 03, 2016 09:11 AM (+3RH+)

26 Isnt there a woman-dinosaur/reptile- sex genre? I'm sure Ace talked about it.

Posted by: Bruce With a Wang! at January 03, 2016 09:11 AM (iQIUe)

27 Can't wait to be involved in the movie version of that werebear book.

Posted by: Leo DiCaprio at January 03, 2016 09:12 AM (H9MG5)

28 Next up on my queue is "Science, Strategy and War: The Strategic Theory of John Boyd". I think it was recommended in a blog post here not too long ago.

Posted by: 144 at January 03, 2016 09:12 AM (Bu1sd)

29
"Buck Me" brings new meaning to the phrase "buck shot".

The More You Know { ** sparkly sounds ** }

Posted by: Krebs v Carnot: Epic Battle of the Cycling Stars (TM) at January 03, 2016 09:13 AM (BK3ZS)

30 It's probably harder to kill when afterwards you are swamped with people telling you you must be disturbed otherwise you are disturbed. Bottom line, it's either you or them.

Posted by: Bruce With a Wang! at January 03, 2016 09:14 AM (iQIUe)

31 A good review posted over at Washington Free Beacon yesterday


The Unhaunted Graveyard
Review: Thomas W. Laqueur, 'The Work of the Dead: A Cultural History of Mortal Remains'


http://freebeacon.com/culture/the-unhaunted-graveyard/

snippet:

In the late 1700s, however, the public cemetery began to appear, for several reasons. The Protestant dismissal of the idea of Purgatory made remembrance of the community of the dead less pressing, even while municipal reformers declared churchyards a public-health hazard. The reformers exaggerated their case, in Laqueur's view, but the stench of a churchyard--with its turned-over bones and loosely buried corpses--was something the new age was not willing to endure, just as modernity tried to sweep out of sight nearly all the unpleasantness of medieval life.

For that matter, churchyards announced that death was an inherently religious event. The new public cemeteries could certainly accommodate religion, but they were in their essence irreligious spaces. "To some degree," Laqueur notes, "this is about the rise of negative liberty: the right to a grave in a neutral civic space irrespective of one's beliefs or lack of beliefs, and the right to a choice in rituals of burial."

And even more to a modern point, cemeteries provided a new and different focus: not the community of the faceless dead but the individuality of the particular corpse. Thus, Laqueur argues, we see the rise of gravestones and monuments, dedicated to modernity's "new gods of memory and history: secular gods." Even the (relative) rise of cremation in the West simply replaced the corpse with its ashes, treated to many of the same funeral practices and depth of respect.


the summary will stop me from reading it, but the review was worth reading, hehe

Posted by: artisanal 'ette at January 03, 2016 09:15 AM (qCMvj)

32 Bear's have very small penises so not sure why a woman would want to get it on with Mr. Bear. Plus, they stink and they have shit all over their fur.

Posted by: Bruce With a Wang! at January 03, 2016 09:15 AM (iQIUe)

33 >>16 I won't go so far as to say 'women like shit,' but I will say that the biggest shit out there is marketed toward women.
Posted by: Pappy O'Daniel at January 03, 2016 09:07 AM (

There are a lot of stupid books but I'm pretty sure the male equivalent is looking at pictures...

Posted by: Lea at January 03, 2016 09:16 AM (vmMMi)

34 About this time last year, I decided to keep a list of the books I read. I'm happy to say that I read 62 books: 55 dead-tree variety and 7 on the Kindle. Almost all that I read were based on recommendations found on this thread, so some thank yous are in order.

First, of course, thank you, Oregon Muse, for the dedication and work you put into this thread to make it happen. I can tell it is a labor of love for you from the consistently high quality and quantity that we find here every week. What I find truly amazing is that every Sunday morning you have the thread posted and are monitoring by 6 A. M. your time. Thank you for all you do.

Secondly, thank you to all who posted a review of something you read. You have introduced me to authors and genres that were new to me and have never led me astray.

I have the same New Year's wish to all of you. May the New Year bring each of you more time to sit, relax and read a good book; but when you do, please post a review here. We're all looking for something good to read.

Posted by: Zoltan at January 03, 2016 09:16 AM (JYer2)

35 So now when I hookup with guys in the parking lot, I've got to worry about bear shifters?

Posted by: Leonardo DiCaprio at January 03, 2016 09:16 AM (7EHW6)

36 On Killing by Grossman is a good book. Definitely recommended, specially for writers.

Posted by: @votermom at January 03, 2016 09:16 AM (cbfNE)

37 I like chiclets.*

(My first book thread post. Did I do it right?)

Posted by: olddog in mo at January 03, 2016 09:17 AM (c/3OG)

38 There are a lot of stupid books but I'm pretty sure the male equivalent is looking at pictures...

Yes. Porn for men is pretty simple.

Posted by: Pappy O'Daniel at January 03, 2016 09:18 AM (oVJmc)

39 We have an older friend who loves cozy mysteries and attends Malice Domestic every year. A question came up on one of the panels about a series that the authors enjoy besides their own. The Chet and Bernie books were mentioned several times. So now you know. Mrs. JTB and I have enjoyed all of them.

Before knowing this, we got her the first two books in the Chet and Bernie series as a Christmas gift. She loves them and has renamed one of her stuffed toy dogs Chet. (She is too old to keep her own pets, so she has a collection of small stuffed animals.) We were thrilled to be able to introduce her to something that delights her.

Posted by: JTB at January 03, 2016 09:20 AM (FvdPb)

40


Haven't read this, but pondering.

The Narrow Road to the Deep North[/o]

http://amzn.com/0701189053

A Man Booker Award, yet some scathing reviews snuck in to the overwhelming glory.

This book was the Winner of the Man Booker Prize 2014. Forever after, there were for them only two sorts of men: the men who were on the Line, and the rest of humanity, who were not. In the despair of a Japanese Pow camp on the Burma Death Railway, surgeon Dorrigo Evans is haunted by his love affair with his uncle's young wife two years earlier. Struggling to save the men under his command from starvation, from cholera, from beatings, he receives a letter that will change his life forever. Hailed as a masterpiece, Richard Flanagan's epic novel tells the unforgettable story of one man's reckoning with the truth.

Posted by: artisanal 'ette at January 03, 2016 09:21 AM (qCMvj)

41 I admire you for posting this despite your state being occupied by militias and choking in the bowl game last night.

Posted by: The Lost Dutchman at January 03, 2016 09:21 AM (Na4RS)

42 Looking at Phillip Sandifer's twitter page, he's everything you could envision and more.

Posted by: Pappy O'Daniel at January 03, 2016 09:21 AM (oVJmc)

43 This week I read The Lord of Death by Eliot Pattison. This is the sixth in the Shan mystery series set in Tibet. This book is set in the Mount Everest (known as Chomolungma by Tibetans) region. From the early 40's until the early 70's this area was a scene of fierce resistance and fighting the Chinese by Tibetans aided by CIA arms and men. The ghosts of these fights create more muder and intrigue decades later.

Posted by: Zoltan at January 03, 2016 09:24 AM (JYer2)

44 So, like other branches of the Armed Forces, the Army maintains its own reading list for both officers and enlisted personnel. The list is divided into four subsections based on rank, so I'll highlight one selection from each.

Thanks for this.
Very interesting.

Posted by: artisanal 'ette at January 03, 2016 09:25 AM (qCMvj)

45 First book finished of 2016 was Hothouse by Brian Aldiss, a British book first published in America as "The Long Afternoon of Earth."

Very odd, strange science-fantasy that takes place several million years in the future when the Earth has stopped rotating. Plants have taken over the biosphere, evolving into deadly and mobile forms, and the Earth is connected to the Moon by gigantic spider-webs, woven by giant, mile-long spider-plants called Traversers.

Humanity manages to survive in a very primitive, tribal state. It's an interesting story (though typically a "quest" story). The main interest is the depiction of the various plant-carnivore things and how they run the ecology.

Posted by: BeckoningChasm at January 03, 2016 09:25 AM (wZtOw)

46 Okay, so somebody is making a stack of cash writing about chubby-chasing were-bears and I can't finish more than a chapter. Long, tormented sigh.

Posted by: joncelli at January 03, 2016 09:25 AM (1FhAQ)

47 Oregon Muse, btw, I have been praying for you to have good luck in the job situation.

Posted by: @votermom at January 03, 2016 09:25 AM (cbfNE)

48 Commies are like blackberry bushes. No matter how much you prune them, uproot them, burn them, or poison them, it never seems to be enough; you always have to go back out to your garden and go whack, whack, whack, otherwise, they're grow right back again.

That's not surprising. Similarly there will always be a need for policemen and locks, since there will always be a steady supply of thugs and criminals. Communism is simply a variation of that. And like nearsightedness or Down's syndrome, it seems to be a permanent fixture in humanity's makeup. HTH.

Posted by: Joe McCarthy at January 03, 2016 09:25 AM (7EHW6)

49 This week, I'm finishing up "Adrenalized: Life, Def Leppard & Beyond" by Phil Collen. ( note NOT "Phil Collins," = different dude).

Also a bio of Hen.V.

Posted by: mnw at January 03, 2016 09:26 AM (4Vu64)

50 42 Looking at Phillip Sandifer's twitter page, he's everything you could envision and more.
Posted by: Pappy O'Daniel at January 03, 2016 09:21 AM (oVJmc)
---
I would intuit that Mr. Sandifer enjoys BBW paranormal bear shifter romances.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, Literate Savage at January 03, 2016 09:26 AM (jR7Wy)

51 Posted by: artisanal 'ette at January 03, 2016 09:25 AM (qCMvj)

thanks from me too

I'm gonna steal some of those lists for a blog post

Posted by: @votermom at January 03, 2016 09:28 AM (cbfNE)

52 Outside of a dog, a book is man's best friend.

Inside of a dog, it's too dark to read.

-Groucho Marx

Posted by: BackwardsBoy at January 03, 2016 09:29 AM (LUgeY)

53 This anthology of essays written by acclaimed Marxist occultist critic
Philip Sandifer during 2015 starts from the Puppies controversy,
presenting an alternative vision of science fiction grounded in
progressive politics and the ability of the genre to explore strange and
unthinkable ideas - one that holds that its primary value is its
ability to do new things, as opposed to being in permanent debt to
antiquated ideas and styles.


So....simplistic rejectionism? A wordier form of 'I have ideas, too, DAD!'?

Posted by: Pappy O'Daniel at January 03, 2016 09:29 AM (oVJmc)

54 Very odd, strange science-fantasy that takes place several million years in the future when the Earth has stopped rotating. Plants have taken over the biosphere, evolving into deadly and mobile forms, and the Earth is connected to the Moon by gigantic spider-webs, woven by giant, mile-long spider-plants called Traversers.
Posted by: BeckoningChasm at January 03, 2016 09:25 AM (wZtOw)
---
Chas, I have been trying to figure out what book this was for ages. I still remember an unsettling illustration of the vines connecting the Moon to the Earth. Thanks!

Posted by: All Hail Eris, Literate Savage at January 03, 2016 09:29 AM (jR7Wy)

55 11 Any suggestions?

Try the FBReader app. It reads most formats and links directly to OPDS catalogs like Gutenburg, Feedbooks, Baen. I prefer it to the Kindle app.

Posted by: cool breeze at January 03, 2016 09:29 AM (6Cu7i)

56 One of my Christmas gifts was "Carrying Albert Home" by Homer Hickam. Another reviewer called it "Big Fish" meets Forrest Gump, which is pretty accurate. It was a fairly nice read but had some of those Hickam moments that drive me crazy, e.g. Hickam's mother telling John Steinbeck he should title his next book "The Grapes of Wrath" because she likes the lyrics of "Battle Hymn of the Republic."

Posted by: roamingfirehydrant at January 03, 2016 09:29 AM (A8ZgE)

57
I'm still reading "Parting the Waters: America in the King Years, 1955-1963" by Taylor Branch. Just arrived at the close of the Birmingham campaign in early 1963, with the March on Washington on deck. On the whole, the author strikes a relatively balanced approach and takes pains to mention that the Republican Party was putting forward civil rights legislation in Congress that was well out in front of anything the Democrats, including the Kennedy Administration, were willing to back at that time. I gave to confess that reading this has brought me to a level of respect and appreciation for John Lewis for all he endured that I otherwise would not have had. Too, I see how degraded and debased the entire corps of "civil rights leaders" of today are when compared to those of fifty years ago.

Posted by: Krebs v Carnot: Epic Battle of the Cycling Stars (TM) at January 03, 2016 09:29 AM (BK3ZS)

58 Didn't get a lot of reading done this week, the Mrs. and I were revamping (read: cleaning out) a couple of rooms that were out of control. Mostly just thumbed through some books on drawing, some magazines, and the next chapters of LOTR.

But I realized this is the 400th anniversary of Shakespeare's death. So I intend to read through many of his plays and all the poetry in the course of the year. It's been decades since I read many of the plays so this is a good excuse. And I found my well used copy of The Riverside Shakespeare, my favorite compendium of the Bard.

Posted by: JTB at January 03, 2016 09:31 AM (FvdPb)

59 Zoltan

So which one did u like best (omit scifi, pls)?

Posted by: mnw at January 03, 2016 09:32 AM (4Vu64)

60 32. It's not about the bears looks. It's always about the woman. The woman controlling a powerful dangerous force of nature with her body. In fact that's the theme to every romance novel. Female empowerment with T &A.
It's why some women dig serial killers.
It's a broken world.

Posted by: simplemind at January 03, 2016 09:33 AM (BTnAK)

61
35 So now when I hookup with guys in the parking lot, I've got to worry about bear shifters?
Posted by: Leonardo DiCaprio at January 03, 2016 09:16 AM (7EHW6)


Guy or bear, it's all buttsecs, Leo!

Posted by: Krebs v Carnot: Epic Battle of the Cycling Stars (TM) at January 03, 2016 09:34 AM (BK3ZS)

62 I won't go so far as to say 'women like shit,' but I will say that the biggest shit out there is marketed toward women.

-
Lifetime Channel.

Posted by: The Great White Snark at January 03, 2016 09:35 AM (Nwg0u)

63 >>BBW

I thought this was big black women, not big beautiful women. I'm not reading the book to find out though!

Posted by: Lea at January 03, 2016 09:35 AM (vmMMi)

64 Ha! Take THAT, Muldoon!
Posted by: Open Blogger at 08:56 AM



****

Now what did I do?




****


OBTW- no bear shifters in my book, but you wouldn't believe the special capabilities that I give a hamster! Shifting, steering, three-point landings, audio triangulation...you name it! Prolly not going to capture the lonely hearts club single women reader demographic though. Hamsters don't have the right mix of threatening bad boy and hero alpha smoldering masculinity. Alas!

Posted by: Seamus Muldoon at January 03, 2016 09:35 AM (NeFrd)

65  Outside of a dog, a book is man's best friend. Inside of a dog, it's too dark to read. -Groucho Marx

I know because my dick can read in a properly lighted area. Hey, it was a shapeshifting dog, so I don't feel I'm to blame.

Posted by: Groucho Marx at January 03, 2016 09:36 AM (7EHW6)

66 Hi....to join the goodreads group

Posted by: Erik at January 03, 2016 09:36 AM (1uwp8)

67
Lifetime Channel

...where the answer is always "counseling"! (An observation first voiced to me by a notoriously liberal coworker who found it amusing.)

Posted by: Krebs v Carnot: Epic Battle of the Cycling Stars (TM) at January 03, 2016 09:37 AM (BK3ZS)

68 Votermom - Hate to be a pain, I don't think emailing myself a book if I have that correct is practical. I had 1 chapter to go in book 12 and there are 21 books in the series. I could read them on line (I might for the 1 chapter) but this machine doesn't seem nice for the Web to me.

Posted by: skip at January 03, 2016 09:39 AM (C1Suc)

69
Hamsters don't have the right mix of threatening bad boy and hero alpha smoldering masculinity. Alas!

Richard Gere recommends that you go with gerbils instead. Powerful juju, they have.

Posted by: Krebs v Carnot: Epic Battle of the Cycling Stars (TM) at January 03, 2016 09:39 AM (BK3ZS)

70 Holy Hormel, I just ordered an Aldiss book on Amazon and they already have me pegged (erroneously, I hasten to add!) as a consumer of BBW bear shifter lite pr0n - "Outlaws Vow: Grizzlies MC Romance". Lots of shirtless beefy lads with mussed tresses astride wheeled steeds. Thanks a pantload, AoSHQ portal!

Posted by: All Hail Eris, Literate Savage at January 03, 2016 09:39 AM (jR7Wy)

71 I won't go so far as to say 'women like shit,' but I will say that the biggest shit out there is marketed toward women.
Posted by: Pappy O'Daniel at January 03, 2016 09:07 AM (

There are a lot of stupid books but I'm pretty sure the male equivalent is looking at pictures...

-
Those are art studies.

Posted by: The Great White Snark at January 03, 2016 09:40 AM (Nwg0u)

72 So now when I hookup with guys in the parking lot, I've got to worry about bear shifters?

Posted by: Leonardo DiCaprio

*****


Not if you use the back seat.

Posted by: Seamus Muldoon at January 03, 2016 09:41 AM (NeFrd)

73 It's not about the bears looks. It's always about the woman. The woman controlling a powerful dangerous force of nature with her body. In fact that's the theme to every romance novel. Female empowerment with T &A.
It's why some women dig serial killers.
It's a broken world.
Posted by: simplemind at January 03, 2016 09:33 AM (BTnAK)

--

Seems like a cynical view.

An alternative view is that love stories about shifters have always existed in myth (Zeus was always disguising himself as a bull, swan, etc) and a mortal - bear love story is lifted straight out of East of the Sun, West of the Moon.

Posted by: @votermom at January 03, 2016 09:41 AM (cbfNE)

74 Ok, so I don't do chick lit, but whatever. But animal shape shifting romance? What is going on with women that so many of then crave these kinds of books, or stuff like 50 shades when there are so many regular romance books out there?

Hate to be judgey (ok, not really) but I really think there must be a huge gaping hole in their lives. I'm single and haven't even been on a date for a loooong time, but I would never read such drivel.

Anyhoo, I am so glad I finally started reading in earnest again after so long. I basically only read detective stories, so I borrowed some Nero Wolfe e-books from the library over the holidays. Loved then and em was able to read 3.

I think I must have read practically every Agatha Christie novel, so I decided to try the other Queens of crime. I didn't like the Ngaio Marsh book I read (Final Curtain) at all, so I'm now trying out Dorothy Sayers, which has been Ok so far.

Posted by: chique testing testing at January 03, 2016 09:42 AM (QX0Xt)

75
Rather than point gingers at one side or the other, I think the lesson is that there's a metric shit-ton of cash to be made by marketing shit.

Posted by: Krebs v Carnot: Epic Battle of the Cycling Stars (TM) at January 03, 2016 09:42 AM (BK3ZS)

76
"fingers", jeebus

Posted by: Krebs v Carnot: Epic Battle of the Cycling Stars (TM) at January 03, 2016 09:43 AM (BK3ZS)

77

I have the Calibre e-book manager installed on my Windows PC, and I can use it to convert any epub book I might want to read on the Kindle to mobi.

yes, the answer

Posted by: artisanal 'ette at January 03, 2016 09:43 AM (qCMvj)

78 Got here early today. Usually I get here too late to post but not to late to get some good recommendations. I would like to recommend Sabrina Chase's Sequoyah trilogy and recommend to Sabrina Chase that she write more of that kinda stuff.
Meanwhile I'm working my way through Roger Scruton's Fools, Frauds, and Firebrands. If you are as frustrated as I am with the fact that the verbalizations of our opponents consist entirely of lies and bad arguments Scruton can help you understand the philosophic groundwork that led to these tactics.
As a palate cleanser I read Nathan Lowell's resurrection of his stories about Ishmael Wang, In Ashes Born.

Posted by: Alo89 at January 03, 2016 09:44 AM (xLrSa)

79 26 Isnt there a woman-dinosaur/reptile- sex genre? I'm sure Ace talked about it.
Posted by: Bruce With a Wang! at January 03, 2016 09:11 AM (iQIUe)


It was me. I covered (i.e. laughed at) this "genre" on the book thread a year or two ago.

Posted by: OregonMuse at January 03, 2016 09:44 AM (OBp0J)

80 "fingers", jeebus

In fairness, gingers are considered a deadly weapon in all 13 states of the Old Confederacy.

Posted by: Grump928(C) says Free Soothie!, with purchase of commenter of equal or greater value at January 03, 2016 09:46 AM (rwI+c)

81 I also started reading this modern mystery by the woman called Jennifer Moss, which I really like. at first I got just a sample, but it hooked me from the first page, so I bought the book. I'll be reading it when I'm done with my current book.

I heard of the book from her advertisement on the great detectives of old time radio podcast. by the way, I really love my Kindle white.

Posted by: chique testing testing at January 03, 2016 09:47 AM (QX0Xt)

82 41 I admire you for posting this despite your state being occupied by militias and choking in the bowl game last night.

Posted by: The Lost Dutchman at January 03, 2016 09:21 AM (Na4RS)


I'm not a Duck fan, so I'm OK with the result. But I've got to tell you, it was one of the most strangest football games I have ever watched.

Strange play-calling, strange plays, strange injuries, and a strange final score, considering it was 31-0 at the half.

And props to TCU for hanging in there and finally sticking it.

Posted by: OregonMuse at January 03, 2016 09:48 AM (OBp0J)

83 "We really dropped the ball on South America. Reagan had the rat bastard commies running for the tall grass back in the 80s, but then we just sort of wandered off, which is why we've had to deal with annoying pests like Hugo Chavez and his Bolivian mini-me, Evo Morales."

It was funny that with the collapse of the Soviet Union, all of the armed commie factions in Latin and South America kinda faded away and became left wing political parties instead. Outside of the Shining Path and FARC, who are funded by and run drugs the rest dried up. And the Dems told us for years that there was no evidence of Russia/Cuba supplying these civil wars. How come no Spanish judges want to try these former Soviet and Cuban generals for war crimes for this like they did to Pinochet?

Posted by: Hairyback Guy at January 03, 2016 09:48 AM (ej1L0)

84 I won't go so far as to say 'women like shit,' but I will say that the biggest shit out there is marketed toward women.
Posted by: Pappy O'Daniel at January 03, 2016 09:07 AM (

There are a lot of stupid books but I'm pretty sure the male equivalent is looking at pictures...
Posted by: Lea at January 03, 2016 09:16 AM (vmMMi)


Heh. No doubt.
No words at all, but the exact same idea.

Posted by: artisanal 'ette at January 03, 2016 09:48 AM (qCMvj)

85
Posted by: chique testing testing at January 03, 2016 09:42 AM (QX0Xt)

I found Tony Hillerman's Leaphorn & Chee series of mysteries interesting to read. The stories tend to be short, but the land and culture plays a big role in them. (I cannot vouch for the continuation of the series by his daughter since Tony's death.)

Posted by: Krebs v Carnot: Epic Battle of the Cycling Stars (TM) at January 03, 2016 09:49 AM (BK3ZS)

86 76 I like the idea of gingers being pointed.

Posted by: steevy at January 03, 2016 09:50 AM (8HTq1)

87 "Modern Advancements in Long Range Shooting" by Brian Litz. Of particular interest is the section on transonic ballistic coefficient.

Posted by: Weasel at January 03, 2016 09:51 AM (e3bId)

88 So someone has a book to recommend, (sometimes their own) and follows said recommendation with "link in nic."

I have no idea what this means, which is a slight impediment to making a purchase.

Posted by: Edmund Burkes Shade at January 03, 2016 09:52 AM (cmBvC)

89 one reason the paranormal romance genre (or any currently hot genre) is favorable to indie self-published writers is that the readers/buyers are looking for the formula and not the author name.
I don't know if I expressed that well.

Posted by: @votermom at January 03, 2016 09:52 AM (cbfNE)

90 So this is not your father's Perry-- wait a minute, actually, this is
your father's Perry Mason. But, this is only the first of about 80(!)
Perry Mason novels, so I don't know if the character changed over time.
Perhaps he did. But even if he did, I must say I kind of like this
harder-edged version.


Recently ran across a pile of Perry Mason books at the local Book Barn. Made me a fan! Gardner's character was a much different breed of cat compared to the Burr version: more devious, more willing to cut a corner or two when it helped his client and, yes, wore willing to take a swing at baddies who got in his way. In short, more human. And his relationship to Della, while never made explicit, was, for want of a better word, closer than the small-screen version. Lt. Tragg was more of a hardass, too.

In this week's reading, I'm making my way through Ike, Michael Korda's bio of Eisenhower. So far, a bit hero-worshippy, but Korda lived through WWII, and therefore had a better picture of Ike as a General. Not sure I agree with some of Korda's conclusions -- he rates Ike well above Patton, for example -- but he seems to have at least the basic of Eisenhower's story right.

Posted by: Mr Scribbler at January 03, 2016 09:53 AM (mIvL9)

91
In fairness, gingers are considered a deadly weapon in all 13 states of the Old Confederacy.

Oh, I know it, as I am happily married to one (but still wary when she "goes off")!

Posted by: Krebs v Carnot: Epic Battle of the Cycling Stars (TM) at January 03, 2016 09:54 AM (BK3ZS)

92 I have no idea what this means, which is a slight impediment to making a purchase.


If the Posted by: is highlighted, it is a link. Like votermom below your post.

Posted by: Grump928(C) says Free Soothie!, with purchase of commenter of equal or greater value at January 03, 2016 09:54 AM (rwI+c)

93 Hmmmm. I may have offended some moronettes with my first comment.

Posted by: chique testing testing at January 03, 2016 09:54 AM (QX0Xt)

94 Edmund, link in nic means the link is in the name of the commenter.

The link in my nic goes to my blog, so if you click on the red @votermom at the bottom of this comment, you will go to www.bookhorde.org

Posted by: @votermom at January 03, 2016 09:55 AM (cbfNE)

95 Apparently there's a gorilla in one of the zoos there that acts as an enormous draw to Japanese women. They find him to be teh hawt, so thoughful and handsome.
Is it any wonder that they are in a demographic death spiral? When the women become as sexually perverse as the men, it's probably game over for that civilization.
Posted by: Koko at January 03, 2016 09:10 AM (7EHW6)

Have you SEEN any Japanese men lately? They have been missing since about 1946....

Posted by: Hairyback Guy at January 03, 2016 09:55 AM (ej1L0)

96 Long time lurker...for joining the goodreads group. You guys are gonna break my checkbook with the book suggestions. I've been reading more this year than I have for a decade.

Posted by: Oklahoman at January 03, 2016 09:55 AM (ul+8R)

97 One of the books they want the enlisteds and the junior NCOs to read is Stephen Crane's classic, The Red Badge of Courage:

Where did you find reference to this exactly?

Posted by: artisanal 'ette at January 03, 2016 09:55 AM (qCMvj)

98
Posted by: Edmund Burkes Shade at January 03, 2016 09:52 AM (cmBvC)

They placed a link to their recommendation in their postin nickname, which should display as a link.

Posted by: Krebs v Carnot: Epic Battle of the Cycling Stars (TM) at January 03, 2016 09:56 AM (BK3ZS)

99 92 Thanks

Posted by: Edmund Burkes Shade at January 03, 2016 09:56 AM (cmBvC)

100 Have you SEEN any Japanese men lately? They have been missing since about 1946....


Their bones are all across the Pacific.

Posted by: Grump928(C) says Free Soothie!, with purchase of commenter of equal or greater value at January 03, 2016 09:56 AM (rwI+c)

101 I have no idea what this means, which is a slight impediment to making a purchase.

If the handle they use (the nickname used on the blog) is highlighted in red, you can click on it.

Posted by: no good deed at January 03, 2016 09:57 AM (GgxVX)

102 I'd like to try out Perry Mason and Raymond Chandler books at some point.

But alas, work is ramping up again and I fear my reading will suffer.

Posted by: chique testing testing at January 03, 2016 09:57 AM (QX0Xt)

103 >>>Hmmmm. I may have offended some moronettes with my first comment.
Posted by: chique testing testing at January 03, 2016 09:54 AM (QX0Xt)

Ha. No worries, I've totally read some crappy romance novels in my time but I'm well aware they are trash. I go in cycles, read stuff and then gets boring and repetitive and I do like a mind cleanse with classics and non fiction.

Posted by: Lea at January 03, 2016 09:58 AM (vmMMi)

104 93 Hmmmm. I may have offended some moronettes with my first comment.
Posted by: chique testing testing at January 03, 2016 09:54 AM (QX0Xt)

--

nah. It's a variation of rule whatever ... if there is a hot book / movie trend, there will soon be a steamy romance genre based on it.

Posted by: @votermom at January 03, 2016 09:58 AM (cbfNE)

105 but I'm well aware they are trash

Sometimes you just want potato chips instead of carrots.

Posted by: no good deed at January 03, 2016 09:59 AM (GgxVX)

106 (I cannot vouch for the continuation of the series by his daughter since Tony's death.)
Posted by: Krebs v Carnot: Epic Battle of the Cycling Stars (TM) at January 03, 2016 09:49 AM


I love Hillerman's books. My mother and grandmother spent much of their lives in Northern AZ -- grandfather worked for the railroad there, grandmother was a teacher, for a while in the Indian schools -- and they hooked me on the land and the people there at an early age. Hillerman was a tremendously perceptive observer of that region; I encountered real-life counterparts of some of his characters, and can visualize the settings every time I pick up one of the books.

Haven't read the daughter's stories, and don't intend to. Most of the time, continuations aren't worth bothering with.

Posted by: Mr Scribbler at January 03, 2016 10:00 AM (mIvL9)

107 I have no idea what this means, which is a slight impediment to making a purchase.

Posted by: Edmund Burkes Shade


*****

At the bottom of this comment, it says Posted by: Seamus Muldoon

The name Seamus Muldoon is in red (on my browser at least). If you hover your cursor over that you will see a url address. If you point and click your browser will open that address. Some people link to their blogs, some use the nickname link to link to news stories, etc. In my case it links to my (seldom used) blog which has a description of my book, a sample chapter and links to the Amazon and Kindle pages.

Posted by: Seamus Muldoon at January 03, 2016 10:00 AM (NeFrd)

108 I'm reading


Spooky Action at a Distance: The Phenomenon That Reimagines Space and Time--and What It Means for Black Holes, the Big Bang, and Theories of Everything
by George Musser

http://amzn.com/B00UG9Y3YE

I can't get enough of this book. It's like chocolate.

Posted by: artisanal 'ette at January 03, 2016 10:01 AM (qCMvj)

109 One (wo)mans trash...

Posted by: Weasel at January 03, 2016 10:01 AM (e3bId)

110 Sometimes you just want potato chips instead of carrots.
Posted by: no good deed at January 03, 2016 09:59 AM (GgxVX)

--

We actually call trashy books doritos in our house

Posted by: @votermom at January 03, 2016 10:01 AM (cbfNE)

111 I've been reading Felix J. Palma's The Map of Chaos this week. It is the third of The Map of Time trilogy. So far I'm quite liking it. This time around we find out how Inspector Clayton lost his left hand, among other things. These are quasi-steampunk stories set in London in the late Victorian era.

Posted by: The Great White Snark at January 03, 2016 10:01 AM (Nwg0u)

112 Good point about Zeus, votermom. Nothing really new under the sun.

I used to be a huge romance reader (and even enjoyed the first five or so Sookie Stackhouse vampire books) but just got squicked out by all the super-creepy paranormal stuff that invaded after Twilight. Laurell K. Hamilton, I'm looking at you. And the bestiality-themed shifter crap like these bear novels. There was also a little upsurge in Flowers in the Attic-ish incestuous romances. Where it was somehow all okay because of "love." Gross. When I'm in the mood I go to second-hand book stores and Goodwill-type places and look for contemporary romances from the 70s and 80s. Hey, the hero is a photographer. Or a lawyer. Or a business exec. Or a rancher. Like, human beings who do actual work. Wow, imagine.

Posted by: Gem at January 03, 2016 10:02 AM (c+gwp)

113 Have you SEEN any Japanese men lately? They have been missing since about 1946....

Perhaps the same kinda thing that happened to England after WWI. A lot of manhood erased. Weakens the breed to put it crudely.

Posted by: Alo89 at January 03, 2016 10:02 AM (xLrSa)

114 This shapeshifting shit kind of reminds me of the old incubus/succubus tales. A being that alters its appearance in order to trick humans into having sex with it. See also Cait Jenner.

Posted by: Sally Kohn, shapeshifting hippo at January 03, 2016 10:03 AM (7EHW6)

115 Btw, my sister devoured Erle Stanley Gardner books in high school. She always preferred modern settings - she'd read Mills & Boon.
I preferred pure escapism, so I'd read fantasy, sf, and Barbara Cartland.

Posted by: @votermom at January 03, 2016 10:05 AM (cbfNE)

116 >>Laurell K. Hamilton, I'm looking at you.

I read one of her Anita Blake novels and it was awful.

I got on a regency kick in college when my brain was full. And then after I'd been out of school I wanted nonfiction. So it's very tied to how bored or busy I am. But the regency romances are kind of like cozy mysteries which I also like.

Posted by: Lea at January 03, 2016 10:06 AM (vmMMi)

117 "To Save Us All From Ruin: A Muldoon Adventure"

A horde author and HIGHLY recommended. Reminds me a bit of early Heinlein.

Well done Seamus, well done.

Posted by: Fewenuff at January 03, 2016 10:07 AM (T/sbU)

118
Haven't read the daughter's stories, and don't intend to. Most of the time, continuations aren't worth bothering with.
Posted by: Mr Scribbler at January 03, 2016 10:00 AM (mIvL9)


A point that flew clean over Issac Asimov's head, IMHO.

Posted by: Krebs v Carnot: Epic Battle of the Cycling Stars (TM) at January 03, 2016 10:07 AM (BK3ZS)

119 Chique, I can't stand chick lit but love Agatha Christie, so you certainly haven't offended *all* the 'ettes.

As it is a new year, may I humbly request that all the Horde consider supporting us authors? Of the ones I know about, Christopher Taylor (as Kestrel Arts) and I are on Patreon; Anna Puma and AllenG are on GoFundMe; and baldilocks, IIRC, has a Paypal donation button on her blog.

Posted by: Elisabeth G. Wolfe at January 03, 2016 10:07 AM (iuQS7)

120 114 This shapeshifting shit kind of reminds me of the old incubus/succubus tales.

--

Incubus / succubus romance is a separate subgenre from shifter romance.

Posted by: @votermom at January 03, 2016 10:07 AM (cbfNE)

121 I'm reading Atlas Shrugged since I've heard so much about it. I have to say, maybe as with Orwell, how could she predict things so well? Every once in a while there's a passage that could come from a blog from today. The college students are described as entitled, whiney, with their thought processes so jumbled that they make no sense when they speak. They wet nurse for Reardon finally seems to understand the value of hard work, but he has no words to explain it. Anyway, I thought I'd be reading an old intellectual book and perhaps learn some history from it. I never thought I would enjoy it this much, and how present it feels in today's world.

Posted by: LurkerLD at January 03, 2016 10:08 AM (og2FN)

122 I just learned of, and ordered, "The Typewriter Revolution: A Typist's Companion For the 21st Century" by Richard Polt. There has been renewed interest in manual typewriters for a decade or so, not just collecting but using them. Polt is an well-known expert on them as well as a professor of philosophy.

I really enjoy using manual typewriters for many, many reasons. The book should arrive in a few days and I'll make time to read it.

Posted by: JTB at January 03, 2016 10:09 AM (FvdPb)

123 So if I can get Republican women to visualize me turning into a bear, they'd vote for me? Is it really that simple?

Posted by: Jeb Bush at January 03, 2016 10:10 AM (7EHW6)

124 I like regency romances a lot but the ones written this centiry are mostly terrible - the heroines are SJWs who mostly manage to fall out of their bodices by chapter 2.

Posted by: @votermom at January 03, 2016 10:10 AM (cbfNE)

125 Posted by: Gem at January 03, 2016 10:02 AM (c+gwp)

Ugh. for some reason, I read the Flowers in the Attic books as a teenager. Gross is an understatement.

Posted by: chique testing testing at January 03, 2016 10:10 AM (QX0Xt)

126 55 cool breeze - FB reader did the trick is got book opened, took a little to figure it out though.

Posted by: skip at January 03, 2016 10:11 AM (C1Suc)

127 Where it was somehow all okay because of "love." Gross.

For quite some time now, I have wanted to bash the entirety of pop culture upside the head with a copy of The Four Loves just to disabuse people of this notion.

Posted by: Elisabeth G. Wolfe at January 03, 2016 10:11 AM (iuQS7)

128
Posted by: Jeb Bush at January 03, 2016 10:10 AM (7EHW6)

The only "bear" anybody might imagine you being, Yeb!, is the woolly bear caterpillar.

Posted by: Krebs v Carnot: Epic Battle of the Cycling Stars (TM) at January 03, 2016 10:12 AM (BK3ZS)

129 Just remember, dinosaur porn is a thing. THIS is pretty tame by comparison.

Posted by: jnials at January 03, 2016 10:12 AM (A2ewB)

130 A point that flew clean over Issac Asimov's head, IMHO.
Posted by: Krebs v Carnot: Epic Battle of the Cycling Stars (TM) at January 03, 2016 10:07 AM


I was actually thinking of continuation books by other authors, but yeah.

I'd suggest that any author think very carefully before keeping a character/story line going past the first sequel. In too many cases, what started as good reading turns into more formulaic drivel with each new edition.

I'm looking at you, zombie Robert B. Parker.

Posted by: Mr Scribbler at January 03, 2016 10:13 AM (mIvL9)

131 1/3 of the way through Erik Larson's In the Garden of the Beasts, about the early 1930s US ambassador to Germany.

1. The rampant anti-semitism in the USA is shocking
2. Many Germans comment on how quickly things were changing-- just 6 months into Nazi control and Jews, communists and anti- govt people are disappearing.
3. Free press is going bye bye quickly
Made me wonder how quickly it could happen here-- or in 5 years we look back and see that it WAS happening here

Posted by: Far Post at January 03, 2016 10:13 AM (HUtw6)

132 Barbara Cartland.

Posted by: @votermom at January 03, 2016 10:05 AM (cbfNE)

But her heroines were so awful. helpless, timid, and speech full of ellipses. it's a wonder women the man did not get impatient with then and yell at them to get to the darn point already.

Posted by: chique testing testing at January 03, 2016 10:14 AM (QX0Xt)

133 @117 Posted by: Fewenuff at January 03, 2016 10:07 AM (T/sbU)


*****


Thanks! Kind words indeed. I am glad you enjoyed it.

Posted by: Seamus Muldoon at January 03, 2016 10:14 AM (NeFrd)

134 OT: This might be good news or at least reverse bad news. Bozo says don't expect ISIS to be eradicated in 2016. But since he's always wrong about everything . . .

See WZ.

Posted by: The Great White Snark at January 03, 2016 10:14 AM (Nwg0u)

135 Sometimes the writer really is messed up, but talented enough to write entertainingly.

Laurell K Hamilton is in some kind of group marriage.
VC Andrews was a housebound invalid who apparently never saw a healthy relationship in real life.

Posted by: @votermom at January 03, 2016 10:14 AM (cbfNE)

136 mnw

The book I liked the best this year was vol II of William Manchester's biography of Winston Churchill, The Last Lion: Alone 1932-1940. Not an easy read, but one sees that the attitude of Neville Chambelain's government and most of the English people towards Hitler and Nazism during this time is mirrored by the Obama administration and many Americans towards Islam. Unfortunately, we don't have a Churchill to wake us up.

The best fiction, non sci-fi, was The Time It Never Rained by Elmer Kelton. It's a story of a rancher in Texas in the 1950's trying to save his ranch and way of life not only from a 7-year drought, but from governmental intrusion as well.

Posted by: Zoltan at January 03, 2016 10:14 AM (JYer2)

137 But her heroines were so awful. helpless, timid, and speech full of ellipses. it's a wonder women the man did not get impatient with then and yell at them to get to the darn point already.
Posted by: chique testing testing at January 03, 2016 10:14 AM (QX0Xt)

I was around eleven. I just loved the dresses and balls.

Posted by: @votermom at January 03, 2016 10:15 AM (cbfNE)

138 Any of you ladies fancy the idea of a shapeshifting dodo bird?

Posted by: Joe Biden at January 03, 2016 10:16 AM (7EHW6)

139 Oh, and happy birthday, Professor Tolkien!

Posted by: Elisabeth G. Wolfe at January 03, 2016 10:17 AM (iuQS7)

140 My librarian recommended a shifter book to me. I laughed out loud all the way through. The girl was a honey badger roller derby and the guy was a bear who played hockey. Can't remember the author's name offhand, but it was truly hilarious. Apparently writes under other pseuds and one is a dinosaur shifting series. When I get to the library this week, I'll ask.

Posted by: mustbequantum at January 03, 2016 10:18 AM (MIKMs)

141
Posted by: Joe Biden at January 03, 2016 10:16 AM (7EHW6)

We'll wait for "Doctor" Jill's autobiography, thanks very much!

Posted by: Krebs v Carnot: Epic Battle of the Cycling Stars (TM) at January 03, 2016 10:18 AM (BK3ZS)

142 I was around eleven. I just loved the dresses and balls.
Posted by: @votermom


I love dresses. Balls, not so much.

Posted by: Caitlyn Jenner at January 03, 2016 10:18 AM (7EHW6)

143 On Japanese men a while ago I read a article how a lot of them have turned off women and hang around in packs of only guys. And didn't get impression that they were all gay. WWII took it all out of Japan.

Posted by: skip at January 03, 2016 10:19 AM (C1Suc)

144 >>3 of the way through Erik Larson's In the Garden of the Beasts, about the early 1930s US ambassador to Germany.

I really enjoyed this book. It was like it came at the whole thing from a different angle? The calm(ish) before the storm.

Laurel k Hamilton is in a group marriage for real votermom? That explains a lot I guess. Wow.

Posted by: Lea at January 03, 2016 10:19 AM (vmMMi)

145 >Commies are like blackberry bushes.

Bad analogy. Blackberry bushes actually produce something, to wit, yummy blackberries. Commies produce nothing. They're like Buckthorn.

Posted by: DanInMN at January 03, 2016 10:20 AM (15ZVX)

146 Earth In the Balance by All Gore been reading have I.

- Koko

Posted by: The Great White Snark at January 03, 2016 10:20 AM (Nwg0u)

147 Bad analogy. Blackberry bushes actually produce something, to wit, yummy blackberries. Commies produce nothing. They're like Buckthorn.
Posted by: DanInMN at January 03, 2016 10:20 AM (15ZVX)

--

Let's not be hasty.
We should try boiling and smushing a batch of commies and see if we get jam.
For science.

Posted by: @votermom at January 03, 2016 10:21 AM (cbfNE)

148 I do have to say I'm missing my kindle fire, and my typing skills aren't any better with a slightly larger keyboard.

Posted by: skip at January 03, 2016 10:22 AM (C1Suc)

149 Speaking of some books being trash, what do you do with really bad books? It's against my nature to throw a book in the garbage.

Posted by: roamingfirehydrant at January 03, 2016 10:22 AM (A8ZgE)

150
Koko, filter a moron through a gorilla and you still have a moron.

Posted by: Krebs v Carnot: Epic Battle of the Cycling Stars (TM) at January 03, 2016 10:22 AM (BK3ZS)

151 WWII took it all out of Japan.

-
A Pyrrhic defeat.

Posted by: The Great White Snark at January 03, 2016 10:23 AM (Nwg0u)

152 My librarian recommended a shifter book to me. I laughed out loud all the way through. The girl was a honey badger roller derby and the guy was a bear who played hockey.

Some unaccountable idjit unilaterally made the decision to purchase that book with your tax dollars.

Still laughing?

Posted by: Hezekiah at January 03, 2016 10:23 AM (7EHW6)

153 It's always nice to get to the Book Thread before the pastries and muffins are all gone. You East Coast people and your early time-zone privilege...

78 Alo89 I am indeed writing more :-D Glad you enjoyed the Sequoyah books! I am thisclose to finishing the sequel to The Scent of Metal -- just have the big battle and aftermath to write. I can't wait to find out what happens! (I am a pantser, get your mind out of the gutter, that means "discovery writer" or writing without a safety net or an outline.) The heroes better survive in usable shape; I have a whole other book after that for them to run around in.

As for the were-shifter-billionaire mommy porn, it mostly comes down to the need for variety. Entire forests have been obliterated to feed the gaping maw of the romance publishing industry. I'm not going to point fingers at romance readers--they deserve books too. Can't write the stuff to save my life, which is a pity from the bank balance perspective. The trouble is "good" romance, which I define as something you can reread and enjoy, is just as hard to write as any other book. (Yes, it does exist. Georgette Heyer is the master. Even the Manly Morons would enjoy The Talisman Ring, I think. Nobody shifts into anything, plus smugglers and adventure!)

But the quick and easy to write romances rely heavily on some exotic twist--location, kink, species....whatever. So you are seeing people running out of odd stuff to spackle over the old Tab A/ Slot B, which gets you dinosaur porn (alcohol may also be a contributing factor). No more decline of Western Civilization than anything else in these piping times.

OK, back to the space battle. Read well, O Morons!

Posted by: Sabrina Chase at January 03, 2016 10:24 AM (GG9V6)

154 Laurel k Hamilton is in a group marriage for real votermom? That explains a lot I guess. Wow.

Posted by: Lea at January 03, 2016 10:19 AM (vmMMi)

--

yes, she talked about it on her blog a while ago - her husband and her moved in with another couple and they are all so happy - I think it must be over a year ago so who knows what the arrangements are now

Posted by: @votermom at January 03, 2016 10:24 AM (cbfNE)

155
It's against my nature to throw a book in the garbage.

Not mine. I render it into its components and recycle the paper. "Out, damn spot!"

Posted by: Krebs v Carnot: Epic Battle of the Cycling Stars (TM) at January 03, 2016 10:24 AM (BK3ZS)

156 149 Speaking of some books being trash, what do you do with really bad books? It's against my nature to throw a book in the garbage.
Posted by: roamingfirehydrant at January 03, 2016 10:22 AM (A8ZgE)
---
Libraries have annual sales so you can drop off boxes of your bear shifter books and nobody will be the wiser.

You can also discretely tuck them into a friend's/enemy's book case if they are particularly horrendous.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, Literate Savage at January 03, 2016 10:25 AM (jR7Wy)

157 Reading Philip Dick's "The Man in the High Castle," set in San Francisco 17 years after an alternate version of WWII has ended.

FDR was assassinated before Pearl Harbor, and Japan and Germany won their wars, so the USA is half German-occupied, and the west coast is Japanese-run.

You would not believe what the Nazis did to Africa.

Only 30 percent into it, I cannot imagine where it is going, but it is quite good.

Posted by: the littl shyning man at January 03, 2016 10:26 AM (U6f54)

158 Sabrina, I loved "The Scent of Metal" and eagerly await the next installment.

So get back to work.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, Literate Savage at January 03, 2016 10:27 AM (jR7Wy)

159 Long time reader, first time commenter. Seeking an invite to the goodreads group. Thanks.

Posted by: Randy at January 03, 2016 10:27 AM (Mb/wu)

160 "Guilty Women," by Richard Baxter.

A real period piece, from 1941 Britain, when the outcome of the war was still very much in doubt. There are several classes of them: Englishwomen who were public supporters of Fascism (not named, due to the ferocity of British libel laws, but I spotted Unity Mitford and her sister Diana Mosley); continental Delilahs who sapped the resistance of the King of Belgium and the French President, and ... (drum roll) EDDA MUSSOLINI!

Seriously - the author devotes two chapters to Edda, calling her her father's evil genius and a big-time meddler in international politics: she had a hand in the murder of the Austrian Chancellor Dollfuss, it was she who persuaded her father to align with Hitler and look upon Britain as the enemy, she is "the most dangerous woman in Europe."
And all, it seems, because she wanted to marry Crown Prince Umberto, and the Italian royals wouldn't have her.

....

When I read about World War Two I have a hard time not looking back through the prism of 1945 ("Well, OUR side was going to win anyway, couldn't they see that?") and seeing what was coming off the press in the early days is...sobering. Also silly and hysterical at times, but thought-provoking. This is what they knew, or thought they knew, and this is what they feared.

Posted by: Annalucia at January 03, 2016 10:28 AM (a5bF3)

161 139 ... Elisabeth, Thanks for the reminder of Tolkien's birthday. Think I'll celebrate with a cup of tea, a pipeful of my favorite English blend tobacco and selections from The Tolkien Reader.

Posted by: JTB at January 03, 2016 10:28 AM (FvdPb)

162 Are there any shapeshifting romances about a goat who shapeshifts into a clock?

Asking for a friend.

Posted by: Ahmad Mohammed at January 03, 2016 10:29 AM (7EHW6)

163 Personal Free book stands to get rid of unloved books? But the only one I have seen is 12 miles away.

Posted by: skip at January 03, 2016 10:31 AM (C1Suc)

164
goodreads:
Lurkers, if you've posted here today go ahead and hit Join on the goodreads group (you must first already have a goodreads account) and mention the name you posted with here.

link to group:

www.goodreads.com/group/show/175335-aoshq-moron-horde

Posted by: @votermom at January 03, 2016 10:31 AM (cbfNE)

165 Some unaccountable idjit unilaterally made the decision to purchase that book with your tax dollars.

Still laughing?

Posted by: Hezekiah at January 03, 2016 10:23 AM (7EHW6)
_______

Ayup. The idea that libraries should censor someone's reading or only buy 'quality' litterychoor is appalling.

The laughs were totally worth it.

Posted by: mustbequantum at January 03, 2016 10:32 AM (MIKMs)

166 Later Perry Mason books do have Perry acting a bit better than that, but he does tend to suppress evidence in a way that under current rules would probably get him disbarred. Probably then too, which was probably the whole point.

Chique, pick up a Raymond Chandler or two, they are very well written and you will find the time to read them. A good anthology of his short stories that he did not mine for his full novels, is The Simple Art of Murder. There are other short story anthologies that have stories that he did base his novels on

Chandler is one of the greats in the American writing.

Posted by: Kindltot at January 03, 2016 10:32 AM (q2o38)

167 97 One of the books they want the enlisteds and the junior NCOs to read is Stephen Crane's classic, The Red Badge of Courage:

Where did you find reference to this exactly?

Posted by: artisanal 'ette at January 03, 2016 09:55 AM (qCMvj)


Click on the Army reading list I linked to. When you get to that page, click on the 'Sublist 1' link. It's the third book down from the top on that list.

Posted by: OregonMuse at January 03, 2016 10:33 AM (OBp0J)

168 Annalucia - In 1942-1943 timeframe the race was between the US getting fully mobilized - industry and military - and the Axis Powers consolidating their victories. Operation Barbarossa put the nails inGermany's coffin.

Posted by: Butch at January 03, 2016 10:33 AM (hXu8T)

169 Whatever your current shape is, it is beautiful, perfection. There is no need to shift it.

Posted by: Lena Dunham at January 03, 2016 10:34 AM (7EHW6)

170 Visual metaphor of 2016 coming at us.

https://youtu.be/4mmWv6pgBQg

Posted by: The Great White Snark at January 03, 2016 10:36 AM (Nwg0u)

171 Zoltan

Thx. I kind of burned through Churchill awhile back. I read a 2-volume bio by somebody-- can no longer remember who now. I think modern readers have no clue how popular & pervasive the instinct we now call appeasement was in the UK between the wars.

Also, I found C's money troubles interesting, similar to Jefferson's-- nobody's good at EVERYTHING, I suppose.

I decided to go back and read English history, by reading bios of the kings, starting w/ Hen. III. I'm up to Hen. V now, as mentioned. This is a very 19th Century approach to the subject. I'll quit with the Glorious Revolution, because the kings & Queens start to be irrelevant then. No interest in pre-Conquest days, either.

Posted by: mnwxyz at January 03, 2016 10:38 AM (NiHAc)

172 Wiener, wiener wiener. Flopping wieners.

Posted by: George R.owr R.owr Martin at January 03, 2016 10:39 AM (AxTzt)

173 I fantasize about shapes a that shift so slightly, so subtly that no one notices.

Posted by: Bill Belichick at January 03, 2016 10:40 AM (7EHW6)

174 Erik Larson's "Dead Wake" on the sinking of the Lusitania. A great read with more info than you thought you knew.

Posted by: Libra at January 03, 2016 10:41 AM (GblmV)

175 My reading of romance novels starts with Jane Austen and ends with a couple by Georgette Heyer. Being a guy, I don't care about the romance stuff so much but enjoy the characters and settings. And they are well-written.

The Bronte sisters can go pound sand.

Posted by: JTB at January 03, 2016 10:41 AM (FvdPb)

176 Roger L. Simon's latest PJ Media column "2016: Year of the Chinese Curse" mentions a book that sounds very interesting. I placed a copy on hold from the library.

Simon: "It's not just because I have been reading the English translation of Michel Houellebecq's Submission that I sense we are heading for some sort of apocalypse in 2016. The novel, ironically published in its original French the day of the Charlie Hebdo massacre (7 January 2015), all too realistically describes an election and near civil war in France in 2022, ending in a Muslim takeover of the state (through an alliance with the left). Not even a year after its publication, and the more recent events in Paris and San Bernardino, this riveting book seems, if anything, a bit tardy in its time frame."

From the Amazon summary: "In an alliance with the socialists, France's new Islamic party sweeps to power. Islamic law comes into force. Women are veiled, polygamy is encouraged, and Francois is offered an irresistible academic advancement--on condition that he convert to Islam."

Posted by: doug at January 03, 2016 10:43 AM (yHWxm)

177 Ot, thank the us govt for your iPhone. Tidbits from cnn post holidays.

Posted by: Lea at January 03, 2016 10:44 AM (k3Bym)

178 >>I found Tony Hillerman's Leaphorn Chee series of mysteries interesting to read.

Hillerman's books are great! My other favorite mystery writers are Dick Francis (all set in horse sports settings) and Nevada Barr (all set in national parks). The family went to a Sherlock exhibit at the local science museum and now I want to read all of the Sherlock books.

Posted by: Lizzy at January 03, 2016 10:44 AM (NOIQH)

179 Recently finished a couple of books recommended to me by a friend.

Grimnoir book 1. Thoroughly enjoyed it.

AlterWorld by D. Rus. Set in the 2030s, the idea is that MMORPGs have become full immersion games (i.e., you plug yourself into the computer and all your senses are involved). If you play too long, you can become "stuck" in the game. Unlike other things I've seen based on this idea, once you're stuck in the game, what happens to your body is irrelevant; you've been completely uploaded and the body is an empty shell. The body exists only long enough to get Our Hero into the game, then it becomes largely forgotten.

Our Hero, having terminal cancer, decides to upload himself and live in a MMORPG instead of dying. He's a bit of a Mary Sue in that he creates a unique character build that gives him awesome power and things go swimmingly for him. He charms all the wimmins he encounters (who are actual wimmins and not men playing female characters). Towards the end of the book he creates a new crafting recipe that will ensure he becomes wealthy. It's not clear to me whether the Mary Sueness in volume 1 is just to set up the remaining volumes or whether he will remain a Mary Sue in them as well.

Since it's mostly set in the game, you'll need to be intimately familiar with a MMORPG to make sense of much of it. It aligns fairly well, but not exactly, with WoW.

The interesting thing about the books, and the primary reason my friend recommended them to me, is that they're translated from Russian. I'll probably continue with at least the next book to find out whether the Mary Sueness continues, but have to decide whether to continue with the English translation or try to tackle the original Russian.

Posted by: Anachronda at January 03, 2016 10:45 AM (eejPc)

180 Click on the Army reading list I linked to. When you get to that page, click on the 'Sublist 1' link. It's the third book down from the top on that list.
Posted by: OregonMuse at January 03, 2016 10:33 AM (OBp0J)



hmmm, still don't see it
the link brings up a pdf, which I search and do not see it

only other links on the page are previous years, and then one to More Info

must be blocking stuff on my laptop, will have to check it out on my PC upstairs.

Thanks though.

*update: I did a general Search for Red Badge of Courage and the Sublist 1 shows up there, in a URL for the Book in that sublist. Wonder why I can't see it on the top page you linked... no matter though, I found it.

Posted by: artisanal 'ette at January 03, 2016 10:46 AM (qCMvj)

181 Finally!

My time has come.

Later this month I'll be publishing my masterwork:

Boinking in the Hole: BBW Groundhog's Day Paranormal Groundhog Shifter Romance (Groundhog's Day Groundhog Shifter Trilogy Book 3)

Carrie Truehart's faces her greatest challenge yet! Tytebutte McAbdomen is everything that she ever dreamed of in a man. Rich, sexy, shirtless and a lover who appreciates all the nooks and crannies of a full figured woman.

But, can she follow him where no woman has dared go before?

Can she live under the cloud of his secret and find true happiness now?

Or will she, hide once again in the Winter of her Loneliness buried under a blizzard of Hagen-Daz Cookie Dough Banana Split Surprise?



Come on, people! Let's do this. Number One on Amazon!


Posted by: naturalfake at January 03, 2016 10:47 AM (KUa85)

182 Those are art studies.
Posted by: The Great White Snark at January 03, 2016 09:40 AM (Nwg0u)


It's a coffee table book.

Posted by: Kindltot at January 03, 2016 10:47 AM (q2o38)

183 Recommend World War IV by Norman Podhoretz ( rip) published in 2007. It's a look back at an opinion on how we handled and should handle the war against Islamofascism. It's always interesting to see what was said in the past since facts and context get lost as time goes by.

Posted by: Max Rockatansky at January 03, 2016 10:49 AM (MNgU2)

184 Anyone who carries a gun - military, police, concealed carry - should read Grossman's On Killing and his companion work, On Combat. The big takeaway for me was to find ways to incorporate "stress inoculation" into training. Anyone can learn how to put holes into the center of a paper target on a calm day at the range; learning how to make good decisions and to shoot accurately under stress is something else.

Posted by: PabloD at January 03, 2016 10:51 AM (5CsS+)

185 #181, naturalfake, I'd buy that for a dollar!

Posted by: OregonMuse at January 03, 2016 10:51 AM (OBp0J)

186 Still working my way through Rutherford's London ... too much work piled up while I was doing the Christmas markets, and then got sick after the last of them.

Is it too late to throw in my huzzah's for Hillerman's Chee and Leaphorn mysteries? He was an amazingly perceptive writer about the spaces of the desert Southwest. Can't say enough good things about them.

The illustration for the Book Thread reminds me irresistibly of romance novel covers re-imagined - at Longmire Does Romance - http://tinyurl.com/4t7mf
- an oldie in internet time but a goodie.

Posted by: CeliaHayes at January 03, 2016 10:52 AM (95iDF)

187 I use the Nook app I sideloaded on my Fire to read my epub books and also sync up with my nook library at the same time. I get to keep my nook books, my old Baen books, and kindle on the same device.

Posted by: Inspector Cussword at January 03, 2016 10:53 AM (Vyvnw)

188 I'm reading To Save Us All from Ruin and I'm hooked in rodents and all but it is making me want to find my historical account of the crossing of the Rapido river, it was a snafu from the get go as I remember from the last time I read it maybe 10 years ago

Posted by: skip at January 03, 2016 10:54 AM (C1Suc)

189 1 of 6 ... Ha ha, just kidding. Well, it was, but I took parts 1 through 5 and made them into a webwork, "Creativity and the Web," which you can find at http://bit.ly/art-and-web. You're welcome.



I admire and respect the self-promotion of folks here, from AllenG's non-existant blog to Seamus and Anna and Poppins and others pushing their books.

I've linked to my own comic or text or video webworks now and then, but I've got nothing as major as ye real authors. I just don't think much of my stuff. Oh, as Randy Newman sang, "sometimes I get off a good one. Least I think I do. No I know I do." But nothing of any significant length, or worth.

There is this one work, of just short-story length I suppose. I think I only ever mentioned it on here once, long ago when I first posted it.



The idea had been rumbling around in my head for years, as a comic book - uh, I mean - a graphic novel. I did some sketches and basic outline for the story, then stuck it in a file and more-or-less forgot about it.

Then, in the midst of being housebound a couple winters back, and having received a shirt-pocket-size blank book, I took up the idea anew. I began from scratch, doing sketches of the start of the story.

But very soon, I found that the story rushed ahead of the art. I began writing the thing, longhand. And wrote, and wrote...

What's online starts with the original rough comic sketches, justified as being done by one of the characters. Then it's just text, pretty much just as I originally wrote it. The last part is portrayed as if there were a website containing the sketches and text, and post-script articles and emails, with a concluding email from the character who did the opening sketches.

So, it's an odd, polyglot format. A webwork fer surely.

After the whole thing was online, I ran across the old file with the original sketches and outlines. Totally different from the final work. I don't think the original plot would've worked at all.



Starts off as a sort of superhero tale, but without flashy costumes or obvious powers. No slam-bang action; intentionally the opposite. There is some big action, but it all happens only in flashback mention. In the second part, the superhero thing morphs into harder science-fiction, with ... ah, spoilers....

One odd aspect is the shifting narrative voice in the second part. Fun to write, but, perhaps confusing? I think it works. But I have no perspective.

I put it online as-was because I wasn't sure I'd ever get around to doing even a revised draft, much less the full "graphic novel" version. Here's the first panel, though, re-done in (large size) painterly format rather than the little pencil sketch rough. This was always how it opened. You might recognize the source of the image. Caption: "Look! Up in the sky!"

http://bit.ly/invul-panel1

After re-reading the whole thing recently, I decided, it is what it is. Heck, I still hope to see the full-length live-action or animated movie adaptation some day! (Sure.)

I'll even be bold enough to encourage folks to break my two-decade-long dry spell, and make a little contribution, if you can and want to spare a buck. (PayPal buttons on the site - they supposedly work.) There is no hard copy, or e-book version, but you can pretend it's "real." I don't mind.

Invulnerable
Out of nowhere came a man with a miraculous message.
Presented in illustrated documentary, what we know of his story, and the history of our community he inspired. (and more)
http://mindfulwebworks.com/invulnerable

Posted by: mindful webworker - dares to say hi at January 03, 2016 10:54 AM (GHHRC)

190 I've started on the Saxon Tales series by Bernard Cornwell. It's nice to read about a part of history I didn't know about - the Viking period in England.

Posted by: Citizen Cake at January 03, 2016 10:55 AM (ppaKI)

191 All kindles come with an e-mail address. You can setup Calibre to convert and mail the book directly to the kindle without having to connect it to the pc.

Posted by: smileynh at January 03, 2016 10:55 AM (cwBD4)

192

The men's "Abs" trend is hilarious, but surely nice to look at. Why not show men finally getting in shape and showing off for us?

I also noticed, on the flip, that that Sherlock Holmes Christmas "special" The Abominable Bride fell into the "Women" Vote for Hillary propaganda trend. What a shame. Maybe the BBC was wishing for another Margaret Thatcher, lol, I know, not.

I was a bit disappointed overall. Although the fx and the acting were great, as usual.

Posted by: artisanal 'ette at January 03, 2016 10:56 AM (qCMvj)

193 Wow, that comment looks even longer than I thought it would. Sorrrrry.

* slinks away in shame to go clip toenails *

Posted by: mindful webworker - oops at January 03, 2016 10:58 AM (GHHRC)

194 174-- Dead Wake is recommended-- lots of little known info that kept me turning the pages (Georg Von Trapp of sound of Music fame was a u-boat skipper)

Posted by: Far Post at January 03, 2016 10:59 AM (HUtw6)

195 187 I use the Nook app I sideloaded on my Fire to read my epub books and also sync up with my nook library at the same time. I get to keep my nook books, my old Baen books, and kindle on the same device.

Posted by: Inspector Cussword at January 03, 2016 10:53 AM (Vyvnw)


How did you sideload the Nook app?

Posted by: OregonMuse at January 03, 2016 11:00 AM (OBp0J)

196 Thanks OregonMuse for another year of the book thread! Look forward to it every weekend.

Since getting a Paperwhite my Mom just pours through books, all romance novels. It's an amazing thing to see. Got her to read one of Russell Blake's Black detective/comedy books but otherwise that's it.

Read Philip K Dick's short story We Can Remember It For You Wholesale, also known as Total Recall. Very good though like the second movie it doesn't go to Mars, and has a loopy twist typical of Dick.

Listened to David Edding's Queen of Sorcery (Belgariad #2) (sadly not available on Kindle in the U.S. due to apparent copyright restrictions), which continues the journey of our young hero to learn about his powers as he travels to confront the forces of evil. Very good story, enjoyed it.

Posted by: waelse1 at January 03, 2016 11:00 AM (GGCQ1)

197 Yes, the real Perry Mason books are great, they are pulp era hard boiled fiction. He's not quite the amoral mercenary presented in the Book Thread here, but he's not the squeaky clean nice guy in the TV show, either. He's a lawyer that will do anything at all to win his case, at great personal cost and danger, as long as he believes in the client. And he's easily bored, so he tends to go with really wild, dangerous, and interesting clients. I recommend the Earl Stanley Gardner books very highly. As you read them, keep in mind he wrote these by dictating them out loud to his secretary.

Posted by: Christopher Taylor at January 03, 2016 11:01 AM (39g3+)

198 I was a bit disappointed overall. Although the fx and the acting were great, as usual.

I agree, the Sherlock one-off was very disappointing and does not bode well for the new season. Season 1 started out great, then got meh, and season 2 was just not at all good.

I managed to read 100 books for the Goodreads challenge last year, but dialed it back to 75 this year.

Posted by: Christopher Taylor at January 03, 2016 11:03 AM (39g3+)

199 ...romance novel covers re-imagined - at Longmire Does Romance - http://tinyurl.com/4t7mf
- an oldie in internet time but a goodie.
Posted by: CeliaHayes at January 03, 2016 10:52 AM (95iDF)


Ha! That page is never not funny.

Posted by: OregonMuse at January 03, 2016 11:03 AM (OBp0J)

200 So, what is Marxist occultist anyway-Someone who believes in the economic theories of Marx but does the whole "magick" thing. I am reminded of this exchange between Glendower and Hotspur in Henry IV Ace 3, sc I:

GLENDOWER
I can call spirits from the vasty deep.

HOTSPUR
Why, so can I, or so can any man;
But will they come when you do call for them?

GLENDOWER
Why, I can teach you, cousin, to command
The devil.

HOTSPUR
And I can teach thee, coz, to shame the devil
By telling truth: tell truth and shame the devil.
If thou have power to raise him, bring him hither,
And I'll be sworn I have power to shame him hence.
O, while you live, tell truth and shame the devil!

Posted by: FenelonSpoke at January 03, 2016 11:03 AM (M+RRn)

201

Been waiting on the Kindle Voyage 2 eReader, to replace my existing Kindle. I can't live without the click page function, versus touchscreen. Because... suntan lotion...

Posted by: artisanal 'ette at January 03, 2016 11:04 AM (qCMvj)

202 Shapeshifting? That sounds sick. Yeah, guys may consume porn too, but at least it doesn't involve shapeshifting.That's a horse of a different color.

Posted by: Andrew Mendoza at January 03, 2016 11:04 AM (7EHW6)

203 help needed: There is a recent set of three detective novels set in the near future, as an asteroid is coming towards Earth. He's a cop then former cop in New England somewhere


read the first two a while ago, forgot the name of the author

Posted by: John Stuart Moop at January 03, 2016 11:05 AM (8CdUx)

204

...need to go cut hubby's hair

bbl

Posted by: artisanal 'ette at January 03, 2016 11:05 AM (qCMvj)

205 make that Henry IV, part I Act 3, Sc, 1

Posted by: FenelonSpoke at January 03, 2016 11:06 AM (M+RRn)

206 Polliwog the 'ette!

The book series I was referring to on the Gnaked Gnome Run was Patrick O'Brian's sea novels, starting with Master and Commander. Its 20 books long, sadly he died writing book 21. I recommend these books to everyone for their fun, historical details, adventure, suspense, characterization, dialog, and literary value. Amazing series that everyone ought to read.

Posted by: Christopher Taylor at January 03, 2016 11:06 AM (39g3+)

207 On the topic of otherworldly crime novels, I've been enjoying Heather Graham's "Krewe of Hunters" novels. UNlike X-files, this FBI unit consists of specially gifted agents who see and can speak with the dead. Most of the time, the murder victims don't know who killed them, so they can only help in a limited way.

These always involve a romance. I have to skip over the steamy scenes since I can't bear that stuff since my true love died. Maybe in the future I can enjoy that again, but not right now.

Reminder - this isn't high literature, but it's nice escapist stuff.

Posted by: Miley's Tongue at January 03, 2016 11:07 AM (NTbr4)

208 #179

Check out 'Mogworld' by the Zero Punctuation guy, Ben 'Yahtzee' Croshaw. The knowledge of games and snark are fully utilized in this tale of an MMORPG NPC who finds himself raised from the dead centuries after being one of dozens murdered just to set up a plot line. Having fulfilled his purpose but possessed of free will, he finds at loose ends in the game world, unable to die and unable to have anything resembling a decent life. So he sets out to get the attention of the game developers in hopes of being erased.

Posted by: Epobirs at January 03, 2016 11:07 AM (IdCqF)

209 So, the lesson for all you moron authors is obvious: if you want to make a big pot of money, add a shape-shifting, shirtless bear-man to your novel and watch your sales skyrocket.

I did it all wrong, my werewolf does not have a happily ever after ending nor is he a billionaire. He's buck naked fairly often though; the clothes all tear and burn off when he shifts.

Posted by: Christopher Taylor at January 03, 2016 11:08 AM (39g3+)

210 203 help needed: There is a recent set of three detective novels set in the near future, as an asteroid is coming towards Earth. He's a cop then former cop in New England somewhere

I think the first one in the series is called 'The Last Policeman'. Been discussed on the book thread a lot.

Posted by: OregonMuse at January 03, 2016 11:09 AM (OBp0J)

211 @200 I like that. It weaves together a few parallel truths corresponding to modern leftists: they are delusional, they have no love of truth, they have no shame.

Posted by: Hezekiah at January 03, 2016 11:11 AM (7EHW6)

212 #203

Sounds like the 'Last Policeman' series by Ben Winters.

Posted by: Epobirs at January 03, 2016 11:11 AM (IdCqF)

213 I would like to drop a request here for reviews. My book old Habits has been out for 4 years and sadly its not managed to get much review love. It has just 5 and they are all quite short, and I'm willing to give anyone a copy who wishes to review it and post the reviews around the internet (amazon, goodreads, smashwords, social media, etc).

Old Habits is a fantasy novel featuring a thief that is taken out of his comfortable city street life and plunged into a strange plot to take over a castle, hunted by assassins, and fighting for his life in a way only a thief can.

Please let me know at kestrelarts -at- gmail.com and I can hook you up, or you can pick up a copy:

http://alphawolf10.wix.com/kestrelarts2#!old-habits/cqd1

Posted by: Christopher Taylor at January 03, 2016 11:12 AM (39g3+)

214 help needed: There is a recent set of three detective novels set in the near future, as an asteroid is coming towards Earth. He's a cop then former cop in New England somewhere


read the first two a while ago, forgot the name of the author

-
The Last Policeman trilogy by Ben Winters.

Posted by: The Great White Snark at January 03, 2016 11:13 AM (Nwg0u)

215 I recommend PD James for those who enjoy mysteries.

Mindful, don't slink away. I think I like where you are going with Invulnerable. Your link takes me to a table of contents. Am I missing something?

The Sherlock Special could have been worse. I had a horrible sinking feeling that it was going to be immigrants.

Posted by: AmericanKestrel at January 03, 2016 11:14 AM (hipNa)

216 Is it terrible that I find it amusing that nearly half of the Kindle paid top 20 multicultural and interracial romance books are actually interspecies?

Somebody should tell the SJWs how badly Amazon is demeaning actual interracial relationships.

Posted by: AndyN at January 03, 2016 11:14 AM (rbmSn)

217 Seasonal Romances are a big thing, but I don't want to read any about large woman. bears, or shape shifters. Several years ago I did read some Regency based romances that take place during the Christmas holidays. They contained no lurid sex (No sex at all actually) no men without shirts and no people turning into animals or vice versa.

JTB, my knowledge of romances is about the same. I had a male friend who sneeringly referred to Georgette Heyer as "bodice" rippers. He hadn't actually read any and I called him on it (Hs wife read them) saying "You obviously haven't read them. They're about as far from bodice rippers as you can get" (although there are some cads in some of the books, but they settle down to faithful domesticity) and they're funny. He didn't believe me about the "funny" part

Posted by: FenelonSpoke at January 03, 2016 11:14 AM (M+RRn)

218 I think the first one in the series is called 'The Last Policeman'. Been discussed on the book thread a lot.


Posted by: OregonMuse at January 03, 2016 11:09 AM (OBp0J)


yes, that's it. Thanks

Posted by: John Stuart Moop at January 03, 2016 11:15 AM (8CdUx)

219 Durn it, done it again. I ordered and received a book I've already read.

Posted by: Dave at Buffalo Roam at January 03, 2016 11:16 AM (rOevZ)

220 The Sherlock Special could have been worse. I had a horrible sinking feeling that it was going to be immigrants.

After seeing the blatantly obvious woman working at the morgue I knew Mycroft was talking about women. It was a bit heavy handed and typical of modern leftists writing about the past. Every woman back then secretly rebelled against her place and was actually all modern and stuff, deep down!

Posted by: Christopher Taylor at January 03, 2016 11:19 AM (39g3+)

221 I really enjoy using manual typewriters for many, many reasons.

Posted by: JTB
-----------------
Not the least of which being typos & autocorrect, am I right?

Posted by: Chi at January 03, 2016 11:19 AM (gQfxF)

222 Rudy Rucker wrote some cyberpunk novels. Something I found interesting in (Software? Wetware? can't remember) is the Villains (driving an ice cream truck) seem omnipotent until they capture and convert the protagonist. Then the Villains seem to be over-matched losers who should have aimed lower. I think "the Materialist Magician" works out the same way.

Rudy Rucker isn't for everyone. But he comes up with interesting ideas.

Posted by: it switches at January 03, 2016 11:19 AM (PGh+Q)

223 Life is too lousy to be reading short books.

Posted by: Insomniac - Pale Horse/Death 2016 at January 03, 2016 11:24 AM (kpqmD)

224 Then the Villains seem to be over-matched losers who should have aimed lower.

Its like the comic book effect: every hero that goes bad gains like 150 points in Champions, while any villain who turns good loses half his points.

Posted by: Christopher Taylor at January 03, 2016 11:24 AM (39g3+)

225 Has anyone mentioned yesterday's trash novelist news?

George RRRRRRR Martin essentially came out and said "I ain't even close to finishing my next Game of Thrones book, so quit asking me about it!"

He was supposed to turn it in in October. That didn't happen. Then he had a deadline (self or otherwise imposed) of the first of the year. Obviously that didn't happen either. He said he wrote a little recently, on the Theon Greyjoy part of the story.

NO ONE GIVES A FLYING FIG ABOUT THEON GREYJOY, YOU FAT DOUCHE! Kill Theon! There, you're done with that part of the story... you don't even have to pay me royalties.

I'm sticking with my prediction. There will be NO next novel published. He'll die first, and HBO will have the tv series long finished, and no one will care at all what this pig has to say or write anymore.

Posted by: BurtTC at January 03, 2016 11:25 AM (Dj0WE)

226 I very much enjoyed Patrick O'Brian but I only made it through about the first 10 books; I don't know why i stopped; I just did.

Posted by: FenelonSpoke at January 03, 2016 11:25 AM (M+RRn)

227 144 Laurel k Hamilton is in a group marriage for real votermom? That explains a lot I guess. Wow.
Posted by: Lea at January 03, 2016 10:19 AM (

Yeah, a foursome. You could see the Anita Blake series change as she moved into the alternative lifestyle. I gave up on the series years ago after one of the books was pretty much a non stop orgy interrupted intermittently with a smidge of story. Oh well she can write what she wants, & there are lots of people who still buy them. Just not to my taste anymore. I still wonder what played out with the mother of all darkness though.

Kim Harrison's Hollows series was fun. I just finished James Rollins new one, Bone Labrynth. It was good. Waiting for the last of his Order of the Sanguines to come out in paperback.

Posted by: bebe's boobs destroy at January 03, 2016 11:25 AM (wpHaq)

228 If you like quasi-supernatural mysteries, you might like The Strings of Murder by Oscar de Murial. I have been bingeing on late Victorian murder mysteries lately. This weeks example is Strings of Murder by Oscar de Muriel. This story concerns disgraced young aristocratic investigator Ian Frey who is assigned to semi-barbarian Edinburgh to investigate the politically sensitive murder of a violin virtuoso. Frey is a bit of an asshole of the snob variety given to snide comments. He is assigned to work not only with but under Inspector McGray, also an asshole but of the thug variety given to responding to perceived insults with physical assaults. Worse, McGray is the head of an X Files like department and the clear demonic signs of the instant murder allow him free reign to his superstition, much to the annoyance of Frey. I was a music major as an undergrad and one thing that attracted me to this book is the musical connection. It seems a cursed violin may be responsible for a number of grisly death, the very violin that that Tartini (in real life) used to compose, or more accurately, to transcribe the Devil's Trill Sonata composed by the Devil himself in Tartini's dream and then owned by Paganini who (in real life) was alleged to have sold his soul to the devil in exchange for his virtuosity. Together they work to solve a grisly locked room murder.

Posted by: The Great White Snark at January 03, 2016 11:26 AM (Nwg0u)

229 I'm sticking with my prediction. There will be NO next novel published. He'll die first, and HBO will have the tv series long finished, and no one will care at all what this pig has to say or write anymore.

I agree. I think he's just enjoying fame and sleeping with deluded girls who think he's a genius. Why should he write, he's making money by just being GRRM?

Posted by: Christopher Taylor at January 03, 2016 11:27 AM (39g3+)

230 222
Rudy Rucker isn't for everyone. But he comes up with interesting ideas.

I was doing OK until the end of the series, in which he builds an antenna for picking up personality waves.

Posted by: Anachronda at January 03, 2016 11:29 AM (eejPc)

231 >>can't live without the click page function, versus touchscreen. Because... suntan lotion...

Oh man. I miss the buttons on the side of my kindle keyboard! But I broke and got the paperwhite instead and it's fine...but no buttons. I'm constantly trying to keep the screen clean.

Posted by: Lea at January 03, 2016 11:29 AM (vmMMi)

232 Caitlyn Jenner is a shape shifter.

Posted by: The Great White Snark at January 03, 2016 11:31 AM (Nwg0u)

233 Did so.some say Chandler?

Chique, I would suggest some.of his novels from.the middle.period, I.e. The Little Sister, The High Window, or The Lady in the Lake. They're more polished than the first two; his skill was.pretty much growing until the alcohol became powerful enough to take.it away from him.

Posted by: Thing From Snowy Mountain at January 03, 2016 11:32 AM (Qty+M)

234 For getting those 'other' books to your Kindle, you can install the 'Send to Kindle' app on your windows machine (7,8 and 10). It will convert it for you.

It sends it to Amazon, converts then whispersync's it to your device that you chose.


Posted by: exsanguine at January 03, 2016 11:32 AM (dZhSr)

235 Ann Perry writes pretty good Victorian era mysteries, although I don't quite care for them as much. She's a bit fixated on how rich people are all awful and evil and needs to have a 'strong female character' in every series, but the books are pretty well written.

Odd side note: remember the film Heavenly Creatures about the girls who killed one girl's mom because she was going to separate them?

The girl who Kate Winslet played is Ann Perry.

Posted by: Christopher Taylor at January 03, 2016 11:32 AM (39g3+)

236 >>>I gave up on the series years ago after one of the books was pretty much a non stop orgy interrupted intermittently with a smidge of story

Yeah, that was pretty much the one I read. And since I generally skim through sex scenes to get to story? That's a problem. I like the regenecy stories where there is generally a mystery being solved at the same time. But I haven't read one in a while. Maybe I'll pick up the writer mentioned above at the library..

Btw, the shifter romances I read were not bestiality! Just in case anyone is confused (although I'm sure that exists somewhere out there with the dinosaur porn)

Posted by: Lea at January 03, 2016 11:33 AM (vmMMi)

237 his skill was pretty much growing until the alcohol became powerful enough to take it away from him.

Its true, Chandler kind of crumbled in those last books, but they're all still quite good. His short stories are very satisfying as well. And while you're at it, pick up Hammet's disappointingly small catalog to read as well. Dashiell Hammet invented the hardboiled detective genre, and Chandler perfected it.

Posted by: Christopher Taylor at January 03, 2016 11:34 AM (39g3+)

238 219 Durn it, done it again. I ordered and received a book I've already read.
Posted by: Dave at Buffalo Roam at January 03, 2016 11:16 AM (rOevZ)

--

I've done that with library books - started reading and by page 6 remembered that I've already read it.
Which is why I should really keep track of my books on goodreads.

Posted by: @votermom at January 03, 2016 11:35 AM (cbfNE)

239 You could see the Anita Blake series change as she moved into the alternative lifestyle. I gave up on the series years ago after one of the books was pretty much a non stop orgy interrupted intermittently with a smidge of story.

Sounds like what Robert Heinlein turned into. 'I Will Fear No Evil' is pretty much a continuous boff-a-thon.

Posted by: OregonMuse at January 03, 2016 11:35 AM (OBp0J)

240 I'm sticking with my prediction. There will be NO next novel
published. He'll die first, and HBO will have the tv series long
finished, and no one will care at all what this pig has to say or write
anymore.


Lots of folks are coming to the same conclusion. Frankly he's an ass and I never saw what people liked in his work. He figured out he can live off what he's done and let someone else do the heavy lifting from now on.

Posted by: Brother Cavil, hither and yon at January 03, 2016 11:36 AM (m9V0o)

241 Late to the thread but I have to say heh, I almost passed on trying Sarah Hoyt because Shape Shifter series and then epic space opera description of another series didn't sound appealing to me. But the Hoyt novels are very interesting.

OTOH after 3 of the Cadfael mysteries the subplots of the saccharin sweet innocent romances was annoying me so I decided I won't put money into a publishing house, possibly also the long dead author's estate to buy anymore of those.

Posted by: PaleRider at January 03, 2016 11:39 AM (chkUd)

242 The girl who Kate Winslet played is Ann Perry.

Posted by: Christopher Taylor at January 03, 2016 11:32 AM (39g3+)


I've always wondered how the woman who eventually changed her name to Ann Perry (Juliette Hulme?) deals with the fact of her participation in a deliberately calculated, premeditated murder that she pretty much got away with. Does it ever bother her? At all?

Posted by: OregonMuse at January 03, 2016 11:39 AM (OBp0J)

243 Frankly he's an ass and I never saw what people liked in his work.

Me either, really. He's trying to mix Bernard Cornwell with JRR Tolkien and doing neither. The idea is good, the execution just disappointed me.

Posted by: Christopher Taylor at January 03, 2016 11:39 AM (39g3+)

244 My novel is going to be about a B and D obsessed billionaire who likes fat chicks and shape shifts into a were-camel. I'll call it Humping the Camel.

Posted by: The Great White Snark at January 03, 2016 11:40 AM (Nwg0u)

245 Megan Frampton comes alive.

Posted by: Bertram Cabot Jr. at January 03, 2016 11:41 AM (FkBIv)

246 Ann Perry writes pretty good Victorian era mysteries, although I don't quite care for them as much. She's a bit fixated on how rich people are all awful and evil and needs to have a 'strong female character' in every series, but the books are pretty well written.

Odd side note: remember the film Heavenly Creatures about the girls who killed one girl's mom because she was going to separate them?

The girl who Kate Winslet played is Ann Perry.
Posted by: Christopher Taylor at January 03, 2016 11:32 AM (39g3+)


The story remains a fascination for New Zealand, decades later. I almost tried to get one of her books to read it, but couldn't quite bring myself to do it.


I can't imagine anything she could write would be half as interesting as the story of two teenage girls (proto-lesbians?) killing one of their mums so they can be together.


Oddly, they have both been living in England for years, not terribly far from each other, and have spoken once or twice, but apparently have no interest in each other as human beings.

Posted by: BurtTC at January 03, 2016 11:41 AM (Dj0WE)

247 >>My novel is going to be about a B and D obsessed billionaire who likes fat chicks and shape shifts into a were-camel. I'll call it Humping the Camel.
Posted by: The Great White Snark

Meh. Been done in real life.

Posted by: Saudi Prince at January 03, 2016 11:42 AM (c7vUv)

248 Does it ever bother her? At all?

I don't know but it surely gives her an interesting perspective on murder as an author. I wonder if she ever misses her best friend. Apparently they have never had contact again after being briefly imprisoned.

Posted by: Christopher Taylor at January 03, 2016 11:42 AM (39g3+)

249 *yawn* I think I'm going to watch something on Netflix.

Posted by: Soona at January 03, 2016 11:43 AM (Fmupd)

250 I've started on the Saxon Tales series by Bernard
Cornwell. It's nice to read about a part of history I didn't know about -
the Viking period in England.

Posted by: Citizen Cake at January 03, 2016 10:55 AM



I love those books, along with almost everything else by Cornwell. He's a guy who knows his history and writes the best battles. He's written a history about Waterloo that I haven't read yet, but I plan to do so.

Posted by: huerfano at January 03, 2016 11:43 AM (NSb9d)

251 I have some of Rudy Rucker's -ware novels on my bookshelf but haven't read them yet.

Two of his stand-alone novels I've enjoyed are "The Hollow Earth" and "Frek and the Elixir".

"The Hollow Earth", in which Edgar Allen Poe, A Virginia farmboy, his slave, and an eccentric explorer reach the interior via the Antarctic, is written in florid 19th Century style. "Frek", which could be considered a YA novel, follows a young boy's adventures through a future heavily photoshopped and edited by all-knowing elites. Practically nothing is natural, unscripted, or untouched.

Rucker is that rare bird, a sci-fi satirist.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, Literate Savage at January 03, 2016 11:44 AM (jR7Wy)

252 I don't read romance, but I do remember reading a really good historical mystery/thriller, one I think most guys would like, where the author snuck in not one but two romances. No WTFs or SJWs either.

The Shadow of The Wind by Carlos Ruiz Zafon

Posted by: cool breeze at January 03, 2016 11:44 AM (6Cu7i)

253 I've always wondered how the woman who eventually changed her name to Ann Perry (Juliette Hulme?) deals with the fact of her participation in a deliberately calculated, premeditated murder that she pretty much got away with. Does it ever bother her? At all?
Posted by: OregonMuse at January 03, 2016 11:39 AM (OBp0J)


There appears to have been some repentance on the part of both girls. The other one, Pauline, has a horse farm, was a special ed teacher/administrator for years, and has lived a life of solitude, with little contact with the outside world.


As I said above, I considered trying to read one of Ann's books, because it is said redemption is a big part of her stories. She's talked about it some, but not enough for those who think they didn't quite get punished enough.


Remember, these girls were 15 and 16 when it happened. In 1954. I don't know what good society would have in keeping them behind bars longer than they were. Which was about 5 years.

Posted by: BurtTC at January 03, 2016 11:45 AM (Dj0WE)

254 >>The Shadow of The Wind by Carlos Ruiz Zafon
Posted by: cool breeze at January 03, 2016 11:44 AM (6Cu7i)

I saw that book on my shelf the other day and was trying to remember why I bought it, I don't think I ever read it. Maybe I will give it a shot

Posted by: Lea at January 03, 2016 11:46 AM (vmMMi)

255 Given that neither woman has to anyone's knowledge killed or even threatened or harmed anyone since, its a pretty fair guess that they aren't a danger to society. Teenage girls can get pretty insane, and they can get into a feedback loop of crazy together.

Posted by: Christopher Taylor at January 03, 2016 11:47 AM (39g3+)

256 Given that neither woman has to anyone's knowledge killed or even threatened or harmed anyone since, its a pretty fair guess that they aren't a danger to society. Teenage girls can get pretty insane, and they can get into a feedback loop of crazy together.
Posted by: Christopher Taylor at January 03, 2016 11:47 AM (39g3+)


Yeah, I think it's not unreasonable to call it some sort of "shared psychosis," during which they whipped themselves into a belief that killing Pauline's mother was a good idea, and that they could be together forever if they did.


It's crazy. Not "legal" crazy, perhaps, but crazy nonetheless.

Posted by: BurtTC at January 03, 2016 11:48 AM (Dj0WE)

257 Oh, and much of what we know about what was going on with the two at the time is based on Pauline's diary. Even the "implied" lesbianism comes only from that diary.

Juliette (aka Ann Perry) had her diary destroyed before this thing ever went to trial. Who knows was interesting information was lost.

Both women deny any lesbian activity at all, to this day, I believe.

Posted by: BurtTC at January 03, 2016 11:51 AM (Dj0WE)

258 Oops, did I accidentally kill the book thread? With a brick in a sock?

Posted by: BurtTC at January 03, 2016 11:51 AM (Dj0WE)

259 221 ... Chi, The joke is my typing is never good but I do better on a typewriter than a computer keyboard. Since I don't have to use one for a finished product (thank God), except for personal letters, I can pound away without spending half my time on the backspace key. Also, I like using a steel and cast iron machine that will stop incoming artillery. The sense of permanence is reassuring.

Posted by: JTB at January 03, 2016 11:52 AM (FvdPb)

260 The men's "Abs" trend is hilarious, but surely nice to look at. Why not show men finally getting in shape and showing off for us?

*jumps up. tightens abs. bounces pecs*

OK, Moar coffee......

*yawns. scratches ass. burps*

Posted by: 98ZJUSMC Staring at the Lake in the rain at January 03, 2016 11:52 AM (WWdgA)

261 re 213. I enjoyed Old Habits and have to get the Amazon review written for it (I did leave reviews for your other 2 novels that I read first Christopher) I don't do a huge amount of reading anymore, not on goodreads or those others; but for anyone who reads a lot and is on a tight budget I would say you should go for this offer.

Posted by: PaleRider at January 03, 2016 11:55 AM (chkUd)

262 Not dead, it's pining for the fjords.

Posted by: BurtTC at January 03, 2016 11:57 AM (Dj0WE)

263 244 My novel is going to be about a B and D obsessed billionaire who likes fat chicks and shape shifts into a were-camel. I'll call it Humping the Camel.
Posted by: The Great White Snark at January 03, 2016 11:40 AM (Nwg0u)

50 Shades of Camel Humps

Posted by: Insomniac - Pale Horse/Death 2016 at January 03, 2016 11:57 AM (kpqmD)

264 I'm sticking with my prediction. There will be NO next novel published. He'll die first, and HBO will have the tv series long finished, and no one will care at all what this pig has to say or write anymore.

I agree. I think he's just enjoying fame and sleeping with deluded girls who think he's a genius. Why should he write, he's making money by just being GRRM?

Posted by: Christopher Taylor at January 03, 2016 11:27 AM (39g3+)


I'm noticing a depressing lack of rape scenes in these comments.

Posted by: GRRM at January 03, 2016 11:58 AM (gn6ig)

265 I just finished "Life Unworthy" last Thursday. Gotta read my kindle books on my phone, which is kind of a pain but makes it much easier to hide in my toolbox drawer. I LOVED THAT BOOK.
Now, I've bought "11/22/63" by Stephen King. Yeah, it's probably mass-market pap, but I read what I like so I'll like what I read. I really, really must get something bigger to read on, though.
Also reading "Only Yesterday: An Informal History of the 1920's" by Frederick Lewis Allen. Since this book was written in 1931, it has a little different perspective on that decade than more recent stuff I've read. It seems pretty good so far, but I'm withholding judgement until I get past the chapter about Wilson and the end of WWI.

Posted by: antisocialist at January 03, 2016 11:58 AM (cDs+4)

266 Bear-catcher, bear-catcher,
Make me a bear's snatch,
Find me some ursine,
Catch me some bear!

Posted by: bear fantasist at January 03, 2016 12:00 PM (DLIIY)

267 I'm noticing a depressing lack of rape scenes in these comments.
Leonard DiCaprio is still too sore to sit down at a p.c. to type.

Posted by: andycanuck at January 03, 2016 12:01 PM (DLIIY)

268 Posted by: bear fantasist at January 03, 2016 12:00 PM (DLIIY)
--
I would have ended with "Catch me some Squatch".

Posted by: All Hail Eris, Literate Savage at January 03, 2016 12:02 PM (jR7Wy)

269 I have some of Ann Perry's books on my wish list for Audible, mostly because they sound OK, they're fairly long and I won't spend my monthly credit on a short lil' brochure. I haven't bought any yet - I must say I'm curious, having seen her story on "Deadly Women" and then Googled her, but something better always seems to come along.

Posted by: antisocialist at January 03, 2016 12:03 PM (cDs+4)

270 Is the DiCaprio flick out yet? Anybody seen it? I would love to know if the bear-on-man scene lived up to your fevered expectations.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, Literate Savage at January 03, 2016 12:04 PM (jR7Wy)

271 Squatch ain't bears! You might as well let an Ewok hump you!

Posted by: bear fantasist at January 03, 2016 12:05 PM (DLIIY)

272 Another great book thread! Sadly, no time for the comments right nos. I'll have to come back and read them later this evening.

Over the break I read "The Boys in the Boat" by Somebody Something Brown, about the 1936 US Olympic rowing team. Very good - the author has an amazing ability to keep you on the edge of your seat as he describes a boat race even though you already know the winners. Highly recommended.

Posted by: biancaneve at January 03, 2016 12:05 PM (e98eb)

273 My novel is going to be about a B and D obsessed billionaire who likes fat chicks and shape shifts into a were-camel. I'll call it Humping the Camel.
Posted by: The Great White Snark at January 03, 2016 11:40 AM (Nwg0u)

Dromedarynatrix?

Bactrian & Discipline?

Posted by: Secundus at January 03, 2016 12:05 PM (gn6ig)

274 I have some of Ann Perry's books on my wish list for Audible, mostly because they sound OK, they're fairly long and I won't spend my monthly credit on a short lil' brochure. I haven't bought any yet - I must say I'm curious, having seen her story on "Deadly Women" and then Googled her, but something better always seems to come along.
Posted by: antisocialist at January 03, 2016 12:03 PM (cDs+4)


There's a show called Deadly Women? Why is this the first I am hearing of it?


I should be an executive producer. Or at least a consultant.

Posted by: BurtTC at January 03, 2016 12:06 PM (Dj0WE)

275 I very much enjoyed Patrick O'Brian but I only made it through about the first 10 books; I don't know why i stopped; I just did.
osted by: FenelonSpoke at January 03, 2016 11:25 AM (M+RRn)


They are hard to read back-to-back-to-back. At some point you have to take a break.
The tone is surprisingly even for all the books, probably tracking Aubrey, even though Maturin is all over the map, and I would catch myself either looking for inconsistencies, or getting pissed that something that was resolved several books before came unstuck.

Try going back but don't go all-in

Posted by: Kindltot at January 03, 2016 12:07 PM (q2o38)

276 How about "Bare me some bear" instead then, smartypants?

Posted by: bear fantasist at January 03, 2016 12:07 PM (DLIIY)

277 I agree with Burt, Ann Perry's body of writings show a woman who got religion.

Posted by: @votermom at January 03, 2016 12:09 PM (cbfNE)

278 Both women deny any lesbian activity at all, to this day, I believe.
Posted by: BurtTC at January 03, 2016 11:51 AM (Dj0WE)


I first read about this NZ murder in a 'true crime' book I got from the library when I was in 7th or 8th grade, and the way it was described, there was lesbian activity but it was quite brief, didn't occur until almost the very end, and really wasn't what defined the relationship. Kind of how Peter Jackson depicted it in 'Heavenly Creatures.'

The "feedback loop of crazy", to use CT's apt turn of phrase, was what defined the relationship, not lesbianism.


Posted by: OregonMuse at January 03, 2016 12:09 PM (OBp0J)

279 There's a show called Deadly Women? Why is this the first I am hearing of it?


I should be an executive producer. Or at least a consultant.
Posted by: BurtTC at January 03, 2016 12:06 PM (Dj0WE)

It's on Investigation Discovery channel. Totally cool show, each one has a theme and they go back to some really old, really interesting stories.

Posted by: antisocialist at January 03, 2016 12:09 PM (cDs+4)

280 There's a show called Deadly Women? Why is this the first I am hearing of it?

Posted by: BurtTC at January 03, 2016 12:06 PM (Dj0WE)

Investigation Discovery, I believe (they should really just change their name to the Murder Reenactment Channel and stop kidding themselves). Saw a couple of episodes offshore... Gulf of Mexico offshore cooks love ID for some reason.

The whole show has this "Ooh... Edgy!" attitude toward chicks offing people that skeeves me out a bit, but Your Mileage May Vary, so whatever.

Posted by: Secundus at January 03, 2016 12:12 PM (gn6ig)

281 Uh oh. Looks as if lady Agatha Heterodyne has a really nasty opponent on her hands now! If that isn't Cheyenne Wright who is king of the silver lands, I'm a monkey's uncle.

What is Hoffman's role in all of this? Or is that another tale?

Posted by: Frumious Bandersnatch at January 03, 2016 12:13 PM (hHQIG)

282 What is Hoffman's role in all of this? Or is that another tale?
Posted by: Frumious Bandersnatch at January 03, 2016 12:13 PM (hHQIG)


He's telling the dentist it is safe.

Posted by: Kindltot at January 03, 2016 12:14 PM (q2o38)

283 Hi

Posted by: Timo at January 03, 2016 12:15 PM (hy43O)

284 Pro forma "bye for now" to change socks. See you later, bearinators.

Posted by: andycanuck at January 03, 2016 12:16 PM (DLIIY)

285 I had read a wholeot of AnnPerr's books before I found out that she was Juliette Hume.
She writes historical murder mysteries, where the protagonists are a bit crusader-y.
She also has a novel set in ancient Byzantium.
I had a month or so of self-questioning after I found out that she was a convicted murderer, but I eventually decided that it appears she did spend her time, she seems to have changed her life and so I continue to read her books.

Posted by: @votermom at January 03, 2016 12:18 PM (cbfNE)

286 How? The Master of Paris pretty much disarmed him (though he is pretty good in unarmed combat) when he took Hoffman's hammers away.

And he, along with the Lady Heterodyne and her companions are at a diplomatic reception surrounded by revenants.

Posted by: Frumious Bandersnatch at January 03, 2016 12:19 PM (hHQIG)

287 Uh oh. Looks as if lady Agatha Heterodyne has a really nasty opponent on her hands now! If that isn't Cheyenne Wright who is king of the silver lands, I'm a monkey's uncle.

For those of you wondering what this is about, check out the delightful and weird webcomic Girl Genius! Its been going for years so you have a huge story to read and its all fun stuff from Phil Foglio.

http://www.girlgeniusonline.com/comic.php?date=20021104

I read a Tom Clancy book I didn't even know existed this last week: Red Rabbit. It was set early in Ryan's life, before Red October, and the book is pretty good but... Clancy died in deep need of an editor. Its way wayyyy too long and spends almost all of that time in extraneous conversations, descriptions and minute, arcane details, and excessive plot padding. The book could have been half as long and twice as good.

Posted by: Christopher Taylor at January 03, 2016 12:20 PM (39g3+)

288 I had a much bigger squick moment when I found out about Marion Zimmer Bradley

Posted by: @votermom at January 03, 2016 12:23 PM (cbfNE)

289 Both women deny any lesbian activity at all, to this day, I believe.
Posted by: BurtTC at January 03, 2016 11:51 AM (Dj0WE)

I first read about this NZ murder in a 'true crime' book I got from the library when I was in 7th or 8th grade, and the way it was described, there was lesbian activity but it was quite brief, didn't occur until almost the very end, and really wasn't what defined the relationship. Kind of how Peter Jackson depicted it in 'Heavenly Creatures.'

The "feedback loop of crazy", to use CT's apt turn of phrase, was what defined the relationship, not lesbianism.


Posted by: OregonMuse at January 03, 2016 12:09 PM (OBp0J)


Pauline's diary contains some passages that suggest the possibility of physical manifestations, and it is reasonable to assume it got sexual. I guess I'm agnostic on the point, and as you say, it's not really the driving force here.


Needless to say, for some who maintain an interest in the case years later, with their axes to grind, they can and sometimes do make it more central than it likely was.

Posted by: BurtTC at January 03, 2016 12:23 PM (Dj0WE)

290 Life Unworthy review going up at Amazon. Entertains and informs - I liked it! Thanks CT

The Cantor wore Crinolines had me shaking with silent laughter as I didn't want to disturb others on the flight home. The series might get too predictable, but this is the first one I read and it did make me laugh.

Posted by: AmericanKestrel at January 03, 2016 12:24 PM (hipNa)

291 Is this the thread where we discuss the militia takeover of that General building in Oregon, and how Obama will deal with that?

I predict bloodshed by the bucket, and a very negative outcome for conservatives in 2016 elections as a result. Lives lost being most important. But the implications are dire if this thing goes out of control. MSM will hang any violence around the mecj of all conservatives.

Posted by: Sharkman at January 03, 2016 12:24 PM (QWtgr)

292 >>Is the DiCaprio flick out yet? Anybody seen it? I would love to know if the bear-on-man scene lived up to your fevered expectations.


Pretty much lived up to mine.

Posted by: Leo at January 03, 2016 12:25 PM (c7vUv)

293 Posted by: Frumious Bandersnatch at January 03, 2016 12:13 PM (hHQIG)
---
Bander, I already thought you were subzero cool, but to find out you're a Girl genius fan?

Don't put your tongue on Bander, it'll stick!

Posted by: All Hail Eris, Literate Savage at January 03, 2016 12:25 PM (jR7Wy)

294 There's a show called Deadly Women? Why is this the first I am hearing of it?


I should be an executive producer. Or at least a consultant.
Posted by: BurtTC at January 03, 2016 12:06 PM (Dj0WE)

It's on Investigation Discovery channel. Totally cool show, each one has a theme and they go back to some really old, really interesting stories.

Posted by: antisocialist at January 03, 2016 12:09 PM (cDs+4)

280 There's a show called Deadly Women? Why is this the first I am hearing of it?

Posted by: BurtTC at January 03, 2016 12:06 PM (Dj0WE)

Investigation Discovery, I believe (they should really just change their name to the Murder Reenactment Channel and stop kidding themselves). Saw a couple of episodes offshore... Gulf of Mexico offshore cooks love ID for some reason.

The whole show has this "Ooh... Edgy!" attitude toward chicks offing people that skeeves me out a bit, but Your Mileage May Vary, so whatever.
Posted by: Secundus at January 03, 2016 12:12 PM (gn6ig)


Thanks, I just ordered the dvd of the first two "seasons." The consensus appear to be that it's very well done. Apparently there are 9 freakin' seasons altogether? I'm gonna assume by the time it petered out they were running out of good stories.


Or maybe not. We'll see.

Posted by: BurtTC at January 03, 2016 12:25 PM (Dj0WE)

295 The Oregon takeover is kind of a watershed moment. You know where you see which side of a divide the water pours down?

Some people who hated occupy are cheering this. Some people who looovved occupy are calling this terrorism. As if each situation is defined by whose team people are on, rather than objective standards.

Me, I sympathize with their frustration and complaints - as I did with many people involved in occupy - but think this a stupid, futile gesture akin to destroying a homecoming parade with a car you modified overnight.

Posted by: Christopher Taylor at January 03, 2016 12:27 PM (39g3+)

296 >>Is the DiCaprio flick out yet? Anybody seen it? I would love to know if the bear-on-man scene lived up to your fevered expectations.

------
Two thumbs up!!!
No, wait...I don't have thumbs...

Posted by: The Bear at January 03, 2016 12:27 PM (cDs+4)

297 I predict I'll be reading more this year because TV is becoming less of a temptation or distraction. The disappointing "Sherlock" the other night (the series went bad after the first season) reminded me how shows I've watched for years have grown tired or gone to crap story lines: Castle, Bones, even NCIS. I can live happily without another gritty, urban cop show or medical drama or anything that involves zombies. (Are you listening AMC?) That leaves "The Librarians", the "Signed, Sealed, Delivered" movies on Hallmark and Nationals baseball. And baseball is great on radio.

Rant off. For now.

Posted by: JTB at January 03, 2016 12:28 PM (FvdPb)

298 Is this the thread where we discuss the militia takeover of that General building in Oregon, and how Obama will deal with that?

I predict bloodshed by the bucket, and a very negative outcome for conservatives in 2016 elections as a result. Lives lost being most important. But the implications are dire if this thing goes out of control. MSM will hang any violence around the mecj of all conservatives.
Posted by: Sharkman at January 03, 2016 12:24 PM (QWtgr)


Yeah, I'm picturing Waco. Who knows, I realize there is a great deal of injustice being perpetrated by the feds in many areas, I'm wondering if this is the right way to fight against it.


We'll see.

Posted by: BurtTC at January 03, 2016 12:28 PM (Dj0WE)

299 I read a Tom Clancy book I didn't even know existed this last week: Red Rabbit. It was set early in Ryan's life, before Red October, and the book is pretty good but... Clancy died in deep need of an editor. Its way wayyyy too long and spends almost all of that time in extraneous conversations, descriptions and minute, arcane details, and excessive plot padding. The book could have been half as long and twice as good.

Isn't that the truth. The creator of the Doc Savage series had a formula which worked out very well. His novels were aroun 200 pages each and never lagged. I have met few authors who could paint as vivid a word picture in as few words as he could.

Posted by: Frumious Bandersnatch at January 03, 2016 12:28 PM (hHQIG)

300 Me, I sympathize with their frustration and complaints - as I did with many people involved in occupy - but think this a stupid, futile gesture akin to destroying a homecoming parade with a car you modified overnight.
Posted by: Christopher Taylor at January 03, 2016 12:27 PM (39g3+)


So you're saying this might result in someone being elected to the Senate?

Posted by: BurtTC at January 03, 2016 12:30 PM (Dj0WE)

301 Found the funny author who does shapeshifter romance. Shelley Laurentson/G.A. Aikin.

Very funny and well done. Acknowledges the absurdity and charges ahead with good humor.


Regarding the Occupy BLM going on now, does anyone have a recommendation of history of the Grange movement? For some reason, I have it in my head that farmers/ranchers banded together to protect land from the Feds -- turn of the century, maybe? Of course, I could be conflating something else, but if someone has some historical knowledge, I would appreciate it.

Posted by: mustbequantum at January 03, 2016 12:30 PM (MIKMs)

302 "Neck" not mecj.

Posted by: Sharkman at January 03, 2016 12:33 PM (QWtgr)

303 So you're saying this might result in someone being elected to the Senate?
Posted by: BurtTC at January 03, 2016 12:30 PM (Dj0WE)

Or at least killed by his own troops.

Posted by: The Bear at January 03, 2016 12:34 PM (cDs+4)

304 http://tinyurl.com/zpcpbfr

This guide goes step by step in installing (sideloading) Nook apps on the Fire. It's how I got mine working.

Posted by: Inspector Cussword at January 03, 2016 12:36 PM (Vyvnw)

305 can't live without the click page function, versus touchscreen. Because... suntan lotion...

Oh man. I miss the buttons on the side of my kindle keyboard! But I broke and got the paperwhite instead and it's fine...but no buttons. I'm constantly trying to keep the screen clean.
Posted by: Lea at January 03, 2016 11:29 AM (vmMMi)


yep
my husband's gone through 2 touchscreen kindles, and meh, and two versions of iPad and meh...

he's always losing his stylus, too

in the couch
on the plane
under the bed
....

Posted by: artisanal 'ette at January 03, 2016 12:38 PM (qCMvj)

306 I'm staying out of that Oregon situation. Plus I have a she-bear shape shifting orgy this afternoon.

Posted by: Janet Reno at January 03, 2016 12:38 PM (QWiro)

307 Morning all
I am currently reading "Disappearing Spoon" by Sam Kean
it is a chemistry book but it is for a nontechnical audience
I haven't gotten very far but so far it's a bunch of stories about different elements on the periodic table

Posted by: chemjeff at January 03, 2016 12:38 PM (uZNvH)

308 I've read Atlas Shrugged several times. The first time I read it in the 80's, the villains seemed like grotesque parodies or caricatures, yet based on true characteristics.

Read Dinesh D'Souza's new book, Stealing America, and I can promise you that the Atlas Shrugged villains will seem almost "ripped from the pages" of today's news.

Stealing America is a frightening look at the type of thing that could happen to many of us if we somehow entered the crosshairs of our betters in the Obama, or the up and coming Hilary!, administration.

It is also a great, down to earth, logical, point by point defense of capitalism and deconstruction of liberal wisdom (like "You didn't build that").

Highly recommended. Should be required of all high school students (Yeah, dream on.)

Posted by: RM at January 03, 2016 12:39 PM (U3LtS)

309 * sneaks back in by the side door *

Wow, my toenails were starting to look like some swami's - the kind that never clip them. All trimmed up now. Ready for 2016.

Somebody mentioned Hillerman's daughter is continuing his stories? I sure miss him. I'll try to check out the daughter's work and tell you what I think.

AmericanKestrel: Mindful, don't slink away. I think I like where you are going with Invulnerable. Your link takes me to a table of contents. Am I missing something?

Wow, someone read my comment!?!

If you're missing something, it's just that the ToC headings are (not obviously, apparently) links to the chapters. Click on "Part I" to start reading.

Posted by: mindful webworker - feeling vulnerable at January 03, 2016 12:40 PM (GHHRC)

310 Okay, I need to choose my words carefully here, because I do not wish to be seen defending the kids of books OM is rightfully poking fun at here, although I do love Ilona Andrews( discovered onthis pestigous thread,no less!), authors of urban fantasy replete with various were-characters and vampires ( their vampires are very interesting; grotesque, barely self aware and controlled by higher mages).

However, the same level pulp-fiction type stuff can be found on the male spectrum of terribly written books, too. Or even not so terribly written books.

I mean, are James Bond's exploits and endless supply of gorgeous women who never seem to want any kind of commitment really any less ridiculous than bear-shifters?

I'm not talking about the quality of writing, I just mean that women and men have different fantasies.

And not all women like that crap. I honestly don't get the whole were thing as far as the romance element goes, but I suppose it's all just an offshoot of how strength and protectiveness is incredibly sexy to most of us.

Seriously, Thor and I have been together for 30 years and I still get weak in the knees, literally, when I see him lift something really heavy.

And usually in the books I have read, the heroes turn in to their were state to fight, and they are absolutely out of control, kicking ass and taking names, destroying all the bad guys, often defense of their women.

So while I don't get why they have to be animals, a part of me does see why women would find it sexy, and I don't see where it's any more foolish than things like Batman and Wolverine and Green Lantern, etc.

Posted by: Tammy al-Thor at January 03, 2016 12:40 PM (ZAhzb)

311 290 ... The Cantor Wore Crinolines is the second to the last in the series so far. I've read all of them in order and they don't get tired. Every one will give you belly laughs. I won't read them in public because of the risk of VERY LOUD laughing.

Posted by: JTB at January 03, 2016 12:40 PM (FvdPb)

312 Disappearing Spoon sounds interesting, ChemJeff. Perhaps a good intro elements for students?

Posted by: AmericanKestrel at January 03, 2016 12:42 PM (hipNa)

313 mindful webworker, I've read up to chapter 4 so far

Posted by: @votermom at January 03, 2016 12:43 PM (cbfNE)

314 Thanks to everyone who has read my books, I'm glad you have enjoyed them It turns out we have quite a few quite talented authors here in the horde.

Remember: for authors, reviews are like candy Christmas orgasms. You can do nothing better for an author you like than to review their books and tell others about them.

Advertising doesn't work. Publicity doesn't work. The only things that sell books in the modern market are reviews, covers, and word of mouth. Plus, if a book gets 50+ reviews of high quality on Amazon, they start to plug your book and offer it as a suggestion to buyers.

Its really helpful. So for those of you who have written reviews, thank you from the bottom of my heart, that is so welcome and helpful.

Posted by: Christopher Taylor at January 03, 2016 12:43 PM (39g3+)

315 "Over the break I read "The Boys in the Boat" by Somebody Something Brown, about the 1936 US Olympic rowing team. Very good - the author has an amazing ability to keep you on the edge of your seat as he describes a boat race even though you already know the winners. Highly recommended."

I read it this time last year. Ditto.

Posted by: RM at January 03, 2016 12:44 PM (U3LtS)

316 In truth, sometimes a situation devolves to the point where the only thing that on can do is what is objectively a stupid, futile gesture.

I think about our founding fathers. I imagine their mind set at the beginning was more in line with that of Eric Stratton (Rush Chairman), than that of a typical politico deciding to go to bat for a favorite proposal.

Posted by: Sharkman at January 03, 2016 12:47 PM (QWtgr)

317 I've had a heck of a time concentrating on reading since having surgery in November. This is puzzling since I have so much spare time on my hands. Here's what I've started but haven't finished :

"Relic Master" by Christopher Buckley
"1599, A Year in the Life of William Shakespeare" by James Shapiro
"Long Time Until Now" by Michael Z. Williamson
"Come the Revolution"by Frank Chadwick
"Eifelheim" by Michael Flynn
"The Dungeoneers" by Jeffery Russell
Currently reading the final book in Kat Richardson's urban paranormal Greywalker series, "Revenant". My Kindle app says I'm 76% done. I'm not giving up until 100% is reached.
Then, back to all the unread volumes and finish those.


Posted by: Tuna at January 03, 2016 12:49 PM (JSovD)

318 >>I suppose it's all just an offshoot of how strength and protectiveness is incredibly sexy to most of us.

Yes, Tammy that's how I see it too. That's how they all are in the books, shifter or no, really.

And I have to say at least it's better than vampires, because I cannot tell you how creepy it was to read about sookie stackhouse having sex with Cold Dead Men. Yuck. I mean, team Eric (until Charlene decided to mess him up) but yuck.

Posted by: Lea at January 03, 2016 12:51 PM (vmMMi)

319 Tuna so sorry
Hope you are doing better

Posted by: chemjeff at January 03, 2016 12:52 PM (uZNvH)

320 Better than 2/3 of the way through a novel I've been writing.

A strange sort of book, but I'm a strange sort of guy, what can I say?

One who's read part of it said, "It makes me want to sob and f*ck. Then shower, have a drink, and tell my parents I love and forgive them."

Posted by: Your Decidedly Devious Uncle Palpatine, Still Accepting Harem Applicants at January 03, 2016 12:52 PM (lutOX)

321 Oh, I wanted to put in a recommendation for James Patterson. Try every couple months to clear out bookshelves, but youngest won't let me get rid of Patterson/Whoever and the Maximum Ride series for middleschoolers.

I had no respect for Patterson as a novelist, but he sold well. The way he has used his 'name' to partner with more obscure authors is, I think, admirable.

Christopher T -- hope you can find more publicity.

Posted by: mustbequantum at January 03, 2016 12:54 PM (MIKMs)

322 316 In truth, sometimes a situation devolves to the point where the only thing that on can do is what is objectively a stupid, futile gesture.

I think about our founding fathers. I imagine their mind set at the beginning was more in line with that of Eric Stratton (Rush Chairman), than that of a typical politico deciding to go to bat for a favorite proposal.
Posted by: Sharkman at January 03, 2016 12:47 PM (QWtgr)
***
Yes. See "Boston Tea Party."

Group of drunk freemasons in Indian mufti throw some tea in the harbor.

Hilarity ensues.

Posted by: Your Decidedly Devious Uncle Palpatine, Still Accepting Harem Applicants at January 03, 2016 12:54 PM (lutOX)

323 Posted by: Annalucia at January 03, 2016 10:28 AM (a5bF3)

That perspective was something I gained from Grant's biography. It's hard enough to remember they didn't know they would win, so often they were truly, deeply afraid they would lose (with good reason). It was very helpful to be reminded that there were battles that *had* to be fought before they saw the victory and to know that my personal hard times aren't a guarantee of defeat.

Posted by: Polliwog the 'Ette at January 03, 2016 12:56 PM (GDulk)

324 Christopher T -- hope you can find more publicity.

There's a reason Muldoon, Anna, Webworker and I plug our books so often here. I'm sure we're wearing out our welcome but its hard to know what to do and how to get word out. And as much as it goes against the grain to self publicize (almost all authors are very introverted), its part of the job of writing.

The way he has used his 'name' to partner with more obscure authors is, I think, admirable.

Apparently Tom Clancy was fond of that as well.

Posted by: Christopher Taylor at January 03, 2016 12:57 PM (39g3+)

325 The description of the beginning of most revolutions should probably include a footnote. Either:

*"Hold my beer and watch this . . ." or,

*Rumor has it that alcohol may have been involved.

Posted by: Sharkman at January 03, 2016 01:00 PM (QWtgr)

326 325 The description of the beginning of most revolutions should probably include a footnote. Either:

*"Hold my beer and watch this . . ." or,

*Rumor has it that alcohol may have been involved.
Posted by: Sharkman at January 03, 2016 01:00 PM (QWtgr)
***
Drunks and drinkers - we make history.

Posted by: Your Decidedly Devious Uncle Palpatine, Still Accepting Harem Applicants at January 03, 2016 01:02 PM (lutOX)

327 *"Hold my beer and watch this . . ." or,

*Rumor has it that alcohol may have been involved.
Posted by: Sharkman at January 03, 2016 01:00 PM (QWtgr)

Hey ya'll, watch this.

Posted by: weirdflunky at January 03, 2016 01:04 PM (xyXuS)

328 Posted by: Lea at January 03, 2016 12:51 PM (vmMMi)

Exactly! Although, Team Bill here. (Book wise, anyway; I have not seen the TV series, so I'm not sure how he was in that)

Have you read any Ilona Andrews?

Posted by: Tammy al-Thor at January 03, 2016 01:05 PM (ZAhzb)

329 326 325 The description of the beginning of most revolutions should probably include a footnote. Either:

*"Hold my beer and watch this . . ." or,

*Rumor has it that alcohol may have been involved.
Posted by: Sharkman at January 03, 2016 01:00 PM (QWtgr)
***
Drunks and drinkers - we make history.
Posted by: Your Decidedly Devious Uncle Palpatine, Still Accepting Harem Applicants at January 03, 2016 01:02 PM (lutOX)
***
Which explains what VDH or whoever it was meant by saying "Russia produces too much history for local consumption."

I can see the rebellion - may it never get so bad as to come to shooting - and its leaders. In encampments in the wilds of East Texas, in the mountains out west, hunkered down around economical campfires, waiting for the airdrop from Russian Federation forces.

Posted by: Your Decidedly Devious Uncle Palpatine, Still Accepting Harem Applicants at January 03, 2016 01:05 PM (lutOX)

330 319
Thanks, but no problems thus far. Just a hip replacement.

Posted by: Tuna at January 03, 2016 01:06 PM (JSovD)

331 Have you read any Ilona Andrews?
Posted by: Tammy al-Thor at January 03, 2016 01:05 PM (ZAhzb)

I like their books.
I also like Patrcia Briggs.

Posted by: @votermom at January 03, 2016 01:09 PM (cbfNE)

332 Posted by: Christopher Taylor at January 03, 2016 11:06 AM (39g3+)

Thanks Christopher Taylor, I'll look in to those.

Posted by: Polliwog the 'Ette at January 03, 2016 01:09 PM (GDulk)

333 You might want to do some more research on that Grossman book. A lot of military and LEO experts have some serious reservations about him and his book. I thought it was pretty flaky myself (among other things, he basically accuses SOF personnel of being psychopaths because they aren't wracked with guilt for killing militant Islamic scumbags wherever they find them).

He also came up with one of the stupidest names for an academic area that I've run across - "Killology". Which I think is complete "Crapology".

Check it out for yourself, but I'd never recommend it for a military reading list, lots of better works out there.

Posted by: Pave Low John at January 03, 2016 01:10 PM (b5yHT)

334 Tuna, my goodness, I hope you're doing better. I didn't realize you'd had surgery!

I think you need something much lighter to read, like the books you loved as a child. Or something like Handling Sin.

Posted by: Tammy al-Thor at January 03, 2016 01:11 PM (ZAhzb)

335 333 You might want to do some more research on that Grossman book. A lot of military and LEO experts have some serious reservations about him and his book. I thought it was pretty flaky myself (among other things, he basically accuses SOF personnel of being psychopaths because they aren't wracked with guilt for killing militant Islamic scumbags wherever they find them).

He also came up with one of the stupidest names for an academic area that I've run across - "Killology". Which I think is complete "Crapology".

Check it out for yourself, but I'd never recommend it for a military reading list, lots of better works out there.
Posted by: Pave Low John at January 03, 2016 01:10 PM (b5yHT)
***
I dunno.... Pa was a Marine and served in both theatres.....

He was so torn with guilt he sent back a skull he kept and a sword his martyred kid brother took, and I know, when he was deep in his cups, he'd weep for the Germans and Japanese he'd killed.

Especially the Japanese. "Why didn't they just give up?" he'd say. "I killed them because I hated them, and I hated them because they made me kill them. But why didn't they just give up? The Germans did; they were good men, most of them, and just wanted to go home when it was over."

Posted by: Your Decidedly Devious Uncle Palpatine, Still Accepting Harem Applicants at January 03, 2016 01:17 PM (lutOX)

336 Hi! I applied to be a part of the book group last night; I am mostly a lurker here on the book thread, due to the fact that most of the time it is later in the day on Sunday when I read it. Anyway, thanks to all for the great book recommendations.

Posted by: DaveKinNC at January 03, 2016 01:17 PM (/NgNT)

337 334
Doing splendidly. Thank you. Hip replacement surgery is pretty easy as surgeries go. Bad hip out, new hip in. No more pain. Can walk again. Healing time is a little longer than expected though. Physical therapy helps a great deal.

Posted by: Tuna at January 03, 2016 01:18 PM (JSovD)

338 You would not believe what the Nazis did to Africa.

Only 30 percent into it, I cannot imagine where it is going, but it is quite good.

Posted by: the littl shyning man at January 03, 2016 10:26 AM (U6f54)


I seem to remember reading a magazine article which stated that there was a Nazi geo-engineering plan to re-flood the Sahara (it was seabed, once), which would change the entire climate of Africa, for the better, one hopes. Anything like that?

Posted by: Alberta Oil Peon at January 03, 2016 01:19 PM (cKwwS)

339 For those who were on the gardening thread yesterday. Another advantage of typewriters is I am more likely to include the letter 'p' when typing the word maple.

Posted by: JTB at January 03, 2016 01:20 PM (FvdPb)

340 Patterson, Clancy, Thor (I'm sure there are others) are big names, but if I want adventure I'll reread old Alistair MacLean.

My librarians are the best. Always ask for my reviews of the wildly disparate things I am reading.

In memory of my mom's best friend, who died this year at age 99, I will have to find some old romance novels. She was a hoot and a romance junkie. Check out 'Smart Bitches Trashy Books' and laugh in memoriam.

Posted by: mustbequantum at January 03, 2016 01:20 PM (MIKMs)

341 I also like Patrcia Briggs.
Posted by: @votermom at January 03, 2016 01:09 PM (cbfNE)

Ditto! I think I'm behind by a few, though. I used to like Jeniene (ap?) Frost, for light paranormal silliness too...at least I think that's who I mean..the Charley Davidson Grave series?.... but they started getting just a tad too samey-samey. Same with the Hexed series, and several others. I am somewhat urban fantasy/paranormal romanced out, I suppose.


Can someone remind me what the Good Reads AoS group is?

Posted by: Tammy al-Thor at January 03, 2016 01:23 PM (ZAhzb)

342 339 For those who were on the gardening thread yesterday. Another advantage of typewriters is I am more likely to include the letter 'p' when typing the word maple.
Posted by: JTB at January 03, 2016 01:20 PM (FvdPb)
***
Yes, for a straight dude, there's nothing worse than male syrup......

Posted by: Your Decidedly Devious Uncle Palpatine, Still Accepting Harem Applicants at January 03, 2016 01:23 PM (lutOX)

343 Posted by: huerfano at January 03, 2016 11:43 AM (NSb9d)

I listened to that through OverDrive. Lots of info I didn't know (although that's not surprising since Georgette Heyer's An Infamous Army was the closest I've come to reading about the battle). He highlights a lot of "little guys" who participate as well as the historical figures.

Posted by: Polliwog the 'Ette at January 03, 2016 01:28 PM (GDulk)

344 Nice to see Phil is still flapping his gums and trying to spin the narrative to one where he doesn't look like a useless douche. I've watched him go toe-to-toe with assorted Puppies during the Hugo fracas and he did not exactly cover himself with glory. If that's what an English PhD looks like, well, then I'm damn glad I went the engineering route instead.

And a Happy New Year to all the Morons to whom I never talk because I'm a career lurker! I'll go back to my hidey hole now.

Posted by: Miles D at January 03, 2016 01:28 PM (2swaq)

345 Can someone remind me what the Good Reads AoS group is?
Posted by: Tammy al-Thor at January 03, 2016 01:23 PM (ZAhzb)

We make the Horde writers post links to their books and tickle them until they get back to work writing. And we rec books to each other. And right now we are discussing Muldoon's book.

You have to have a goodreads account, then click on Join
(identity your usual name here)

https://www.goodreads.com/group/show/175335-aoshq-moron-horde

Posted by: @votermom at January 03, 2016 01:30 PM (cbfNE)

346 OT:

I find I'm watching less TV but want to have some options if I quit cable-

Does anyone have:

Roku 4 or 3

Apple TV

Fire TV

what do you think of it?

Posted by: naturalfake at January 03, 2016 01:32 PM (KUa85)

347 >>Exactly! Although, Team Bill here. (Book wise, anyway; I have not seen the TV series, so I'm not sure how he was in that)
Have you read any Ilona Andrews?
Posted by: Tammy al-Thor at January 03, 2016 01:05 PM (

That name sounds familiar but I don't know that I've read any. I'm off romance and fantasy stuff right now mostly. I'm sure I'll get into it again at some point but I just got tired of it.

And I thought bill was creepy as hell and their relationship was nine kinds of messed up! I won't bore everyone else with the reasons though

Posted by: Lea at January 03, 2016 01:34 PM (k3Bym)

348 Thanks to Miles D, I just noticed that goodreads also has a Rabid Puppies group, for anyone who is interested. Vox Day is a mod.

Posted by: cool breeze at January 03, 2016 01:35 PM (6Cu7i)

349 Posted by: DaveKinNC at January 03, 2016 01:17 PM (/NgNT)

I think you are in the group - I see a Dave K that was admitted this morning (guy in cap & glasses, right?)

Posted by: @votermom at January 03, 2016 01:37 PM (cbfNE)

350 Posted by: Frumious Bandersnatch at January 03, 2016 12:13 PM (hHQIG)

Yeah, the action has really picked up over the last mont or so. I'll have to tell the kids that the King is the colorist. We'd never have known since we've never seen any of the team IRL.

Posted by: Polliwog the 'Ette at January 03, 2016 01:37 PM (GDulk)

351 @votermom, as usual, I wasn't clear in my meaning... I know what the group is about, just couldn't remember the name!

I need to join, but may do so under a new account. Will probably have some variant of Jolie Fleurs in the name!

Posted by: Tammy al-Thor at January 03, 2016 01:38 PM (ZAhzb)

352 Would this be the same Phil Sandifer that GamerGate outed as a pedophile?
(Answer: yes.)

Posted by: Luke at January 03, 2016 01:42 PM (1JNGW)

353 Tammy when ypu join the group there's a line where you can add a message - just say that you are Tammy al-Thor on it. Only me & cool breeze will see it.

Posted by: @votermom at January 03, 2016 01:43 PM (cbfNE)

354 Posted by: All Hail Eris, Literate Savage at January 03, 2016 12:25 PM (jR7Wy)

Frumnious is different from "your" Bander AHE. Hasn't been around for a while but was a fairly consistent commenter a couple of years ago.

Posted by: Polliwog the 'Ette at January 03, 2016 01:43 PM (GDulk)

355 Posted by: naturalfake at January 03, 2016 01:32 PM (KUa85)

We have Roku. I don't watch TV, but Thor cancelled our satellite months ago, and between Roku and Netflix, he says he doesn't miss it at all.

We also have Amazon Prime, but he says he doesn't think to use it. We do get a network channels via old-fashioned over-the-air broadcast, I think abc and nbc.

Posted by: Tammy al-Thor at January 03, 2016 01:46 PM (ZAhzb)

356 348 Thanks to Miles D, I just noticed that goodreads also has a Rabid Puppies group, for anyone who is interested. Vox Day is a mod.
Posted by: cool breeze at January 03, 2016 01:35 PM (6Cu7i)

--

For Sad Puppies supporters, there is also group of Sarah Hoyt fans & friends called Hoyt's Huns.

Posted by: @votermom at January 03, 2016 01:46 PM (cbfNE)

357 Tammy, what about for watching sports - does Roku have that?

Posted by: @votermom at January 03, 2016 01:47 PM (cbfNE)

358 Frumnious is different from "your" Bander AHE. Hasn't been around for a while but was a fairly consistent commenter a couple of years ago.
Posted by: Polliwog the 'Ette at January 03, 2016 01:43 PM (GDulk)
---
Then I retract my tongue. Quelle embarrassment!

Posted by: All Hail Eris, Literate Savage at January 03, 2016 01:52 PM (jR7Wy)

359 Posted by: Lea at January 03, 2016 01:34 PM (k3Bym)

Ha, I preferred Bill based solely on his being Southern and dark haired!

I think you'd like Ilona Andrews, even being tired of UF/PR. IMHO they're by far the best writers in the genre, and the stories are never sappy. Very adventure-y, and always somewhat humorous. I liked The Edge series best, but the Magic/Kate Daniels series is what they're most famous for, so should the UF urge strike you again, I'd start with those. (And truly, you'd probably like them regardless of the UF aspect)

Posted by: Tammy al-Thor at January 03, 2016 01:54 PM (ZAhzb)

360 Thanks for the "unpacking" of the bear shifter title - always wondered what BBW stood for. Never went that far with the PNR genre, but after getting hooked on the Sookie books a while back, discovered Ilona Andrews (a real sweetheart, btw, and her husband's also nice in person, if a lefty troll online at times) and Patricia Briggs, etc. Kresley Cole is also fun to read, not too serious. They're mind candy, fun for an escape; too many in a row, though, they get repetitive. I have a couple of Aiken's dragon shifter books somewhere in storage, will have to look for them. I skimmed the LKH books at the store when I was looking for something after Sookie, and Jean-Claude sounded interesting, but looking at the author pic on the back, I got a Mary-Sue vibe for Anita. Also, she seemed humorless. (I'd heard LKH married the head of her fan club?)

Posted by: venus velvet at January 03, 2016 01:55 PM (g94P/)

361 Posted by: All Hail Eris, Literate Savage at January 03, 2016 01:52 PM (jR7Wy)

I was confused at first myself since I assumed Frumnious had just dropped the first part.

Posted by: Polliwog the 'Ette at January 03, 2016 01:55 PM (GDulk)

362 Haven't read the motorcycle story in the picture, but Cara McKenna is a good writer, also writes as Meg Mcguire (her more mainstream stuff). My brother loves Bernard Cornwell, I'll check out the Saxon series. When I'm not reading pulp fiction, I like history.

Posted by: venus velvet at January 03, 2016 01:59 PM (g94P/)

363 discovered Ilona Andrews (a real sweetheart, btw, and her husband's also nice in person, if a lefty troll online at times)

--

he is? I thought he was a vet - that surprises me
they are a writing team but I get the impression that Ilona does most of the actual writing

Posted by: @votermom at January 03, 2016 02:01 PM (cbfNE)

364 First time on the thread, but lurked here for a while. Will join your Goodreads group!

Posted by: Rankovich at January 03, 2016 02:07 PM (Wwdqg)

365 318I cannot tell you how creepy it was to read about sookie stack house having sex with Cold Dead Men. Yuck. I mean, team Eric (until Charlene decided to mess him up) but yuck.
Posted by: Lea at January 03, 2016 12:51 PM (

With you there on the vampires. I never trusted any of the vampires beyond Pam & thank God she didn't have sookie go muff diving. I was always team Sam.

Posted by: bebe's boobs destrot at January 03, 2016 02:07 PM (wpHaq)

366 The new Amazon Fire 10 is much lighter than the old HD 7. Having said that, the HD 7 still gets more use, because it fits better in my bag. I largely use the 10 to surf the net from the couch. Sounds like the new 7 isn't much lighter than the old one.

I use the Roku 3 for TV, and my only complaint is that my old Roku only lasted 5 years.

Posted by: Oschisms at January 03, 2016 02:08 PM (ZsN9X)

367 Hmm. According to Amazon, my old HD7 is 11odd oz, and the new 10 is 15odd oz.

I guess it just seems lighter because it's thinner?

Posted by: Oschisms at January 03, 2016 02:12 PM (ZsN9X)

368 @votermom, yeah, I don't get it either, and I haven't run across him online, except when he called the outraged Sookie readers "butt-hurt over Eric" in his defense of Charlaine Harris and Ilona had to reel him in, pointing out he was insulting his own readers. He was nice when I met them at a writers conference, and she was awesome, lugging chairs across the hotel lounge for fans to sit, and drawing a cartoon in my sketchbook. I'm guessing he does the writing for the male characters? I fell behind with their books waiting for the pb editions to come out.

For laughs, there's an old take-down review of an infamous title "Pregnesia" at the site smartbitchestrashybooks.

Posted by: venus velvet at January 03, 2016 02:14 PM (g94P/)

369 328 Exactly! Although, Team Bill here. (Book wise, anyway; I have not seen the TV series, so I'm not sure how he was in that)
Posted by: Tammy al-Thor at January 03, 2016 01:05 PM (

Do NOT watch the tv show. It was pron that bore little resemblance to the books. And a big part of the reason that people, me included, were really worried what they would do to outlander. The graphic sex is totally unnecessary, but at least they are staying true to the books.

Posted by: bebe's boobs destrot at January 03, 2016 02:14 PM (wpHaq)

370 I am busily writing my first novel (definitely chick lit--sweet Regency, don't hate). In the mean time I run a blog about an author (born in 1909, wrote for Mills and Boon (the Harlequin of Britain) and in 134 books she never had her characters have sex (which is what I prefer to read, not judging the others who don't). Anyway, my readers have gotten on this hobby horse about how much sex the heroes really had ("He's in his 30s! Of COURSE he had sex. I should hope he did!" and "Obviously gay.") and I, while religious and knowing lots and lots of people for whom choosing not to have sex before they are married doesn't make them gay or ugly or stupid or uninterested in sex, am feeling some rage. I swim in this world and I don't run around pointing fingers of scorn at those who don't live as I do but, even in this deeply traditional forum, I'm some sort of freak. And I'm like, "Dammit. There is no damn place for me in society. I will not damn well be edged out of this author of all things." I am the moderator there so have some responsibility to present a 'fine with all this stimulating discussion' face but I had to say this somewhere. So there you go. Anyway, get off my lawn.

Posted by: Beanerschnitzel at January 03, 2016 02:17 PM (UOaGM)

371 I just don't read a lot of fiction. Never understood the appeal of those romantic books. What I read for trashy book are those Hollywood exposes. Lots of fun.

I've been enjoying the Kindle Paperwhite. I like being able to tap into Wikipedia. Don't expect it to replace dead tree books. It's a nice companion.

Posted by: Notsothoreau at January 03, 2016 02:24 PM (Lqy/e)

372 So that is why I'm not a #1 Amazon Kindle Store writer. I don't write weird enough stuff or check the truly weird category boxes. I think I'll pass anyway.

OM, you should watch the 1930's era Perry Mason movies. They are interesting and definitely not Raymond Burr.

Back to the writing. Managed to get over 3,000 words of story written yesterday.

Posted by: Anna Puma at January 03, 2016 02:28 PM (hmbKk)

373 I owe Christopher Taylor a review for Life Unworthy and need to finish Muldoon's To Save Us All From Ruin. Both are very good.

Posted by: Polliwog the 'Ette at January 03, 2016 02:31 PM (GDulk)

374 Gordon Andrews is a classic Southern Yellow Dog Democrat, albeit I think he is more Liberal than most. He IS a vet, but I've noticed many of the younger ones do lean left. I'd say he does a fair bit of the writing for the series, too. I think he more or less does the male characters and she takes the females, and the in-between stuff.

I've heard nothing but good about both of them from anyone who has met them, and even though I got into a heated argument on Twitter with Ilona over Republicans and abortion, she was very gracious and it never got nasty.


Posted by: Beanerschnitzel at January 03, 2016 02:17 PM (UOaGM)

I look forward to your sweet Regency! (I cede to no one my status as Georgette Heyer's Number One Fangurl)

And although I do hate sap, lord knows I cut my eye teeth on Barbara Cartland, so I have a high tolerance!

Posted by: Tammy al-Thor at January 03, 2016 03:03 PM (ZAhzb)

375 Posted by: Frumious Bandersnatch at January 03, 2016 12:13 PM (hHQIG)
---
Bander, I already thought you were subzero cool, but to find out you're a Girl genius fan?

Don't put your tongue on Bander, it'll stick!
Posted by: All Hail Eris, Literate Savage at January 03, 2016 12:25 PM (jR7Wy)



Someone who ain't me has posted a couple of times as Frumious Bandersnatch.

I don't think that's cricket.

Posted by: Bandersnatch, Team Lefty and Scamp at January 03, 2016 03:04 PM (1xUj/)

376 Frumnious is different from "your" Bander AHE. Hasn't been around for a while but was a fairly consistent commenter a couple of years ago.


I was Frumious Bandersnatch a couple of years ago and shortened it.

This one is a newcomer.

Posted by: Bandersnatch, Team Lefty and Scamp at January 03, 2016 03:05 PM (1xUj/)

377 I don't think that's cricket.
Posted by: Bandersnatch, Team Lefty and Scamp at January 03, 2016 03:04 PM (1xUj/)


I don't either, but you don't post as often as you used to, so the other person might not even be aware you had the nic first.

Posted by: Tammy al-Thor at January 03, 2016 03:10 PM (ZAhzb)

378 So do we have the start of a new genre of book?

Will the Real Shape-Shifting Bandersnatch uh Stand Up?

Posted by: Anna Puma at January 03, 2016 03:10 PM (hmbKk)

379 And on topic, I stumble upon this: Classic bodice ripper romance novels:

http://tinyurl.com/z823h4h


Posted by: All Hail Eris, Literate Savage at January 03, 2016 03:15 PM (jR7Wy)

380 I just got back from my road trip this past 4 days. Good to be home. So what is the first AOS thread I have to hit? The book thread of course.


I see the topic of the day is bodice rippers. My wife gets those is paper format and I asked her one time why she was reading that worthless crap. Her response was they are "brain pablum". I only read them in the waiting room at the Dr's office to zone out.


As for problems with the Kindle Fire when they first came out I had thought about getting one for my wife for Christmas. I read the reviews on Amazon and there were a LOT of very negative reviews. I knew one of my SILs had one so I called her. She told me to forget about it. She had got her son a Galaxy Tab 2 and he loved it. She said that it was major winner over the Fire. And that is what I got my wife. Later I got me one.



Posted by: Vic We Have No Party at January 03, 2016 03:16 PM (t2KH5)

381

Posted by: Tammy al-Thor at January 03, 2016 03:03
I look forward to your sweet Regency! (I cede to no one my status as Georgette Heyer's Number One Fangurl)



And although I do hate sap, lord knows I cut my eye teeth on Barbara Cartland, so I have a high tolerance!

I'm excited to finish it. I have been starting things for years but this year I finally managed full drafts. A good writing critique group (which I had to stick my neck out to assemble) and weekly deadlines totally helped. For anyone who wants to start writing, I found Brandon Sanderson's Creative Writing courses on Youtube to be invaluable. Great stuff, all free, very mentor-y.

Also, RE: Barbara Cartland. All the ellipsis are good for cutting teeth on I hear.

Posted by: Beanerschnitzel at January 03, 2016 03:20 PM (UOaGM)

382 Posted by: Bandersnatch, Team Lefty and Scamp at January 03, 2016 03:05 PM (1xUj/)

Ah. More confused since the (new?) Frumnious' first post recently said they were back to the HQ after being gone dor a while which is why I thought they were the original.

Posted by: Polliwog the 'Ette at January 03, 2016 03:22 PM (GDulk)

383 All the ellipsis are good for cutting teeth on I hear.
Posted by: Beanerschnitzel at January 03, 2016 03:20 PM (UOaGM)


I never thought about that, but I overuse ellipsis....well, a LOT! I wonder if you have found the answer as to where I formed the habit?!

Posted by: Tammy al-Thor at January 03, 2016 03:32 PM (ZAhzb)

384 All Hail Eris - Sword of the Golden Stud the name sells it doesn't it?

And Countdown, oohhh is that a Saturn V in your pants???

Posted by: Anna Puma at January 03, 2016 03:33 PM (hmbKk)

385 [370] I am busily writing my first novel (definitely chick lit--sweet Regency, don't hate). In the mean time I run a blog about an author (born in 1909, wrote for Mills and Boon (the Harlequin of Britain)...

--------------
You don't mean Georgette Heyer, do you? I love her books, she was a fantastic writer.

Posted by: microcosme at January 03, 2016 03:35 PM (8QCtS)

386 No, It's Neels--they're about plain British nurses and rich Dutch doctors and socking great Bentleys and gallons of tea. I do love Heyer though. She wrote so hilariously. And you don't trip all over her prose-style--it seems so effortless which I am learning it IS NOT.

Posted by: Beanerschnitzel at January 03, 2016 03:40 PM (UOaGM)

387 --------------------
I'm not a Duck fan, so I'm OK with the result. But I've got to tell you,
it was one of the most strangest football games I have ever watched.

Strange play-calling, strange plays, strange injuries, and a strange final score, considering it was 31-0 at the half.

And props to TCU for hanging in there and finally sticking it.
---------------------

I almost feel sorry for Nike Univ. Last year, weren't they playing for the Championship and lost? This year, they were playing for 3rd Place in the Pac-12. And lost.

Currently reading "With Intent to Kill" by George Harmon Coxe. He wrote a lot of mysteries in the 50s and 60s and somehow I ended up with most of them. Quick afternoon/evening reads. This book is particularly enjoyable because it takes place in Belize, British Honduras and it's warm. I'm a bit north of our host and I'm not warm.

Posted by: John Pomeroy at January 03, 2016 03:49 PM (THdbh)

388 I forgot to say what I was reading. Currently on the last book in the Recluse series by Modisette.

Posted by: Vic We Have No Party at January 03, 2016 03:52 PM (t2KH5)

389 Is it possible to have sub groups on our Goodreads group? We could all worship at the Altar of Heyer.

I remember way back when the interwebz were invented by Al Gore, the very first interaction of any kind I had online was to join the Heyer List. It came as a digest and I had a helluva time figuring out how to work it, so to speak.

I have First Editions with dust jackets of all her Regencies, and several of Venetia, The Grand Sophy and Unkown Ajax.

Her mysteries are darn good, too. My Lord John, not so much, and I didn't like the 18th centuries as much as the Regencies, but I have them. They released tons of her earlier (rather dreary) works a few years back.

Posted by: Tammy al-Thor at January 03, 2016 03:53 PM (ZAhzb)

390 389 Is it possible to have sub groups on our Goodreads group? We could all worship at the Altar of Heyer.

--

We could have a discussion thread for it, seems like a good idea...

Posted by: @votermom at January 03, 2016 04:50 PM (cbfNE)

391 A late entry, and I feel there has been some overlap with previous "bad reads" lists on this blog, but here is "Library of Shame '73":

http://tinyurl.com/h58aycg

Check out who wrote "Sharing: A Novel About Group Sex".

Posted by: All Hail Eris, Literate Savage at January 03, 2016 05:31 PM (jR7Wy)

392 However, the same level pulp-fiction type stuff can be found on the male spectrum of terribly written books, too. Or even not so terribly written books...

I mean, are James Bond's exploits and endless supply of gorgeous women who never seem to want any kind of commitment really any less ridiculous than bear-shifters?

Posted by: Tammy al-Thor at January 03, 2016 12:40 PM (ZAhzb)


You're absolutely right, Tammy, men indeed do have their own desires and fantasies that pulp writers can and do advantage of, and I probably should devote some book thread space to laughing at it.

But just so you know, my intention wasn't to make fun of women in particular, but just the title of that book with its string of adjectives made it look like the ingredient list on a can of soup. At least you know what you're getting!

Posted by: OregonMuse at January 03, 2016 05:49 PM (OBp0J)

393 Posted by: OregonMuse at January 03, 2016 05:49 PM (OBp0J)


Yep. The specificity of the title was astounding.

Very, very much truth in advertising for a niche audience.

I suppose the male equivalent would be:

Banging' Ho Ho Hos for Christmas: BBMWALSALTAIWDAUKF* Holiday Kurt Mannly Master Spy Adventure containing Lots of Sex with Beautiful Exotic Women, and Killin' Lots of Odious Villains and Saving the Whole Freakin' World and then, get this, all the Beautiful Exotic Girls Want To Join Kurt Manny's Private Harem and They Even Make Him Delicious Sammiches After Super Hot Sex! (Christmas Master Spy Adventure Book 2)






*Beer Bellied Male with Average Length Schlong and Lower Than Average Income who Drives a Used Kia Forte

Posted by: naturalfake at January 03, 2016 06:47 PM (KUa85)

394 I don't think that's cricket.

-
That's it! The insect romance genre is wide open! Or should I say insex?

I Was Raped By a Radioactive Giant Ant In the Ruins of Hiroshima . . . And I Liked It!

Posted by: The Great White Snark at January 03, 2016 06:54 PM (Nwg0u)

395 So, the whole romance novel thing. Yeah. I actually write those. Not that one in particular, but others that are not entirely dissimilar.

And lemme tell you something ... there's a market for these things. A BIG market. Bored housewives with Kindles spend a LOT of money on these things every day.

You have NO idea how much, actually.

Seriously. No idea. None at all.

Posted by: Uh, BEADWINDOW much? at January 03, 2016 07:01 PM (9Sf0r)

396 Check out who wrote "Sharing: A Novel About Group Sex".

-
Ha ha ha!

Posted by: The Great White Snark at January 03, 2016 07:03 PM (Nwg0u)

397 Calibre is a great program. Been using it for years. And I have an older fire that I've loved. BUT here's a big heads up to the horde...

I recently upgraded to Win 10 and it does not recognize kindle fires (at least the kind I have). So the Calibre program will not see your kindle and you're SOL. A workaround is to convert epubs to mobi and then email them to your kindle account.

Or keep a non win 10 pc around for calibre and you'll be groovy.

Posted by: Noelemite at January 03, 2016 07:42 PM (Bv+3J)

398 On the concept of the "Marxist occultist", the late Russell Kirk used such a character as the villian in two of his novels "Old House of Fear" and "Lord of the Hollow Dark". Both excellent reads if you enjoy the Gothic/ghost story sort of tale.

Posted by: John F. MacMichael at January 03, 2016 07:48 PM (EPk52)

399 Been reading a fairly newish author named Joshua Guess. His genre is post apocalyptic zombie. His "The Fall," series is pretty good. Different than most zombie stuff. He has also written non-zombie stuff, a new series called "Next." Anyways, I think he's a pretty damn good writer IMHO.

Posted by: lindafell de spair at January 03, 2016 07:59 PM (xVgrA)

400 Posted by: OregonMuse at January 03, 2016 05:49 PM (OBp0J)

Oh, I know it wasn't and I didn't mean my reply to sound as whiny as it does upon re-reading!

And if you think that title was bad, you should subscribe to Urban Fantasy, Paranormal Romance and Historical Fiction on Book Bub.

Go ahead. I Triple-Dog dare ya!

Posted by: Tammy al-Thor at January 03, 2016 08:45 PM (ZAhzb)

401 Check out who wrote "Sharing: A Novel About Group Sex".
Posted by: All Hail Eris, Literate Savage at January 03, 2016 05:31 PM (jR7Wy)

Eek!

Posted by: @votermom at January 03, 2016 08:54 PM (cbfNE)

402 Also, if there is anyone here that thinks this stuff is over the top, I TRIPLE DOG DARE you to go and search criteria for anything by Chuck Tingle.

Posted by: Uh, BEADWINDOW Much? at January 04, 2016 12:08 AM (9Sf0r)

403 The place to go to learn how to modify your kindle fire 7 fifth gen or whatever other device is XDA. Just Google xda forums amazon fire.

I've been waiting to root mine so I can give the fire is a good test drive but being locked into only the amazon app store and all the crap they put on the screen plus lock window adds, really sucks. Also, the blue screen filter and lineral use of airplane mode helps prolong the battery charge.

Posted by: Wodun at January 04, 2016 02:47 AM (DD0s8)

(Jump to top of page)






Processing 0.05, elapsed 0.0539 seconds.
14 queries taking 0.0119 seconds, 411 records returned.
Page size 272 kb.
Powered by Minx 0.7 alpha.



MuNuvians
MeeNuvians
Polls! Polls! Polls!
Frequently Asked Questions
The (Almost) Complete Paul Anka Integrity Kick
Top Top Tens
Greatest Hitjobs

The Ace of Spades HQ Sex-for-Money Skankathon
A D&D Guide to the Democratic Candidates
Margaret Cho: Just Not Funny
More Margaret Cho Abuse
Margaret Cho: Still Not Funny
Iraqi Prisoner Claims He Was Raped... By Woman
Wonkette Announces "Morning Zoo" Format
John Kerry's "Plan" Causes Surrender of Moqtada al-Sadr's Militia
World Muslim Leaders Apologize for Nick Berg's Beheading
Michael Moore Goes on Lunchtime Manhattan Death-Spree
Milestone: Oliver Willis Posts 400th "Fake News Article" Referencing Britney Spears
Liberal Economists Rue a "New Decade of Greed"
Artificial Insouciance: Maureen Dowd's Word Processor Revolts Against Her Numbing Imbecility
Intelligence Officials Eye Blogs for Tips
They Done Found Us Out, Cletus: Intrepid Internet Detective Figures Out Our Master Plan
Shock: Josh Marshall Almost Mentions Sarin Discovery in Iraq
Leather-Clad Biker Freaks Terrorize Australian Town
When Clinton Was President, Torture Was Cool
What Wonkette Means When She Explains What Tina Brown Means
Wonkette's Stand-Up Act
Wankette HQ Gay-Rumors Du Jour
Here's What's Bugging Me: Goose and Slider
My Own Micah Wright Style Confession of Dishonesty
Outraged "Conservatives" React to the FMA
An On-Line Impression of Dennis Miller Having Sex with a Kodiak Bear
The Story the Rightwing Media Refuses to Report!
Our Lunch with David "Glengarry Glen Ross" Mamet
The House of Love: Paul Krugman
A Michael Moore Mystery (TM)
The Dowd-O-Matic!
Liberal Consistency and Other Myths
Kepler's Laws of Liberal Media Bias
John Kerry-- The Splunge! Candidate
"Divisive" Politics & "Attacks on Patriotism" (very long)
The Donkey ("The Raven" parody)
News/Chat